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imagineNATIVE!Film!+!Media!Arts!Festival! October!17=21,!2012! Press!Summary!


TV & Radio Coverage Interview conducted by 680 News with Jason Ryle, with focus on Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative.

CTV News Toronto Journalist : Karlene Nation Air date: Saturday, October 20th, 6:00pm and 11:30pm news

TFO – Carte de Visite Journalist: Gisele Quinneville Air date: November

CP24 – LeDrew Live Journalist: Stephen LeDrew Air date: October 15th 2


CBC radio Canada – Champ libre Journalist: Isabel Gobeil Air date: October 19th, 2012

Radio Regent – Frameline Journalist: Barbara Goslawski Air date: Interview #1 – October 11th; Interview #2 – October 17th

Aboriginal Voices Radio Journalist: Bob Philips Air dates: Various – multiple interviews conducted. Broadcast on 106.5 FM; in addition on the national network: Ottawa 95.7 FM, Edmonton 89.3 FM, Calgary 88.1 FM and Vancouver at 106.3 FM, and two satellite channels – Sirius channel 158 and XM channel 156. Also on Rogers Digital Cable on channel 952.

Arte Germany Journalist: Daniela Thiel and Marita Loosen Air dates: Various – multiple interviews conducted; festival piece to be presented on Opening Night at Berlinale 2013, with various future dates to be announced. 3


Print & Online Coverage

http://www.moneyville.ca/article/1272430--imaginenative-festival-drama-out-of-trauma

imagineNATIVE Festival Drama out of Trauma By Jason Anderson | Tue Oct 16 2012 When it comes to discovering the breadth and depth of aboriginal cinema, Toronto moviegoers have had no shortage of opportunities  in  recent  months.  An  ambitious  series  that  ran  all  summer  long,  TIFF  Bell  Lightbox’s First Peoples Cinema demonstrated the vitality and diversity of cinematic visions  by  the  world’s  indigenous  filmmakers.  Now  the  Lightbox   is one of several venues playing host to ImagineNative,  the  city’s  annual  showcase  of  film,  video  and  new  media  by   aboriginal peoples. The  fest’s  13th  edition  begins  on  Wednesday  at  2  p.m.  with  a  welcome  gathering  at  the  Native  Canadian  Centre  of  Toronto.   As for the five-day  program’s  on-screen component, it opens with a strong double bill of new and old works by one of Canada’s foremost documentary filmmakers. In The People of KattawapiskakRiver — which makes its world premiere on Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema — director Alanis Obomsawin creates a stark but sympathetic portrait of the Attawapiskat community in northern Ontario, whose desperate housing crisis and struggles with poverty continue to be national news. And just as Obomsawin did in Christmas at Moose Factory — her debut short from 1971, which also plays ImagineNative’s  opening  gala  — the director expresses  a  keen  interest  in  the  children  of  the  community.  It’s  deeply   affecting to see them bundled up in blankets and sweatshirts as they contend with the cold that has little trouble penetrating their makeshift and dilapidated homes. Another new film at ImagineNative recounts the sufferings of earlier generations. Drawn from the experiences of two survivors, We Were Children uses a combination of first-person narration and dramatic reenactments to portray horrific abuses that occurred in residential schools  in  Saskatchewan  and  Manitoba  in  the  late  1950s  and  ’60s.In  fact,  some  scenes   may be so upsetting to viewers that the festival has partnered with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada to have health support workers trained to address residential school trauma on hand at the screening at the Lightbox on Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Thankfully, not every event at ImagineNative requires such sensitive handling. Viewers can expect something more playful from Tweet This!, a program of short films by young filmmakers, and Unsettling Sex, a set of experimental works that includes a new video by the reliably provocative Kent Monkman. Other moviegoers may savour the oddly serene experience of watching Tibetan herdsmen demonstrate the many uses of yak feces in a documentary with the highly appropriate title of Dung. In another thoughtful gesture, ImagineNative has even created a program to suit busy travelers. Visible until Oct. 21 on the 300-plus screens located on subway platforms throughout the TTC are four new one-minute videos that were commissioned  by  the  festival’s Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative. Other programs, panels, events and exhibitions — including a show of prints by Alanis Obomsawin at Open Studio — demonstrate  ImagineNative’s  eagerness  to  venture  beyond  the   confines of movie screens and forge new connections between artists and the people they hope to engage and embolden. The ImagineNative film and media arts festival runs Oct. 17-21.

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http://www.ammsa.com/publications/windspeaker/meet-%E2%80%9C-people-kattawapiskakriver%E2%80%9D

Meet  “The  People  of  the  Kattawapiskak  River” Author: By Barb Nahwegahbow Windspeaker Contributor TORONTO Volume: 30 Issue: 8 Year: 2012 One  of  Canada’s  poorest  First  Nation  communities  is  next  door  to  a  diamond   mine that is expected to produce six million carats of rough diamonds in its lifetime. The First Nation, Attawapiskat, made inter-national headlines in October 2011 when Chief Theresa Spence declared a state of emergency because of a severe housing crisis. Several  of  Attawapiskat’s  citizens,  including  elders and families with babies and toddlers, were living in tents, sheds or condemned houses without indoor plumbing, electricity or heating. Many others were living in a construction trailer donated by DeBeers Canada which operates the diamond mine located  on  Attiwapiskat’s  traditional  territory.  With  winter  fast  approaching   with its minus-40 to minus-50 degree temperatures, Chief Spence, concerned about the health and safety of her community, said she had no choice but to make the declaration. The people of Attawapiskat are the subject of a new film by world-renowned Abenaki documentary film maker Alanis  Obomsawin.  The  People  of  the  Kattawapiskak  River,  Obomsawin’s  38th  film  had  its  world  premiere  at  the   opening of the 13th Annual ImagineNATIVE Film Festival in Toronto on Oct. 17. The film opened to a sold-out crowd at the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema. One  of  Obomsawin’s  greatest  gifts  as  a  filmmaker  is  her  compassion  and  her  love  for  her  people.  Tom   Perlmutter of the National Film Board introduced her before the screening  and  spoke  about  “her  ability  to   uncover things in a way that was different, in a way that opened up worlds, in a way that was so respectful and in  a  way  that  forced  you  to  exist  and  think  and  feel  differently…  Very  few  people  can  do  it  in  that  kind of authentic  way.” The  film  goes  behind  the  headlines  of  what  became  known  as  a  “Canadian  tragedy”  and  into  the  homes  of  the  

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people  affected  by  the  crisis.  Obomsawin’s  film  gives  a  voice  to  the  people  of  Attawapiskat  and,  yes,  it  does   challenge the viewer to think and feel differently. One of the people introduced in the film is Sharon Spence, a young woman living in a construction trailer donated by DeBeers. She and her three children, ranging in age from five months to three years, live in one room. She takes Obomsawin on a tour and the camera follows as she points out the shared bathrooms and showers and finally, the common kitchen, a cavernous room devoid of any niceties or even the necessities usually found in a kitchen, like tables and chairs. The corridors are narrow and the rooms are like cells. William Wesley is an Elder who had to move out of his house because it has mold. “This  is  only  a  shed,  not  a  house,”  he  said  in  the  film  while  he  builds  a  fire  in  a  stove  he  crafted  out  of  a  barrel.   He’s  mourning his wife who he lost in 2010 and he talks about the good times they had hunting in the bush. He confides that now he goes into the bush to cry because he misses his wife and his late mother. His home is neatly kept and a crucifix hangs on the wall alongside pictures of his children, grandchildren and late wife. There are others who tell their stories and like Spence and Wesley, they tell them in a matter-of-fact way, with dignity and with no bitterness or resentment. One woman, Rosie Koostachin, shares her optimism for the future for her community. Obomsawin  spoke  to  the  audience  before  the  screening  and  said,  “I  fell  in  love  with  the  people  and  you  will  too   once  you  see  them.”  After  the  film,  Obomsawin  took  the  stage  again  and  she  invited  the  people of Attawapiskat who were in the audience, some of whom were featured in the film, to join her. The audience gave them a thunderous standing ovation. “There  is  poverty  there,  yes,  but  to  me,  the  richness  of  the  mind  and  the  heart,  it’s  so  big,”  Obomsawin  said when  she  spoke  to  Windspeaker.  “I  guess  to  describe  them  best  would  be  people  of  good  minds  and  good   hearts.” Chief Spence, in Toronto for the screening, talked to Windspeaker about the film and the current conditions in her community. “It’s  an  incredible  documentary,”  she  said.  “I  was  really  astonished  and  I  could  see  she  was  there  for  the   community,  not  for  herself  and  it  shows.  You  don’t  have  too  many  people  like  her.”  She  went  on  to  say,  “It’s  a   documentary meant for people to see and to learn what is  going  on  in  the  reserves…” The housing crisis is far from over, said Chief Spence. There are well over 300 people on the waiting list for safe housing. Severe overcrowding, older houses requiring renovations and houses with mold are part of the crisis. Chief Spence has set up a Housing Working Group with Mushkegowuk Tribal Council and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada to develop a 20-year housing strategy for Attawapiskat.

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Attawapiskat raconté par Alanis Obomsawin http://www.radio-canada.ca/emissions/grands_lacs_cafe/2011-2012/chronique.asp?idChronique=251932

Le samedi 20 octobre 2012 La réalisatrice Alanis Obomsawin a présenté son nouveau documentaire en ouverture du Festival ImagineNative de Toronto. « Le peuple de la rivière Kattawapiskak » nous plonge dans la réserve d'Attawapiskat qui a fait les manchettes, il y a quelques années après de très importantes inondations. La cinéaste expose la dure réalité des quelque 1700 habitants du village.

Audio-vidéo Attawapiskat raconté par Alanis Obomsawin Hyperliens pertinents Dossier | Attawapiskat une réserve sous surveillance Attawapiskat, une communauté de près de 2000 habitants située sur la côte ouest de la Baie James, est aux prises avec une grave pénurie de logements. Des dizaines de personnes vivent dans des tentes, des roulottes ou des maisons en bois non isolées et dépourvues d''eau et d''électricité. Le conseil de bande a sonné l''alarme à la minovembre devant la crise humanitaire qui s''annonçait. La Croix-Rouge a envoyé des secours et Ottawa a décrété la mise sous tutelle de la réserve autochtone, une décision contestée par la Première Nation d''Attawapiskat, qui a déposé une demande d''injonction devant les tribunaux à la fin janvier 2012.

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http://www.nowtoronto.com/news/story.cfm?content=155719 Listing – NOW Magazine

FESTIVALS

Fall Preview : Festivals Fall Preview : Festivals By LESLEY MCALLISTER Harvestfest Festival  celebrating  fall  harvest  with  entertainment,  food,  crafts,  kids’  activities  and   more. Free. Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay W. 416-9734000,www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Oct 8 and 9 Festival Of Spoken Word Workshops on spoken word, poetry slams and performances by Shane Koyczan, Lillian Allen, Robert Priest, Motion and Sheri-D Wilson. 416-3123865, www.cfsw.net. Oct 11 to 14 Toronto International Latin Film Festival Films from Chile, Argentina, Portugal, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, Cuba, Spain, Quebec, Uruguay and France. $10, passes $40-$120. www.tilff. com. Oct 13 to 20 Cuban Cinema: The Many Layers Of Reality In Cuba Festival of new and classic Cuban films. Free  w/  museum  admission.  Royal  Ontario  Museum,  100  Queen’s  Park.  416-5865524, www.rom.on.ca/about/icc. Oct 15 to 20 Diaspora Film Festival Celebrating the diversity of films and videos made by cineastes living and working outside their countries of origin. $10, stu/srs $7. 416-5712150, www.diasporafilmfest.org. Oct 18 to 22 Imaginenative Film and media arts festival with work by Kanakan Balintagos, Alanis Obomsawin and others. Various prices. Downtown cinemas. 416-5852333, www.imagineNATIVE.org. Oct 18 to 22

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http://ca.news.yahoo.com/cultural-tributes-imagine-native-film-fest-001150585.html YAHOO News Canada Yahoo! News

Cultural  tributes  at  Imagine  Native  Film  Fest CBC – Wed, 7 Nov, 2012 Alanis Obomsawin's latest movie, The People of Kattawapiskak River, shines a light on the lives of First Nations people who, she said, are often represented in a negative light. After working on other movies, Obomsawin noticed viewers had mixed reactions to her work. "Why is it that people love to hear about bad people? You tell me," she said. "Why is it that they are so happy to talk about those 'savages,' those people that don't know how to live and calling them all kinds of names?" The People of the Kattawapiskak Riveris screening on Nov. 11 at the Grande Bibliotèque and again on Nov. 17 as part of the 13th annual Imagine Native Film and Media Arts Festival.

Also published at:

Nolet http://nolet1.nolet.com/article/cultural-tributes-imagine-native-film-fest

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Alanis Obomsawin doc to open ImagineNATIVE film festival http://playbackonline.ca/2012/09/19/alanis-obomsawin-doc-to-open-imaginenative-filmfestival/#ixzz2CGWJtnva September 19, 2012 by Etan Vlessing

The 13th annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival is to open with festival favourite Alanis Obomsawin screening her latest documentary, The People of the Kattawapiskak River. “Throughout  her  decades  long  career,  Alanis  has  produced  work  of  great  importance  to  global Indigenous  cinema,”  Jason  Ryle,  imagineNATIVE  executive  director,  said  Wednesday  in  a  statement. “With  this  latest  film  she  continues  her  commitment  to  present  a  real  picture  of  Indigenous   perspectives  that  are  often  overlooked  or  unheard,”  he  added  of  Obomsawin’s  commitment  to  telling   traditional native Canadian stories. Obomsawin, the doyenne of Canadian native filmmakers, will bring her feature about the struggling Attiwapiskat First Nation in Ontario to the Bloor Hot Docs cinema on October 17 for a world premiere. And the imagineNATIVE festival will close on Oct. 21 with a gala screening of Benjamin Brattstarrer The Lesser Blessed, director Anita  Doron’s  coming  of  age  feature  set  in  the  Northwest   Territories that debuted at TIFF.

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http://nationtalk.ca/story/alanis-obomsawin-award-winning-filmmaker/

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http://ca.news.yahoo.com/sami-filmmaker-brings-1st-feature-doc-imaginenative-233221873.html

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http://thetfs.ca/2012/10/17/today-on-the-scene-screenings-and-film-fun-for-wednesday-october17-2012/ Toronto Film Scene THE AUTHOR

Danita Steinberg I  love  old  musicals,  Bette  Midler,  and  great  horror  films.  I’m  a  student,  barista,  bookworm,  wannabe   foodie,  cinephile,  and  celebrity  stalker.  If  I’m  at  home,  I’m  in  my  pajamas.  I  think everyone should laugh more. Follow me on twitter@danita_35

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Today on the Scene: screenings and film fun for Wednesday, October 17, 2012 DANITA STEINBERGCOMMENTS (0) SHARE

How  is  everyone’s  week  going?  You’re  halfway  there.  As  Dory  says,  “Just  keep  swimming!”  Or  as  I   would  say,  “Just  go  see  a  movie,”  so  here  is  what”s  happening today on the Scene for Wednesday, October 17, 2012. The TIFF Bell Lightbox is screening four films today - Keep the Lights On, Samsara, Nobody Walks, and Dial M for Murder. Looking to spice up your afternoon? The Bloor Hot Docs Cinema has Por El Flamenco and Flamenco From the Roots beginning at 1:00 pm. These two films are part of the Flamenco Film Lunch Break series. Tonight at 7:00 pm is the ImagineNATIVE opening night gala. The opening film, The People of the Kattawapiskak River, promises to be an eye opening and rewarding experience for audiences. 13


http://thetfs.ca/2012/10/17/imaginenative-review-we-were-children/ Toronto Film Scene THE AUTHOR

Brandy Dean Brandy Dean is the owner of the digital marketing consultancy Pretty Clever Things and the editor, writer, and janitorial staff for the film blog Pretty Clever Films. She likes dogs, poutine, silent movies, and hockey, not necessarily in that order.

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imagineNATIVE Review: We Were Children BRANDY DEANCOMMENTS (7) SHARE

Director Tim  Wolochatiuk’s  docudrama We Were Children is an examination of  Canada’s   Indian Residential School system, as recounted by two survivors Lyna Hart and Glen Anaquod. Both Hart and Anaquod were torn from their families and reservation homes as very young children and shipped to residential schools in Manitoba and Quebec, respectively. Forced to speak English and punished for speaking their own languages, they were subjected to years of physical, psychological, and sexual abuse. The movie is a harsh indictment of a shameful period in Canadian history and of the Catholic Church, but the mix of talking head testimony from Hart and Anaquod and movie-of-the-week quality dramatizations robs the film of the moral high ground. The filmmakers may have hoped that dramatic recreations of the tale would be more visceral to audiences, but watching in adorable, chubby-cheeked little girl be slapped by nuns and raped by priests just feels tawdry, sensational, and exploitative. The obvious pain and trauma expressed by Hart and Anaquod are so obvious and heart wrenching. The real shame of We Were Children is that these two survivors were not given a dignified forum in which to be heard. Is We Were Children Essential imagineNATIVE Viewing? No. There are many, many docs, non-fiction  books,  and  novels  about  Canada’s  policy  of  boarding  Aboriginal   children in abusive schools. Seek out a more dignified telling, historical or artistic account. The survivors of these houses of abuse deserve to be heard and respected, not further exploited. We Were Children Screening Times Thursday, October 18, 2012 at 7:30pm at TIFF Bell Lightbox

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http://realscreen.com/2012/09/19/alanis-obomsawin-doc-to-open-imaginenative-film-festival/

Obomsawin doc to open ImagineNATIVE film festival September 19, 2012 by Etan Vlessing

The 13th annual ImagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival is to open with festival favorite Alanis Obomsawin screening her latest documentary, The People of the Kattawapiskak River. “Throughout  her  decades  long  career,  Alanis  has  produced  work  of  great  importance  to  global   Indigenous  cinema,”  Jason  Ryle,  imagineNATIVE  executive  director,  said  in  a  statement. “With  this  latest  film  she  continues  her  commitment to present a real picture of Indigenous perspectives  that  are  often  overlooked  or  unheard,”  he  added  of  Obomsawin’s  commitment  to  telling   traditional native Canadian stories. Obomsawin, one of the doyennes of Canadian native filmmakers, will bring her feature about the struggling Attiwapiskat First Nation in Ontario to the Bloor Hot Docs cinema on October 17 for a world premiere. And the ImagineNATIVE festival will close on October 21 with a gala screening of Benjamin Brattstarrer The Lesser Blessed,  director  Anita  Doron’s  coming  of  age  feature  set  in  the  Northwest   Territories that debuted at TIFF. From Playback Daily. Photo: Alanis Obomsawin, via NFB.ca

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http://toronto.ctvnews.ca/more/hot-links Listing

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http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/imaginenative-celebrates-13thanniversary/article4621295/ Globe and Mail FILM

imagineNATIVE  celebrates  13th  anniversary JAMES ADAMS The Globe and Mail Published Thursday, Oct. 18 2012, 5:00 PM EDT Last updated Thursday, Oct. 18 2012, 2:41 PM EDT

Billed  as  “the  world’s  largest  film  and  media  arts  festival  devoted  to  indigenous  peoples,”   imagineNATIVE is celebrating its 13th anniversary this weekend in Toronto. One  of  the  event’s  must-sees  is  the  international  premiere  on  Friday  of  Cao  Honghua’s   documentary The Grandmother’s House Away from Home. In the matriarchal society of the Mosuo, one of the many indigenous peoples of mainland China, the grandmother’s  house  or yimi is  considered  the  spiritual  heart  of  the  family.  Cao’s  film  explores  the   controversial  fallout  from  young  Erche  Pichu’s  decision  to  sell  a yimi – the first such sale in Mosuo history – and have it transported to an art exhibition in Beijing. Is it another example of globalization as its most exploitative? Or the chance to celebrate Mosuo culture and promote it to a wider audience? imagineNATIVE runs through Sunday at various locations in downtown Toronto; click here for website. The Cao documentary screens at noon at TIFF Bell Lightbox.

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http://www.ecomediastudies.org/2012/10/23/imaginenative-film-festival-in2012/ Gettysburg College

Ecomedia Studies Exploring non-print media and environment

ImagineNATIVE  film  festival  (iN2012) 2012 OCTOBER 23 tags: film festivals, indigenous film by smonani A shout out for the ImagineNATIVE film festival that I attended this past week. While not officially designated an eco-film festival, there is plenty in the films screened (as I argue more generally about indigenous film festivals) to pique the interest of any ecomedia scholar. While feature  length  films  such  as  Katja  Gauriloff’s Canned Dreams, an aesthetically stunning and unnerving rumination on global food systems, and Dung, Tibetan  Lance  No’s  experimentation  with   observation documentary, speak explicitly and powerfully to environmental themes, it was the shorts, many made by upcoming and emerging young indigenous artists, with their implicit eco-sensibilities that really captured me. From  Miranda  de  Pencier’s  heart-wrenching Throat Song to Jules Koostachin’sNiiPii and  Anne  Merete  Gaup’s Eahparas eerie resonances, and the more tongue-in-cheek tones  of  Kent  Monkman’s Dance to Miss Chief and  Tiffany  Parker’s Scar, ecology is well and alive in the cinematic imaginations of these filmmakers, a number of whom I had the privilege of speaking with. A special thanks to all who were kind enough to take the time to be interviewed (including Jason Ryle, the Executive Director; and Alanis Obomsawin, a stalwart in the field.) If  the  festival  films  come  touring  in  your  vicinity,  I’d  highly  recommend  attending.

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http://www.blogto.com/film/2012/10/this_week_in_film_the_imposter_antiviral_nobody_walks_helg a_fanderl_imaginenative_and_whats_new_in_dvd_bluray/

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http://philanthropyandaboriginalpeoples.ca/2012/10/16/original-indigenous/

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http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/10/12/five-things-to-do-this-week-october-13-19/ National Post Reposted at Rendezvous With Madness: http://www.rendezvouswithmadness.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/03/Oct-12-National-Post-5-things-to-do_The-Maze.pdf

POSTED TORONTO Five  things  to  do  this  week:  October 13-19

JASON REHEL | Oct 12, 2012 1:30 PM ET More from Jason Rehel | @culturejunky 1. FILM: The  latest  documentary  feature  by  Alanis  Obomsawin  will  open  this  year’s imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, which is dedicated to indigenous filmmakers and artists. The People of the Kattawapiskak River is an account of the tragically impoverished conditions among the Attiwapiskat First  Nation  in  Ontario,  but  unlike  much  of  the  newsmedia’s  coverage  of  the  housing  and  basic  needs   crisis, the story is told here by residents themselves from within their own homes. A program of shorts by youth, plus features such as The Tundra Book,  about  Russia’s  indigenous  Arctic  peoples; We Were Children, about survivors of the residential schools tragedy; and Smoke Traders, about the aboriginal tobacco market, help round out a lineup of workshops, roundtables and artist talks. On Oct. 21, 6 p.m., the fest closes with The Lesser Blessed, starring newcomer Joel Evans and Benjamin Bratt (Law & Order), about the coming of age of a First Nations teenager in a remote Northern community. •  October  17  to 21. Bloor Hot Docs Cinema, 506 Bloor St. W., TIFF Bell Lightbox, 350 King St. W. and other venues. Screenings: $7-$12 with some free events, festival pass: $40; visit imaginenative.org/festival2012 for tickets and a full schedule.

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http://blog.zeebigbang.com/post/33891870272/imaginenative-industry-panel-music-in-film-tv Zee Big Bang.com

imagineNATIVE Industry Panel - Music in Film & TV: Guide for Filmmakers and Musicians The 13th Annual imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival comprises a line up of thought-provoking films, New Media Art exhibits and an Industry series, which celebrate the works of Indigenous peoples who are at the forefront in film and new media. zeeBigBang attended the Music in Film & Television panel, which connected Indigenous musicians with Indigenous filmmakers and mainstream professionals within the Film, TV and Music industries. The panel discussed the many sides of music licensing. The panel was moderated by Denise Bolduc the Board Vice-Chair for imagineNATIVE and featured Brent Bain, manager of the Submissions Department at FACTOR; Elizabeth Klinck, Research & Copyright Clearance Specialist at E Klinck Research; Cris Derksen, Aboriginal Composer & Cellist; Paul Still, Account Executive for Film & TV at SOCAN; Jeremy von Hollen, Music Coordinator atInstinct Entertainment, and Geoff Morrison, Producer and Director at FilmCAN. Here are the top tips we learned from these industry professionals, which can help you as a filmmaker, television producer or musician. 

For Filmmakers and Television Producers - Get your music cleared early on! According to Jeremy von Hollen, who works with both musicians and filmmakers, he is often approached by filmmakers or TV producers at a very late stage in their productions. He suggests involving a music coordinator early on in your production. This way they can get a better idea of what  it  is  you’re  looking  for  and  work  with  you  to  find  the  right  music  or  composer  for  your   project.  It’s  also  important  to  note  that  broadcasters  won’t  look  at  your  project  without  the   music rights cleared.

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For Musicians - Don’t  be afraid to step out of your comfort zone. Cris Derksen says that working in the arts can be  “a  crazy  career  where  you  never  know   what  you’ll  get.”  She  suggests  stepping   out of your comfort zone and taking smaller projects that you can learn and improve from so that when you work on bigger projects, you will have that knowledge to help you.

For Filmmakers and Television Producers - Working on a small budget? Find a composer rather than getting songs licensed for your project. Both Elizabeth Klinck and Geoff Morrison  agreed  that  if  you  are  working  with  a  small  budget,  it’s   better financially to find a composer to score your film or TV show rather than getting licenses to specific songs. Klinck suggests finding a composer early on in your project so that you can work with him/her every step of the way.

For both Filmmakers, TV Producers and Musicians - Transparency is key! All  of  the  panelists  agreed  that  transparency  is  very  important,  whether  you’re  in  film,  TV  or   music.  According  to  Derksen,  don’t  be  afraid to say no or walk away from a project that goes against your beliefs, both artistically or otherwise. The same goes for filmmakers and TV producers. If you disagree with the terms of a music license, then be honest about it. People appreciate the honesty.

zeeBigBang’s  Takeaway: If  you’re  a  a  filmmaker  or  television  producer,  think  about  the  music  rights   early on in your project - don’t  leave  it  till  the  end!  If  you’re  a  musician,  know  your  rights  and   limitations  and  don’t  be  afraid  to  walk  away  from  a  project  that  doesn’t  work  for  you. Join the new world of arts & entertainment and do business online. Sign up now onzeeBigBang.com

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http://danielgarber.wordpress.com/2012/10/19/oct-19-2012-imaginative-imaginenative-moviesreviewed-charlie-zone-we-were-children/

Oct 19, 2012. Imaginative ImagineNATIVE. Movies Reviewed: Charlie Zone, We Were Children Hi, this is Daniel Garber at the Movies for culturalmining.com and CIUT 89.5 FM, looking at high-brow and low-brow movies, indie, cult, foreign, festival, documentary, genre and mainstream films, helping you see movies with good taste, movies that taste good, and how to tell the difference. Earlier this week, I found myself munching some bannock and wild rice in a packed hall on Spadina to witness the opening ceremony of one of the warmest and  friendliest  film  festivals  I’ve  seen  in  Toronto.   ImagineNATIVE is a celebration of indigenous film, video and art in Canada  and  around  the  world  and  it’s  on  right  now,  and  open  to   everyone. There are free short film screenings tonight at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, art installations around the downtown,  and  films,  parties,  concerts  and  lots  of  great  movies  to  see.  So  check  it  out.  This  week  I’m   reviewing two Canadian movies playing at ImagineNATIVE, both with aboriginal topics and actors, and both about people trapped far away from their homes. Dir: Michael Melski Avery (Glen Gould) is the strong silent-type, a tough Native guy who did time and never shies from a fistfight. Now he just wants to earn some good money so he takes on a sketchy job. He has to find a young woman in Montreal, abduct her, and drive her back to her parents. Easy, no? No. She’s  an  angry  junkie  who  doesn’t  trust  anyone,  and  will  do  anything not to go home again – ever. Turns out Jan (Amanda Crew) was adopted and now feels adrift – she doesn’t  even  know  who  she   really  is.  But  it’s  up  to  Avery  to  get  her  there  safeky.  But  things  start  to  change. 24


There’s  an  extremely  violent  Quebec  biker  gang  chasing  the  two  of  them,  two  young  gangsters  who   think of Jan as their property, and a shady, secretive businesswoman orchestrating the whole deal by telephone for unstated reasons. And Avery is stuck in the middle of it — a thug magnet – but  won’t   give up on her. Are Jan and Avery enemies or allies? And will either of them ever connect with the people they really want to find? Charlie Zone is partly an action-packed violent crime movie about the seedier side, partly a heartfelt drama about rural life, loves lost and families torn apart. Glen Gould and Amanda Crew make a good pair, (though without any sexual spark between them) and the plot-driven story keeps you guessing till the end. UPDATE:  This  year’s  ImagineNative  Best  Dramatic  Feature  award  went  to Charlie Zone: Producer, Hank White. We Were Children Dir: Tim Wolochatiuk For over a hundred years, but especially from the 1930s to the 80s, 150,000 native children were taken from their families and sent to residential schools to learn English and French and trade skills, and to be assimilated into the dominant Canadian culture. Most of them were run by churches, and the children often treated as inmates not students. Harsh corporal punishments were common, as was malnutrition, and, shockingly, emotional, physical and sexual abuse of the boys and girls sent there. We Were Children is a powerful film that combines a documentary history of two kids Lyna and Glen (now adults) who lived through this in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and a shocking dramatization of what it was like. Glen is locked in a dungeon room by an abusive priest and Lyna, who initially spoke no English was physically punished just for speaking her native tongue. Although they want to go home, they are prevented from leaving and treated like escaped prisoners if they run away. Not a one-sided film at all, it takes pains to show some positive characters at the schools, like a nun who helps the girls when they are hungry. This film is an eye-opening look at shameful chapter of Canadian history and the attempts at cultural genocide forced upon First Nations children, scarring families for generations. For show times of Charlie Zone, We Were Children and more, go to ImagineNATIVE.org . Other festivals in the city this weekend include the very scary Toronto After Dark, Ekran.ca the new Polish film festival (starting next week), and Brazilfilmfest.net for movies and music from Brazil. This is Daniel Garber at the Movies, each Friday morning on CIUT 89.5 FM and on my website, culturalmining.com . 25


http://www.iheartmoviesto.com/press1-canadian-film-review-premieres-november-6th/ Canadian Film Review: First of three interviews

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http://playbackonline.ca/2012/09/27/imaginenative-festival-fills-out-film-lineup/

ImagineNATIVE Festival fills out film lineup September 27, 2012 by Etan Vlessing

The ImagineNATIVE Film Festival is to screen in all 80 film and video works from Canada and internationally, including a world premiere for We Were Children, a Cree, English and French language film about residential school survivors by director Tim Wolochatiuk.

Also booked  into  the  festival  is  Michael  Melski’s  thriller Charlie Zone, which stars Glen Gould, the Tibetan-language documentary Dung,  about  China,  from  director  Lance  No,  and  Honghau  Cao’s The Grandmother’s House Away from Home, a Mandarin and Mosuo language film. And  ImagineNATIVE  has  programmed  Australian  director  Ivan  Sen’s Toomelah, a take on Aboriginal youth,  James  Diamond’s The Man from Venus,  and  Danis  Goulet’s Barefoot.

The  festival  already  announced  Alanis  Obamsawin’s The People of the Kattiwapiskat River as the opening  film,  with  Anita  Doron’s The Lesser Blessed to close the 13th edition. In all, ImagineNATIVE has booked 24 world premieres and seven Canadian premieres. 27


http://mixedbagmag.com/tag/imaginenative-2/

imagineNATIVE  FILM  FEST:  Celebrating   Canadian  &  International  Indigenous   Filmmakers  &  Media  Artists Posted on October 17, 2012

On the subject of Contemporary Aboriginal Art… & considering how Indigenous Culture has a vital place in the current global landscape MIXED BAG MAG recommends checking out imagineNATIVE – Toronto’s  film  festival  that  focuses  on  Canadian  &   international Indigenous talent. “imagineNATIVE is committed to dispelling stereotypical notions of Indigenous peoples through diverse media presentations from within our communities, thereby contributing to a greater understanding by audiences of Indigenous artistic expression.” One  event  in  particular  that  would  make  for  interesting  dialogue  is  “Alternative Audiences and Interactive Storytelling: Infusing Indigenous Art and Issues into the Public Consciousness” on Saturday 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm at TIFF Bell Lightbox.

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http://thetfs.ca/category/festivals/imaginenative-festivals/ Toronto Film Scene – Full Program Reviews

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http:/ /www.cbc.ca/news/arts/story/2012/10/22/lesser-blessed-imaginative-charleyboy.html

The  Lesser  Blessed  tells  universal   story  of  alienation N.W.T.-set film focuses on experiences of First Nations teen CBC News Posted: Oct 22, 2012 5:09 PM ET Last Updated: Oct 22, 2012 5:36 PM ET

The Lesser Blessed, a story of teenage angst and seclusion told from the perspective of one young First Nations man, was the closing gala at the ImagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival. The film combines a universal story about feeling like an outsider with the unique tale of a young man who has to overcome much hardship in his young life. Based on the novel of the same name by Dene author Richard Van Camp, the story is set in the Northwest Territories and follows a Tlicho teenager, Larry Sole, through some of his high school experiences. The Lesser Blessed is written and directed by Ukrainian filmmaker Anita Doron and has a mostly Canadian cast including Chloe Rose (Degrassi), Kiowa Gordon (The Twilight Saga), Benjamin Bratt, Tamara Podemski as Verna Sole and Joel Evans as Larry Sole. The film was shot in Sudbury, in part because of the lack of government incentives for movie-making in the Northwest Territories. But it still manages to cinematically capture the feelings of social, cultural and geographical isolation of the original novel. “I  feel  like  Anita  totally  captured  that  —what  it’s  like  to  be  in  the  middle  of  nowhere,  so  far  away  from   everybody — that  it’s  both  in  a  geographic  sense  and  in  the  social  sense  of  being  an  outsider,”  says   Tamara Podemski who plays Larry Sole's mother. 30


“He  was  a  boy  who  couldn’t  be  more  different.  But  he’s  not  so  different  because  he’s  Indian,  he’s   different  because  he’s  traumatized,  and  that’s  the  beautiful  part  about  the  story.” ImagineNATIVE winners        

Best dramatic feature:Charlie Zone, produced by Hank White. Best indigenous language film: Throat Song, Stacey Aglok MacDonald. Best documentary: My Louisiana Love,Monique Verdin. Best short documentary: Songline to Happiness, directed by Danny Teece-Johnson. Best short drama:Throat Song, Stacey Aglok MacDonald. Best new media: Sense of Home, Leena Minifie. Emerging talent: Scar,directed by Tiffany Parker. NFB/imagineNATIVE Digital Media Partnership: In the Similkameen, Tyler Hagan Podemski has had to face her own challenges as a native actor. “I’ve  never  only  been  put  out  for  native  roles,  but  I  only  get  cast  in  native  roles.  I  can’t  say  that  it’s  been   a  bad  thing,”  she  says. “I’ve  often  been  told  ‘It’s  so  interesting  that  you  have  only  done  native roles, or have chosen to do native  roles.’  And  they  don’t  understand  that  it’s  not  a  choice.  We  (native  actors)  are  told  where  we   can  be  seen,  how  we  can  be  seen,  and  who  we  can  be  seen  with  on  the  screen.” “It  takes  courageous  producers  filmmakers,  writers,  to  fight  for  their  stories  to  be  told,”  says  Podemski. It seemed to be a great feat to get this indie film made – taking seven years from the time it was a figment  of  the  imagination  of  director  and  screenwriter  Doron.  Van  Camp,  the  novel’s  author, worked with Doron from the beginning, even opening up his home to her so she could capture the feel of the N.W.T. The Lesser Blessed is  most  certainly  a  First  Nations  story  about  a  young  man’s  struggle  for  identity  and   healing,  but  it’s  also  a  story  that is universally felt. And that is what makes this film beautiful, that we can all relate no matter what colour of skin we have.

Also published at:

http://f3v3r.com/2012/10/22/the-lesser-blessed-tells-universal-story-of-alienation/ 31


http://www.cbc.ca/news/arts/story/2012/10/19/imaginenative-we-were-children-charleyboy.html

We Were Children 'a healing journey' for residential school survivors CBC News Posted: Oct 19, 2012 11:59 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 19, 2012 5:28 PM ET

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We Were Children is a feature-length docudrama that tells the story of residential school survivors Lyna Hart and Glen Anaquod. (ImagineNATIVE)

Residential schools, revisited in the new film We Were Children, are one of those things that no one wants  to  talk  about.  It’s  a  shameful  part  of  Canada’s  history  that  many  would  prefer  to  ignore  or  to  just   put to rest. The forced assimilation of First Nations children in residential schools lasted more than 130 years. Until 1996, more than 100,000 children were legally placed in Christian care. There were many atrocities and cases of abuse that occurred, leaving thousands of residential school survivors with wounds that run deep. 32


Lisa Meeches, an esteemed Aboriginal producer, spent more than seven years travelling across Canada to collect these survivors' stories for the federal government. The idea for We Were Children stemmed from a discussion she had at the Banff World Media Festival. A feature-length docudrama, We Were Children tells the story of residential school survivors Lyna Hart and Glen Anaquod. Their sorrowful stories unfold with deep emotion and impact for the audience: there are times of humour as well as heartbreak, but most of all their tales showcase strength and resilience. The film underlines the vast suffering of the Aboriginal children forcibly removed from their homes and put in the care of those who tried to strip them of their identities and culture. “I  believe  that  they  were  trying  to  annihilate  us  and  they  couldn’t,  because  what  they  did  to  us  — and everything that we had to live through — only  made  us  stronger,  made  us  more  determined,”  Hart  says   in We Were Children.  “I  had  so  much  rage.  It  took  a  long  time  to  make  peace  with  the  church.” For Meeches, who co-produced the film with Kyle Irving, the film is for different audiences. “We  told  the  story  for  the  survivors,  we  told  the  story  for  folks  who  are  intergenerationally  impacted   and we told the story for Canadians  who  also  have  been  lied  to,”  she  said. “It’s  a  crime  of  knowledge  that  we  [Aboriginal  people]  don’t  know  what  happened  to  us.  If  Canadians   knew what was making us sick, I think they would all cheer for our speedy recovery, because Canadians have a lot  of  compassion.” In a moderated panel discussion following the film's screening at the ImagineNATIVE Film Festival, she added:  “We  know  now  what  pain  looks  like  and  now  it’s  our  goal  to  capture  the  healing  and   forgiveness.” Hart added: "this is part of my healing journey, this film. “I’m  hoping  that  it  is  an  inspiration  for  the  survivors  to  tell  their  story  and  release  it  and  go  do  the  work   that  they  need  to  do  in  order  to  move  on  beyond  being  a  survivor.” For generations of Aboriginal people to move forward, there needs to be an open discourse about the experiences and impact of residential schools and We Were Children offers a portal for that discussion — not only for Aboriginal people, but for all Canadians alike. Aboriginal Peoples Television Network will broadcast We Were Children in March 2013.

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OCTOBER 19, 2012 imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival 2012 http://hyemusings.blogspot.ca/2012/10/imaginenative-film-media-arts-festival.html

In its 13th year, imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival is the largest festival of its kind in the world. Dedicating its programming to highlighting Indigenous films, music, and other digital projects, imagineNATIVE will offer a five full days of great programming. The festival kicked off this week with the Opening Night and World Premiere screening of The People of the Kattawapiskak River by Alanis Obomsawin. This film takes us north to the Attiwapiskat First Nation in Ontario where a housing crisis and poverty levels made international headlines. Other films to note include the National Film Board's We Were Children, which presents very personal, hearbreaking yet important stories from survivors of residential schools and their families. This year, their international spotlight will be on the Mapuche Nation. The Mapuche are an indigenous group from Chile, who have been fighting to gain more autonomy and preserve their independence and culture. This international spotlight includes the documentaries Diez Veces Venceremos and Wallmapu. I'll have more on these documentaries in this program shortly. Also of note is the Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative (SSDI) an artistic commission and national exhibition of four, one-minute digital works by award-winning Canadian Indigenous filmmakers celebrating and honouring Indigenous women and their contributions as strong, successful and valued members of society. SSDI  will  be  exhibited  throughout  Toronto’s  subway  system on more than 300Pattison Onestop digital subway platform screens, on 254 digital monitors in 33 English language shopping centre display screens across Canada, at the Calgary International Airport, and at the TIFF Bell Lightbox leading up to and during the festival. Definitely lots to experience at imagineNATIVE this year. Check out the website for full scheduling, event, and ticketing information. Read more at http://hyemusings.blogspot.com/2012/10/imaginenative-film-media-artsfestival.html#4K7VkF6Ire38c9KY.99 34


http://www.cbc.ca/news/arts/story/2012/10/18/imaginenative-obomsawin-charleyboy.html

ImagineNATIVE opens with Alanis Obomsawin's distinctive lens Film fest hosts premiere of Attawapiskat doc The People of the Kattawapiskak River CBC News Posted: Oct 18, 2012 11:10 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 18, 2012 1:24 PM ET

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Alanis Obomsawin's latest doc The People of the Kattawapiskak River tells the story of those who continue to live in Attawapiskat despite some deplorable conditions. (ImagineNATIVE)

Alanis Obomsawin brought fans to their feet in Toronto Wednesday night, as the Canadian filmmaking icon helped kick off the ImagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival with her new doc about the crisis in Attawapiskat.

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“You  make  me  feel  like  I’m  coming  home,”  she  told  the  crowd  about  its  warm  welcome,  after   ascending the stage. Obomsawin’s documentary film career has spanned four decades and more than 30 films. Her work is dedicated to Aboriginal peoples and she chronicles First Nations experiences, but her exploration of social and political issues is of interest to all Canadians. Of Abenaki descent, she has received several honorary degrees and awards, including her appointment as an Officer of the Order of Canada. Her film Christmas at Moose Factory started off Wednesday night's screening and it definitely took  the  audience  back.  It  was  her  first  short  film,  created  in  the  late  ‘60s.  The  film  presented  a   creative take in documenting the lives of Cree children through their illustrations, renderings, and their own voices, as the children do the storytelling from their perspective. Presenting a distinct point of view is exactly what Obomsawin is known for and this was reiterated with the night's feature film. In her new doc The People of the Kattawapiskak River, Obomsawin offers the audience a glimpse into the previously untold story of community members fromAttawapiskat First Nation in Northern Ontario. Last October, when Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence declared a state of emergency because of the state of housing on the reserve, the small community became the spotlight of media attention all over the globe. That  spotlight  wasn’t  always  so  friendly  and  many  media  stories focussed on the chief and council of the community, placing the blame on them rather than exploring the issues at hand. The documentary captures the people who live in Attawapiskat, who share their stories and why they continue to live there despite some deplorable conditions. There is finally a personal touch to the tale, so vastly different than the mass media reports that emerged last fall. Despite the seemingly gloomy feel to the film, it offered a bright light of hope and change that was felt throughout the cinema. At the end of the screening, Obomsawin was joined on the stage by Spence, NDP MP Charlie Angus, and members of the Attawapiskat First Nation. There was a celebratory cheer in the air that must have contributed to her feeling at home in a theatre where her work, once again, was being warmly received.

Also published at:

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http://www.blog.filmarmy.ca/2012/10/imaginenative-stays-strong-and-diverse-in-2012/

IMAGINENATIVE STAYS STRONG AND DIVERSE IN 2012  

October 24, 2012 / Written by Tyler Lemaich

What can you say about a festival like ImagineNATIVE? I know that  I  can  say  that  it’s  one  of  the   many Toronto festivals that I look forward to the most every year. Not just because of its strong lineup of diverse films they have each year, the very interactive industry panels they have, which attract speakers from all over the world, or the celebration of native culture in such a positive and inspiring  way.  For  me,  it  really  is  that  extra  mile  the  staff  goes  to  make  the  festival  so  special.  It’s  by   no means just another film festival; their parties are more vibrant and they have much more to offer – they always have a really outstanding musical performance which is something you rarely see at festivals. Daryl over at Daryl’s Hard Liquor and Porn Film Festival usually books an awesome surf rock band like Luau or Die, and you can usually find some local DJ spinning records at your TIFF parties but ImagineNATIVE actually attracts a well known star in the native community and it really adds to the credibility of the festival and their strong sense of community. Beyond the music and entertainment of this festival, again, I have to go back to the staff and mention how freakishly approachable and friendly they are. Industry Manager Daniel Northway37


Frank called me up a few months ago and invited me to partake in their distribution roundtable talks  which  are  so  useful!  They’re  like  speed  dating  for  business  meetings  and  I  heard  about  a  lot  of   interesting projects that I hope I can distribute or finance in the near future. Having a festival director  that’s  easy  to  get  along  with  is  crucial  for  a  distributor  and  I  have  to  assume  it  would  also   translate well to the filmmakers. I love the big festivals like TIFF and Sundance but if I could constructively criticize them, it would be that  they’re  just  way  too  busy.  It’s  one  big  circus  and  a  lot  of  great  films  get  lost  in  the  shadow  of   huge budget studio films that already have distribution and will get a worldwide theatrical release in  a  few  months  anyways.  There’s  nothing  like  that  going  on  at  ImagineNATIVE.  Sure  you  might  see   some of the films at TIFF and Sundance but there is no sense of one film overpowering any other, which brings me back to that theme of community. It’s  just  really  important  to  support  festivals  that  aren’t  just  your  generic  festival  like  (INSERT  CITY)   International  Film  Festival.  It’s  really  important  to  have  festivals  with  a  strong  focus  on  a  specific   race or culture, especially when you’re  living  in  a  city  with  a  massive  film  market  like  Toronto.  I   attend  so  many  festivals  and  I  can’t  tell  you  how  many  times  I’ve  seen  the  same  film.  It’s  brutal  and   the  programming  blocks  get  eaten  up  by  films  that  have  played  100  other  festivals.  It’s  gotten so bad that just last week I was flipping through the print source list of one of those international film festivals and I had literally seen or at least heard of every single film they had programmed!! This is so  lazy,  sad,  and  more  than  anything,  it’s  uncultured  mainstream. So  support  these  powerful  niche  festivals.  You  don’t  need  to  see  a  Johnny  Depp  movie  at  TIFF;  just   wait two months! Go to ImagineNATIVE, Reel Asian, Hotdocs,Planet in Focus and Reel World. TIFF doesn’t  need your support nearly as much as these festivals do. Now more than ever, with the tragic hiatus of the CFC World Wide Short Film Festival, we need to make sure our voices are strong,  loud  and  heard.  We  can’t  allow  a  monopoly  to  happen  with  the  most  mainstream  festivals. I  don’t  have  anything  against  TIFF.  I  love  TIFF  and  have  already  signed The Dancing Cop, which also screened  at  ImagineNATIVE.  I’m  just  saying,  if  you  do  go  to  TIFF  support  the  film  that  you  might  not   get to see ever again. So submit, attend, learn, and party at ImagineNATIVE.  You  won’t  regret  it.

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http://thetfs.ca/2012/10/15/13th-annual-imaginenative-film-media-arts-festival-starts-wednesdayoctober-17-2012/ Toronto Film Scene

13th annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival starts Wednesday, October 17, 2012 DANIEL JANVIERCOMMENTS (0) SHARE

Every year, the work of Indigenous artists of film, video, radio, and new media across the planet are celebrated  during  Toronto’s  imagineNATIVE  Film  +  New  Media  Arts  Festival.  Now  in  its  thirteenth  year,   the festival will take place at TIFF Bell Lightbox where, in addition to the usual cinematic delights, a selection of web-based New Media will be showcased. Featured  artists  include  Cheryl  L’Hirondelle,  Archer  Pechawis  and  Sheila  Urbanoski,  who  will  be   recreating  the  website  “Speaking  the  Language  of  Spiders,”  an  artistic  collaboration  between   imagineNATIVE, the NFB, Vtape, and ITWÉ will be given a sneak peak during the festival as well at VMAC Gallery, with a discussion being held at TIFF Bell Lightbox on Saturday October 20, 2012 at 10:30am.  Some  films  featured  in  the  Festival  include  Michael  Melski  and  Hank  White’s Charlie Zone, Cristian  Jure  and  Pascual  Pichún’s Diez Veces Venceremos, and  Melissa  A.  Henry’s Run Red Walk. All screen  as  part  of  this  year’s  vast  selection  of  shorts  and  feature  lengths,  for  which  you  can  find  a   complete list (including screening times) here. What: 13th Annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival When: October 17-21, 2012 Where: All over Toronto For More Info: For more information, go to imagineNATIVE’s homepage.

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http://www.blogto.com/events/63409 Listing – Blog TO

EVENTS

2012  imagineNATIVE  Opening  Gala The Festival runs October 17 - 21, 2012 Tickets go on sale October 3 Festival Passes are on sale NOW http://www.imaginenative.org/page.php?p=buytickets&y=2012 Welcome Gathering Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, 16 Spadina Road 2-4PM FREE Welcome in the 13th annual Festival as our cultural advisor commences with an opening prayer. Enjoy Canadian  Indigenous  dancers,  local  craft  vendors  and  a  bite  to  eat  before  going  to  imagineNATIVE’s   Opening Night Screening.

Opening Night Screening Screening presenter Aboriginal Peoples Television Network The Bloor Hot Docs Cinema, 506 Bloor Street West 7PM (arrive early to guarantee a ticket and good seat) $12 ($10, students/seniors/underemployed) The Festival opens with the World Premiere of The People of the Kattawapiskak River (Screening presenter Aboriginal Peoples Television Network), the latest documentary from legendary Canadian filmmaker, Alanis Obomsawin. A moving and powerful feature that takes the viewer north to the Attiwapiskat First Nation in Ontario where a housing crisis and poverty levels made international headlines in the winter of 2011. More info: http://www.imaginenative.org/newsdetails.php?id=232

Opening Gala After-Party The Brant House, 522 King Street West 9PM FREE with an opening night screening ticket stub or Festival pass. Celebrate the Festival launch with attending filmmakers and artists at The Brant House! Bear Witness of DJ collective A Tribe Called Red will bring us through the night.

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Indigenous Music Culture. http://rpm.fm/news/imaginenative-2012-indigenous-film-music-and-media-arts-take-centre-stage-2/

NEWS

imagineNATIVE  2012:  Indigenous  Film,  Music  and  Media  Arts   Take  Centre Stage BY: MELODY MCKIVER | PHOTO: NICKSHERMAN-REDWORKS | NOVEMBER 7, 2012 IN NEWS | ADD COMMENT

Since  its  inception  in  1998,  Toronto’s imagineNATIVE Film & Media Arts Festival has grown to be the largest festival of Indigenous film and media arts in the world. The annual celebration was held October 17-21, 2012. Melody McKiver was the grateful recipient of a delegate pass for Indigenous musicians  sponsored  by  Slaight  Music.  Here’s  her  exclusive  festival  recap  for  RPM. DAY ONE: Wednesday October 17th I last attended the festival when I lived in Toronto in 2009. Returning home to see that most imagineNATIVE screenings and workshops are now held in the TIFF Lightbox (Toronto International Film Festival) is a welcome development, and a testament to the major impact this festival has made on the international film, media, and Indigenous arts communities. OPENING GALA: THE PEOPLE OF KATTAWAPISKAK RIVER The sole film screening held off-site  was  Wednesday’s  opening  gala  and  world  premiere  ofThe People of the Kattawapiskak River. Acclaimed Indigenous filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin, along with many community members from Attawapiskat First Nation including Chief Theresa Spence, were present, and received standing ovations following the film. Preceding the main feature was Christmas at Moose 41


Factory,  Alanis  Obomsawin’s  1971  debut  film. Despite the 41-year gap between the two films, both share a gentle portrayal of the realities of life in remote Northeastern Ontario and a focus on Omushkego (Swampy Cree) youth. Obomsawin was on the ground in Attawapiskat as news of the community’s  state of emergency went viral in late-2011. As mainstream media coverage quickly devolved into factually inaccurate stereotypical reporting, Obomsawin masterfully took vitriolic commentary from Sun Media conservative ideologue Ezra Levant, and presented community  members’   responses to his unfounded accusations. The film began with the community at the peak of the housing crisis, then showed community members celebrating newly-built housing six months later, and concluded with the court case that absolved Attawapiskat First Nation of any financial misdoings—and illustrating the callousness of the federal  government’s  response  to  the  crisis. AFTER-PARTY  ROCKIN’  WITH  DJ  BEAR  WITNESS Following the film, imagineNATIVE provided buses to an after-party that offered a happy reunion for many members of the Indigenous arts community. RPM and festival favourite, DJ Bear Witness (of A Tribe Called Red), spun a wide range of reggaeton, Latin, reggae, hip-hop, and his own powwowstep. At 80 years young, Alanis Obomsawin showed off her spirit and vitality by owning the dance floor late into the night.

imagineNATIVE@imagineNATIVE Alanis Obomsawin on her reception @ #iNfest2012 : "you make me feel like I'm coming home" The party was also an appropriate send-off for DJ Bear Witness, who was set to meet his ATCR brothers at the Toronto airport less than 12 hours later to fly out to perform at the WOMEX Festival in Thessalakoni, Greece. DAY TWO: Thursday, October 18th PANELS & WORKSHOPS I began my day at the Music in Film & TV: A Guide for Filmmakers and Musicians industry panel, where a diverse and accomplished roster of panelists were invited: Brent Bain of FACTOR; Elizabeth Klinck of E Klinck Research; Paul Stillo of SOCAN; Jeremy von Hollen of Instinct Entertainment, and RPM favourite cellist/composer, Cris Derksen. The audience was filled with film, music, and dance professionals, culminating in a lively question period. For my own soundtrack work, the workshop was more than worthwhile, answering  some  long  outstanding  questions  I’ve  had  regarding  the  nuances  of  licensing   new recordings of existing songs. UNSETTLING SEX With a slight overlap between the end of the industry panel and the beginning of the Unsettling Sex screenings assembled by Chickasaw artist and curator John G. Hampton, I snuck into the movie 42


theater. Although I missed the screening of Dance to Miss Chief by Cree Two-Spirited iconoclast Kent Monkman, I recently saw the piece in a gallery and can testify that his mash-up of disco and powwow music is well worth a listen for powwowstep fans. Dear Diary and Target Girls by Cree/Ojibway/Roma/Jewish filmmaker and video artist Ariel Smith lacked dialogue, but paired score and sound design by Ottawa band Crush Buildingswith vivid black  and  white  imagery.  ‘Unsettling’  was  an  apt  description  for Target Girlsespecially: the cinematography was reminiscent of German expressionism, while the soundtrack was reminiscent of 1950’s  bubblegum  American  pop  with  decidedly  un-bubblegum lyrics. Also featured in Unsettling Sex was Mars-Womb-Man and I am the art scene starring Woman Polanski by Cree/Métis artist James Diamond and About Town by Métis filmmaker, writer, and artist Marnie Parrell. The screenings were shorter than usual in order to give curator John G. Hampton time to read his paper on the series. His written work draws heavily on recent developments in Queer Indigenous studies, while also emphasizing that the films screened should not be essentialized to any single descriptor of queer, Indigenous, sexuality, or feminism. CONCEALED GEOGRAPHIES When not at the TIFF Lightbox, many imagineNATIVE attendees could be found nearby at the 401 Richmond artist complex, which houses a number of small galleries, while others found their way to exhibitions and artist talks including: Concealed Geographies: New Media Exhibition featuring the works of KC Adams, Jason Baerg, Merritt Johnson, Cheryl  L’Hirondelle, Justine McGrath and Nigit’stil   Norbert, De Nort: New Media Exhibition by the ITWÉ Collective of Kevin Lee Burton, Caroline Monnet, and Sébastien Aubin, andWbomsawinno: Les estampes de/ The Prints of Alanis Obomsawin. RESONATE: YOUTH MULTIMEDIA EXHIBITION I made my way to RESONATE – Indigenous Youth Showcase, where a variety of print media and video art was on display by youth artists Nishka Turner, Leslie McCue (Ojibway), Asivak Koostachin (Cree), Cecily Jacko (Ojibway), Kyle Burton, Jared Robilliard (Dene), Damien Bouchard, Cheyenne Scott (Coast Salish), Nigel Irwin-Brochmann, Emily Jones, Alice Thompson and Alana Mcleod. A reception complete with frybread followed that emphasized the tightknit nature of the community and everyone from newborns to kookums were in attendance. INDIGENOUS  WRITERS’  GATHERING  &  MUSKRAT MAGAZINE That evening, I made the difficult choice to break from imagineNATIVE to catch the wrap party of the 5th annual Indigenous  Writers’  Gathering and launch of MUSKRAT Magazine, where I caught up with Cree cellist Cris Derksen, who wowed the crowd with recent material not heard on her album or 8th Fire soundtrack, along with some older favourites. An all-star lineup of Indigenous writers, including Lee Maracle, Richard Wagamese, and Marilyn Dumont read from their work. Daniel Heath Justice’s  (Cherokee)  new  poem,  which  dealt  with  lies  told  about  Indigenous people, was a personal stand-out, as its unflinching honesty and emotional intensity were reminiscent of Ryan Redcorn’s   acclaimed poem Bad Indians. And, of course, event hosts Sid Bobb and Wab Kinew kept the crowd entertained throughout the night. DAY THREE: Friday, October 19th 43


SPOTLIGHT ON THE MAPUCHE NATION On Friday I caught two documentaries that were part of an International Spotlight on the Mapuche Nation I. Each year at imagineNATIVE an Indigenous nation from around the globe is featured, and this year’s  invited  guests  were  representatives of the Mapuche Nation from what is also known as Chile. Indigenous resistance to colonialism, capitalism, dispossession of land, and loss of language were recurring themes in the two documentaries screened, En El Nombre del Progresso (In the Name of Progress), and Wallmapu – but also a profound resilience and fierce pride in their culture and nation. I would revisit these themes later in the evening, when I performed as part of the afterparty for the Mapuche delegation. SHORT FILMS: TURNING POINTS Immediately after the International Spotlight screening I saw the Turning Points: Shorts Program I. Showcasing a wide variety of creative projects, shorts programs are my favourite parts of film festival programming, but they often force you to make difficult viewing choices. Plus, I knew I would have to run to soundcheck midway through the program. But the opening film, Throat Song, directed by Miranda de Pencier, was a standout. Set in Iqaluit, the 18-minute film follows a young Inuk woman as she seeks an escape from an abusive relationship. The acting and the technical production were superb  and  throat  singing,  as  the  title  suggests,  played  a  major  part  in  the  film’s  soundtrack and sound design. This incredible form of singing propelled the action through dreamy sequences of running and hunting across the tundra that owed much to Zacharias Kunnuk’s  groundbreaking  work   in Antanajuarat: The Fast Runner. SPOTLIGHT ON THE MAPUCHE NATION As I ran out early to set up my drums for soundcheck at The Central, I was honoured to participate in the celebration of the Mapuche Nation and perform under their flag. The evening began with a selection of hip-hop and heavy metal music videos curated by director Danko Mariman, whose En El Nombre del Progress (In the Name of Progress) screened earlier in the day. The feature of the screenings was the 2008 film Cortometraje  “Che  Üñum,  Genta  Pájaro”, a 22 minute short by Mapuche video artist Francisco Huichaqueo (huichaqueo.cl). The dreamy film opened with a quote which, in English  translation,  read  “When  somebody  has  to  move,  he  has  to  start  all  over  again  and  open  his   eyes  and  look  another  way”.  Movement  was an ongoing theme, with a number of the performers, wearing helmets that suggest the mandibles of ants, engaging in near-impossible displays of parkour throughout the urban landscape of Santiago, Chile. The third movement was particularly mesmerizing, with the introduction of the song Anarky Plastic by Mario Z propelling the action forward and building the sound design from the first two movements to incorporate traditional Mapuche horns. The shift to electronic music in the final movement suggests that this contemporary mix of electronic and Indigenous  sonic  aesthetics  is  truly  an  emerging  global  sound  (as  we  explored  in  RPM’s Electric Pow Wow podcast – which included artists Cris Derksen and Bear Witness, who also performed during this year’s  imagineNATIVE). AMAZONICA SOUND FORCE & RED SLAM COLLECTIVE Following the film screenings, live music took the stage. Toronto-based Mapuche MC La Bomba opened things up with her reggae-influenced band, Amazonica Sound Force.  All  of  the  band’s   44


members are veterans of the hip-hop en espanol and reggae communities, and performed a tightly polished set. ASF were a tough act to follow, but my band Red Slam Collective took the stage. Red Slam represents a diverse number of Indigenous nations from across Northeastern Turtle Island and our brand of live hip-hop draws from a diverse set of influences including reggae, hand drum songs, spoken word, and funk. It was a true pleasure to play in front of such an inspiring Indigenous audience. DAY FOUR: Saturday, October 20th SPOTLIGHT ON MAPUCHE NATION – PT II On Saturday the International Spotlight on the Mapuche Nation continued with more documentaries. First up was  the  North  American  premiere  of  Francisco  Huichaqueo’s  2012  film Kalül (Reuniôn de Cuerpo / Reunion of the Body) which brought his dreamy cinematographic style, as seen in the previous night’s Cortometraje  “Che  Üñum,  Genta  Pájaro”, to document a Mapuche performance art intervention in a shopping mall in Santiago. This was followed by the international premiere of Diez Veces Venceremos (We Shall Overcome Ten Times) by director Cristian Jure. Diez follows the political exile Pascual Pichún, as he attempts to return from his journalism studies in Argentina to his Mapuche homelands in occupied Chile. The title of the film is drawn from a protest song often sung by Pascual and his supporters. Protest songs are an integral part of the narrative of the film, sung by Pascual in exile in Argentina, and by his supporters in his home community. THE BEAT The Beat is  a  hotly  anticipated  part  of  imagineNATIVE  that  shifts  the  festival’s  focus  from film to music for a Saturday night celebration. Demonstrating the strong connection between film and music, each year  The  Beat  opens  with  a  collection  of  the  past  year’s  best  Indigenous  music  videos. This  year’s  line-up represented Indigenous nations from around the globe, including: This Is My Time Everyday directed by Michelle Latimer, Leivänmuruseni (Breadcrumbs) directed byOskari Sipola, Ghost House directed by Zoe Hopkins, Mr. Milkman directed by Laura Milliken, Dirty Games directed by James Kinistino, My Blood My People directed by Martin Leroy Adams, and Waardeur directed by Eugene Hendriks.  I  was  proud  to  contribute  drum  tracks  to  this  year’s  Best  Music   Video, Sides directed by Mosha Folger, an Ottawa-based Inuk writer, performer, playwright, and member of the Counterfeit Nobles.

Nick Sherman (Ojibway)  opened  up  the  evening’s  live  music  component  with a commanding solo set. The Sioux Lookout-based singer-songwriter performed seated on his suitcase, which doubled as a bass drum.  For  the  final  portion  of  Nick’s  set,  he  invited  up  the  visual  artist  and  musician Arthur

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Renwick (Haisla). The two men had only recently began playing together at the Ontario Council of Folk Festivals a few weeks ago, but impart a familiarity that I hope will lead to many future collaborations.

George Leach (Sta’atl’imx)  was  the  evening’s  headliner,  performing  a  mix  of  old  favourites  and  new   tracks from his eagerly anticipated new release, Surrender. Audiences at The Beat got a chance to purchase copies of the new album prior to the official release, and I can confirm that it sounds as great as his live set. George Leach and his band pumped up the mood in the room, switching gears from the quiet  reverence  of  Nick  Sherman’s  set  to  a  full-on  Saturday  night  rock’n’roll  party. They played a high-energy set, proving that nobody in Indian Country rocks a double-necked Gibson SG quite like George Leach. DAY FIVE: Sunday, October 21st CLOSING GALA: THE LESSER BLESSED On Sunday, I made my way to the closing night gala screening of The Lesser Blessed directed by Anita Doron and based on the Richard Van Camp (Dogrib) novel of the same name. Shot in Sudbury but based  in  the  Northwest  Territories,  the  film  was  gorgeously  rendered  and  scored.  The  film’s   protagonist Larry Sole, a Tlicho youth played by Joel Evans in a stellar acting debut, comes to terms with his traumatic past as he deals with high school bullies. The film premiered earlier this year at the Toronto International Film Festival, and is well worth seeing as it screens more widely. The 13th annual imagineNATIVE Indigenous Film & Media Arts Festival wrapped up with an awards gala at The Mod Club hosted by actor Billy Merasty,  who  donned  this  year’s  circus  theme  and  put  on   his top hat as the ringmaster. The crowd was tired but happy after a week jam-packed with festival events and networking that always ran well into the night. To take part in the festival as a musician truly demonstrated to me how interconnected Indigenous arts practices  are:  what’s  a  film  without  a  soundtrack,  or  a  musician’s  single  without  a  music  video? At  the  end  of  the  festival,  my  only  regret  is  that  I  can’t  go  back  and  catch  everything  I  missed  the  first   time around. Aho!

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http://povmagazine.com/blog/view/imaginenative-film-media-arts-festival-2012

imagineNATIVE  Film  +  Media  Arts  Festival  2012 Posted  on  October  16th,  2012  • 0 Comments Point of View is proud to once again be sponsoring the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival! “The  imagineNATIVE  Film  +  Media  Arts Festival celebrates the latest works by Indigenous peoples at the forefront of innovation in film, video, radio, and new media. Each fall, imagineNATIVE presents a selection of the most compelling and distinctive Indigenous works from around the globe. The Festival’s  programming,  cultural  &  social  events,  and  Industry   Series attract and connect filmmakers, media artists, programmers, buyers, and industry professionals. The works accepted  reflect  the  diversity  of  the  world’s  Indigenous   nations and illustrate the vitality and excellence of our art and  culture  in  contemporary  media.” Running from October 17-21 in Toronto, ON, the festival kicks off at 2pm on Wednesday, October 17th at the Native Canadian Centre of Canada. This event is FREE and open to the public! Though  there  are  many  films  to  choose  from,  we’d  like  to   highlight one in particular: POV is co-presenting Young Lakota this Saturday, October 20th at 4:30pm at the TIFF Bell Lightbox. “On  the  Pine  Ridge  Reservation  in  South  Dakota,  teenagers  Sunny   Clifford and Brandon Ferguson dream of one day changing the world. They find inspiration in the leadership of Cecelia Firethunder, the first female President of their tribe. But when their new Chief challenges a South Dakota law criminalizing abortion, her actions unleash a political firestorm that sets off a chain reaction in the lives of her young supporters.  Sunny  finds  herself  embroiled  in  a  battle  for  women’s   rights, while Brandon abandons his ideals in the face of political opportunity. Each is forced to make difficult choices in this raw and uncompromising coming-of-age  story.” A representative from POV will be on hand at the screening – hope to see you there!

Also published at: 47


http://www.cbc.ca/news/arts/story/2012/10/19/imaginenative-canned-dreams.html

Sami filmmaker brings 1st feature doc to ImagineNATIVE CBC News Finnish filmmaker Katja Gauriloff has had quite a run this year. Her first feature length documentary film Canned Dreams had its international premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival earlier this year, where ImagineNATIVE Film +Media Arts Festival's Jason Ryle first saw the film  and  was  “completely  blown   away.”

Gauriloff, 40, was born in Inari, Northern Lapland, where her grandmother is a famous Skolt Sami traditional storyteller. She studied film directing at the Tampere University of Applied Sciences, School of Art and Media and has been involved in filmmaking for over 14 years. She last presented her work at Toronto's ImagineNATIVE festival back in 2008: A Shout into the Wind followed the lives of the Skolt Sami, an endangered people trying to survive and striving to hold onto their indigenous lifestyle in the harsh climate of northern Finland. The verité documentary was her first foray into the genre. Her fourth film, it is an evocative and thought-provoking reflection on the struggle of indigenous peoples striking the balance between traditional and modern life. Her latest film, Canned Dreams, screened earlier this spring at Toronto's Hot Docs film festival, which is co-presenting it at imagineNATIVE Film. Canned Dreams is an intense look at processed food and its production. Gauriloff's gaze is neutral and she takes a humanist approach as she travels across Europe and South America to discover the unique journey of each ingredient in a can of ravioli: from metal mined in Brazil for the tin to the wheat produced in Ukraine and the pork from Romania for the pasta. The audience is offered glimpses of factory facilities that might cause one to question our penchant for processed foods. 48


In Portugal, we learn that a woman who picks tomatoes dreams of staying healthy enough to work so she can afford  to  send  her  daughter  off  to  university,  where  “she  can  achieve  what  I  could  never   achieve.” A Romanian young woman who prepares pigs to be slaughtered wants one day to be a beautiful bride in a pretty dress and makeup, though in reality she is in an abusive common-law relationship with the father of her child. She works to keep her child in diapers and afford abortions when necessary. Each scene is visceral. Gauriloff shotCanned Dreams in 16mm and had to carefully plan her shoots as she only had a day or two in each location. One of the most powerful moments in the film is at a processing plant in Romania where pigs are electrocuted and their throats slit before they're sent for slaughtered. A man who works in the plant says that it took him more than three months to get used to killing the animals, and that even after having killed around 15,000, his heart still cringes. “I  still  think  of  it,  and  then  I  think  of  my  family,”  he  says.  “Without  this  sacrifice,  what  am  I  going  to  put   on  my  table?” After an hour and a half of watching these far-flung stories behind just one example of processed canned food, one begins to question what exactly we're putting on our tables to feed our families. “If  there  was  one  film  that  I’d  like  to  see  again  is Canned Dreams,” says Ryle, executive director of ImagineNATIVE. “It’s  an  incredible  documentary,  really  masterfully  made,  and  the  content  of  the  documentary  is  very   current.  It’s  a  film  that  we  can  all  relate  to,  but  it’s  also  something  that  we’ve  never  really  considered before. I really like work that takes something everyday and completely flips it and makes us think about  things  that  we  never  thought  about,  and  that’s  whatCanned Dreams does.”

Also published at:

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ArtBridges/ToileDesArts EVENT: imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, Oct. 1721 (Toronto) http://artbridges.wordpress.com/2012/10/17/event-imaginenative-film-media-arts-festival-oct-17-21-toronto/

17/10/2012

13th Annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival Five days of Indigenous film, video, radio, new media, entertainment, and more. Presenting Sponsor: Bell Media October 17-21, 2012 The  imagineNATIVE  Film  +  Media  Arts  Festival,  the  world’s  largest  Indigenous  media  arts  festival,  celebrates  its   13th year October 17-21, 2012 at the TIFF Bell Lightbox (Reitman Square, 350 King St. W) and various other venues in downtown Toronto. This year imagineNATIVE celebrates 117 new works by Indigenous people at the forefront of innovation in film, video, radio and new media. imagineNATIVE’s  Opening  Night  Screening  features  the  world  premiere  of  Alanis  Obomsawin’s  captivating   feature-length documentary The People of the Kattawapiskak River. Obomsawin takes her camera and awardwinning direction behind media headlines with the personal journey of the people of the Attawapiskat First Nation and the realities in their northern Ontario community. The Festival closes with the gala rresentation of The Lesser Blessed. Adapted from Executive Producer Richard Van  Camp’s  celebrated  novel,  this  deeply  moving  dramatic  feature  film  takes  us  to  the  Northwest  Territories  as  a   young Tlicho teen takes his first, challenging steps toward adulthood. TICKETS: – Regular screenings: $7 (FREE to students, seniors and the under-employed before 6pm) – Opening Night Screening and After-Party: $12/$10 – Closing Night Screening and Awards Show: $12/$10 Other FREE festival highlights include: - Welcome Gathering at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto (Wednesday, October 17th @2pm) - Industry Series - New Media Installations - The Witching Hour: Late Night Shorts (screening) - New Media Presentation (screening) Visit www.imagineNATIVE.org for the full festival line-up. Connect with imagineNATIVE on Facebook or Twitter #iNfest2012.

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http://nationtalk.ca/story/imaginenative-film-media-arts-festival-is-proud-to-present-the-beat/

imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival is proud to present The Beat by aanationtalk on October 16, 2012 Presented by Slaight Music Featuring: George Leach with Guest: Nick Sherman

October 20, 2012 – 9:00PM – Lee’s  Palace  – 529 Bloor Street West The Beat Tickets: $15 ($10 students/seniors/underemployed) Available online, by phone, in person: www.imagineNATIVE.org George Leach and Nick Sherman are available for interviews (Toronto – October 15, 2012) – The imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival is thrilled to announceThe Beat,  presented  by  Slaight  Music,  at  Lee’s  Palace  (529 Bloor Street West) on October 20, 2012 at 9PM, featuring a rock-out performance by George Leach. This 9th annual showcase of Indigenous music includes opening guest Nick Sherman, and international Indigenous music videos. Playing from his latest album, Surrender - set for release in November – Leach brings together a collection of unique and distinctively original songs reflecting a deeply felt musical statement of change, growth and maturation. A limited number of this new album will be for sale at The Beat. Leach is a much-respected multi-award winning singer, songwriter, guitarist and performer. His video for the popular single, Young Enough, reached the top 5 on the coveted Bravo Video Hit list, and the Top 10 on the Much More Music chart. Opening for Leach is promising singer/songwriter, Nick Sherman, who hails from Northwestern Ontario. He will play from his debut album Drag Your Words Through, released this past March and available now through iTunes. 51


The Beat also  features  imagineNATIVE’s  music video program, featuring works from Canada, Finland, Australia and South Africa; the screening presents some of the latest in Indigenous music. George Leach A  member  of  the  Sta’atl’imx  Nation  from  the  interior  British  Columbia,  George  Leach  has   earned his  artistic  integrity.  His  debut  album,  Just  Where  I’m  At  (2000),  garnered  international   recognition, establishing him as a respected singer, songwriter, guitarist, and performer. Leach composed, performed and arranged all of the vocal, guitar and bass tracks on the selfproduced  album,  winning  “Best  Male  Artist”  and  “Best  Rock  Album”  awards  at  the  2000   Canadian  Aboriginal  Music  Awards.  The  video  of  its  popular  single,  “Young  Enough,”  reached   the Top 5 on the coveted Bravo Video Hit List and the Top 10 on the Much More Music chart. Equally  impressive  is  its  win  for  ”Best  Music  Video  Award”  at  the  2002  American  Indian   Film Festival in San Francisco. He has shared the stage with such talented and legendary artists as Bo Diddley, the late Jeff Healey, Great Big Sea, Tom Cochrane, Robin Ford, Robert Randolph, 54-40, Doc Walker, Robbie Robertson, Susan Aglukark, Trooper, Chilliwack, and The Constantines. His music has enjoyed radio play across Canada. Nick Sherman Nick Sherman (Ojibway) is a singer/songwriter from Northern Ontario who spent his childhood traveling between his birthplace of Sioux Lookout, the remote First Nation community of Weagamow Lake and North Caribou Lake trapline. His songs are earnest and thoughtful, rooted in contemporary-folk sound. Nick plays most shows as a solo act unless joined by invited guests who play under the name The Winterdark. Nick released his debut, full-length album entitled Drag Your Words Through on January 20, 2012, with funding from the Ontario Arts Council. The album was recorded in Northwestern Ontario in the city of Thunder Bay. The sentiments of the album are broad as the songs cover the best and worst days of the last four years. About imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival The imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival celebrates the latest works by Indigenous peoples at the forefront of innovation in film, video, radio, and new media. Each fall, imagineNATIVE presents a selection of the most compelling and distinctive Indigenous works from around the globe. The Festival’s  programming,  cultural  &  social  events,  and  Industry   Series attract and connect filmmakers, media artists, programmers, buyers, and industry professionals.  The  works  accepted  reflect  the  diversity  of  the  world’s  Indigenous  nations  and   illustrate the vitality and excellence of our art and culture in contemporary media. TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE ONLINE, BY PHONE AND IN PERSON NOW Online: www.imagineNATIVE.org Phone: 416 599 TIFF (8433) (10am-10pm, daily) 52


In-Person: TIFF Bell Lightbox, Reitman Square, 350 King St. W (10am-10pm, daily) PASSES All-Access $110/$65 Industry All-Access $90 Screening $40/$24 Weekend $65/$40 TICKETS Regular Screenings $7 Students/Seniors/Underemployed before 6pm FREE Opening Night Screening and Party $12/$10 Opening Night Party only $8 Closing Night Screening and Awards Show $12/$10 The Beat featuring Buffy Sainte-Marie $20/$15 For more information and the full Festival listings, including FREE events, visit: www.imaginenative.org 2012 Sponsors: Presenting Sponsor: Bell Media Gold:  Astral  Radio  •  Deluxe  •  Slaight  Music  •  Aboriginal  Peoples  Television  Network Silver:  Global  Toronto  •  RBC  Royal  Bank  •  Canada  Media  Fund Bronze:  TD  Bank  •  TVO  •  Astral’s  Harold  Greenberg  Fund  •  CBC  •  Casino  Rama Media:  NAPT  •  NOW  Magazine  •  Muskrat  Magazine  •  Voices  106.5FM  •  Media  Indigena Public  Funders:  Ontario  Arts  Council  •  Canada  Council  for  the  Arts  •  Canadian  Heritage  •   Miziwe Biik Aboriginal Employment  and  Training  •  Ontario  Ministry  of  Tourism,  Culture  and   Sport  •  Telefilm  Canada  •  Toronto  Arts  Council Community  Partners:  A  Space  Gallery  •  ACTRA  Toronto  •  Beehive  Design  •  Charles  Street  Video   •  Liaison  of  Independent  Filmmakers  of  Toronto  •  National  Film  Board  of  Canada  •  V  tape  •   William  F.  White  •  Native  Canadian  Centre  of  Toronto  • The  Brant  House  •  WIFT-Toronto  •   Pattison Onestop Official Airline Carrier: Star Alliance Festival Hotel: Hilton Garden Inn Festival Restaurant: The Ballroom Hospitality:  The  Charlotte  Room  •  Smoke’s  Poutinerie  •  Café  Crepe  •  Kind  Exchange  •   Manitobah  Mukluks  •  Art  Gallery  of  Ontario  •  Global  Village  Backpackers  • Super 8 Hotel Friends:  DHL  •  SABAR  •  Technicolor  •  Niagara  Custom  Lab Foundations: Ontario Trillium Foundation  •  McLean  Foundation  •  Dreamcatcher  Fund

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http://thetfs.ca/2012/10/02/the-people-of-the-kattawapiskak-river-to-open-imaginenative-2012/

The People of the Kattawapiskak River to open imagineNATIVE 2012 PAM FOSSENCOMMENTS (0) SHARE

The 13th annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival is coming to town, bringing us five days of the latest film, video, radio and new media work by Indigenous peoples. Running from October 17 to 21, 2012, it will feature 80 works from Canada and around the world, with an impressive total of 24 world premieres. The festival opens with a free Welcome Gathering at 2:00 pm on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto (16 Spadina Road), which is open to the public. The opening night screening, later that evening at 7:00 pm,  is  the  world  premiere  of  Alanis  Obomsawin’s  documentary The People of the Kattawapiskak River, at the Bloor Hot Docs  Cinema.  And  in  honour  of  Ms.  Obomsawin’s  80th  birthday,  there’s  also  going  to  be  a  special  solo  exhibition  of  her   etchings,  running  from  the  festival’s  opening  date  until  October  20  at  Open  Studio  (401  Richmond  Street  W,  Suite  104). Also part of the festival  is  this  year’s International Spotlight on the Mapuche Nation of Latin America. It will include all kinds of special programming to illustrate the history and creativity of one of the largest Indigenous nations in South America. And the festival will close with The Lesser Blessed,  Anita  Doron’s  adaptation  of  Richard  Van  Camp’s  novel,  at  6:00  pm  on   Sunday, October 21. This story of a teenager in a remote Northwest Territories community stars Joel Evans, Benjamin Bratt, Tamara Podemski and Kiowa Gordon. Check out the festival schedule and get on out ther to see some of the excellent film fare on offer. Tickets are available as of October 3, 2012. What: imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival When: October 17 to 21, 2012 Where: TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West) and other venues More Info: For additional details, visit their website.

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http://www.meltingpot.spaa.org.au/events/imaginenative-2012 The Melting Pot – Events Listing

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Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative – October 2012 National  Exhibition  by  Indigenous  Artists  brings  Indigenous  Women’s Rights to the Forefront * Also published on newz4u.net

Beneath the Surface – October 2012

Pattison Onestop, imagineNATIVE and Amnesty International Canada co-present Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative (SSDI), a national project presenting four commissioned works that celebrate and honour Indigenous women and their contributions as strong, successful and valued members of society. The four one-minute, silent digital works were created by award-winning, Canadian Indigenous artists: Jesse Gouchey and Xstine Cook (LIKE IT WAS YESTERDAY), Lisa Jackson (SNARE), Cara Mumford (WHEN IT RAINS) and Angela Sterritt (YOUR COURAGE WILL NOT GO UNNOTICED). “I’m  honoured  to  be selected to participate in the SSDI.  It’s  through  art  that  we  can  express  the   human  side  of  tragic  social  issues  like  this,  so  often  lost  in  news  coverage,”  says  Genie  awardwinning  filmmaker,  Lisa  Jackson.  “It’s  an  opportunity  to  recognize  the  women  at  the heart of the issue  and  to  bring  an  awareness  of  the  violence  against  them  to  a  broader  audience.” SSDI will  play  on  the  Pattison  Onestop  subway  screens  to  over  1  million  Toronto’s  daily commuters and nationally on 254 digital monitors in 33 shopping centres across Canada, at the Calgary 56


International Airport, and TIFF Bell Lightbox leading up to and during the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival. The  Festival’s  SSDI  webpage  (http://imaginenative.org/festival2012/SSDI) includes details on mall and shopping centre locations screening the SSDI, a resource page featuring artists, issues and links to organizations to find out more about the history and movement surrounding Indigenous women’s  rights. “The  passion  of  our  partners,  collaborators  and  artists  to  bring  attention  to  such  an  important  issue   to  potentially  over  2.5  million  viewers  is  an  unprecedented  opportunity,”  beams  Daniel  NorthwayFrank,  Programming  +  Industry  Manager.  “To  challenge our artists to marry artistic style and social justice is a new and exciting venture. We hope this initiative adds a strong voice and attention to the  Indigenous  women’s  rights  movement  in  Canada,  and  spurs  action  and  awareness  through   creative outlets in other Indigenous communities and countries around the world, which sadly have  similar  experiences.” The SSDI project  started  as  a  call  by  imagineNATIVE  and  its  partners  to  Canada’s  Aboriginal  artistic   community to conceive of a video piece creatively reflecting and responding to the Stolen Sisters, a term adopted by the Aboriginal community and larger social justice organizations of the struggle to find answers for the over 500 official (and arguably more) unsolved cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal women across Canada. The Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative was funded by imagineNATIVE and Canada Council for the Arts, and is co-presented by Pattison Onestop and Amnesty International Canada.

About the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival - www.imagineNATIVE.org The imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, now in its 13th year, is an international festival that celebrates the latest works by Indigenous peoples at the forefront of innovation in film, video, radio and new media. Each October, imagineNATIVE presents a selection of the most compelling and  distinctive  Indigenous  works  from  around  the  globe.  The  Festival’s  programming, industry events, panel discussions, and cultural and social events attract and connect filmmakers, media artists, programmers, buyers, and industry professionals. The works accepted reflect the diversity of  the  world’s  Indigenous  nations  and  illustrate the vitality and excellence of our art and culture in contemporary  media.  This  year’s  Festival  runs  October  17-21, 2012 at the TIFF Bell Lightbox.

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Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative Posted By Gail Chiasson On 15 October 2012

Pattison Onestop [1], imagineNATIVE [2] and Amnesty International Canada [3] are co-presenting Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative from October 15 to 21, 2012: four one-minute videos created by Canadian Indigenous artists: Jesse Gouchey & Xstine Cook, Lisa Jackson, Cara Mumford, and Angela Sterritt.

[4]

The national project of the four commissioned works celebrate and honour Indigenous women and their contributions as strong, successful and valued members of society. Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative will play on the Pattison Onestop subway screens to over 1 million Toronto’s  daily  commuters,  nationally  on  digital  monitors  in  shopping  centres  across  Canada,  at  the   Calgary International Airport, and TIFF Bell Lightbox.

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Snare - Spotlight on Director Lisa Jackson The Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative (SSDI) exhibit starts today as part of theimagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival. SSDI is an artistic commission of four one-minute digital works made by award-winning Canadian Indigenous filmmakers. The films celebrate and honour Indigenous women and shed light on the hundreds of unsolved cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal women across Canada. zeeBigBang spoke with director Lisa Jackson about her short film Snare, which can be seen on TTC Subway screens across Toronto starting on Monday, October 15, 2012.

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Jackson’s Snare is a performance-piece that captures the brutality of violence against Aboriginal women. According to Jackson, the idea for Snare just popped into her head and she ran with it. We asked her what were some of the challenges in making a one-minute silent project.

Still from Snare. Photo by Michael Labre. “Because  the  idea  was  fairly  contained,  it  was  all  achievable  from a story perspective and it was really doable in a minute and in a silent format. On the execution side, it was a lot of work, in particular the task  of  actually  hanging  the  women  upside  down.  We  didn’t  do  visual  effects  to  hang  them  upside   down, we actually hung them upside down. That required stunt people and rigging. It was intense. I was also aware that I had to take care of their physical safety and their emotional safety as well. Physically it just took a lot of time to get them up there and I could only hang them for a minute and a half at a time. Just coordinating everything to fit in those one minute increments of shooting time was challenging,”  explained  Jackson. According to Jackson, only one of the women in Snare is a professional actor. The rest were chosen from an audition of over 45 women who have been touched in some way by the issue. “Once  you  get  into  aboriginal  experience,  these  are  very  shared  histories,  most  if  not  all  of  these   women have personal connections to the issues so they were bringing all of that to their performance,”  said  Jackson.  “There  was  a  great  feeling  of  contribution  amongst  the  cast  and  crew.”

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The cast of Snare smudging sweetgrass to begin the shoot day. Photo by Michael Labre. “People  were  coming  from  far  away.  Two  of the women in the film are actually from a reserve in Washington. Once the word got around that this film was happening, there was a huge amount of community  help  to  get  people  to  come  out  to  the  audition,”  said  Jackson.  “I  really  like  these  women.   They have incredibly compelling faces and they were a joy to have on set. Even though it was sort of a performance  piece,  it  felt  grounded.  People  took  the  issue  that  it  was  based  on  seriously.” Jackson got into filmmaking through her love of research. “I  really enjoy  the  research  area,  specifically  in  theme  or  subjects  that  I’m  interested  in.  I  just  dig  in,  in  a   big way to find out who the characters are, what the background is, what the context is, what the story is and what the settings are. I just fill my mind with all of that stuff and usually a story or theme emerges  from  that,”  explained  Jackson. She explains her creative process as something that changes with every project. She says almost everything  she  does  is  based  in  a  “documentary  instinct”  with  a  commentary on social issues. “I’ve  worked  on  so  many  different  types  of  films;  for Snare it was completely based on images. I just get  the  pictures  coming  to  my  head  and  a  mood.  Then  there’s  the  development  of  the  idea  and  trying   to  execute  it.” Snare will screen on more than 300 Pattison Onestop subway platform screens across Toronto and at the TIFF Bell Lightbox leading up to and during theimagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival from October 15 – 21, 2012.

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imagineNATIVE’s  Stolen  Sister  Initiative Posted by Urban Native Girl on September 4,

First Contact by Ange Sterritt imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival is presenting the Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative (SSDI) an artistic commission and national exhibition of four, one-minute digital works by award-winning Canadian Indigenous filmmakers celebrating and honouring Indigenous women and their contributions to the Canadian social fabric. This very exciting and cool digital artistic project is the first time the Festival has partnered to present a simultaneous exhibition on a national scale. SSDI will  be  shown  throughout  Toronto’s  subway  system,  on  254  digital  monitors  in  malls   across Canada, at the Calgary International Airport, and at the TIFF Bell Lightbox leading up to and during the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, October 15 – 21,  2012.  The  four  artists  are  ….  *drumroll  please*: 1. Snare, a stylized acrobatic tableau by filmmaker Lisa Jackson (Anishinaabe) 2. When it Rains, a spoken word dance piece by filmmaker Cara Mumford (Metis/Chippewa Cree) 3. Like It Was Yesterday, a documentary graffiti animation by artists and filmmakers Jessy Gouchey (Cree) and Xstine Cook 4. Your Courage Will Not Go Unnoticed, an animated mural piece by artist and journalist Angela Sterritt (Gitxsan/Lax Gibu) Here’s  the  thing.  Animation  is  expensive  right?  So  that’s  why  Artist  Angela  Sterritt  started  an  IndieGoGo  campaign  to  pay   her animator to transform her large acrylic paintings into an animation film. Here is the campaign link so you can help a sister  out  and  not  only  will  you  get  warm  fuzzies,  you’ll  also  be  able  to  see  what  you  contributed  to  right  in  front  of  your very eyes on a subway platform, at the airport, or while shopping for some new jeans. Just think of how great it will feel when  you  can  say  to  yourself  ‘I  made  that  happen’  while  you  are  strolling  around  your  city.  

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Web-based and Installation New Media Works Presented at ImagineNATIVE Fest 2012 The 13th annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, October 17 – 21, 2012, presents an innovative and engaging collection of new media programming throughout its 2012 festivities. All FREE to the public, these include web-based works, public exhibitions and gallery installations. “New media works by Indigenous artists remain a vital component of imagineNATIVE,” say Jason Ryle, Executive  Director.  “Innovation  and  adaptation  to  new  technologies  have  been  inherent in the work of Indigenous  artists  worldwide  for  centuries.  We’re  excited,  as  always,  to  showcase  a  selection  of  these   digital, web-based  and  installation  works  at  imagineNATIVE.” The  Festival’s  selection  of  web-based new media works is available now through www.imagineNATIVE.org and from October 18-21, 2012 at the Radio & New Media Lounge at the TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King St. W). They  include  two  new  works  by  Cheryl  L’Hirondelle  (http://spiderlanguage.net)  and  Archer  Pechawis  &   Sheila Urbanoski (http://lovingthespider.net) honouring and re-imagining the groundbreaking interactive website isi-pîkiskwêwin-ayapihkêsîsak (Speaking the Language of Spiders) created by Ahasiw Maskegon-Iskwew.  L’Hirondelle  features  for  a  second  time  with  NDNSPAM.com  along with artists Jennifer Wemigwans (Wampum Interactive), Beth Aileen Dillon (Ginebigoog Ezhi-ayaajig/The Nature of Snakes), and Leena Minifie (Sense of Home). Their work is joined by new creations by The Ullus Collective (The Picto Prophesy Project) and The Indigenous Routes Collective (Indigenous Routes). In partnership with A Space Gallery, imagineNATIVE presents Concealed Geographies, a group exhibition featuring the works of KC Adams, Jason Baerg and Justine McGrath along with three new works commissioned  exclusively  for  this  exhibition  by  Cheryl  L’Hirondelle,  Merritt  Johnson,  and   Nigit’stil  Norbert.  Concealed  Geographies  is  on  now  until  October  27,  2012  at  A  Space  Gallery  (401   Richmond St. W., Suite 110). An artist talk and reception takes place October 19, 5:30pm. The Festival also presents a special sneak preview installation of De Nort, an artistic collaboration between imagineNATIVE, the National Film Board of Canada, Vtape and ITWÉ Collective (Kevin Lee Burton, Caroline Monnet and Sébastien Aubin). This interactive installation preview takes place October 17-20 at VMAC Gallery (401 Richmond St. W., Suite 452), and in discussion Saturday, October 20, 10:30am at the TIFF Bell Lightbox.

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The  Stolen  Sisters  Digital  Initiative  (SSDI)  is  the  Festival’s  first simultaneous national exhibition and presented in partnership with Pattison Onestop and Amnesty International Canada. Four commissioned one-minute silent digital works reflecting on the strength and importance of Indigenous women by artists Jesse Gouchey & Xstine Cook, Lisa Jackson, Cara Mumford and Angela Sterritt will be screened on more than 300 Toronto Transit Commission subway monitors to over one million viewers daily and nationally on 254 digital monitors in 33 shopping centres across Canada. The films have an accompanying website driving viewers to a resource page featuring artists, issues and links to organizations  to  find  out  more  about  the  history  and  movement  surrounding  Indigenous  women’s   rights. Join new media artists and thinkers for Alternative New Media on Screen, an innovative and interactive screening and discussion on Saturday, October 20 at 10:30am at the TIFF Bell Lightbox ($7/FREE to students/seniors/underemployed).  A  selection  of  the  Festival’s  alternative  and  new  media  offerings   will be presented by attending artists, followed by a lively discussion on the creative and technical processes behind their works. This screening is followed by the Alternative Audiences and Interactive Storytelling panel, moderated by Steven Loft, at 1:00pm at the TIFF Bell Lightbox.

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http://www.mediaindigena.com/lisa-charleyboy/arts-and-culture/go-native-again-this-fall-withimaginenative-2012 Media Indigena

Go  Native  again  this  Fall  with  imagineNATIVE  2012! BY LISA CHARLEYBOY, ON OCTOBER 13, 2012

It’s  that  time  of  year  again,  the  time  when  the  leaves  begin  to  fall and we reluctantly bring out our boots and heavy coats. But fall also happens to be my favourite time of year because that means the annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival is just around the corner. I like to think of it as NDN country’s  TIFF  (Toronto  International  Film  Festival).  Films,  celebrities,  parties — what’s  not  to  like? A showcase of new works by Indigenous artists at the forefront of innovation in film, video, radio and new media, the imagineNATIVE festival is celebrating its 13th year. From October 17-21, 2012, events will take place at venues across downtown Toronto — many at the beautiful TIFF Bell Lightbox — with the recently-restored Bloor Cinema hosting opening night. “I  am  proud  of  what  we  at  imagineNATIVE  as  a  team  have  done  this  year,”  says  festival  Executive   Director  Jason  Ryle.  “We’ve  really  put  together  a  really  strong  collection  of  programs  and  events  for   the community. We always keep at the forefront our mandate and our responsibilities — not just to the  artists,  but  also  to  the  community  and  our  audiences,”  says  Ryle.  “I  think  a  large  part  of  our  success   has  been  our  devotion  to  that  mandate,  and  clarity  and  focus  in  terms  of  what  we  do.” With all the artistic expression and inspiration that it offers, imagineNATIVE is one of those festivals that gets digitally inked into my calendar year after year, not only for its fantastic films and events, but also the friendships that form there. Here are some of the highlights of the festival that  I’ve  selected  from its exciting lineup of films, workshops, and events. Admission to the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival ranges from $7 for an individual ticket to $110 for  a  festival  pass.  Hope  I’ll  see  you  there! *** Opening Night: The People of the Kattawapiskak River 66


This  year’s opening night screening offers an enriching experience in the world premiere ofThe People of the Kattawapiskak River, directed by Alanis Obomsawin. This feature takes the viewer beyond the housing and poverty headlines of Attawapiskat First Nation to get a fuller glimpse of life on this northern Ontario reserve. The Opening Night Party following the screening will be at The Brant House on King Street West, so be sure to wear your best town clothes.

Friday Night: Canned Dreams According  to  imagineNATIVE’s  Jason  Ryle,  “If   there  was  one  film  that  I’d  like  to  see  again   is Canned Dreams [by Saami filmmaker Katja Gauriloff].  It’s  an  incredible  documentary,   really masterfully made, and the content of the  documentary  is  very  current.  It’s  a  film   that  we  can  all  relate  to,  but  it’s  also   something  that  we’ve  never  really  considered   before. I really like work that takes something everyday and completely flips it and makes us think about things that we never thought about,  and  that’s  whatCanned Dreams does.”

Saturday Night: The BEAT The annual music night at imagineNATIVE is always a fan favourite, a night where not only film festival participants  congregate,  but  all  of  Toronto’s  urban  Natives  too.  It  is  definitely  the  event  where  you   show off your new mukluks, or that medallion  beadwork  you’ve  been  waiting  to  wear  for  just  the  right   occasion.  This  year,  ‘The  BEAT’  concert  features  blues  rocker George Leach and contemporary-folk singer/songwriter Nick Sherman. It is sure to be a stomping good time.

Closing Night: The Lesser Blessed A film that won many hearts during its premiere at TIFF is The Lesser Blessed, adapted from a story by Dogrib (Tlicho) authorRichard Van Camp and starring Benjamin Bratt, Tamara Podemski, and Kiowa Gordon (of Twilight fame). This dramatic feature film, set in the Northwest Territories, is a youthful coming of age story with a hint of grit. Following the screening, the Closing Night Awards Show (hosted by actor Billy Merasty) at the Mod Club Theatre will award $25,000 in cash and prizes to many deserving artists in a number of categories.

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http://www.nowtoronto.com/movies/story.cfm?content=189181

Native truths Rounding up the best First Nations flicks By NORMAN WILNER ImagineNATIVE FILM + MEDIA ARTS FESTIVAL at TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King West), to Sunday (October 21). See Indie & Rep Film. imaginenative.org. After opening earlier this week at the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema, the ImagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival settles into the TIFF Bell Lightbox for a run of features, documentaries and shorts addressing the lives and concerns of First Nations peoples all over the world. A  particular  standout  is  Tim  Wolochatiuk’s  drama We Were Children (October 18; rating: NNNN). A number  of  documentaries  and  even  a  feature  or  two  have  been  made  about  Canada’s  residential   schools program, which removed native children from their families and sent them to Catholic- and Anglican-run schools bent on turning them into good little Europeanized drones – often punishing them brutally when they failed to follow the program. Folding interviews into a dramatized narrative, We Were Children tells the true stories of Glen Anaquod  and  Lyna  Hart  as  representative  of  tens  of  thousands  of  similar  experiences,  but  it  doesn’t  do   the sanctimonious finger-wagging so common in Canadian historical dramas; it just plunges us into the nightmarish situation with its young heroes. I  was  surprised  to  find  Katja  Gauriloff’s Canned Dreams (October 19; rating: NNN)  on  the  schedule.  It’s   a Finnish documentary about the international labour that produces the ingredients in a can of European ravioli: tomatoes from Portugal, beef from Poland, pork raised in Denmark and slaughtered in Romania, and so forth. It’s  a  more  focused  version  of  Nikolaus  Geyrhalter’s  spellbinding  factory  farming  doc  Our  Daily  Bread,  if   Geyrhalter had been a sadist bent on driving the viewer from the auditorium. It also has minimal First Nations content, making its inclusion in this festival seem a bit of a stretch. Michael  Melski’s Charlie Zone (October 19; rating: NNN) takes a generic action template and makes it feel – well, if not  fresh,  then  at  least  lively.  Glen  Gould  (DaVinci’s  City  Hall)  stars  as  a  fallen  boxer  hired   to  rescue  a  young  woman  (Charlie  St.  Cloud’s  Amanda  Crew)  from  a  crack  den,  a  job  that  naturally   turns  out  to  be  more  complicated  than  it  first  appears.  It’s  cheaply  made,  but  the  leads’  strong   performances  compensate  for  the  production’s  ragged  edges. The  festival  closes  with  Anita  Doron’s The Lesser Blessed (October 21; rating: NN), a dull coming-of-age drama  that  premiered  at  last  month’s  Toronto  Film  Festival. Set  in  a  remote  town  in  the  Northwest  Territories,  it’s  the  sort  of  movie  that  gets  made  because  it   ticked  the  right  boxes  on  some  Telefilm  bureaucrat’s  list.  The  hero  is  a  sensitive  First  Nations  teenager   (Joel  Evans)  with  a  buried  secret  who’s  infatuated with a pretty classmate (Chloe Rose) and befriended by a volatile newcomer (Kiowa Gordon). But Doron seems more interested in creating striking images than in working with her actors, and the teen stars are utterly at sea.

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http://www.thegridto.com/culture/film/imaginenative-film-media-arts-festival/

ImagineNATIVE  Film  &  Media  Arts  Festival BY: JASON ANDERSON Oct 17-21 at various theatres. It’s  a  nice  gesture  that  the  programmers  of  this  year’s  ImagineNATIVE  Film  &   Media Arts Festival have turned their opening-night gala into a kind of minicareer retrospective. Not only is the festival screening The People of the Kattawapiskak River—the latest film by Alanis Obomsawin—but  it’s  being  preceded  by Christmas at Moose Factory, the 1971 short that started the venerable  Canadian  filmmaker’s  career.  (The  films  screen  on  Oct.  17,  7  p.m.  at  Bloor  Hot  Docs  Cinema.) Beyond  showcasing  Obomsawin’s  durability,  the  double-header is a smart pairing: Both films deal with native settlements on the shores of James Bay. Christmas at Moose Factory is a kind of mood piece, combining a little girl’s  narration  with  crayon  drawings  to  give  a  child’s-eye view of the community—one that still works, 40 years later,  to  collapse  the  sense  of  distance  between  the  director’s  subjects  and  a  hypothetical urban viewer. The  switch  at  the  end  to  actual  photographs  of  Cree  families  doesn’t  contradict  the  scribbled,  two-dimensional aesthetic: If anything, it gives the film a beguiling dual vision. The People of the Kattawapiskak River is less poetic  and  more  methodical:  It’s  an  overview  of  the  housing  crisis   that made headlines in 2011 and the ensuing media crush that resulted in all kinds of partisan posturing in Ottawa. Obomsawin summarizes the positions and interests of the various power players and then hunkers down with members of the Attawapiskat settlement, who seem reluctant to slide into their externally prescribed roles as victims. If the film is conventionally made, it still works effectively within that framework—it’s  engaging   without being overwrought. Not all of the offerings at ImagineNATIVE are so serious-minded. The genre-oriented Witching Hour Shorts program (Oct. 19, 11:30 p.m., TIFF Bell Lightbox) is highlighted by the Swedish entry, Retaliation for a Greater Good, a concise, dialogue-free thriller centred on a very valuable (and very dangerous) book. There are even pulpier pleasures on display in Charlie Zone (Oct. 19, 9:15 p.m., TIFF Bell Lightbox), which concerns a down-onhis luck Aboriginal boxer hired to pluck a poor little rich  girl  out  of  a  crackhouse.  It’s  a  bit  like  an  East  Coast  gloss   on Taken, with  a  strong  performance  in  the  lead  from  Glen  Gould,  who’s  got  the  battered  tough-guy thing down pat—he looks like he can take whatever the filmmakers can throw at him, which turns out to be plenty.

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http://ca.news.yahoo.com/imaginenative-opens-alanis-obomsawins-distinctive-lens-150846962.html YAHOO News Canada

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http://nationtalk.ca/story/jason-ryle-executive-director-of-imaginenative-film-media-arts-festival/

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Toronto.com - Listing

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http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/movies/article/1272430--imaginenative-festival-drama-outof-trauma

ImagineNative  Festival:  Drama  out  of  trauma Published on Tuesday October 16, 2012 Jason Anderson Special to the Star When it comes to discovering the breadth and depth of aboriginal cinema, Toronto moviegoers have had no shortage of opportunities in recent months. An ambitious series that ran all summer long,  TIFF  Bell  Lightbox’s First Peoples Cinema demonstrated the vitality and diversity of cinematic visions  by  the  world’s  indigenous  filmmakers.  Now  the  Lightbox  is  one  of  several  venues playing host to ImagineNative,  the  city’s  annual  showcase  of  film,  video  and  new  media  by  aboriginal   peoples.

The  fest’s  13th  edition  begins  on  Wednesday  at  2  p.m.  with  a  welcome  gathering at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto. As for the five-day  program’s  on-screen component, it opens with a strong  double  bill  of  new  and  old  works  by  one  of  Canada’s  foremost  documentary  filmmakers.   In The People of Kattawapiskak River — which makes its world premiere on Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema — director Alanis Obomsawin creates a stark but sympathetic portrait of the Attawapiskat community in northern Ontario, whose desperate housing crisis and struggles with poverty continue to be national news.

And just as Obomsawin did in Christmas at Moose Factory — her debut short from 1971, which also  plays  ImagineNative’s  opening  gala  — the director expresses a keen interest in the children of the  community.  It’s  deeply  affecting  to  see  them bundled up in blankets and sweatshirts as they contend with the cold that has little trouble penetrating their makeshift and dilapidated homes.

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Another new film at ImagineNative recounts the sufferings of earlier generations. Drawn from the experiences of two survivors, We Were Children uses a combination of first-person narration and dramatic reenactments to portray horrific abuses that occurred in residential schools in Saskatchewan  and  Manitoba  in  the  late  1950s  and  ’60s. In fact, some scenes may be so upsetting to viewers that the festival has partnered with theTruth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada to have health support workers trained to address residential school trauma on hand at the screening at the Lightbox on Thursday at 7:30 p.m.

Thankfully, not every event at ImagineNative requires such sensitive handling. Viewers can expect something more playful from Tweet This!, a program of short films by young filmmakers, and Unsettling Sex, a set of experimental works that includes a new video by the reliably provocative Kent Monkman. Other moviegoers may savour the oddly serene experience of watching Tibetan herdsmen demonstrate the many uses of yak feces in a documentary with the highly appropriate title ofDung.

In another thoughtful gesture, ImagineNative has even created a program to suit busy travelers. Visible until Oct. 21 on the 300-plus screens located on subway platforms throughout the TTC are four new one-minute  videos  that  were  commissioned  by  the  festival’s Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative. Other programs, panels, events and exhibitions — including a show of prints by Alanis Obomsawin at Open Studio — demonstrate  ImagineNative’s  eagerness  to  venture beyond the confines of movie screens and forge new connections between artists and the people they hope to engage and embolden.

The ImagineNative film and media arts festival runs Oct. 17-21.

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http://notable.ca/nationwide/shop/Executive-Reads-Jason-Ryle/

Executive  Reads:  Jason  Ryle By: Notable Posted in: Shop - Nationwide || October 17, 2012, 3:00 pm Jason Ryle is the Executive Director at imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, which will take place this year from October 17 though 21. Jason oversees all aspects of the organization including programming, operations, finance, and the annual Festival. He sits on the Board of Directors for Vtape, an independent video distributor, and is a script reader for The Harold Greenberg Fund, which provides financial aid to Canadian filmmakers. As an award-winning writer, Jason has written for the Smithsonian Institution and numerous publications throughout North America. A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry Rohinton Mistry has long been one of my favourite authors (years before Oprah book clubbed him, I feel it's important to add). I have yet to travel to India physically but truly feel I know this beautiful country and its people through his words. There's a love and a tenderness in how he writes about the terrible circumstances that happen to good people in A Fine Balance. I read this novel when I was relatively young and its central message that life is "a fine balance between hope and despair" has resonated with me ever since. The Line of Beauty by Alan Hollinghurst Nick Guest, the central character of Hollinghurst's Booker Prize-winning Thatcher-era novel, is someone I strongly identify with, much to my chagrin. Spending my childhood between cultures and countries often made me feel like an outsider. And like Nick Guest (his surname clearly speaking to his lot in life) I was an observer rather than a participant in certain social settings that enticed and repelled in equal measures. But unlike Mr. Guest, the travel I've done for work that has taken me around the world has given me a different, positive perspective on where I fit in (and where I don't). When I think of this book it reminds me what a powerful gift becoming an adult can be. The Chrysalids by John Wyndham I am a proud sci-fi and comic book nerd so I can't let 'proper lit' steal all the thunder. The brilliant His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman almost made the cut, but I'm choosing The Chrysalids as my final notable novel. Written sometime when the Earth was still cooling (c. 1955) this sci-fi treat is one of the rare books I re-read every few years. I'm a sucker for anything post-apocalyptic (not sure exactly what this says about me) and the 10-year-old me loved that it was set in what was once Newfoundland & Labrador. Its story of evolution, acceptance, and escaping rural life still continue to capture my imagination.

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http://noticias999.com/a/1969801/documental_diez_veces_venceremos_participar%C3%A1_en_festi val_imaginenative_film_media_arts_en_canad%C3%A1

Documental  “Diez  Veces  Venceremos”  participará  en  Festival   “ImagineNATIVE  Film  +  Media  Arts”  en Canadá Posted on 28 de septiembre de 2012 http://adkimvn.wordpress.com/author/adkimvn/ El  Festival  “ImagineNATIVE  Film +  Media  Arts”  es  un  evento   cinematográfico indígena y de artes mediáticas, que se celebra anualmente en Toronto en el mes de octubre, con el primer festival en 1999. Es un festival internacional que recopila los últimos trabajos de los pueblos indígenas en la vanguardia de la innovación en el cine, el vídeo, la radio y los nuevos medios, presentando una selección de las obras de todo el mundo, que reflejan la diversidad de los pueblos indígenas e ilustran la vitalidad y la excelencia de nuestro arte y la cultura en los medios de comunicación contemporáneos. Sinopsis Documental: Acusado de un acto terrorista y encarcelado a raíz de una protesta en apoyo de los derechos territoriales Mapuche, Pascual Pichun escapa y huye a Argentina, donde vive en el exilio político. Siete años más tarde, Pichun hace la valiente decisión de regresar a su patria Mapuche en Chile, consciente de las posibles consecuencias de su regreso a casa. Después de cruzar la frontera clandestinamente, Pichun se reencuentra con su familia, explora su territorio tradicional y se enfrenta a la invasión cada vez mayor de las empresas multi-nacionales. Diez Veces Venceremos documenta las experiencias de un joven cuya fuerza, pasión y amor por su pueblo y su territorio lo convierte en un símbolo de la resistencia Mapuche contemporánea. Argentina  •  76  minutos  •  DVCAM Mapudungun y español con subtítulos en inglés Director: Cristian Jure Productor: Pascual Pichún Además de ser protagonista de este documental, Pascual Pichun (Mapuche) también es productor de la película. Él sigue siendo un activista, periodista y profesor de la Universidad de La Plata en Argentina. Proyectado como una parte de: Spotlight Internacional de la Nación Mapuche II Sábado, 20 de octubre 14:00 TIFF Bell Lightbox Distribuidor: FBA UNLP Página del Festival: Imagine Native

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http://thetfs.ca/2012/10/18/imaginenative-review-toomelah/ Toronto Film Scene

18 Oct2012 THE AUTHOR

imagineNATIVE Review:Toomelah PAM FOSSENCOMMENTS (2) SHARE

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Ivan  Sen’s  new  film, Toomelah, a look at the life and choices of a young boy in a remote community of Australia, will screen as part of imagineNATIVE 2012. Ten-year-old  Daniel  doesn’t  seem  to  have  a  lot  of  options  the  tiny  town  of  Toomelah,  a  former  outback   mission.  He  doesn’t  like  school,  so  after  a  few  scrapes  with  the  other  kids  and  his  teacher,  he  decides   not to bother going back. His parental figures  have  pretty  much  checked  out,  and  he  can’t  go  a  day  in   town without someone telling him what a disappointment his father is. Friendship and guidance comes from the local drug dealer and his small posse of thugs. It begins to go to hell, with Daniel caught in the middle, when another drug-dealing gangster returns from prison to reclaim his territory. From the opening credits of the film, over images of half-lit old athletic trophies, director Ivan Sen sets the tone. Daniel is searching for a male role model, someone to help him find his way to manhood. Alternately  bored  and  angry,  Daniel’s  search  yields  nothing  but  examples  of  faded  and  former  glory.   Sen  has  constructed  the  film  to  evoke  Daniel’s  boredom  and  emptiness,  something  shared  by  most  of   Toomelah’s  inhabitants.  Slow  moving  shots  pan  around,  but  very  little  usually  happens.  As  the  limitless   Australian  terrain  looms  in  the  background,  one  is  struck  with  the  sense  that  Daniel’s  life,  by  contrast,   has nothing but limits. Though  it’s  a  dramatic  work  of fiction,  it  looks  and  feels  like  a  documentary.  Sen’s  use  of  mostly  nonprofessional (and extraordinary talented) actors from nearby communities creates totally believable characters.  It’s  bleak  and  honest,  and  frequently  maddening. Is Toomelah Essential imagineNATIVE viewing? A fascinating but slow-moving coming of age film, Toomelah is essential viewing for anyone interested in films about the Australian experience. Toomelah Screening Times Saturday, October 20, 2012 at 7:00 pm at TIFF Bell Lightbox. More About This Movie Toomelah Trailer

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http://thetfs.ca/2012/10/17/imaginenative-review-my-louisiana-love/ Toronto Film Scene THE AUTHOR

imagineNATIVE Review: My Louisiana Love KRISTAL COOPERCOMMENTS (0) SHARE

Monique Verdin has a deep love for Lousiana, a place she lived as a child and returned to as an adult. Her  Father’s  family  is  descended  from  the  Houma  Indians,  and  after  graduating  high  school,  Verdin   moves in with her Grandmother in St. Bernard Parish to  begin  a  video  document  of  the  “old  ways”  that   the  Houma  used  as  a  way  to  live  off  the  land.  As  she  becomes  more  entrenched  in  her  descendants’   culture, she begins to look into the modern advancements that are threatening to suck her beloved Lousiana dry. As Lousiana is hit by Hurricane Katrina, then Rita and then the BP oil spill, Verdin finds 79


herself becoming an environmental activist, documenting the rapidly disappearing land and the many native people in Southern Louisiana Who are being affected.  As  Verdin  notes  in  the  film,  “I  can  see  how   the illness of our land and waters breeds illness on our people but our love ties us to this place and makes  us  feel  responsible  to  care  for  it.” A truer title for a film could not have been chosen. Verdin documents her adoration and respect for Lousiana and its people, as well as her love for her family who have lived in Louisiana for over a century. In providing us with a brief history of the Southern Lousiana native settlers and her family, and in documenting their struggle to stay close to the land despite the ever-disappearing coastline, she very eleoquently communicates just why we should care about them too. This would make an excellent companion piece to 2008 Katrina documentary Trouble the Water, to get a complete picture of just how devastating the hurricane was and how much it continues to affect Louisiana and its residents. You can tell that Verdin and Director Sharon Linezo Hong have put their hearts and souls into My Louisiana Love and  you’ll  be  hard-pressed not to fall completely in love with both the Verdin clan and Lousiana as seen through their eyes. My Lousisiana Love screens as part of the Rising Tides: Environmental Program at imagineNATIVE 2012. Is My Louisiana Love Essential imagineNATIVE Viewing? Yes.  Anyone  who’s  ever  loved  a  place  as  though  it  were  a  family  member  will  more  than  relate  to  this   documentary.  It’s  a  small  but  extremely  affecting film that you may not have another chance to experience on the big screen. My Lousiana Love Screening Times 

Sunday, October 21,2012 at 3:15pm at TIFF Bell Lightbox More About My Lousiana Love My Louisiana Love Trailer

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http://thetfs.ca/2012/10/18/imaginenative-2012-review-dung/ Toronto Film Scene

18 Oct2012 THE AUTHOR

imagineNATIVE Review: Dung WILLIAM BROWNRIDGECOMMENTS (0) SHARE

Director Lance No documents the lives of one family living on the Tibetan Plateau in Dung, screening at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival. Being resourceful is an important part of daily life on the plateau, and yak dung has become the most important piece of the puzzle. Showcasing the endless 81


amount of uses for dung, this documentary gives a very interesting look into the different ways that people use to survive. The idea of this film may turn certain viewers off, but the final result is a visual wonder. Filmed on the Tibetan Plateau, Dung offers viewers a look at the incredible scenery that welcomes the inhabitants on a daily basis. The film also gives audiences a greater understanding of how important little things that we tend to ignore or dispose of can be. Without yak dung, the people living on the plateau would be unable to survive. They use it to build walls, doghouses, and coolers to keep meat fresh. It helps keep the stove burning, as well as protecting it from cracking. Burnt dung ash is mixed with medicine for horses, to make it more effective and to help it last longer.  They’re  even  able  to  sell  it.  It’s  astounding  what  it  can  be  used  for.  The  only  problem   with the film is there is no explanation given to anything. By the end, there are a lot of questions that don’t  get  answered,  and  it  would  have  been  a  much  more informative documentary with some sort of narration. Is Dung Essential imagineNATIVE Viewing? This  film  lies  somewhere  in  the  middle.  It’s  fascinating  to  watch  what  dung  is  used  for,  although  it  may   seem  a  bit  disgusting  to  some  viewers,  but  there’s  such  a lack of information in the film that it suffers. A documentary should not only show us something we may not know, but it should also offer us information  about  what  we’re  viewing. Dung falls short in that respect, leaving viewers with too many unanswered question http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2012/10/18/attawapiskat-film-opens-imaginenative-festival-in-toronto/

Attawapiskat  film  opens  imagineNative  festival  in  Toronto NATIONAL NEWS | 18. OCT, 2012 BY APTN NATIONAL NEWS | 0 COMMENTS APTN National News The imagineNative Film Festival kicked off Wednesday night in Toronto. The festival highlights Indigenous filmmaking. Renowned filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin will unveil her latest work, a film on Attawapiskat. http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/10/18/imaginenative-opens-with-_n_1980487.html 82


ImagineNATIVE  opens  with  Alanis  Obomsawin's   distinctive  lens Alanis Obomsawin brought fans to their feet in Toronto Wednesday night, as the Canadian filmmaking icon helped kick off the ImagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival with her new doc about the crisis in Attawapiskat. “You  make  me  feel  like  I’m  coming  home,”  she  told  the  crowd  about  its  warm  welcome, after ascending the stage. Obomsawin’s  documentary  film  career  has  spanned  four  decades  and  more  than  30  films.  Her  work  is  dedicated   to Aboriginal peoples and she chronicles First Nations experiences, but her exploration of social and political issues is of interest to all Canadians. Of Abenaki descent, she has received several honorary degrees and awards, including her appointment as an Officer of the Order of Canada. Her film Christmas at Moose Factory started off Wednesday night's screening and it definitely took the audience back.  It  was  her  first  short  film,  created  in  the  late  ‘60s.  The  film  presented  a  creative  take  in  documenting  the   lives of Cree children through their illustrations, renderings, and their own voices, as the children do the storytelling from their perspective. Presenting a distinct point of view is exactly what Obomsawin is known for and this was reiterated with the night's feature film. In her new doc The People of the Kattawapiskak River, Obomsawin offers the audience a glimpse into the previously untold story of community members from Attawapiskat First Nation in Northern Ontario. Last October, when Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence declared a state of emergency because of the state of housing on the reserve, the small community became the spotlight of media attention all over the globe. That  spotlight  wasn’t  always  so  friendly  and  many  media  stories  focussed  on  the  chief  and  council  of  the   community, placing the blame on them rather than exploring the issues at hand. The documentary captures the people who live in Attawapiskat, who share their stories and why they continue to live there despite some deplorable conditions. There is finally a personal touch to the tale, so vastly different than the mass media reports that emerged last fall. Despite the seemingly gloomy feel to the film, it offered a bright light of hope and change that was felt throughout the cinema. At the end of the screening, Obomsawin was joined on the stage by Spence, NDP MP Charlie Angus, and members of the Attawapiskat First Nation. There was a celebratory cheer in the air that must have contributed to her feeling at home in a theatre where her work, once again, was being warmly received.

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http://www.chinokino.com/2012/10/2012-imaginenative-film-media-arts.html

CHINO  KINO CINEMA, FILM INDUSTRY, MUSIC, ARTS

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012

2012 imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, Oct 17-21

The 13th imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival begins tonight with a gala screening featuring the world premiere of Alanis Obomsawin's The People of Kattawapiskak River at the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema (506 Bloor Street West). Beforehand, the festival will officially launch with a Welcome Gathering, a free event held at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto. The closing night presentation will be Anita Doron's The Lesser Blessed, which recently had its premiere at the 37th annual Toronto International Film Festival. In addition to many other screenings, the festival will host their always-memorable music night The  Beat  at  Lee’s  Palace,  and  many  industry  events  including  the  ROCK  YOUR  DOC!  Documentary Pitch Competition and the DRAMA QUEEN! Drama Series Pitch Competition. The 13th imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival continues to October 21, mostly at the TIFF Bell Lightbox.

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http://torontoist.com/2012/10/imaginenative-turns-lucky-thirteen/

OCTOBER 16, 2012 AT 2:30 PM CU LT UR E

imagineNATIVE Turns Lucky Thirteen The annual film and media-arts festival focuses on Indigenous stories. BY KIVA REARDON Alanis Obomsawin's new documentary, The People of Kattawapiskak River, will open the fest.

imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival Various venues October 17–21 Individual screening tickets $7 to $12 For imagineNATIVE, thirteen is no unlucky number. Established in 1998 by Cynthia Lickers-Sage, the annual festival of work by Indigenous filmmakers and artists has beaten the odds, managing to carve a niche  for  itself  on  Toronto’s  busy  film  calendar—and a meaningful one, at that. Part of its charm is the diversity of forms and genres that it encompasses: fiction feature films, documentaries, shorts, radio broadcasts,  music  videos,  and  art  exhibits.  Despite  being  a  film  festival  in  name,  imagineNATIVE’s  focus   has  never  been  on  the  medium.  It’s  about  the  stories. The  festival  begins  with  the  world  premiere  of  Alanis  Obomsawin’s  new  documentary, The People of the Kattawapiskak River. An acclaimed Canadian filmmaker (whose 80th birthday coincides with the festival), Obomsawin rose to prominence with her 1993 documentary on the Oka Crisis, Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance. Her work has centered on Indigenous rights, with the aim of sharing the stories of First Nations people—particularly those not heard (or actively ignored) in the mainstream 86


media. For her new work, Obomsawin journeys to Kattawapiskak River, 700 kilometres north of Timmins, Ontario, in Cree territory. Around 1700 people live in this remote community. One thousand of them are in need of homes. The documentary begins with a montage of Ministers of Parliament from all political parties tossing around  the  word  “Kattawapiska.”  By  presenting  politicians’  hollow  cries  for  more  housing,  Obomsawin   quickly establishes the disconnect between Ottawa and the very real crisis on the reserve. Tracing the Cree’s  long  history  of  disappointments  (beginning  with  Catholic  missionaries  and  pre-confederation heads of state, and ending in the present day), Obomsawin eschews talking to politicians. Instead, she focuses on those living and working in the Kattawapiska community. Her intimate interviews never reek of poverty porn or voyeurism. Instead, they give platforms to people who belong to demographics that are often talked about, but rarely listened to: a single father giving a tour of his condemned home; a teacher reduced to frustrated tears because her students have to choose between coming to class and adequate housing; a mother who dreams of her son becoming chief one day. Though the subject is dour,  Obomsawin  doesn’t  sentimentalize  it.  Instead,  she  captures  a  pragmatic  truth:  to  dream  of  the   future, one needs to be able to take root in the present. Kattawapiskak River is  paired  with  Obomsawin’s  first  film, Christmas at Moose Factory, a 1971 short comprised of simple illustrations drawn and explained by children from the titular community on James  Bay.  It’s  easy  to  write  off  the  short  as  “cute,”  but it dovetails with the themes expressed in Kattawapiskak River and  Obomsawin’s  other  works:  delving  into  the  untold  story,  giving  a  voice  to   those who are marginalized.

A snow-swept scene from The Tundra Book. The  festival’s  features  programme  offers a mixed bag. Not to linger on the bad, it suffices to say that Michael  Melski’s Charlie Zone aims for Flashpoint via The Wire, but lacks the basic tension of the former and the nuance of the latter. (Though fans of the short-lived prime-time soap Whistler will recognize  B.C.’s  Amanda  Crew.)  By  contrast,  the  documentary  by  Aleksei  Vakhrushev, The Tundra Book,  paints  an  illuminating  (and  often  funny)  portrait  of  life  on  the  Chukotka  peninsula  in  Russia’s   Arctic Circle. After a brief overview of the Indigenous population who live in the region, the on-screen 87


text  tells  viewers:  “So,  it’s  noon  in  Chaun  tundra.  -37  C.  Squally  wind.”  Though  seemingly  glib,  this   sentence sets the tone for the film, which captures the daily existence of Vukvukai, a 72-year-old deer herder.

Kaniehtio (Tiio) Horn plays a loutish Quebecker looking for cheap rez smokes. In  the  festival’s  shorts  programme,  one  of  the  strongest  is Da Smoke Shack, a satirical look at a day in the life of a cashier selling native cigarettes. Directed and written by Kaniehtio (Tiio) Horn, the short humourously lampoons the boredom, monotony, and isolation of smoke-shack work. Horn plays not only  the  cashier,  but  also  the  cashier’s  boyfriend  and  a  white,  loutish  Quebec  customer. Da Smoke Shack captures the frustrating  cyclical  nature  of  life  on  the  reserve,  concluding  with  the  line:  “Time  to   go  home  and  do  the  same  shit  I  did  all  day.”  Fittingly,  the  short  is  paired  with  an  excellent  documentary   on the subject of Native cigarettes, Smoke Traders. Closing night will feature The Lesser Blessed, which, having played at TIFF, might have less pull for serious  film  fans.  Adapted  from  Richard  Van  Camp’s  novel,  the  film  is  set  in  the  Northwest  Territories. It centres on Larry Sole (Joel Nathan Evans), a man who is bullied because of his past. The story is one of finding the balance between the present and the past. And this is merely the tip of the iceberg. After the festival kicks things off with a welcome gathering at the Native Canadian Centre, the space will host new media and digital installations (such as Concealed Geographies, a group exhibit which examines geography through an Indigenous lens) and an exhibition of  Obomsawin’s  prints,  which  have  never been displayed in Toronto before. So no matter what your style,  there’s  sure  to  be  a  story  that  speaks  to  you. Images courtesy of imagineNATIVE. CORRECTION: October 17, 9:37 AM This  post  previously  stated  that  the  character  Larry  Sole  is  “bullied  because of his native roots.”  He  is  in  fact  bullied  because  of  past  (burns  that  cover  his  body,  his  interest  in  metal,  etc.).  The  post  has  been  edited to reflect this.

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http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/10/18/imaginenative-film-festival-opens-with-tribute-to-alanisobomsawin-140775

imagineNATIVE Film Festival Opens with Tribute to Alanis Obomsawin By ICTMN Staff October 18, 2012 The 13th imagineNATIVE Film Festival opened Wednesday with Alanis Obomsawin's documentary 'The People of Kattawapiskak River.' The 13th annual imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival festival opened yesterday in Toronto, and the first screenings  showcased  the  work  of  a  filmmaker  who’s  been  documenting  Native  stories  for  over  40  years. Alanis Obomsawin, Abenaki, has made a career of chronicling the Aboriginal people of Canada in film, and the warm welcome she received upon taking the stage last night reflected the vast respect she has earned from the Native  film  community.  “You  make  me  feel  like  I’m  coming  home,”  she  told  the  audience,  according  to  a  report   at CBC.ca. First up was her first film, the 14-minute  short  “Christmas  at  Moose  Factory,”  first  seen  in  1971,  about  Native   children at the Horden Hall residential school. The feature presentation that followed, The People of Kattawapiskak  River,  is  Obomsawin’s  latest,  and  documents  the  living  conditions  of  the  Attawapiskat  First  Nation in the north Ontario. On  October  8,  2011,  the  Nation’s  chief,  Theresa  Spence,  made  global  news  reports  when  she ��declared  a  state  of   emergency. Many tribal members were living in tents or other inadequate housing, and with the onset of winter temperatures their lives were at risk. Attawapiskat quickly became a political football, the topic of the week for talking heads and editorializers. But little  was  being  done.  This  is  the  scene  as  Obomsawin  sets  it  in  her  documentary.  “By  presenting  politicians’   hollow cries for more housing, Obomsawin quickly establishes the disconnect between Ottawa and the very real crisis  on  the  reserve,”  reads  a  review  at  Torontoist.  Obomsawin  meets  with  the  people,  and  “her  intimate   interviews never reek of poverty porn or voyeurism. Instead, they give platforms to people who belong to demographics  that  are  often  talked  about,  but  rarely  listened  to.  …  Though  the  subject  is  dour,  Obomsawin   doesn’t  sentimentalize  it.  Instead,  she  captures  a  pragmatic  truth:  to  dream  of  the  future, one needs to be able to  take  root  in  the  present.” Obamsawin’s  strength  as  a  filmmaker  is  capturing  genuine  stories  from  the  unheard  — in a June interview for Wawatay  News  Online,  she  spoke  of  “the  art  of  listening.”  “To  this  day,  I  never  start  with  filming  people,”  she   said.  “When  I  go  and  see  them,  I  bring  a  tape  recorder  and  just  listen  for  hours.  …  I  never  get  tired  of  listening  to   people.”

Also published at: 89


13th Annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival Tuesday, August 28th, 2012 | Posted by shael Stolberg The imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival celebrates its 13th year October 17-21, 2012. Held in various venues in downtown Toronto, imagineNATIVE showcases new works by Indigenous artists at the forefront of innovation in film, video, radio and new media. The  Festival’s  Opening  Day  Celebrations  kicks  off  with  a  Welcome  Gathering  at  the  Native  Canadian  Centre  of  Toronto  (16   Spadina Road) on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 at 2:00 p.m. with remarks from imagineNATIVE, an honoured elder and traditional  singers.  imagineNATIVE’s  popular  Opening  Night  Gala  screening  returns  to  the  Bloor  Hot  Docs  Cinema  at  7:00   p.m. followed by the Opening Night Party at The Brant House (522 King Street West). “We’re  incredibly  excited  about  this  year’s line up as imagineNATIVE once again presents innovative, beautiful, challenging and  cultural  works  by  Indigenous  artists  from  Canada  and  around  the  world,”  says  Jason  Ryle,  Executive  Director.  “This   year’s  programming  includes  numerous  World  Premieres,  art exhibitions, industry events, and social gatherings for everyone.” Highlights  of  this  year’s  Festival  include  an  International  Spotlight  on  the  Mapuche  Nation,  one  of  the  largest  Indigenous   nations in Latin America. This Spotlight showcases riveting videos made by Mapuche filmmakers and addresses themes of land, culture, and resistance. New Media and digital arts continue to exert a strong presence in our lives and at the Festival, including the World Premiere group exhibition, Concealed Geographies co-curated by Suzanne Morrissette and Julie Nagam. This exhibition, held at A Space Gallery (401 Richmond Street West, Studio 110) from September 22-October 27, 2012, examines geographical places from Indigenous perspectives. imagineNATIVE is also proud to present De Nort, a stunning interactive digital work that provides a unique glimpse into life on a reserve. This World Premiere work is the first commission offered in collaboration with  the  National  Film  Board  of  Canada’s  NFB  Interactive. imagineNATIVE also celebrates a living legend with a rare solo exhibition of prints by acclaimed filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin. Never before presented in Toronto, a small collection of etchings made by Alanis over the last 30- years will be presented and available for sale at Open Studio (401 Richmond Street West, Studio 104) from October 18-21, 2012. imagineNATIVE continues its popular The Beat concert  on  Saturday,  October  20,  2012  at  9:00  p.m.  at  Lee’s  Palace  (529   Bloor Street West), and the Closing Night Awards Show on Sunday, October 21, 2012 at 9:00 p.m., hosted by actor Billy Merasty, where over $20,000 in cash and prizes will be awarded to 13 outstanding filmmakers and artists. The Festival also offers numerous artist talks, a FREE Industry Series of workshops and panels, screenings and exhibitions. Admission to the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival ranges from $7 for an individual ticket to $110 for a Festival Pass, in addition to many FREE events and screenings. There is truly something for everyone of all ages at imagineNATIVE! For more information, visit: www.imaginenative.org

http://www.northernstars.ca/News/01210220843_imagine.html#.UNE-4G-zj_h 90


http://thinkinganddreaming.ca/2012/10/18/the-people-of-the-kattawapiskat-river/

Thinking and Dreaming The People of the Kattawapiskak River Posted on October 18, 2012by fearlessanalyst

I sit here in my large, comfortable, well-heated  home,  almost  trembling  with  reverberation  from  seeing  Alanis  Obomsawin’s   film,  “The  People  of  the  Kattawapiskak  River”  at  the  ImagineNative  film festival in Toronto. Every Canadian needs to see it.

It’s  late,  and  I’ll  soon  hit  the  sack,  unworried  about  a  fire  starting  in  the  night  from  improper  wiring  or  an  overheated   makeshift stove. I  don’t  have  to  worry  about  the  approaching  winter  with  40  below zero cold but little insulation in my “temporary”  ‘emergency’  trailer. And  I  don’t  have  to  worry  about  feeding  or  clothing  my  children,  or  whether  they  soon   will lose our mother tongue – and our traditional survival skills, like snaring a rabbit.

I don’t  have  to  worry  that  when  I  wake  up  tomorrow  my  neighbour’s  adolescent  boy  may  have  died  of  alcohol  poisoning  or   suicide. Or in the final analysis, of boredom, and deep feelings of inadequacy, chronic depression, despair.

And to realize that most of this misery is the result of cruel  and  ignorant  exploitation  by  my  ancestors’  governments  and   churches. I feel shame, to the point of tears, whenever I am reminded of the residential school history.

You cannot, for example, take a young boy far away from his family and everything that is familiar and safe then, while he is already suffering from loneliness and homesickness, subject him to the additional cruelty of abuse, and expect him to become a strong, confident, emotionally healthy man who can lead his people to success and happiness. You are more likely instead to drive him to drink, a life of nightmares and terrible memories, misery, and early death.

“The  answer”  is  not  self-flagellation. We  can’t  undo  the  crimes  that  were  done. What wecan do is everything in our power to make amends including all the help and support that will ever be needed. There are many smart, impressive indigenous people trying to fix the wounds, in creative ways, but they need all the help they can get, because it was an emotional “bloodbath.” We owe at least this.

And Restitution. We should all be talking about this.

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http://tracingmemory.com/2012/10/19/i-heart-imaginative/

Tracing Memory I heart ImagiNATIVE October 19, 2012 Last night, I attended the opening night screening at ImagiNATIVE, the indigenous film and new media festival in Toronto. In short,  it  was  awesome.  Alanis  Obomsawin’s  first  film, Christmas in Moose Factory (1971) and her most recent film, The People of the Kattawapiskak River (2012) were screened. I feel I could write a lot about these two films, about how well they communicate so many things that are often so hard to express, about family life, about challenges and resilience, about colonialism and injustice, but also about optimism and hope. But, these days, most of my writing is targeted toward the dissertation, so instead, I will simply say that they are two wonderful films that I hope people get to see. To read a review, check out Lisa Charleyboy for the CBC. The festival has also  integrated  artwork  into  Toronto’s  urban  landscape.  While  waiting  for  the  subway   after  the  film,  I  saw  that  the  public  transit’s  screens  were  showing  artwork  dedicated  to  raising   awareness about and paying respect to the many indigenous women who are missing or have been murdered and whose cases remain unsolved. The art project is called the Stolen Sisters Initiative. ImagiNATIVE is on until Sunday. Check it out! More information on the Stolen Sisters Initiative from the artintransit website: National Exhibition by Indigenous Artists brings  Indigenous  Women’s  Rights  to  the   Forefront Pattison Onestop, imagineNATIVE and Amnesty International Canada co-present Stolen Sisters Digital Initiative (SSDI), a national project presenting four commissioned works that celebrate and honour Indigenous women and their contributions as strong, successful and valued members of society.

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The four one-minute, silent digital works were created by award-winning, Canadian Indigenous artists: Jesse Gouchey and Xstine Cook (LIKE IT WAS YESTERDAY), Lisa Jackson (SNARE), Cara Mumford (WHEN IT RAINS) and Angela Sterritt (YOUR COURAGE WILL NOT GO UNNOTICED). “I’m  honoured  to  be  selected to participate in the SSDI.  It’s  through  art  that  we  can  express  the  human   side  of  tragic  social  issues  like  this,  so  often  lost  in  news  coverage,”  says  Genie  award-winning filmmaker,  Lisa  Jackson.  “It’s  an  opportunity  to  recognize  the  women  at  the heart of the issue and to bring  an  awareness  of  the  violence  against  them  to  a  broader  audience.” SSDI will  play  on  the  Pattison  Onestop  subway  screens  to  over  1  million  Toronto’s  daily commuters and nationally on 254 digital monitors in 33 shopping centres across Canada, at the Calgary International Airport, and TIFF Bell Lightbox leading up to and during the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival. The  Festival’s  SSDI  webpage  (http://imaginenative.org/festival2012/SSDI) includes details on mall and shopping centre locations screening the SSDI, a resource page featuring artists, issues and links to organizations  to  find  out  more  about  the  history  and  movement  surrounding  Indigenous  women’s   rights. “The  passion  of  our  partners,  collaborators  and  artists  to  bring  attention  to  such  an  important  issue  to   potentially  over  2.5  million  viewers  is  an  unprecedented  opportunity,”  beams  Daniel  Northway-Frank, Programming  +  Industry  Manager.  “To  challenge  our artists to marry artistic style and social justice is a new and exciting venture. We hope this initiative adds a strong voice and attention to the Indigenous women’s  rights  movement  in  Canada,  and  spurs  action  and  awareness  through  creative  outlets  in   other  Indigenous  communities  and  countries  around  the  world,  which  sadly  have  similar  experiences.” The SSDI project  started  as  a  call  by  imagineNATIVE  and  its  partners  to  Canada’s  Aboriginal  artistic   community to conceive of a video piece creatively reflecting and responding to the Stolen Sisters, a term adopted by the Aboriginal community and larger social justice organizations of the struggle to find answers for the over 500 official (and arguably more) unsolved cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal women across Canada.

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http://revista.escaner.cl/node/6557

Kalül Trawün_Reunión del Cuerpo viaja a imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival en Toronto Jue, 10/18/2012 - 04:06 |

que se teje

Kalül Trawün_Reunión del Cuerpo viaja a imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival en Toronto

Esta obra fílmica de Francisco Huichaqueo expuesta y rodada entre el 17 de diciembre y el 15 de enero en la Sala de Arte MNBA Mall Plaza Vespucio, correspondiente al proyecto Museo Sin Muros viaja invitada al festival de Toronto imagineNATIVE Film Festival. En Kalül Trawün el artista aborda la temática del mestizaje y la relación entre el Estado y los pueblos originarios desde una postura distinta a la polaridad del nosotros y los otros.

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Desde 1998 imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival es un festival internacional emplazado en Toronto que promueve y difunde las creaciones más recientes de artistas indígena en la vanguardia de las innovaciones en cine , video, radio y nuevos medios. La programación del festival, las charlas y talleres atraen y conectan a los cineastas, artistas mediales , compradores, programadores y profesionales de la industria de todo el mundo. La diversidad de los trabajos en el festival es un reflejo de la diversidad de los pueblos nativos el mundo y deja de manifiesto la vitalidad y excelencia de sus creaciones. ImagineNATIVE está comprometido con la lucha en contra de estereotipos y mitos en torno a los pueblos indígena y es a través de esta plataforma que pretende mostrar sus perspectivas únicas e historias particulares . Kalül Trawün_Reunión del Cuerpo fue exhibida en el MNBA como obra en proceso, y su resultado, una pieza audiovisual homónima, consideró como elemento fundamental el registro de los visitantes a la muestra montada en la Sala de Arte Mall Plaza Vespucio en la comuna de La Florida. Esta propuesta se realizó de acuerdo al planteamiento de la curadora María José Rojas, perteneciente a la agrupación Kinoki, dedicada a la investigación de los lenguajes audiovisuales experimentales. Dicho colectivo hace énfasis en el distanciamiento cultural entre chilenos e indígenas y pone especial atención a las diferencias de los procesos creativos de los artistas influenciados por origen cultural. Este es el caso del artista Francisco Huichaqueo. Kalül Trawün_Reunión del Cuerpo se plantea como una instancia de diálogo entre el artista y el espectador, a la vez que entre la cultura chilena y la mapuche, conversaciones de los que Francisco Huichaqueo forma parte hace algún tiempo. Reconocido en el ámbito del cine indígena por su trabajo sobre la problemática e identidad mapuche, ésta propuesta se inserta en el circuito nacional e internacional del video arte, la animación y el cine ensayo. En MENCER, su obra anterior recién exhibida en el Primer Festival Indigena de Buenos Aires, Huichaqueo construye íntegramente la estructura e historia del film en base a imágenes presentadas en sueños y bajo la lógica onírica. En sus obras anteriores como Fuego en el Aire, Antilef La caída del sol y Che Uñüm_ Gente Pájaro, la presencia de los sueños era importante, pero el proceso se veía más matizado por preocupaciones estéticas de la academia occidental. Con el recrudecer del conflicto entre el Pueblo Mapuche y el Estado Chileno, surge con él una fuerte sensación de distancia, a veces inabordable, entre ambas cosmovisiones y nociones de bienestar, poder y desarrollo. Dentro de este contexto, y respondiendo al llamado de líderes indígenas de crear puentes entre las dos culturas y de sacar provecho de los estudios y conocimientos de los Mapuches cuyo destino ha sido el de 96


ir a la Universidad, y teniendo la convicción que este proceso de reconocimiento e independencia sólo se puede iniciar una vez que entendamos nuestras formas de ver y comprender el mundo, Francisco Huichaqueo decide dar una visión interna del proceso de creación de una obra audiovisual con herramientas creadas y explotadas por el mundo occidental pero bajo la inspiración y energía creadora de un Mapuche como forma de aportar a este reconocerse y respetarse como Otro.

Partiendo desde el supuesto de que la creación es un proceso en el que se está involucrado individualmente, pero también se está en contacto con una energía grupal, tribal y ancestral, entendiendo por esto que hay un conocimiento y sentido de pertenencia traspasado desde generaciones anteriores por vía de la sangre y de los sueños que entrega la orientación del trabajo, esta obra audiovisual será filmada dentro de la galería con presencia del público y posible participación de quienes estén dispuestos a entrar en una dinámica creadora con el equipo de filmación. Los personajes ejecutan acciones performáticas reaccionando a la energía y pulso del momento y de la situación, partiendo de cierto estímulo dado por el director a manera de susurro inspirador. No existe guión previo ni instrucciones propiamente tales, los márgenes de esta acción están dados por el contexto de la situación, por la relación con el público y con el director, de esta forma no podemos hablar de actuación y el resultado de la acción y de la filmación, en consecuencia, es imprevisible. Esta improvisación le otorga poder al performer, pero también al público asistente que, con su presencia, influye en el resultado de la obra. A través de este mecanismo se quiere vivenciar esta experiencia de la forma en que se hace un ritual, una ceremonia grupal, donde el espectador se convierte en parte de la tribu, experiencia fundamental en la concepción de la sociedad Mapuche, aportando a la creación de una imagen de la cultura indígena más allá del estereotipo folklórico difundido por la cultura occidental.

Enlace con sitio del festival: 97


http://imaginenative.org/festival2012/node/1871

Contacto: María José Rojas

mjrojas@kinoki.cl

Sinopsis: Esta obra da cuenta de una experiencia llevada a cabo en una galería de arte perteneciente al Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes instalada dentro de un centro comercial en la cuidad de Santiago. Se trabajó en conjunto a una familia en torno al concepto de la reunión Mapuche y el paisaje social actual. Las acciones corresponden a improvisaciones dentro de un marco general dado por el propio director dentro de el concepto del trawün mapuche. La participación del público durante la filmación es una clara manifestación de solidaridad e identificación con la lucha del pueblo Mapuche por sus derechos y dignidad. Título: Kalül Trawün_ Reunión del Cuerpo Dirección: Francisco Huichaqueo. Cámara: Francisco Huichaqueo, Paulo Fernández, Fernando Mendoza. Edición Francisco Huichaqueo. Duración: 25:min. Formato: Video HDV. Música: Rodrigo Contreras; Ignacio Fernández. Dirección de arte: Pablo Mansilla, María José Rojas Curatoría: María José Rojas. Interpretes: Malen Aniñir, Valentina Caniuñir, David Aniñir, Carolina Kabrapan, Rodrigo Contreras. Vestuario: María Jose Rojas, Carolina kabrapan, Francisco Ríos. Locación: Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de Santiago. Financiamiento: KINOKI, IACCTIS, CONADI y Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes. 2012

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http://www.elespectadorimaginario.com/noticias/filmes-mapuches-se-destacan-en-la-programacionde-imaginative/

Filmes mapuches se destacan en la programación de Imagine Native 17/10/2012

Por Pablo Gamba

Cuatro

filmes

de

realizadores

mapuches figuran en la programación del Festival de Cine y Artes de los Medios Imagine Native, que se realiza desde hoy hasta el 21 de octubre en Toronto, Canadá.

El festival dedica una sección especial a las películas de ese pueblo originario de Suramérica, en la que figuran los filmes Wallmapu, dirigido por Jeannette Paillán; Kalul Trawun, dirigido por Francisco Huichaqueo, y En el nombre del progreso, dirigido por Danko Mariman, de Chile, y Diez veces venceremos, producido por Pascual Pichún, de Argentina.

El programa también incluye Tatuushi, dirigida por Jorge Montiel, del pueblo wayuu de Venezuela; Silvestre Pantaleón, dirigida por Roberto Olivares, del pueblo maya de México; Narcisa, del colectivo indígena Cineminga de Colombia, y Entre dos aguas, dirigida por Ludovico Pigeon, de los pueblos que hablan quechua de Perú. Vaya a la página web de Imagine Native Foto: Kalul Trawun

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http://www.artes.uchile.cl/noticias/85842/francisco-huichaqueo-estreno-pelicula-enfestival-de-canada

El pasado sábado 20 de octubre:

Francisco Huichaqueo estrenó película en festival de Canadá En el marco del ImagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival de Toronto, el profesor del Departamento de Artes Visuales estrenó "Kalül Trawün_Reunión del Cuerpo", pieza audiovisual en la que aborda la temática del mestizaje y la relación entre el Estado y los pueblos originarios. "Quise construir una película en la galería, donde la ambientación y los escenarios fuesen una instalación de arte contemporáneo. Para ello, la Sala de Arte funcionará como un set, representando también el encierro y la reducción del cuerpo mapuche, como si fuese una especie de cárcel", señalaba Francisco Huichaqueo en diciembre de 2011 sobre Kalül Trawün_ Reunión del Cuerpo, propuesta expositiva que calificó como una obra en proceso y con cuya inauguración dio inicio al rodaje de la pieza audiovisual del mismo nombre que realizó íntegramente a partir de las escenas que grabó durante el periodo de exhibición de dicha muestra.

Así, entre el 17 de diciembre y el 15 de enero pasados, este profesor del Departamento de Artes Visuales obtuvo las imágenes que dan forma a su nueva producción, una propuesta que consideró como elemento fundamental el registro de los visitantes a esta exposición que fue montada en la Sala 100


de Arte que el Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes tiene en el Mall Plaza Vespucio y que, bajo la curatoría de la artista María José Rojas, se planteó como una instancia de diálogo entre el artista y el espectador, a la vez que entre la cultura chilena y la mapuche, problemáticas que Francisco Huichaqueo ya había abordado en trabajos anteriores. "No existe guión previo ni instrucciones propiamente tales, los márgenes de esta acción están dados por el contexto de la situación, por la relación con el público y con el director", explica María José Rojas respecto a cómo se trabajó en Kalül Trawün, agregando que "esta improvisación le otorga poder al performer, pero también al público asistente que, con su presencia, influye en el resultado de la obra. A través de este mecanismo se quiere vivenciar esta experiencia de la forma en que se hace un ritual, una ceremonia grupal, donde el espectador se convierte en parte de la tribu, experiencia fundamental en la concepción de la sociedad Mapuche, aportando a la creación de una imagen de la cultura indígena más allá del estereotipo folklórico difundido por la cultura occidental".

Kalül Trawün_ Reunión del Cuerpo se estrenó el pasado 20 de octubre en el ImagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, festival internacional que no sólo promueve y difunde las creaciones más recientes de artistas indígenas que trabajan en cine, video, radio y nuevos medios, sino que además, y a partir de los trabajos que allí se presentan, busca dar cuenta de la diversidad de los pueblos indígenas del mundo así como de la vitalidad y excelencia de su arte y cultura.

Texto: Isis Díaz López / Periodista Facultad de Artes Fuente: Comunicado de prensa Fotografías: Cortesía de Francisco Huichaqueo Lunes 22 de octubre de 2012

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http://www.chirapaq.org.pe/noticias/documental-indigena-entre-dos-aguas-sera-proyectado-encanada

Documental  indígena  “Entre  Dos   Aguas”  será  proyectado  en  Canadá 28TH SEP 2012 Corto documental de CHIRAPAQ Centro de Culturas Indígenas del Perú, competirá con lo mejor del arte audiovisual indígena del mundo. Película explora el impacto negativo del cambio climático en los pueblos andinos y amazónicos del Perú. El  corto  documental  “Entre  Dos  Aguas”,  producido  por  CHIRAPAQ  Centro  de  Culturas  Indígenas del Perú, competirá con audiovisuales indígenas de nivel internacional en la 13ava edición del ImagineNATIVE Film+Media Arts Festival que se realizará en Ontario, Canadá, del 17 al 21 de Octubre. Esta será además la única producción audiovisual indígena de Perú presente en el Festival. “Entre Dos Aguas”  expone  las  dificultades  que  enfrentan los pueblos indígenas del Perú frente al cambio climático: desde el incremento de las lluvias, pasando por el derretimiento de los glaciares hasta la pérdida de la biodiversidad. A través de las voces de los afectados, el corto dirigido por Ludovico Pigeon, concluye que pese a que los pueblos indígenas son los que menos han contribuido en causar este fenómeno, sí son los más afectados. 102


La película fue realizada gracias al apoyo de la organización indígena Tebtebba, aliada de CHIRAPAQ para promover la participación activa de líderes y pueblos indígenas frente a este problema desde el quehacer político así como el medioambiental. El ImagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival celebra los últimos trabajos de artistas y agrupaciones indígenas en la vanguardia de la innovación en cine, video, radio y nuevos medios de comunicación. Cada año, presenta una selección de los trabajos más atractivos y distintivos de los pueblos indígena de Canadá y el mundo. Es hoy considerado como uno de los festivales de arte audiovisual indígena más importantes del mundo y un evento imprescindible en el escenario cultural de Canadá. La presencia de CHIRAPAQ en este espacio ha sido posible gracias el apoyo de David Hernández Palmar, realizador indígena Wayuu de Venezuela. Desde hace ocho años CHIRAPAQ promueve la formación de comunicadores indígenas, así como la difusión del cine y video indígena en nuestro país, como estrategia para el reconocimiento de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas. Esta labor la realiza como miembro del Grupo Impulsor de la Coordinadora Latinoamericana de Cine y Video de los Pueblos Indígenas CLACPI. Para mayor información sobre el festival visite www.imaginenative.org

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http://adkimvn.wordpress.com/2012/10/28/obras-audiovisuales-mapuche-se-presentaron-en-festivalde-cine-y-nuevo-arte-imaginenative-de-canada/

Obras audiovisuales Mapuche se presentaron en Festival de Cine y Nuevo Arte ImagineNATIVE de Canadá Posted on 28 de octubre de 2012by adkimvn

(Toronto – Octubre, 2012) Cada año, el festival Canadiense de cine y nuevo arte imagineNATIVE se enfoca en artistas indígenas de alrededor del mundo. Este año fue el turno de la nación Mapuche, con las premieres internacionales de En el Nombre del Progreso, de Danko Mariman, Diez Veces Venceremos de Cristian Jure, la presentación de Wallmapu, de Jeannette Paillan y Kalul Trawun de Francisco Huichaqueo. Las cuatro obras audiovisuales presentadas, proporcionan una mirada general de las realidades de los Mapuche en la sociedad contemporánea Sudamericana y su cultura. Ademas de mostrar los filmes, estos fueron acompañados de un panel en el que los cineastas invitados charlaron acerca de los problemas que representa ser un cineasta indígena en América Latina. Las Obras Audiovisuales en el programa especial de imagineNATIVE incluyeron: En El Nombre Del Progreso * Premier Internacional* Director: Danko Mariman 104


Quien define la noción de progreso? Para muchos Mapuche vivir en la región de la Araucanía en el sur de Chile, el concepto capitalista – y la búsqueda agresiva – del progreso está en oposición con sus formas de ver la vida. Producida con financiamiento exclusivo de Mariman, este es un documental con una perspectiva cien por ciento activista. Wallmapu Director: Jeannette Paillán Cubriendo más de 400 años de historia, Paillan da una visión general de esta misma desde la perspectiva Mapuche, desde los tiempos del primer contacto con los españoles Esta explicación compleja de la colonización y continua resistencia en territorio Mapuche es la esencia de Wallmapu. Kalul Trawun Director: Francisco Huichaqueo A través de un lente innovador, Huichaqueo documenta una pieza de arte performance montada en un centro comercial de Santiago. Un paisaje evocativo de sonidos es tejido con escenas del documental así como con imágenes poéticas que en conjunto le proporcionan una voz a la lucha Mapuche por su tierra y sus derechos culturales. Esta pieza de performance, puesta en escena por una familia, está basada en el concepto Mapuche de Trawun o unión refleja una fuerte creencia en la conexión de el cuerpo físico con el mundo natural. Diez Veces Venceremos * Premier Internacional* Director: Cristian Jure Acusado de actos de terrorismo y encarcelado después de una protesta a favor de los derechos sobre el territorio Mapuche, Pascual Pichun escapa a Argentina, donde vive en exilio político. Siete años después, Pichun toma la valiente decisión de regresar a su tierra natal en Chile, teniendo en cuenta las consecuencias potenciales de su viaje. Diez Veces Venceremos documenta la experiencias de un joven, cuya fuerza, pasión y amor por su gente y territorio lo hace un símbolo de la Resistencia Mapuche contemporánea. Panel Industria Creativa de imagineNATIVE Junto con los estrenos mundiales, se realizó un panel ante la industria creativa indígena internacional – moderada por Rodrigo Ardiles de la Comisión Fílmica Lacustre de la Araucanía, en los Studios del TiFF Lightbox. La temática de la presentación  “La  experiencia  de  Filmar  en  territorios  indígenas   en América Latina”. 105


http://www.yepan.cl/canada-mapuche-spotligth-en-el-inaginenative-2012/

Canadá:  Mapuche  Spotligth  en  el  InagineNative  2012 POR ADMIN – 19 OCTUBRE, 2012

Danko Mariman y Francisco Huichaqueo en el Estreno Mundial de Realizadores Mapuche imagineNATIVE 2012 – Toronto, Canadá

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imagineNATIVE FESTIVAL CONTEST Get Engaged with the ImagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival!

Press +1 and the13th Annual imagineNATIVE Festival want to see you at the weekend happenings in Toronto. Win a Double guest pass to the Festival for October 20th and 21st! Head over to our FACEBOOK PAGE and tell us what you're most excited to see at imagineNATIVE. Just leave us a comment or post on our Press+1 Facebook page with your answer. A winner will be picked randomly from our entrants on October 19th, 2012. You can enter on our FACEBOOK PAGE HERE

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imagineNative Wraps with Awards (October 22, 2012 - Toronto, Ontario) The imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival marked  a  triumphant  close  to  the  world’s  largest   festival honouring indigenous filmmakers. Awards and honourable mentions were offered up at a special presentation last night hosted by award-winning  actor  Billy  Merasty,  at  Toronto’s   Mod Club. The documentary, My Lousiana Love won the coveted Alanis Obomsawin Best Documentary Award. The 60-minute film traces photographer Monique Verdin's quest to find a place in her Native American community as it reels from decades of environmental degradation. It's a look at the complex and uneven relationship between the oil industry and the indigenous community of the Mississippi Delta. "We had more sold-out screenings at our festival than ever in its history," said a beaming Jason Ryle, Executive Director of imagineNATIVE. "The attendance to not only the films, but all our events this year, were phenomenal. There is nothing more fulfilling than bringing the many talented and creative Indigenous artists from Canada and around the world right here to our Festival for everyone to see, and from the looks of our growing audience, they like it too." Following is the complete list of awards: Shaw Media Mentorship Program Jules Koostachin NFB/imagineNATIVE Digital Media Partnership In the Similkameen Tyler Hagan Drama Pitch Prize This is Skye Eva Thomas and Roxanne Dodge Documentary Pitch Prize Pull Out Your Guns Sarah DeCarlo

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BEST MUSIC VIDEO Sides Director, Mosha Folger BEST EXPERIMENTAL Her Silent Life Director, Lindsay McIntyre BEST CANADIAN SHORT DRAMA A  Red  Girl’s  Reasoning Director, Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers BEST SHORT DRAMA Throat Song Producer, Stacey Aglok MacDonald BEST SHORT DOCUMENTARY – HONOURABLE MENTION Language of Love Director, Marie Clements BEST SHORT DOCUMENTARY Songline to Happiness Director, Danny Teece-Johnson BEST RADIO Trailbreakers: Cindy Blackstock Producer, Angela Sterritt BEST NEW MEDIA Sense of Home Artist: Leena Minifie THE CYNTHIA LICKERS-SAGE AWARD FOR EMERGING TALENT Scar Director, Tiffany Parker BEST INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE PRODUCTION AWARD Throat Song Producer, Stacey Aglok MacDonald THE ELLEN MONAGUE AWARD FOR BEST YOUTH WORK Le Joie De Vivre Director, Jérémy Vassiliou BEST DRAMATIC FEATURE Charlie Zone Producer, Hank White THE ALANIS OBOMSAWIN BEST DOCUMENTARY AWARD HONOURABLE MENTION Young Lakota Executive Producer, Heather Rae THE ALANIS OBOMSAWIN BEST DOCUMENTARY AWARD My Louisiana Love Producer: Monique Verdin

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Charlie Zone big winner at imagineNATIVE festival October 22, 2012 by Etan Vlessing

http://playbackonline.ca/2012/10/22/charlie-zone-big-winner-at-imaginenative-festival/

Writer/director  Mike  Melski’s  First  Nations  crime  drama Charlie Zone was the big winner at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival on the weekend, taking the best dramatic feature prize. Melski’s  second  feature  sees  Glen  Gould  as  a  washed-up boxer hired to abduct a runaway from a crack house  in  Halifax’s  notorious  Charlie  Zone  neighbourhood. Charlie Zone producer  Hank  White  picked  up  the  imagineNATIVE  trophy  for  Melski’s  follow-up to Growing Op. Other  award  winners  included  Sharon  Linezo  Hong’s My Louisiana Love, produced by Monique Verdin, taking the Alanis Obomsawin best documentary award, with Young Lakota earning an honourable mention. Other  winners:  Mosha  Folger’s Sides for best music video,  Lindsay  McIntyre’s Her Silent Life for best experimental film, Elle-Máijá  Tailfeathers’ A Red Girl’s Reasoning for best Canadian short drama and Danny Teece-Johnson’s Songline to Happiness for best short documentary.

Read more: http://playbackonline.ca/2012/10/22/charlie-zone-big-winner-at-imaginenativefestival/#ixzz2FcfiDLJ2

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imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival 2013 - press summary