Page 1

portfolio

2020 • Gavyn Silva • selected works


CONTENTS I.

PROFILE

II.

PROJECT NARRATIVE

III.

............................................................................................................................................................. ......................................................................................................................................

1

TRANSITIONAL GATEWAY .............................................................................................................................. University Of Nevada, Las Vegas • Las Vegas, NV, U.S.A.

3

2

SPACE HABITATION ............................................................................................................................................ Parametric Modeling in boardwalk design • Torrey Pines City Beach, CA, U.S.A.

9

3

ABSTRACT LANDFORMS ................................................................................................................................. Unique creation & texture in the showcasing of site analysis • Advanced Digital Media

13

4

THIS PLACE MATTERS - BAKER EDITION .............................................................................................. Baker Proper & Great Basin Nat’l Park • Baker, NV, U.S.A.

17

5

RESTORING A DREAM ....................................................................................................................................... The Historic West Las Vegas • Las Vegas, NV, U.S.A.

26

TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION

DIAGRAMING

.....................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................................

29

................................................................................................................................................................

31

CONSTRUCTION

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION OVERLAY

IV.

IDEATION

40

..........................................................................................................................................................

HAND RENDERINGS

...................................................................................................................................................

CONCEPTUAL MODELING

1

2

................................................................................................................

43 45


PROFILE

GAVYN

SILVA

"Nothing is impossible." Are the words that I always think to myself. "We live in an amazing world and having the ability to duplicate, alter, and enhance nature's beauty allows us to connect to the world around us in new ways that generations before us could only dream of." This general idea is what I would usually think to myself as I was beginning a new project in design school. The exciting thought of being able to transpire this idea through a profession is what really created momentum for me in all of my work and will continue to do so throughout the rest of my life. After doing my research, I felt that becoming an Architect and even a Landscape Architect is what would allow me to have the same the creative outlet as a kid, now as a Professional. Implementing this unique trait, alongside making so many peoples' visions come to life, has got to be the most rewarding aspect of this profession. - G.S.

EDUCATION

2006 - 2010 ED W. CLARK HIGH SCHOOL • HONOR’S DIPLOMA 2010 - 2013 THE UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS • ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2013 - 2019 THE UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS • LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE • BLA 2019

EXPERIENCE

SILVERADO MECHANICAL • PLAN COORDINATOR, LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, U.S.A. August 2018 - February 2019 DERSE INC. • PRODUCTION ARTIST, NORTH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, U.S.A. November 2015 - July 2018 AMERICAN AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION (AAA) • CLAIMS ADJUSTER, HENDERSON, NEVADA, U.S.A. May 2014 - May 2015 SORENSON COMMUNICATIONS • COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANT, HENDERSON, NEVADA, U.S.A. April 2013 - February 2014 UNLV S.U.E.S. • MARKETING + GRAPHICS ASSISTANT, LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, U.S.A. December 2012 - March 2013

TECHNICAL SKILLS

TECHNICAL PROFICIENCY

LINKS

AUTODESK AUTOCAD 2011-2019, LAND F/X, SKETCHUP, RHINOCEROS 3-D, GRASSHOPPER, ADOBE PHOTOSHOP CC, ADOBE LIGHTROOM CC, ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR CC, ADOBE INDESIGN CC, ADOBE PREMIERE PRO CC, ADOBE AFTER EFFECTS CC, ADOBE BRIDGE CC, MICROSOFT OFFICE SUITE, & ARCGIS. ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR

AUTOCAD

ADOBE PHOTOSHOP

LAND F/X

ADOBE INDESIGN

SKETCHUP

RHINOCEROS 3-D

ARCGIS

GRASSHOPPER

MICROSOFT OFFICE

issuu.com/gavynsilva www.linkedin.com/in/gavyn-silva

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1

TRANSITIONAL GATEWAY University of Nevada, Las Vegas • Las Vegas, NV, U.S.A.

As the city of las vegas continues to grow, all parts of the city that were once just interesting additions to the metropolitan equation become more important. One portion that fits this characteristic is none other than the university of nevada, las vegas or unlv. This university continues to grow and serves as the leading system of higher education for southern nevada, but also with a growing institution comes a developing identity and consequently, this identity may need to be addressed in the situation of unlv. The thomas & mack center, at the moment, serves as a large portion of unlv’s identity due to the facility’s large amount of events that are held each year. Generating millions of tax dollars and attracting millions of people annualy, this area of campus has the ability to serve as the starting point to attracting visitor to other areas of unlv’s main campus. Lying directly behind the t&m center and cox pavilion facilities, is a drop off area to the

c

3

portion of campus that sees a large amount of use by students daily. Zoning in on the back doors to the event arenas, the pedestrian tunnel underlying the arenas, the student drop-off zone, and a unique stretch of pathway that connects unlv’s gym road, a major campus artery, to the event arenas, respectively, a series of possibilities open up regarding 2 key factors and 3 usability factors that give Character to this area. The key factors to take into consideration are safety and identity for thie entire site. The 3 usability factors that determine the site’s overall ability to create a proper connection and Transitionary bridge are circulation, erosion, and vegetation, which all pair with future design decisions regarding the use of institutional space and quality. Located in the heart of las vegas, nevada, within the university of nevada, las vegas, the site sits in a very crucial point between a large event Space and large amounts of class and maintainance space. The entire elevation of the site ranges from 2,027 feet to 2,062 feet since a majority Of the site’s space is situated on a hill overlooking the east-end of the campus. Encompassing a total area of about 86,000 square feet, there is a large amount of space that has potential for reconfiguration and utilization. As with the rest of the city of las vegas, the climate of the site is Subtropical/hot desert (bwh) based on the koppen climate classification system. Being semi-arid, many considerations such as only receiving Only 4 inches of rain annualy and lower than 10% humidity are to be taken into consideration. Desert characteristics such as the ones Previously mentioned, are what play a major role in the three key issues of bridging the transition.


TRANSITIONAL GATEWAY A

Site Plan + Features 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

UNLV Parking: Lot 1 Xeriscape Garden Entrance Xeriscape Garden Gateway T&M Center Entrance “University of Nevada, Las Vegas” Sign Connected Restaurant Area Detached Restaurant Area

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

2

Additional Restaurant Pathway Desert-style Swale Terraced & Shaded Gateway Experience Education Hub: Gym Road Entry Education Hub: CBC Entry Carol C. Harter - Central Building Complex (CBC) Student Services Complex (SSC)

B

12

3

13

1 5

Vicinity Map C

7 4

11

10 8

6

CC

9 6

AA

14 1” = 50’

BB

A

AA

1/8” = 1’-0”

1” = 1000’

B

BB

1/8” = 1’-0”

CC

1/14” = 1’-0”

4


TRANSITIONAL GATEWAY

Day-time visuals from Thomas & Mack Gateway entrance.

5


TRANSITIONAL GATEWAY

Night-time visuals from Thomas & Mack Gateway entrance. (Top). Night-time visuals from swale, near Gym Road connection. (Bottom Left). Night-time visuals from detatched restaurant area. (Bottom Right).

6


TRANSITIONAL GATEWAY The Classroom Building Complex serves as a 3-story main hub for core classes offered at UNLV.

Small, narrow (Square)

Narrow to open area at Gym Rd. (Rectangular)

Student drop off, loading, & RTC bus

Large vehicles

Classrooms

Wide open (Rectangular)

Radial spatial alignment throughout site

Faculty & Maintainance golf cart parking

Small vehicles

Bicycle

Geometric Transition

West site bike racks

East site bike racks

Campus Services

Utilities

Drop-Off/Pick-Up

On Site & Adjacent Usage

Bicycle

Vehicular

8 am

Noon

5 pm

Pedestrian

7

The Student Services Complex assists in many activities such as: Enrolling students, paying tuition, & registration.

Utilities such as a large A/C unit, two large power box transformers, janitorial storage areas, & shut-off valves can be found here. The area is small but plays an important role in the functionality of nearby buildings and outdoor electrical ďŹ xtures.


TRANSITIONAL GATEWAY Programming

48.5 Million Visitors

For many, the journey into las vegas begins at the McCarran International Airport, located directly southwest across the intersection of Tropicana & Paradise. Since the airport is so close to campus, it might be thought that the main core of UNLV would have more out of state visitors & students. As a matter of fact, the airport saw 48.5 Million visitors in 2017 alone. Beginning at the airport, signs can be placed just outside of the terminals & parking garages advertising the programs & curriculum here at UNLV. Visitors to the campus would then generally park in one of The Thomas & Mack parking areas. From there, visitors can be guided by signage, which may be utilized more often to create a gateway towards the academic core.

Seperating Traffic Types

Pedestrian foot traffic has almost always been and is currently Constricted, forcing together foot and vehicular traffic, in the area that Exists between the cbc and the ssc, making the overall strategic value low In accompanying vast amounts of people like gym road; perpendicular and to The east of the site. In the upper drop-off zone, a large area of concrete Serves little purpose to accomidate an area that only needs a sidewalk-sized Parthway, while the lower drop-off zone appropriately targets handicapped Individuals, pedestrians riding the rtc bus route, vendors, students, and Even visitors to the thomas & mack center’s sporting events.

Diverting Soil Runoff

Quite possibly the most noticable issue of the site, intertwining with Safety - the poor and dry soil conditions are assumably being caused in part by poor irrigation and storm water management practices. On an average semester day, one can observe cracked, hard, & loose top-soil, being stemmed from faculty-used golf carts & their tire tracks. As noted to the left of the current and curved pathway, Erosion in the area is caused by poor circulation issues. Other interesting notes of erosion are occuring on the south half of the site by excessive pooling of water combined with near-impermeable surface soils.

Using Less Water

While there is a decent amount of vegetation currently present At the site between unlv’s cbc and student services complex, the type of vegetation and quality of this vegetation is Argueably fair to poor. Existing california-fan palm and Mexican-fan palm hybrid trees dot the northern portion of the Site, using large amounts of water to stay quite healthy, while On the southern half of the site, mostly native shrubbery takes Up only small amounts of water but continues to serve only as a weak buffer against pedestrian traffic.

Concepts

Circulation. Convert current pathway to a zig-zag pattern to serve multiple purposes: 1) Slow down all types of traffic. 2) Allow for pedestrian access only - eliminating possible golf cart accidents. 3) Create a memorable gateway entrance experience for all pedestrians.

Erosion. To address the surface runoff conditions, a desert-style swale can be placed through the most troublesome areas of the site.

Vegetation. Adding multiple-terraced sections with drought-tolerant plant material allows for a visual buffer between the Sports/Events arenas and the Primary Education core of the University.

Diagramatic sketch showing current movement & issues of pedestrian traffic. (Left). Diagramatic sketch showing site alignment & current small vehicle designations. (Center). Conceptual hand rendering addressing all 3 primary site issues. (Right).

8


2

SPACE HABITATION

Parametric Modeling in boardwalk design • Torrey Pines City Beach, CA, U.S.A. What defines a space? Sometimes we go about our daily lives without ever thinking twice about the environment that we are in and how it was intended to be experienced. There are countless, subtle characteristics that are involved in the formation of each and every space that we interact with. The possibilities are endless when thinking about the number of variations, abstract languages, and combinations of human interactions that will take place in any given space. Pushing the envelope and blurring the lines between what makes a space definite or indefinite gives a whole new meaning to the culture of the built environment. Taking this set of charateristics and combining them with natural occurances is what begins to create a new habitat. Whether it be

through nature or through the mind of a designer, the intent of your experiences in a place can either be specifically defined or abstract. Whether it be the material in relation to the weather or the inconspicuous hues carefully layered into the stone pavers, our habitation and occupancy of a space has a certain standard of living intent. The coastal location of Torrey Pines City Beach, in California, explores the elements brought on by a high usage of space, a strong and lengthy amount of annual sunlight exposure, and a chaparral climate. Assessing the large variations in color and completely unique forms, while conscious of diversity in activities, can prove to be a challenging task in the execution of tailored pathways in a coastal setting.


SPACE HABITATION A

PLAN VIEW

B

B

2nd set of shade structures for afternoon

SECTION A

Boardwalk support system

0’

2’ 1’

4’

SECTION B Sheltered shade structure for maximum seating area comfort Handrailing for safety between boardwalk & tide zone

Corner seating area

0’

2’ 1’

A

4’

Seating area where boardwalk opens to 8’ of horizontal clearance

0’

2’ 1’

4’

10


THIS PLACE MATTERS

Entire boardwalk cast in afternoon shadow.

Shaded view looking from corner bench towards South entrance.

11

Ground-up view of North entrance.

Shaded view looking from corner bench towards South entrance.


SPACE HABITATION

Perspective rendering showing typical boardwalk use on beach side.

12


3

ABSTRACT LANDFORMS

Unique creation & texture in the showcasing of site analysis • Advanced Digital Media Storytelling through landscape can be done solely through the manipulation of the information that is given. Numerical values placed on an axis can begin as one simple set of negative or positive points in the X, Y, or Z directions. A typical approach on how this data is interpreted would have a given two dimensional graph structure with points in space respective to their location in their distance from the coordinate 0,0. Obviously, this system is familiar in visual patterns that we come across frequently. When interpreted into a graph, these visual patterns can take on new characteristics, unseen in their previous renditions. This is when complex algorithms can be interpreted and manipulated to show data in different ways. An image, for example, is composed of large amounts of data. Darker shades

13

and lighter shades can all be interpreted as values that can be transformed into visual constructs - thus illustrating characteristics taken from a real world analogy. In this sense, landforms can be analyzed through Geographical Information and overlayed with additional visual information to create an effective approach to research and interpretation. Exploring different textures and gradients can then cradle parametric values in stylistic art forms that become diverse and informative. Geometric shapes can be applied and extruded through either portion of the evolved surface to show landforms in new ways of abstract methodology. This allows parametric modeling to have more possibilities in the execution of both analytical and ideological theses.


ABSTRACT LANDFORMS Higher Values

1

Abstract Image.

Landform values in height are determined from the lightness of colors represented in this image. Darker values represent lower elevations while brighter values represent higher elevations. Elevated Points (z values)

2 Lower Values

Grid System.

In order to set values of height that correspond to changes in color, a grid of points is generated across the image in rows and colums that are complex enough to demonstrate an analysis of surface differences.

Grid Spacing (x & y values)

3

Grid Height.

Using an image sampler to show changes in height, each point value is elevated above the original surface image with arrows showing the positive movement on the z axis.

Interpolated Surface

4

Surface From Points.

An interpolated surface, representing a landform, is generated using the point heights generated from the original image.

14


ABSTRACT LANDFORMS

Start

End

Drainage. Analyzed to show stormwater runoff/flow lines. This diagram indicates that gentle slopes are present, the possibility of ponding is lower, and the risks of flash flood hazards are lower, especially on the summits and ridgelines.

0’

15‘

30’

Elevation. Analyzed to show the differences in height from sea level. The information in this diagram shows slight variation in the darker browns and beiges, while the vanilla has the highest variation, and the cream color, located at the highest elevations, actually has the least.

15


ABSTRACT LANDFORMS

0%

50%

100%

Slope. Analyzed to show percentage change in ends or sides of a surface. Steeper surfaces of this landform are shown as canyon-like and these are made through hydrolodgy.

Aspect. The existing geometry of this model shows which direction that each surface faces. Based on the above information, most of these surfaces are facing West.

16


4

THIS PLACE MATTERS Baker Proper & Great Basin National Park • Baker, NV, U.S.A.

The contrast between urban, suburban, and rural has given the world an unmistakably large range of different environments that we can explore, visit, and live in. A city can be an urban fabric that allows built form to be carried out in a vertical fashion as opposed to a rural setting that may spread outwards but with an entirely different behavior. Many rural locations are much more community-based and the demands are grouped into catagories that rely on small scale preservation. Places that are unique in the way that they carry out life and places where connecting to your neighbors every day, exists inbetween the large social centers that we call cities. Rural developments or villages and towns are all unique in their own respects, but the importance of these places is something that can often be Movement.

17

1

2

3

overlooked. The culture and character of these communities is worth noting in terms of importance and adequacy. One such community is called Baker, Nevada. Through the processes of town meetings, it wasn’t too difficult to notice that the representatives of this community felt that they were often left out. Through making connections from the natural beauty of the surrounding areas to the locality of Baker, configuring a strategic plan to shine light on this unforgettable place quickly became the premise for combining previously known ideas with new ones. Just down the road is Great Basin National Park a mildly popular attraction. With Baker as the only point of entry to the long climb up the mountain range, creating an effective Gateway to this National Park was key in drawing more attention to the community and exploration thereof.

4

5


THIS PLACE MATTERS Archeological Site

Fence Rd

5 4

Baker Reservoir

Ranching Exibit GBNP Visitor Center

Baker

Lehman Caves Rd

6000

52

5500

50

Ba

ke r

Cr ee

k

1

5750

3

South Baker

2 500’ 0’

Land Use.

1

2

3

4

2000’ 1/2mi

1000’

5

0’

790’ 395’

1580’

18


THIS PLACE MATTERS

Nevada’s Electricity Installed Capacity Rankings (2014)

Renewable Energy Consumption (2014)

California Florida

Transportation Industrial Residential Commercial

Nevada

365 64

75

Winnemucca

Concentrated Solar (MW)

Elko

3RD Place

32.6%

Battle Mtn.

Reno

26.0%

469

23.6% 17.8%

43

Ely

66%

s Ga

2,615.4

al tur Na

Hawaii

r to ec

WHITE PINE

California

S By

Nevada

Geothermal (MW)

Baker

Tonopah

Natural Gas is Nevada’s primary energy source

2ND Place

Nevada Energy Resource Consump62.47%

Tourism is the leading cause of Energy Consumption.

2025 Goal 2014

Las Vegas

0.04%

0.16%

0.37%

Other

Oil

Biomass

Biofuel

Solar

1.39% Nuclear

3.15% Wind

GeoThermal

6.55%

HydroElectric

Coal

Natural Gas

25%

16%

90%

y erg En te Sta of

0.02%

t Ou

0.01%

4.39%

s bl e wa

19

21.44%

ne Re

Source: NV Energy

A ll

Geothermal Hydro Wind Biomass Solar Waste Heat Recovery


THIS PLACE MATTERS

WASHINGTON

MONTANA

Regional Renewable Energy Nevada State Energy Production Rankings (2014)

OREGON

27

28,000 Barrels/Yr

WYOMING

32

3,000,000 Cu Ft/Yr

s Ga

23.6%

IDAHO

al tur Na

il eO

ud Cr

26.0%

Boise, ID

Salt Lake City, UT

17.8%

Denver, CO Baker, NV

Reno, NV

UTAH

NEVADA

COLORADO

San Francisco, CA

34

3,537,000 MWh/Yr

40

42 Million Tons/Yr

ctr

on rb Ca

Ele

CALIFORNIA

Em

y

t ici 16%

ARIZONA

s ion iss

25%

Las Vegas, NV

Albuquerque, NM Los Angeles, CA

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration May 2014

Geothermal Hydro Wind Biomass Solar Waste Heat Recovery

NEW MEXICO Phoenix, AZ

1” = 50’

0

mi 50

100

200

20


THIS PLACE MATTERS

Hand rendering of a typical Baker proper trail crossing.

Hand rendering of a typical trail crossing outside of Baker proper.

Swale 5’

Native Rabbit Brush

Native Rabbit Brush

Swale 5’ Highways 487 & 488

Highways 487 & 488

Asphalt 12’

Asphalt 12’

Efficient, solar-powered trail crossing signs with push button & LED flash indicators

Section showing typical town trail crossings. (Left). Section showing typical town trail crossings. (Right). Sandy-Clay Alkaline Soil Compacted Subsurface

Depth 2’ Compacted Subsurface

21

Crushed Stone Surface


THIS PLACE MATTERS

Visual of typical crosswalk with conditions in context; located at Baker’s North entrance.

22


5

RESTORING A DREAM The Historic West Las Vegas • Las Vegas, NV, U.S.A.

In the City of Las Vegas, Nevada, there are numerous iconic locations located throughout the very core of both it’s foundation and it’s respective metropolitan area. Multi-million dollar casinos, which have focus primarily on gaming and tourism, shine brightly alongside their towering hotel counterparts above the world-famous ‘Strip.’ Downtown has a much more vintage approach and appriciation than the ‘Strip,’ but still maintains a similar reputation to the hotel & resort corridor located on Las Vegas Boulevard. Although this type of reputation has somewhat set the standard on what attracts visitors to the Las Vegas Valley, people in adjacent neighborhoods to Downtown LV, seek to be noticed and to be heard. One such neighborhood, located directly Northwest of

Downtown, goes by the name of “The Historic West Las Vegas.” A shortened and more commonly used name is “The Historic Westside.” A neighborhood just as rich in culture as it is in life, The Historic Westside was once filled block to block with thriving development, homes, and businesses. Icons such as The Moulin Rouge contrasted with The Historic Westside School and let this neighborhood thrive with popularity in the mid to late 20th century. Although the years have crept by one by one and shown a physical toll on this lavish gem, many residents and visitors seek to bring back those glorious days yet again. As a collaborative effort in a studio comprised of Architects & Landscape Architects, generating this amount of forward initiative on constructing a new, ‘One Hundred Plan’ and bringing back the beautiful soul of ‘The Historic Westside’ was only the beginning.


RESTORING A DREAM The Historic Westside Concept Plan 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Westside School Renovation Tenaya Creek Brewery & South Commercial Corridor Bring Back Jackson, a community-owned business Repair The Edges, Martin Luther King Blvd. Create Gateways using public art projects Jackson Memorial Park & Plaza Walker African American Museum expansion Madison ‘Spirit Plaza’ Community Center addition Greenway at Owens Complete The Streets Washington Live, Local Entertainment Corridor Green Corridor Moulin Rouge, casino & vocational training center Density Housing for students & downtown residents Madison Lot Business in Edmond Town Center

10 17 3

7

6

9 16 4

11

8 1 12

5 14

15

13

0 - 5 Year plan What is going on now 5 - 10 Year plan Bringing back the neighborhood 10 - 15 Year plan Bold Moves For The Westside

2 0’

750’ 500’

1000’

24


RESTORING A DREAM Contamination Possibility High Contamination Possibility

Zoning - Property

OWENS AVE HARRISON AVE

OWENS AVE C-2

C-1

R-2

R-3

R-3

R-3

C-1

R-4

C-2

R-3

R-3

R-3

R-3

C-2

R-3

R-4

C-2

C-2

R-4

R-3 R-3

JACKSON AVE

MADISON AVE

R-2

R-2

R-2

R-2

R-2

R-2 C-V

R-E

R-2

R-2

R-2

C-2

R-2

R-2

R-2

R-2

R-2

R-4

C-2 C-2

C-2 C-2

MONROE AVE

R-4

R-4

R-4

R-3

R-4

R-4

R-3

MADISON AVE C-V

C-V

R-4

R-3

R-4

R-4

R-4

R-3

C-V

R-4 JEFFERSON AVE

R-3

R-3

R-4

R-3

R-3

R-4

R-3

R-4 R-4

C-V

ADAMS AVE

ADAMS AVE C-1

C-2

C-2

R-4

R-3

C-1

E S T.

F S T.

C-2 C-2

C-V

R-3

R-3

R-2

C-2 R-3

R-3

R-3 R-2

R-E

JEFFERSON AVE

R-3

R-E

J ST.

MA R TIN L KI N G B L V D

R-2

C-V

G S T.

H S T.

B ST.

C ST.

D ST.

E ST.

F ST.

G ST.

H ST. J ST.

R-4

R-4

C-2 R-3 C-2

R-3

R-3

MONROE AVE

MARTIN L KING BLVD

R-4

R-4

JACKSON AVE

R-3

R-3

R-3

R-3

R-4 R-4

C-V

WASHINGTON AVE

WASHINGTON AVE

7

R-3

VAN BUREN AVE

R-2

3

R-3

R-3

HARRISON AVE

R-2

VAN BUREN AVE

R-3 R-3

R-3

R-3

C-1

B S T.

1

C S T.

Possible Constraints

5

D S T.

2

R-3

R-3 R-2

C-M

R-3

R-3 R-3

MCWILLIAMS AVE

MCWILLIAMS AVE

R-3

R-4 R-4

R-3

R-3

6

R-4 R-4

R-3

R-4

R-3

R-3 C-M

4

C-2

C-M

R-3

8

Hazardous Waste Release Area

BONANZA RD

BONANZA RD

Gas Station

250’ 0’

750’

500’

250’

1000’

0’

ZONING AND EASMENTS

750’

500’

1000’

Owens and H St Intersection

Commercial District

Paths

OWENS AVE

Edges

OWENS AVE

Districts & Landmarks

VAN BUREN AVE

Historic Neighborhood Core

ADAMS AVE

INTERSTATE

JEFFERSON AVE

ADAMS AVE

WASHINGTON AVE

NEVADA

Landmark Westside School

WASHINGTON AVE

Commercial Public Vacant Historic Religious Residential

MCWILLIAMS AVE

Historic Westside Sign and School MCWILLIAMS AVE

Industrial Zone

F Street Underpass

Landmark Moulin Rouge

BONANZA RD

BONANZA RD

250’ 0’

500’

750’ 1000’

B ST.

H D

G

E

MADISON AVE

5

1

C ST.

E ST.

F S T.

G ST.

S

H S T.

T.

4

Residential District

E

JEFFERSON AVE

Landmarks

MONROE AVE

J S T.

J ST.

MADISON AVE

MA R T I N L KI N G B L V D

Edge MLK Blvd.

B ST.

C ST.

D ST.

E ST.

F ST.

G ST.

H ST. MARTIN L KING BLVD

MONROE AVE

3

25

Nodes

JACKSON AVE

JACKSON AVE

2

Districts

D ST.

Zoning - Building

Commercial District

E

D

Industrial Zone G

E

250’

F R E

E

W A Y

S

Edge Freeways

0’

500’

750’ 1000’


RESTORING A DREAM

Curved wall with ‘Historic Westside’ signage at Owens & I-15 gateway.

Metal letter art signage at the Martin Luther King Blvd. & Bonanza gateway.

Alternative I-15 freeway signage showing ‘The Historic Westside’ at the Washington Ave., D Street, & City Pkwy. exit.

Stylized metal framing for traffic signals & street signs; intersection of Martin Luther King Blvd. & Owens Ave. (shown above.)

26


RESTORING A DREAM

Gateway signage hand-rendered into an early evening scene to showcase lighing effects.

27


RESTORING A DREAM

Night-time scene, looking East; showing a revived, yet contemporary approach to the design of Jackson Ave.

28


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // CONSTRUCTION

1A

1B

2

SITE SECTION Scale: 1/8" = 1'-0"

SITE SECTION Scale: 1/8" = 1'-0"

SITE SECTION Scale: 1/14" = 1'-0"

P-1 (Portfolio Project 1) Plan Drawings & Site Sections

29


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // CONSTRUCTION

Pedestrian Bridge Section/Elevation

P-2 Plan View

0’

2’ 1’

P-2 Section A 0’

P-2 Section B

2’ 1’

4’

0’ 4’

2’ 1’

4’

30


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // DIAGRAMMING Green Roof Section Cut

Permeable Pavers Section Cut

Runoff Reduction Value For 0.25”

Runoff Reduction Value For 0.25”

Parking Lot Conditions • 75,000 square feet • 80% Runoff Retention

Growing Media (Extensive, 2”) Filter Sheet Drain (1”) Insulation Waterproofing Membrane

Permeable Paving (4”)

Evapotranspiration

Aggregate Chips (4”)

Compacted Soil Subgrade Infiltration

Aggregate

Stone Washed (2”) Underdrain

Filter Fabric

Concrete Header Curb Surface Runoff

Swale

Roof Conditions

GALLONS

• 40,000 square feet • 50% Extensive Runoff Retention

1,943.44 (259.8 FEET ) 3

GALLONS

TOTAL RUNOFF REDUCTION VALUES

5,830.32 3

)

TOTAL RUNOFF REDUCTION VALUES

Rainwater Harvesting Section Cut

Green Roof Section Cut Inlet Filter

Runoff Reduction Value For 1.00”

Peak Monthly Rainfall For Las Vegas

Growing Media (Extensive, 2”) Filter

Access Mainway

Sheet Drain (1”) Insulation Waterproofing Membrane

Inlet

Evapotranspiration

Overflow

First Flush Diverter

GALLONS

Roof Conditions • 40,000 square feet • 50% Extensive Runoff Retention

10,494.57 GALLONS

7,773.75

(1,039.2 FEET 3)

31

3

TOTAL RUNOFF REDUCTION VALUES

)

TOTAL RUNOFF REDUCTION VALUES

Low Flow Outlet


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // DIAGRAMMING Green Roof Section Cut

Permeable Pavers Section Cut

Runoff Reduction Value For 4.00”

Runoff Reduction Value For 1.00”

Parking Lot Conditions • 75,000 square feet • 80% Runoff Retention

Growing Media (Extensive, 2”) Filter Sheet Drain (1”) Insulation Waterproofing Membrane

Permeable Paving (4”)

Evapotranspiration

Aggregate Chips (4”)

Compacted Soil Subgrade Infiltration

Aggregate

Stone Washed (2”) Underdrain

Filter Fabric

Concrete Header Curb Surface Runoff

TOTAL RUNOFF REDUCTION VALUES

Swale Roof Conditions

GALLONS

23,321.27 3

)

GALLONS

• 40,000 square feet • 50% Extensive Runoff Retention

TOTAL RUNOFF REDUCTION VALUES

31,095.02 3

TOTAL RUNOFF REDUCTION VALUES

TOTAL RUNOFF REDUCTION VALUES

)

1) Shoestring Acacia - Acacia stenophylla

Runoff Treatment Section-Cut

Plant Selection Section-Cut

2) Blue Palo Verde - Parkinsonia florida 3) Desert Museum Palo Verde - Parkinsonia x 'Desert Museum'

Soil Mix Precipitation

Riser With Underdrain (Outlet)

5) Weeping Acacia - Acacia pendula

(60% Organic Compost, 30% Construction Sand, 10% Topsoil) • BMP Function: Conveyance & Treatment

4) Western Honey Mesquite - Prosopis glandulosa torreyana

Temporary Ponding Area

Infiltration

Underdrain

Inset View

6) Screwbean Mesquite - Prosopis pubescens

Washed Stone

Gavyn Silva

Portion of Roof Without Grass Application

Pollution Removal • 81% Suspended Soils • 24% Phosphorus [P 15 ] • 56% Nitrogen [N 7] • 39% Nitrogen/Nitrate [N ”” ] • 25% Bacteria • 62% Hydrocarbons

1

5 2

3

4

(Inset View)

Bioswale Between Large Trees BMP Function: Mitigation & Reduction

Bio-Retention Cell Placement BMP Function: Mitigation

32


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // DIAGRAMMING Bioretention Plan & Longitudinal Cut Drawings

Permeable Pavers

Direction Of Runoff

Total Runoff Reduction Values

Desert Museum Palo Verde Desert Museum Palo Verde

Evapotranspiration

Riser With Underdrain (Outlet) Riser With Underdrain (Outlet) 5.1626 ft3 Runoff Collected For 1.0” Rain Event

Evapotranspiration

Temporary Ponding

TOTAL RUNOFF REDUCTION VALUES

Infiltration

S/W Entry & Curb Cut On Section Cut Drawing

0.75 Based On Construction Sand, Located at Bottom of Soil Mix, After Mulch & Organic Compost

Infiltration

Soil Mix

Infiltration

Temporary Ponding Area Soil Mix (60% Organic Compost, 30% Construction Sand, 10% Topsoil)

33

Washed Stone Underdrain

(60% Organic Compost, 30% Construction Sand, 10% Topsoil)

Washed Stone

Underdrain

Pollutant • 90% Of Phosphorus, Sediment, & Hydrocarbons • 90% Of Metals Removed • 50% Of Nitrogen


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // DIAGRAMMING • Runoff from SOA parking lot

Bioswale Section

• Direction of swale runoff

• Drought Tolerant Plants to absorb runoff & pollutants

Pollution Removal

• Structure to control runoff

• 81% Suspended Soils • 24% Phosphorus [P 15 ] • 56% Nitrogen [N 7] • 39% Nitrogen/Nitrate [N ”” ] • 25% Bacteria • 62% Hydrocarbons

Soil Mix • 10% Topsoil • 60% Organic Compost • 30% Construction Sand

Landscape Contour Manipulation

Primary Outer Layers • Asphalt • Gravel • Basin & Alluvial Fan Deposits

• Gravel Pipe Bed • Perforated Underdrain Pipe

• Runoff from SoA Parking Lot

Bioswale Longitudinal Cut

• Drought Tolerant Plants to absorb runoff & pollutants

• Direction of swale runoff

••• Structure for runoff control

34 Topsoil


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // DIAGRAMMING

Flow Lines

Runoff Collection

Slope Percentage

Soil Permeability

35


• Organic Compost

TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // DIAGRAMMING

• Construction Sand

Wetland Drainage & Collection Plans

Gavyn Silva

• Slope At 1% • Water Residency At ~10 Minutes (Per 80% Total Suspended Soils Removal)

Wetland Longitudinal Section Cut

Seasonal Water Level Table

• 4% Based On Lat. Length of Wetlands and Elevation Change. (L= 200ft & DE= 5ft) Water Residency

Maximum Storm Water Level Allowance

Maximum Storm Water Level Allowance

Slope Percentage

Seasonal Water Level Table

Normal Water Table

Vegetated

Swale Vegetated Swale

Pool

Pool

Normal Water Table

Low Low Marsh Marsh

High High Marsh Marsh

Low Low Marsh Marsh

High High Marsh Marsh

Low Low Marsh Marsh

HighHighLow Low Marsh Marsh Marsh Marsh

Micropool

Micropool

Embankment Embarkment/ /Outlet Outlet

• 10 minutes (Based On 80% Total Suspended Soils Removal)

36


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // DIAGRAMMING

Curvature

Attraction

0.78

1.31

1.66

1.89

1.98

2.21

2.17

2.47

1.81

2.13

1.87

2.43

1.91

2.35

2.40

1.97 2.38 1.16

37

1.80

2.01

2.00

0.85

2.20 1.65

2.25

2.25

2.30

2.23

1.82 2.00

2.10

2.12

2.29 1.86

1.25 2.19

2.41

1.14 2.51

2.42

2.32

1.84

1.86

2.02 1.28

1.46

2.05 2.26

2.05 1.65

2.48

1.94

2.31 2.25

2.46

1.56

Size & Area

1.41

2.10

2.24

1.80

1.88 2.00

Distance

1.71

1.95

1.70

2.19

2.38

2.38

2.25

1.99 2.22

2.21

0.9

2.02

1.60

2.19

1.34

2.32

2.36 1.83

2.13

1.88

2.51

1.15

1.73

2.12

2.16

2.02

1.33

1.50 2.29

2.21 1.11

1.14

1.16

1.81

1.92

2.06

1.93

1.31


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // DIAGRAMMING

Shape

Color

Size

Height

38


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // DIAGRAMMING

Comprehensive Transformation

Comprehensive Transformation

Rotation

Comprehensive Transformation

39


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION OVERLAY

Aspect image of the Las Vegas Valley & surrounding areas showing differences in terrain textures.

Elevation ďŹ ll image of the Las Vegas Valley & surrounding areas. Warmer colors & white indicate higher elevations while green & cooler colors indicate lower elevations.

Flow Direction, with corresponding colors showing North (Blue), South (Light Green), East (Green), & West (Light Blue) in the Las Vegas Valley & surrounding areas.

Slope image of the Las Vegas Valley & surrounding areas. Warmer shades of yellow, beiges, greys, & whites indicate a greater change in slope percentages.

40


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION OVERLAY Site Plan + Features

Inner-City Neighborhoods appear to be more concentrated in population as well as more racially defined

Vicinity Map

Suburban neighborhoods have less distinct colors and more color variation at the same time, thus indicating diversity

White African American American Indian Asian Pacific Islander Biracial Hispanic

30.36%

44.98% 10.6%

9.2% 0.67% Pacific Islander

Asian

3.59% Hispanic

White

African American

Bi-

Racial

0.4% American Indian

0

2 1

41

4 mi.


TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION // GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION OVERLAY Site Plan + Features

Vicinity Map

Vegetation

Water

1.8%

0.55%

Urban

Open/vacant Land

18.36%

79.29%

Taking up an even smaller percentage than vegetation, our water supply cannot realistically support our growing urban areas.

In urban areas of the valley, areas with large amounts of vegetation appear to be golf courses or parks.

Open/Vacant Land Urban Water Vegetation

0

2 1

4 mi.

42


IDEATION // HAND RENDERINGS

43


IDEATION // HAND RENDERINGS

44


IDEATION // CONCEPTUAL MODELING Site Plan + Features

Vicinity Map

45


IDEATION // CONCEPTUAL MODELING Site Plan + Features

Vicinity Map

46


47


Site Plan + Features

Vicinity Map

Thanks!


GAVYN

SILVA

Profile for Gavyn Silva

Gavyn Silva -2020 Landscape Portfolio  

2020 Landscape Architecture discipline; degree studied & completed at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Summary of selected Projects (201...

Gavyn Silva -2020 Landscape Portfolio  

2020 Landscape Architecture discipline; degree studied & completed at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Summary of selected Projects (201...

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