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PORTFOLIO

GAYATRI MURLIDHAR Taubman College of Architecture University of Michigan M.Arch II 2019


gayatri-murlidhar.com gmurli@umich.edu (734)-991-5226 2


// Gayatri Murlidhar

CONTENTS

The River House

Professional // Architecture

4

Co-Living Stack

Academic // Architecture

14

Partial Parts

Academic // Workshop

22

Studio Ensamble Workshop

Academic // Architecture

32

Academic // Architecture Den-City 40

Cultural Centre

Academic // Architecture

52

The Restaurant

Academic // Interior Design

56

The Library

Academic // Interior Design

60

Professional // Interior Design Internship 64

Generative Design Computing

Academic // Architecture

68

Fabrication

Academic //

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ULI HINES Embracing Winter

Competition // Urban Design

74

Graphic Design & Photography

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3


Professional //

THE RIVER HOUSE Professional/ Freelance Project 2016-2018 The “River House� is located in the hills of Southern India. The site was the originator of the design. The stream at the bottom of the steep site inspired the three-stepped house, with every drop in level bringing you closer to the sound of the stream, with the roofs following the profile of the land. The project, from initial design to client meetings, preparation of design and working drawings and contractor coordination was handled by me. The house is currently under construction.

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// The River House

5


Professional //

Design Development

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// The River House

Design Development

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2

Three levels leading down to the stream

Compression to fit within maximum allowable area of 1500 sq ft.

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4

Interconnection

Roofs that follow the profile of the land

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6

Cost considerations and physical limitations shifted the design closer to the road

Vertical lines of the trees anchor the horizontal lines of the house in four courtyards

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Professional //

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Entry

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8


// The River House

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1

2

9


Professional //

Shingle Roof

Spruce Rafters

Stud & Post System

Pine wood walls

Concrete Slab + Pine floor

Concrete Foundation

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// The River House

ROOF BASE FRAMING 55 X 135 X 3990 REDWOOD PINE ROOF LEVEL TIE FRAMING 55 X 135 X 3990 REDWOOD PINE

0.60 4.10 2.83

2.83

TOILET 2.45

3.85 2.40

2.82

ROOF-SKIN 27 X 124 X 3990 LUMBER REDWOODTONGUE AND GROOVE JOINT INTERNAL & EXTERNAL SKIN 27 X 124 X 3990 LUMBER REDWOOD IN TONGUE & GROOVE

VERTICAL FRAMING 45 X 105 X 2965 LUMBER WHITEWOOD & GULELAM WHITEWOOD AT ALTERNATE SPACING

1.5013

X

3.8500 3.0000 4.10

3.00

DINING ROOM

FOYER

Y

Z

TOILET

3.8044

4.75 2.82

2.13 UP UP

3.85 3.00 4.10

EXTERNAL STAIRCASE

3.00

DINING ROOM

TOILET

3.87 2.45

UP

UP

X'

Roof Drawing

ROOF DRAWING

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Y'

Z'


Professional //

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// The River House

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Academic // Graduate

CO-LIVING STACK University of Michigan Instructor | Claudia Wigger Winter 2018 The rising trend of co-living and community living in high-density cities is addressed in this project. By minimising the personal spaces to the bare minimum that is required functionally, and creating a continuous series of common and shared spaces, A delicate balance is explored between the notions of privacy and interactive spaces. Human movement through the blocks was prioritized in order to create exciting, surprising places with a seemingly endless quality.

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// Co-Living Stack

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Academic // Graduate

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// Co-Living Stack

As this project looked at rethinking the relationships existing between personal and the community spaces, the house consisting of three types of units- Private, (pink) Semi-Private,(Blue) and Services (purple). These units ranged from sleeping units to computer rooms and are distributed in the space that forms the comunity and informal areas of the house. The blocks were morphed around the body.

1 Person Sleeping unit

Computer study

Library

Community kitchen spaces

Indoor Garden

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Academic // Graduate

Second Floor

First Floor

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// Co-Living Stack

Third Floor

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Academic // Graduate

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// Co-Living Stack

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Academic // Graduate

PARTIAL PARTS University of Michigan Instructor | Michael Jefferson Fall 2018 The institution of a Fire Station was conceived through an exploration of “parts�. Through exploring how the functioning of a rigid institution like the firestation can be enhanced through the relationships between parts, they become Partial. Working througha series of sketch models, they created tactics for the future fire station typology, through the resolution of tyoplogical errors as coherent form.

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// Partial Parts

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Academic // Graduate

Based on initial precedent studies, The “box” was selected as the “Part”. The project seeks to explore the variety of part-to-part relationships, like • Fineness/Smoothness vs. Coarseness • Continuous vs.Dispersed vs. Clustered • Assemblage vs. Aggregation Sketch models were made to explore iterations and recombinations of the Part. The intial models established certain “rules”, and the second iteration sought to understand and create Operational Misreadings. The final selected series played with the following variables

The Part.

• Density of parts • The extent of the overlap is varied. • Angle of overlap • Iterations testing the posibilities offered by 90, 75, 45, and 15 degree combinations. • Scale • Possibilties for the iteration at the furniture, room, and building scale. The most successful models were then re-interpreted and translated into architectural strategies for space-making in the design and conception of the Fire Station.

Zooming In

Zooming Out

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// Partial Parts

Overlap

Larger gathering spaces

Community + Semi-Private spaces

Private/ Smaller spaces

Stairs & Skylights

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Academic // Graduate

The blocks created through overlapping spaces are intersected - creating cut-outs, skylights, and opportunities for voyeuristic relationships between parts. These areas of overlap are distinguished through their form and materials from the space the protrude into/merge with.

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// Partial Parts

Second Floor

First Floor

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Academic // Graduate

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// Partial Parts

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Academic // Graduate

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// Partial Parts

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Workshop //

STUDIO ENSAMBLE WORKSHOP University of Michigan Guides | Anton Abril + Deborah Melina Fall 2018 Group Work The intensive workshop was a session run by the principle archtiects of Studio Ensamble, which aimed at replicating their method of designing and working. The workshop focussed on their iterative, back and forth process which begins with model making. The materia used was concrete, and through an iterative process of ideating and making, we first experimented with various methods of forming concrete. The most successful outcomes were then assembled to form our “Tabula Acoustica”; one of their objects in Studio Ensamble’s “Structures of Landscape” project in Montana. The Tabula is an open air venue for music. I worked with Maggie Cochrane and Haley Craft collaboratively for the entire project.

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// Studio Ensamble Workshop

Process

Making + Experimenting+ Ideating

From Sculpture to ArchitectureModification of the 3D model + remaking of physical models

Selection of most successful iterations

Detailed 3D model development and manipulation

Assembled Tabula

3D scan to generate a meshs

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Workshop//

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// Studio Ensamble Workshop

Casting in-bag

Surface textures

Foam formwork

Base

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Workshop //

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// Studio Ensamble Workshop

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Workshop //

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// Studio Ensamble Workshop

Background Images courtesy Studio Ensamble 39


Academic // Graduate

DEN-CITY University of Michigan Instructor |Craig Borum + Claudia Wigger Fall 2018 Group Work Based in Tianjin, China, this high-rise residential tower draws inspiration from its site, which is currently a disorganized Hutong settlement . The residents of the Hutongs have a distinct lifestyle, which is reflected in the architecture and planning of their colony. Blurred boundaries between the inside and outside, pockets of space accommodating and encouraging informal social interactions, shared community spaces and varying degrees of privacy (both from outside the hutong colony and among its residents) are some elements of the existing sociaI fabric that the project seeks to emulate.

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//Den-City

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Model made in collaboration with Akshay Srivastava


Academic // Graduate

Location: Tianjin, China

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//Den-City

However, there are a myriad of problems that currently plague the residents of the site, which has a lack of amenities and green space. Our solution was to IiteraIly “pull” up the horizontaI fabric; translating the courtyard spaces and passages into the three dimensional language of a high-rise tower. The space that the “pull” leaves behind can now be used to provide all the amenities that the site currently lacks, like a garden, marketplace, sports facilities, and a library to name a few. The negative spaces, namely the courtyards and the small passageways that entwine the houses in the hutong are the most intriguing and arguably important element of the fabric, and as a result our design begins with the negative space. The form of the voids spaces dictates the character of the sociaI interaction that takes place within it; whether it encourages larger gatherings with more residents, or allows small pockets of space for solitude and more intimate activities. The units were then literally wrapped around these spaces, allowing for unique configurations of apartments to cater to a large variety of family arrangements. Ultimately, the design makes it’s statement in it’s refusal to completely abolish the existing characteristic of its context; choosing, instead, to celebrate and enhance its unique architectural character.

Analysing the street-life of the Hutong

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Academic // Graduate

Process

1. Designing the negative spaces

2. Wrapping the units around the negative spaces

3. Units result in twisted duplexs with unique configurations

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//Den-City

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Academic // Graduate

“Pulling� of the urban mat

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Concept drawing made in collaboration with Adithi Vellimana


//Den-City

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Academic // Graduate

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//Housing

Drawing made in collaboration with Adithi Vellimana 49


Academic // Graduate

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//Den-City

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Academic // Undergraduate

CULTURAL CENTRE MEASI Academy of Architecture Undergraduate Thesis 2015 The traditional Japanese stroll garden inspired the cultural centre; with the expereice of the movement of the user through space dictating the arrangement of volumes to engender emotional responses. The theoretical base for the design was provided by an analysis of the design techniques used in the stroll gardens., and copper was chosen to celebrate the aging of the building.

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// Cultural Centre

53


Academic // Undergraduate

MOVEMENT THROUGH THE SITE MOVEMENT THROUGH THE SITE FROM BUILT FORM TO THE GARDEN/ SANCTUARY

“REWARD”- THE SANCTUARY

THE WATER BODY SERVES AS A PHYSICAL BOUNDARY TO THE GARDEN, ACTING AS AN OBJECT OF “DENIAL”

COMPRESSION AND RELEASE : AREAS OF COMPRESSION AREAS OF RELEASE

THE BODY’S MOVEMENT BETWEEN THE BUILDINGS GOES THROUGH ALTERNATING SPACES THAT FEEL OF COMPRESSION AND RELEASE

PARTIAL VIEWS VS CONTINUOUS VIEWS RARE CONTINUOUS VIEWS AFTER A SERIES OF PARTIAL VIEWS THROUGH THE SITE HINTS AT THE GARDEN BEYOND. INCITES CURIOSTY AND DRAWS THE USER IN

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// Cultural Centre

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Academic // Undergraduate

THE RESTAURANT MEASI Academy of Architecture Undergraduate Thesis 2015 The thesis was a combination of architecture and interior design, and the Japanese restaurant was one of the four spaces i chose to design. The aim was not to recreate a traditional Japanese restaurant; rather it was to design a high-end space drawing inspiration anf influences from the country. The concept was based on a Japanese forest, with painted bamboo sticks acting as the canopy through which light filters. The light is designed to change to reflect thhe different colours of the japanese seasonsl with display cooking units forming the focus of the restaurant. The columns form the “trees� holding up the canopy.

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// The Restaurant

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Academic // Undergraduate

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// The Restaurant

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Academic // Undergraduate

THE LIBRARY MEASI Academy of Architecture Undergraduate Thesis 2015 The thesis was a combination of architecture and interior design, and the Japanese restaurant was one of the four spaces i chose to design. The aim was not to recreate a traditional Japanese restaurant; rather it was to design a high-end space drawing inspiration anf influences from the country. The concept was based on a Japanese forest, with painted bamboo sticks acting as the canopy through which light filters. The light is designed to change to reflect thhe different colours of the japanese seasonsl with display cooking units forming the focus of the restaurant. The columns form the “trees� holding up the canopy.

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// The Library

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Academic // Undergraduate

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// The Library

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Professional // Internshiip

INTERNSHIP Khosla Associates Bangalore, India Winter 2013 Shown here are the working drawings I did during my internship at Khosla Associates, for the typical hotel room for a five-star hotel in india. The scope included preparation of all working drawings and client presentation boards.

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// Khosla Associates

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Professional // Internshiip

o

INTERIOR FINISHED IN AS APPROVED BY AR

OAK WOOD COPING

WARDROBE SHUTTER FINISHED IN 4mm OA AND OAK WOOD RIB

FINISHED IN 4MM OAK VENEER AND OAK WOOD RIBS 20mm THCK IMPERIAL BEIGE MARBLE SUPPORTED ON 20mm PLY

1” THICK PLYWOOD S BE FINISHED IN WHITE AS APPROED BY ARC

WARDROBE SHUTTER TO BE FINISHED IN 4mm OAK VENEER AND OAK WOOD RIBS 2” SKIRTING IN 19mm PLY

ELEVATION

SECTION BB

20mm PLY

1” WARDROBE SHUTTER TO BE FINISHED IN 4MM OAK VENEER AND OAK RIBS

20mm THCK IMPERIAL BEIGE MARBLE SUPPORTED ON 20mm PLY OAK WOOD COPING

PLAN @ 1’6

1/2” OAK RIBS 1” PLYWOOD

FINISHED IN 4mm OAK VENEER AND OAK WOOD RIBS WALL FINISHED IN 4mm OAK VENEER AND OAK WOOD RIBS 20MM PLY 20mm THCK IMPERIAL BEIGE MARBLE SUPPORTED ON 20mm PLY

DETAIL B

FINISHED IN 4MM OAK VENEER AND OAK WOOD RIBS

PLAN

OAK WOOD COPING

MASONARY

MASONARY

12mm PLYWOOD

4MM oak veneer 1/2” x 1/2” oak ribs

4mm OAK VENEER

12mm PLYWOOD

1/2”X 1/2” OAK RIBS

OAK WOOD COPING TO PROJECT OUIT FROM EITHER SIDE OF FINISHED WALL

DETAIL E

DETAIL F

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// Khosla Associates

4MM OAK VENEER 1” THCK PLYWOO SHUTTER

INTERIOR FINISHED IN LAMINATE AS APPROVED BY ARCHITECTS

N LAMINATE RCHITECTS

1/2” OAK RIBS

WARDROBE SHUTTER TO BE FINISHED IN 4mm OAK VENEER AND OAK WOOD RIBS

TO BE AK VENEER BS

1” THICK PLYWOOD SHELVES TO BE FINISHED IN WHITE LAMINATE AS APPROED BY ARCHITECTS

SHELVES TO E LAMINATE CHITECTS

2” SKIRTING IN 18mm PLY

SECTION AA

INTERNAL ELEVATION OF WARDROBE

DETAIL A

12mm PLYWOOD 4mm OAK VENEER 1/2” X 1/2” OAK WOOD RIBS 20mm THCK IMPERIAL BEIGE MARBLE

20mm THCK IMPERIAL BEIGE MARBLE

20mm PLY 20MM PLYWOOD

20MM PLYWOOD 4MM OAK VENEER 19mm PLY BACKING FINISHED IN WHITE LAMINATE AS APPROVEF BY ARCHITECTS

1/2” OAK RIBS

DETAIL D

DETAIL C

MASONARY 20mm PLYWOOD FOR SHUTTER PLY WOOD PACKING

LED STRIP LIGHT

1/2” THICK OAK WOOD COPING

4MM OAK VENEER 20MM PLYWOOD

4mm OAK VENEER 1/2” X 1/2” OAK RIBS

1/2” OAK RIBS

DETAIL H

DETAIL G

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Academic // Graduate

GENERATIVE DESIGN COMPUTING University of Michigan Instructor | Matias Del Campo Fall 2018 Using Maya as a tool, speculative towers were designed as a generative design concept. Starting with a basic torus as the originator, through a series of mirroring, repetition, stacking, and finally animating, the towers are a result of a combination of a slightly hands-off process and a set up strict transformations, and the controlled unpredictability of animation.


// Partial Parts

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Academicl // Graduate

FABRICATION University of Michigan Instructor | Asa Peller Fall 2018 Highlighted here are the projects showcasing work from the fabrication course. Each of the projects focused on learning how to use the KUKA extrusion robot, the 5 axis CNC router and the ZUND. The materials used were cardboard, wood, and plastic.

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// Fabrication

Modular Cardboard Taking inspiration from Erwin Hauer’s work, our team attempted to recreate the illusion of weaving and interlocking modules with corrugated coardboard as the main material. Our team created a “Y” shaped interlocking module with curved score lines to force the cardboard into a concave shape. The modules were locked in place by the adjoining modules because the “male” pieces kept the “femalE” piece from flattening out. The result was a self-holding generating structure which had the ability to withstand gravitational forces as both a vertical and horizontal structure.

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Academicl // Graduate

Graphic Orders The cruciform column formed the base for this excercise, and using the concept of wrapping primitives around the column in 3D and projecting them, the shapes were routed out . The column was later painted black and pink to highlight it’s graphic quality.

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// Fabrication

Robotic Extrusions Three wall tiles were designed using a grasshopper script and then extruded using the KUKA. The thickness of the lines and the overlapping of colour combinations was considered in this project.

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Academic- // Competition

EMBRACING WINTER University of Michigan ULI HINES competition Guide | Jen Maigret The brief for the multidisciplinary HINES competition was to propose a mixed-use development agenda for the East Don lands in Toronto. Working in a team consisting of three architects, an urban planner, and a business graduate, we came up with the concept of “embracing winter�; designing the massing and master plan to maximise the use of outdoor spaces in all weathers.

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// HINES

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Academic- // Competition

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// HINES

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Academic- // Competition

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// HINES

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GRAPHIC DESIGN & PHOTOGRAPHY 2015-2016 Personal Projects

Posters, brochures and marketing campaigns were created for Milagro; an organic herb company, and Samvasa, a service apartment company. The two designs strove to reflect each company’s unique ethos . Milagro sought to target a younger crowd and wanted a message that reflected earthiness and freshness, while Samvasa wanted to highglight it’s connection to traditional homes in India with a touch of luxury.

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Thank You

GAYATRI MURLIDHAR gmurli@umich.edu (734)-991-5226

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Profile for Gayatri92

Masters in Architecture Portfolio  

University of Michigan, 2019

Masters in Architecture Portfolio  

University of Michigan, 2019

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