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Christopher Fernandez 2 0 0 8 - 2 0 1 4

S e l e c t e d

W o r k s

graduate University of Cincinnati undergraduate University of Florida


CV Chri st ophe r F e r n a n d e z

EDUCATION University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH Masters of Architecture, 2013, GPA: 3.8

chrisfz87@gmail.com + 1(239) 898-7549 www.cfzdesign.com www.linkedin.com/CFZ

I find myself laughing when looking back at my history and the obstacles that I was faced with, wondering exactly how I made it to where I am. Supporting my way throughout undergraduate and graduate, I worked an average of thirty hours a week at Geek Squad and side jobs, and yet finished in the top of my class. Through all these forces in my life, it was architecture that allowed me to escape. The endless amount of information, multitude of possibilities, and the ability to express my creative side to create a better place. My past has instilled a determination and focus to continue to push to be the best. One may say the reason why I am bald has to do with my genetics, or because I am constantly pushing myself to be better, but I blame it on my lovely fiancee soon to be wife 05.24.14. : )

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University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Bachelor of Design in Architecture, 2010, GPA: 3.8 Brevard Community College, Palm Bay, FL Associate of Arts, 2007, GPA: 4.0

PUBLICATIONS & AWARDS University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH Design Excellent Award, 2011-2014 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Honorable Dean’s List 2017 - 2011 AIAS / AARP Creating Community Competition, Honorable Mention, Sept. 2010

EXTRACURRICULAR AARP American Association of Retired Persons at the University of Cincinnati, member AIAS The American Institute of Architecture Students at the U. of Florida and U. of Cincinnati, member

Winner of Luminaire Design Competition, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Published works: Architrave 19 & 21: Stratification

Design Teaching Assistance at UF for Architecture Design Studio, Spring 2010

EXHIBITIONS AIAS Forum 2010 “Connective Constructs” Toronto, Canada: December 2010 Gallery Exhibition at U. of Florida. Design 1 through 7 displayed.

University of Florida Architecture home page, Design 8 project Pavilion


EXPERIENCES

SKILLS

Kohn Pedersen Fox, New York, NY May 13’ ~ August 13’ Assisted in the master planning, and design for a 55,000 SQ. M. Cultural Center in BangKok, Thailand. The program encompass a mall, museum, six theatres, and 2,000 seat concert hall. The project requires 3D & 2D drawling’s, renderings, area calculations within a two month deadline. Choeff+ Levy P.A. , Miami, FL Jan 13’ ~ August 13’ Assisted in designing, building 3D & 2D, and rendering pertinent to client specifications per several competitions. Managed several projects at all different phases: Schematic, DD’s, CD’s, and permitting. Manage and updated software and hardware issues.

Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects, Seattle, WA Intern Architect - Health Care, Edu. Institutions, and Commercial Completed DD & CD’s documents on a Cath. Laboratory. Worked with the design team on multiply competitions creating concept drawings, models presentation boards.

January 12’ ~ March 12’

Architecture Incorporated, Fort Myers, FL Schematic Designer, Health Care & Civic Buildings Assisted in the schematic design for the Imaginarium in Fort Myers, FL.

August ~ September 11’

Geek Squad at Best Buy, Gainesville, FL, Computer Technician - Job requires high knowledge in hardware and software to be able to diagnose and repair laptops, computers, and televisions. Marketing Designer - Design the sign-age used throughout the store, and district.

99% Rhinoceros 85% Revit 99% Google SketchUp 99% Autocad Architecture 99% Adobe Photoshop 70% Adobe Illustrator 90% Adobe InDesign 70% Autodesk 3dsmax 99% MS Office 99% MS Excel 95% V-Ray Single Renders 80% Grasshopper 80% Adobe Premiere 70% Adobe After Effects 80% CNCing 90% Laser cutting 90% 3d printing 80% Websites

REFERRALS For the privacy of my fellow coworkers, referrals are available upon request. Contact information can be found on the back cover. Thank you.

Jan. 08’ ~ August 11’

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Copyright Š 2014 by Christopher Fernandez

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 01

FABRICS

Urban Catalyst

15 Programmatic

Void

Rethinking Retirement

09

HISTORICAL DISTRICT 21 31

21

Acknowledging

01

Responding to URBAN

Fracture

Charleston Atheneum

35 REinventing 39 Axial 41 Connective

Home

Armature

Constructs

49

Symbiosis

51

Semperian XX

Juxudio

Out of Failure

57

Irvine Residence

59

Isaias Residence

63 Traasdahl

57

PROFESSIONAL WORK

65 BangKok

49

Influenced by TECTONICS

XX

35

Within LANDSCAPE

Residence

Cultural Center

v


1


The Urban Catalyst Revitalizing Urban Fabric through

Manhattan, NY

Hell’s Kitchen

Site

Hyper-Urbanization New York City, NY In collaboration with Misagh Abdoliseisan Design 7 - Fall 2010 Critic: Prof. Albertus Wang

By capturing the revitalizing effect of activating a Manhattan block through hyper-urbanization, new urban possibilities - in a cross programmatic fashion - are created. The animated infrastructure of the block sets up a vigorous urban threshold which dynamically shuffles urban programmatic elements with those of anti-urban quality in order to interplay the contrasting interests which would eventually draw enormous volumes of metropolitan traffic and advantageous congestion to the area. The existence of numerous retail and commercial elements throughout Tenth Avenue and the lack thereof throughout Eleventh Avenue has created a programmatic, and therefore experiential, opposition; which bears a negative impact on the vitality of the urban fabric and the value of properties occupying the urban edge of the avenue. The diversion of urban congestion across 44th and 45th streets to Tenth Avenue, stimulating the activation and occupation of the urban edges of the avenue, creates a certain programmatic dialogue with the more populous zones of New York City and an experiential equilibrium from the street occupants’ perspective.

2


The hyper-urban edge of the block, receiving relatively heavy congestion from Tenth Avenue, feeds the traffic via the interior operations and the exterior peripheral conditions to its opposite side in Eleventh Avenue. This hyper-urban operation necessitates its own dialectic converse in order to create an anti-urban void, which shapes the peripheral urban maneuvers of the street edges bearing commercial and retail programs. This anti-urban void, behaving as a casual mall, can potentially host a multitude of cross programmed interactions of various collective activities which nourish and ensure the dynamic vitality of the urban programmatic elements.

Institutions

Vacant

3

Industrial

Residential

Traffic Flow

Commercial

Urban

Commercial

Anti Urban

School + Office

Hyper Urban

Residential

Railroad

Restaurant


Ribs

Enclosure

Exterior Skin

Void Core

Structure

Plates

Skin

4


The pedestrain view of the muti-layered nature of the programtic conditions happening along the urban edge

The Podium, that serves as the base of the building, also serves as a division between the residential and commercial towers. The intricate joints at the intersection of the two towers creates experiential gathering spaces that are further activated by its correlation to the building. Cuts in the building respond to the angles of the podium, allowing natural light to inhabit the space.

1

5

View of podium pealing from the ground, revealing vehicular transportation route to the parking garages


Viewing the vertical continunity

6


The undulating facade of the towers create aid in creating voids and interaction between the two. The point of convergence of the two towers houses a bridge that serves as the main circulation between them. This bridge proceeds to manipulate itself through the construct creating a core.

WEST

7

SOUTH

EAST


11

NORTH

8


Play

M ie ov

Rethinking Retirement Chair: John E. Hancock

With a large amount of the population entering retirement within the next two decades, reevaluating the perception of a “retirement community” is vital to accommodating baby boomers’ core values: health and wellness, community engagement, service, and recreation. Baby boomers, “the most skeptical, innovative, and technologically savvy generation” will demand more innovative retirement communities that will allow them to (a) “age in place” while retaining access to all levels of medical care, (b) carry out their daily lives with “walkable” access to everyday commerce, (c) participate in socially and intellectually stimulating intergenerational activities, and (d) reflect the values of sustainability and environmental ethics in their life choices. This thesis will present the design of an innovative retirement community in Naples, Florida, based on interdisciplinary research on the major problems with aging, in particular isolating communities, the changing nature of retirement, and common aging illnesses. Through a contemporary, vibrant urban district approach, this will instill walkable, intergenerational, healthy, and active community values that will prolong and enrich the independent active lifestyle for the third-stage of life, addressing both the problems and the expectations of the aging Boomer generation.

9


Dis er

trict

Gr e

Wa t

m

Square

Co

nity mu

C at

ircle

PARK

PUTT PUTT

Golden gate parkway

BRIDGE

GIANT SCULPTURES

SCULPTURE ALLE

ROOFTOP POOL

NT RA

TRAILS

BIKING WALKING

ART DISTRICT

RES

TAU

GROCERY

UNDERGROUND

PARKING SIGN-AGE

REHABITATIO HOSPITAL HUB

RESTAURANT

SMART CAR PARKING

COFFEE GARDEN

TIAL

RESIDEN

E SHOP

COFFE

MUSEUM

Y

LIBRAR

PRIVATE COURTYARD

ENCOUN

OL ZO ANIMA

MARTK

ET

G

THE GREAT CIRCLE

RESTAURANT WATCH TOWER

POOL

ZOO

E ENAD

PROM

STORAGE

GOLF ISLAND

FOOD COURTYARD

THERIN

GIFT SHOP E

LAG TER VIL

RESIDENTIAL

COMM MANCE UNITY GA RS

FARME

T

CLUB HOUSE SECURITY

HARBOUR PUTT PUTT

ZOO DISTRIC

MAIN ST. NURSINGN

T

PERFOR

RETAIL SHOPS SECURI TY

SECURITY

RAN

CANOE RENTAL

WATER DISTRICT RIVER STREET

RESIDENTIAL

AL

ENTI RESID

PRIVATE

PROTECTED NATURE PRESERVE

RESTAURANT

SECURITY

NAPLES HIGH SCHOOL

MALL ST.

HOTEL

AU

MUSEUM

APPLE

WORK

PARKING

RESIDENTIAL

SHOPS

E SHOP

COFFE

TECH DISTRICT

UNDERGROUND

PUTT PUTT

RE ST

CONTINUING EDUCATION

GARDEN PLAYGROUND

SHOPPING

Golden gate parkway

Th e

o Zo

ZOO

REGION BUS

LOCAL BUS

NEIGHBORHOOD SHUTTLE

BIKE RENTAL

ZIP CAR

10


Public

The section illustrates the co-dependent relationship between the built and natural environments. “We humans are now a ‘superspecies’, making personal and national choices that together will determine the world our children will inherit and the fate of the world’s other species. The urban layout makes use of more human power and creates a less-resource intensive lifestyle. Renewable energy technology and nature’s processes are expressed through out the design, from geothermal systems that heat and cool the infrastructure to solar panel systems that take advantage of Florida’s sun throughout the year. In addition, natural systems are used, such as outdoor wastewater treatment, natural detentions, intensive and extensive green roofs, and rain gardens to cleanse the ground water. These simple functions that may have a large upfront cost, but have proven to pay for themselves in the future. Statistics show that homeowners are willing to spend up to 20% of their home value to incorporate these systems.

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Bus lane

Water Table

Walking path

Public Parking


Semi-Private

Private terrace

Semi Public

Sem-Private

pool Smart car parking

Walking path

Bike lane

Seating / Putt Putt

Smart Car Parking

Museum

Mech. Grey Water & Geothermal

Bike lane

B.O.H.

Walking path

Retail

Customization to adapt to all ge the building allows walls to exp the user needs. Allowing them t

12


Facade Study in Elevation Insitutional Promoting Self Identity a transition from Institutional Facade Study in Elevation Institutional

Vertical

Horizontal Verticle Horizontal Hybrid

Monolithic

Slice Slice

Shift Shift

Slice

Shift

Irregular Individual

Irregular

Materiality Applied to all Break Materiality Break

Inter-Program Inter-Program

Irregular

Materiality

Inter-Program

Hybrid Diagonal Diagonal Precedent Precedent

Grid Spacing Parking Width Grid Spacing Parking Width

Facade Study in Section Insitutional

Individual

Facade Study in Section Insitutional

B

13

B

Applied to all

Individual

Precedents

Verticle

Horizontal

Insitutional Monolithic Monolithic

Individual

Monolithic

Slice

Shift

Individual Irregular

Monolithic

Slice

Shift

Irregular

Break


Current retirement facilities are institutional. The following diagrams illustrate design strategies to help prevent an institutional quality. Beginning on the left (monolithic), all the windows are duplicates of each other; there isn’t any facadiel variation to inform or welcome visitors. Individuality increases in the columns to the right, where the spaces become more of a representation of the user inside. There is a sense of welcome brought though this aesthetic. By slicing the volume, it begins to break down the scale and reduce its apparent mass. Shifting also plays a role in breaking the scale. To the far right, an irregular system is also unfamiliar, so that it causes curiosity, and begins to entice visitors. There are other methods that can be applied to these figures. By changing the materiality, creating breaks, and intermixing the program, things move closer towards an individualistic building aesthetic. This methodology can be used to design all the buildings.

14


15


Green Space

Congestion Map

The Programmatic Void

URBAN DEVELOPMENT Revitalizing Urban Fabric through Hyper-Urbanization New York City, NY In collaboration with Misagh Adoliseisan Design 7 - Fall 2010 Critic: Prof. Albertus Wang

The contextual data gathered from the district, and more specifically the site surrounding, suggest the proposal of The Urban Catalyst as a means to enhance the community life and contribute to the cultural spirit of the neighborhood. The Urban Catalyst proposal endeavors to incorporate culturally significant factors specific to the region of the building site into the design methodology, and interconnect them with the programmatic nature of the block. The verticality can create an escape from the congestion of the streets. It also provides a mediator and anchor. All of these attributes of the context contribute into the thought process behind the development of this design. The construct seeks to create a place of refuge within the vigorous city block, while still being mindful of the conveniences of the area.

Residential

Commercial

Hell’s Kitchen District

Transportation

16


Restaurant Permanent Living Hotel Private Garden

Garden

Theatre

Lobby

2

Commercial / Retail

17

West To East Section


Pedestrain view of the garden 1

1

Lobby 2

North To South Section

18


19


Skin

The exterior form of the building mimics Manhattan’s grid-like fabric. A spatial axial armature located within the core begins to penetrate the exterior grid-like surface from all sides, revealing and exposing apertures within. This penetration begins to form key gathering spaces within the building; including, outdoor courtyards, a kitchen, and a theater. The interaction with the core of the building creates a hierarchy for these spaces;as well as, a visual connection. The central vacuos core of the building creates various cracks on the exterior facade as it turns away from the center in a swirling motion creating a dynamic spatial condition from within that allows several of the programmatically active pods in the spatial sequence to fluently connect to each other

Core

Volumes

20


FRACT URE Bloomfield, MI Graduate - Q 2011 Critic: Bob Burnham

In the 1920’s, Eliel Saarinen designed the School of Cranbrook, a private school for K-12, in Bloomfield, MI. Since it’s conception, the program of Cranbrook changed from the way Saarinen predicted; and the school began to expand their programs. The Natatorium, designed by Todd Williams, lies at the west end of the Grand Allee, terminating it. This project is a Wellness Center that will support the body, mind and spirit of the students, faculty and community. The diagramming the site forces and faults within Cranbrook. The Wellness Center is designed as a catalyst to strengthen the ideas of Saarinen. Cranbrook Wellness center blends within its context, reestablishes the grand allee axis, and creates a foreground for people coming to Cranbrook and through the Friendship Gates. The building is a direct result of its site forces. To the right is a movie that walks you through Cranbrook. Quote from Critic Prof. Burnham : “This building has a simple yet powerful influence on the campus of Cranbrook, Saarinen would be proud.”

21


Play

M ie ov

22


Chinese Dogs

Natatorium 2

Parking

D

3

Parking

Friendship Gate

Existing The chosen site is located on the Northern edge of the Cranbrook School for Boys and Academy of Art in Bloomfield, MI - in what is called by the campus as the Grand Allee,The Grand Allee is defined by the Natatorium on the West side and the Chinese Dog statue on the East. The Grand Allee is defined by the hard, man-made facade of campus on the South, and the natural landscaping on the North. Proceeding down the Grand Allee from the Natatorium, several elements begin to dissect into the Grand Allee. Analyzing site forces, dictated the placement of the Wellness Center in the Grand Allee.

23

Visual Axis | Disconnection + Axis

Depature/Arrival Point | Unceremonious

Parking | Insufficiency + displeasing to the eye

The visual axis along the Grand Allee disappears at certain points. When standing at the Natatorium (Image 1), there is a clear view down the Allee, only because Todd Williams and Billie Teisen elevated their end to help reconnect the visual axis. As you proceed down the Allee towards the round-about, (Image 2) the view of the Chinese Dog Statue disappears because of the bluff that was created when they constructed the roundabout. Continuing up the bluff, the statue.

The Friendship Gate is the main entrance into Cranbrook, because of the location of the round-about just north. The round-about serves as main vehicular drop off/pick up point for the buses, faculty, and parents. This unattractive unceremonious poor round-about is position off the axis of the Friendship Gate, utterly ignoring Saarinen vernacular language of registration.

Parking is an evolving controversial issue as the campus begins to reach out into the community by exposing the works produced by their students, additional of programs, and popularity of their recreational sports. Located along the south end of the Grand Alle just in front of the Boy’s dormitories are eighteen parking spaces reserved for employees, and handicap personnel. With the nearest public area located at the edges of campus, a mile west of the Natatorium. This calls for a reposition and revaluation of future parking for employees and visitors, who are drawn to the Natatorium and Welness center.


Proposed Visual Axis- Re-sloping the Grand Allee with the help of retention walls begins to reconnect the visual axis from the Natatorium to the Lion statue. Faculty Road- reconnecting pedestrian circulation to Cranbrook

Transition circulation into Grand Allee - Circulation within Cranbrook end at nodes wether its a fountain or a statue reminiscing the history of Cranbrook. Utilizing a water feature or statue will help transition the schools circulation with the Grand Allee.

D

Departure point - By removing the Turn around from cutting through the Grand Allee allows celebrating entrance into the Grand Allee.

24


Friendship Gate Axis

POOLS

WET SAUNA Roundabout

Axis

CHANGING ROOMS

DRY

CHANGING ROOMS

LIBRARY

The Wellness Center uses the same language as the Natatorium in how

WAITING AREA CAFE

it receives the Grand Alle. Both the Natatorium and the Wellness Center respond to the axis of the Grad Alle. The axis that runs from South to

RECEPTION

North through the Friendship Gates is carried through to the layout of the Wellness Center. It divides the plan from private on the left (offices,

OFFICES

25

bedrooms, library) and active programs to the right.


North Elevation faces away from Cranbrook and towards the ever green pine. As the facade begins to peal from both sides, this gives the occupants visibility to the natural environment and allows northern light to filter through. The undulating angular structure mimics the irregular ever green trees in the foreground.

South Elevation is many opaque for two reasons. The Wellness center program does not call to take away from the Grande Allee but should assist in strengthening the Grand Allee axis. Secondly the wellness center is a place to escape, so blocking out distractions and giving privacy is vital for occupants who seek repair. Just offset from the middle on the brick wall, a thin rectangular reflection spot, which reconnects the axis that cuts through the Friendship Gates into the campus.

26


Roof - intensive green roof providing a reduction to co2 emissions Tertoary - 10’ x 8’ exterior perforated copper panels rain screen that is being held up by the secondary system

Secondary - Independent system columns spaced eight feet apart hold up a diaphragm of steel U-shape channels which houses: drywall, insulation, and HVAC

Primary - Carries all the forces from the roof and floor to the ground

27


Rain

The program is split in half with the wet program (showers, changing rooms, pool, sauna) located on the first floor and dry spaces(Studio, massage rooms) located at the second floor.

28


Biomimetic Techtonic Light Modulator

Interlocking within the Kalahari Desert Namibia, South Africa D4 - Spring 2009 Critic: Prof. Alfonso Perez-Mendez

Unique seaweed found in the ocean has several intriguing characteristics to examine. The strong vertical axis establishes a structure; while the tectonic horizontal planes are spaced according to its biological genetics. The multitude of changing begins to create complex qualities of layers that start to play with how matter is collected and passed through. By distilling this organism, and analyzing it to understand and develop a synthetic understanding of a sea weed in a pre-fabricated mindset.

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30


Charleston Atheneum

Contextual Integration within a Historical Fabric Institution for the promotion of Literary or scientific learning Charleston, SC Design 6 - Spring 2010 Critic: Prof. Guy Peterson

The Charleston Atheneum is located at the intersection of East Bay and Brandon Street in Charleston, South Carolina. The form of this building responds to the rhythmic measure of Charleston’s urban fabric. The historical context creates opaque surfaces to the exterior. However, the large expanses of glass integral to this building juxtapose the historic norm and create an interaction between the exterior and interior spaces. Standing three stories tall and 22,000 total square feet, this flexible building will house a restaurant, film theater, and library with archives and collection stacks. The nature of the programs within this building called for the careful balance between the separation and integration of spaces.

31

Film Theatre Cafe + Reading Area Computer Lab Rest room Archives Collection Stacks

1 2 3 4 5 6


5

2

6

3

4

4 1

The dynamic section of the building reveals the programmatic divisions within. The section unfolds into the streets of Charleston, breaking the historic boundaries between the exterior and interior spaces. A large cantilevered viewing platform extends over an expansive outdoor entrance, creating a relationship between the public and the construct.

32


3

1. Film Theatre 2. Back Stage 3. Mechanical 4. Men’s Rest room 5. Women’s Rest room 6. Restaurant 7. Kitchen Storage 8. Kitchen 9. Lobby

1

2

6 9

8 4

5 7

3

N 33


Second Floor

Third Floor

5

1

2

4

9 1

3

5

2

6 9

8 5

6

1

2

7

8 2

1. Cafe 2. Meeting Room 3. Computer Station 4. Offices 5. Reading Area

6. Meeting Room 7. Men’s Rest Room 8. Women’s Rest Room 9. Mechanical Room

3

1. Periodical 2. Central Reading 3. Archives 4. Reference 5. Collection Stacks

6. Men’s Rest Room 7. Women’s Rest Room 8. Mechanical 9. Study Rooms

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35


8 16

15

14

7

6 5

13

12 2

3

1

4

5

2

3

4

1

6

8

7

9

10

11

REinventing Home Oregeon AARP/AIAS Compeition In collaboration with Corey Thomas

With a large amount of the population entering retirement within the next two decades, reevaluating the perception of a “retirement community” is vital to accommodating baby boomers core values: health and wellness, community engagement, service, and recreation. Baby boomers, “the most skeptical, innovative, and technologically savvy generation” will demand more innovative retirement communities that will allow them to (a) “age in place” while retaining access to all levels of medical care, (b) carry out their daily lives with “walkable” access to everyday commerce, (c) participate in socially and intellectually stimulating intergenerational activities, and (d) reflect the values of sustainability and environmental ethics in their life choices.

36


37


Top R

VALUES

D SELFRELIANCE

RECREATION

ENTITLEMENT

FAMILY

STATUS

Technology allows us to Technology allows us to reremove nurses from visual move nurses from visual presence by ghosting nurses presence by ghosting and giving elderly an indenurses and giving elderly pendent lifestyle, removing common perception of an independent the lifestyle, nursing homes. removing the common perception of nursing homes.

HOME

PERCEPTION

Technology allows us to remove nurses from visual presence by ghosting nurses and giving elderly an independent lifestyle, removing the common perception of nursing homes.

INDEPENDENCE

EXPERIENCE

BEHAVIOR

FACTS

d support each related to different necessary aspects The elderly want of retirement we are Early signs of s for the better. In the effort of mixing such different lifestyles as 20% demintia, the todrastically be able to take rban district is created along the relatively hospitable care of them - environment along the most common cities and needs the workspace needs an enhancement. After distributing adecease amoung selves without depending on was there break room the elderly, inesults showed that the most prized space for workers clude searching others. The accommodation of varying resident capacities, taken to the next level of with no reason. or the youth as a constant reminder of life, strength, and a sense of familiaries the workplace becomes a less negative place which it is most commonly s of the next generation to be utilizing retirement communities, the boomers. n be itemized as design characteristics of the programed spaces as follows:

WANDERING

SELF-CARE

iring, stimulating, communal, work space.

SENIORITY

A prominent side diseases is con nected to owning objects.

HOARDING

INTERACTION

Current com munities do not promote interaction.

ISOLATION

PERCEPTION

Baby bombers have a negative perception and see visiting as a duty.

RESISTIVE TO APPROACH

REMINISCE

Creating a community by Creating a community by inserting activities intoactivities the into the inserting to createactive socially accenter to create center socially tive vibrant walkable natuvibrant walkableralistic naturalistic serviceable healthy public boulevard. serviceable healthy public boulevard.

Elderly people want to remem ber their past.

Technology allows us to remove nurses from visual presence by ghosting nurses and giving elderly an independent lifestyle, removing the common perception of nursing homes.

, Comfortable, Safe, Hearthable, Nostalgic, Housing Units

blic, Boulevard.

Maximization of views to the Maximization of views exterior landscape is done byto the exterior landscape is done by thus allowrotating volumesrotating thusvolumes allowing ing green spaces to spawn in green spaces toitsspawn in its stead. stead.

DESIGN

DIAGRAMS

e would steer away from retirement communities today. The most obvious ents, workers, and public community. Along with the feeling of self-reliant ng about the ethics of safety and standards of procedure, there are accomesigned to help cope with symptoms most common among the elderly such mization of rooms through transparent storage furnishings while allowing for of our memories. In addition we can equip the work spaces with the necesat we see throughout the practice today. Empowerment of the work spaces and/or pill distribution systems integrated. In order to successfully transmit ns were made with the constant foci being activities and behaviors. Main ace with the public at large and an open market space, centrally located as program additives produce the proper alchemy to support the intent of dewith our environment. Nature is actually known to be the definition of beauty nurses with nature including eutic relationships of the site we mergedGhost the building with and beach below. This healing routes of the neighboring wooded plateau Nature trails. technology. s should provide a supportive environment for elderly to remain stimulated.

Technology allows us to remove nurses from visual presence by ghosting nurses and giving elderly an independent lifestyle, removing the common perception of nursing homes.

Technology allows us to remove nurses from visual presence by ghosting nurses and giving elderly an independent lifestyle, removing the common perception of nursing homes.

Providing customizable living conditions

Variety of activities and transportation.

Making the project a destination.

Developed clusters of commonality.

T COMMUNITY

INTERACTION

ISOLATION

STATUS

PERCEPTION

HOME

Programming seven different lifestyles throughout the Programming seven different lifestyles throughout the building to enforce a easier building to enforce a easier stimulation by way of social stimulation by way of social interaction. interaction.

Boomers concern on where to situate themselves after retirement can be determine based off seven core values: (1) health (2) sense of community (3)service (4) recreation (5) self-reliance (6) entitlement (7) idealism. After distrubting short questionaires to several Continuing Care Retirement Communities, we were able to understand the behaviors that effects these core values. As a result, we have created design principles to inform the form, organization, and program. RESISTIVE TO APPROACH

Baby bombers have a negative perception and see visiting as a duty.

Building extensions lead into the landscape, serving as way-points for the wanderers, powering the facility, and based on proximity become structure.

PLAY - Creating a community by inserting activities into the center to create socially active vibrant walkable naturalistic serviceable healthy public boulevard.

Maximization of views to the exterior landscape is done by rotating volumes thus allowing green spaces to spawn in its stead.

Programming seven different lifestyles throughout the building to enforce a easier stimulation by way of social interaction.

Technology allows us to remove nurses from visual presence by ghosting nurses and giving elderly an independent lifestyle, removing the common perception of nursing homes.

REMINISCE

NOSTALGIA

Building extensions lead into the landscape, serving as way-points for the wanderers, powering the facility, and based on proximity become structure.

Current communities do not promote interaction.

PLAY - Creating a community by inserting activities into the center to create socially active vibrant walkable naturalistic serviceable healthy public boulevard.

Building extensions lead into the landscape, serving as way-points for the wanderers, powering the facility, and based on proximity become structure.

DIAGRAMS

FAMILY

PLAY - Creating a community by inserting activities into the center to create socially active vibrant walkable naturalistic serviceable healthy public boulevard.

NOSTALGIA

Elderly people want to remember their past.

Building extensions lead into the landscape, serving as way-points for the wanderers, Building extensions lead into the and landscape, serving powering the facility, as way-points for the wanbased on proximity derers,become powering the facility, and based on proximity bestructure. come structure. Building extensions lead into the landscape, serving as way-points for the wanderers, powering the facility, and based on proximity become structure.

Programming seven different lifestyles throughout the building to enforce a easier stimulation by way of social interaction.

Programming seven different lifestyles throughout the building to enforce a easier stimulation by way of social interaction.

38


6 6 6 7

7

3 1

2

Other component consist of housing for the scientists, a water well for the irrigation syste and multiple lookout towers located systematica

39


em ally.

Axial Armature

Interlocking within the Kalahari Desert Namibia, South Africa D4 - Spring 2009 Critic: Prof. Tony White

The desert construct is profoundly influenced by the path of the sun throughout the day. Emerging from the desert, the structure unfolds into an intervention within the landscape running parallel with the axis of the sun. This axis promotes an itinerary of the overall program. The spaces are placed according to their time of interaction with the sun. Therefore, this influenced the position of the dormitories to the East, as they will be the first to meet the sun, and the position of the laboratories to the West, as they will have natural light throughout the day. Numerous light studies influenced the design of this construct. A grid and rhythm were established by responding to the tectonic shifts in the existing landscape. These tectonic shifts that extend through the vast desert serve as a guide, leading travellers to the space. This response also creates different thresholds that invite users into the space.

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Community Features Integrated within residential blocks fronted to public residential green space

Commercial/ Business

Small Scale office space integrated within west side retail and residential Large scale office space in the east anchoring Orlando’s current business district

Residential Housing

Approx 420 Units in the west neighborhoods Approx. 240 Units in the east muti-use tower Approx. 40 assisted living Units with roof top agricultural gardens connected by small

Retail

Small scale retail in the west arranged along both sides of W. Amelia St. on the first and second levels of residential buildings. Large scale retail located in the east within the muti use tower and integrated into the central transportation hub.

Green Space connecting Civic, Public, Entertainment continous

Green space is the foundation of the livable Community. It unites the east and west sides of Orlando and provides the framework for layered programming. Large public green space unites Civic, public, and entertainment structures while smaller community parks and green walkways link residential neighborhoods, retail, and community features

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Connective Constructs

URBAN DEVELOPMENT AIAS / AARP Livable Communities Honorable Mention Orlando, Florida in collaboration with Thomas Keiper and Davie Mojica Summer 2010 Critic: Prof. Martin Gold

We are a constantly changing demographic. By 2030 Generation Y, now 20-30 years of age, will be 50-70, making more than half of Americans over the age of 50. With this demographic shift comes a shift in cultural values. Gen Y marks the first generation who will primarily live within city limits rather than rural neighborhoods. A focus of community health and environmental stability as well as social and economic concerns call for a shift in city planning to a create a place where multiple cultures merge to develop innovative solutions. I-4 C2 mends the divide created by Interstate 4 by linking the east and west sides of Orlando, FL through a much needed green space. Anchored by the existing downtown on the east and a new livable community on the west, the heart of the development is the central public transportation hub consisting of the Lynx Bus Station and the future Sun Rail Station. Built on the soon to be demolished Amway Arena the new development encourages the relationship between culture, technology, and nature as integral components of a

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Large Scale Connectivity Connected by the Florida High Speed Rail Tamp, Orlando, Miami Population 15 million $430 billion / yr.

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Orlando, Florida Smart infill Lot Previously Developed 60 West Ameila St. Population 2 Million 40 billion / yr.

Phase 1 Bridging from East to West 1.1 Public Green Space - initial increase in land value to attract occupants. Unite east and west Orlando 1.2 Retail and Entertainment - Develop the destination 1.3 Civic and Public - promote culture 1.4 Commercial / Business - promote commerce 1.5 Residential Housing - Bring residents to complete the Livable Community

Phase 2 Resulting Impact 2.1 Revitalization of Parramore Ave. North and South 2.2 Revitalized connection to exist green space and civic center


The neighborhood is the basic community building block. It is an interweaving of green space, community features and housing. The sidewalk and green space become the modern front porch and promote intermingling across generations, cultures, and income groups resulting in a richer culture.

is no longer isolated but rather integrated within all aspects of life. Transportation hubs become meeting points, while park spaces serve as conference rooms, and coffee shops as offices. In turn, the concept of an office building must evolve to a place where one can live,work and play

Promotes a healthier life style for all generations through swimming basket ball, tennis, skateboarding, biking, and racket ball. An Open field and recreation center provide multipurpose space for rotating activities

Pavilions arranged on a digital walkway hold exhibits focused on technology as a part of daily designed life. This transportation junction encourages integration between diverse demographics from the local community as well as the greater Orlando area, It is a celebration of technology fused in everyday appliances, in the medical practice, within environmental

Educational, religious, and community centers provide opportunities for the preservation of distinctly diverse cultural aspects within a unified community

Orlando has become a world wide center for Arts and Entertainment technology. As a major incubator for pop culture Orlando is a tourism mecca. The result is diverse demographics converging within public and civic space.

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Typical Housing Section - Owner- occupied and Rental are to promote diversity neighborhoods Typical Housing Section Owner occupied andintermixed Rental are intermixed to within promote diversity

within neighborhoods


Civic spaces and green spaces become muti-use community features utilized at all times of the day. Such space gives identity to new and existing neighborhoods establishing economic and cultural value both for the present and the future

Retail streets become gathering spots for the community. The promotion of choices encourages community interaction not realized within big box stores and the internet.

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The relocation of Amway Arena in Orlando, FL leaves over 29 acres of land open for redevelopment. This infill lot is disconnected from the thriving portion of downtown due to Interstate-4 cutting directly through the city, resulting in transitional neighborhoods on the east and thriving developments on the west. Furthermore the new Amway Arena has relocated the city civic center south of the site. West of the interstate, is the Lynx Central Bus Station, soon to be adjacent to a commuter rail traveling north to Deland and south to Poinciana, with connections to the airport and theme parks. Additionally, the High Speed Rail will link Orlando to the urban centers of Tampa and Miami. To the east of the central bus station is a vacant lot adjacent to the Orange County Court House. This lot combined with the infill lot, provides land for a series of connective constructs which reestablish this place as a destination within the cityscape. This series of constructs explores the question - What must we do now to create value in the city of 2030? Ascertaining public green space as the foundation of community, a bold park bridges over the interstate uniting Orlando. As the green space trickles and divides westward, a framework for layered programming emerges. Large green spaces unite civic, public, and entertainment structures while smaller community parks and green walkways link residential neighborhoods, retail, and community features. These flexible urban spaces provide a sense of place where diverse cultures can evolve and coexist. Retail streets and community parks have been given just as much attention as larger civic spaces in order to facilitate chance encounters between residents as a method of promoting community life. Recognizing America’s aging demographic, public programs within the park focus on community health through the promotion of recreational activities. The Digital Walkway incorporates University of Central Florida’s Center for Emerging Media, by providing spaces for exhibits focused on technology as a part of daily designed life. Located above the central transportation junction, this bridge encourages interaction between diverse demographics from the local community as well as the greater Orlando area. It is a celebration of technology fused in everyday life with a focus on keeping the America’s ageing population educated with technological advancements. Connective green spaces and alternative transportation, enable all destinations within the community to be within 15 minutes of one another. Bus routes stop at every major public destination and every block in dense neighborhoods. Uninterrupted green space and green paths promote a walk able and bike friendly community linking affordable and diverse housing. Housing is intermixed in order to prevent social segregation and promote interaction across income classes. No program within the community is isolated, including work spaces. Although the traditional business spaces are provided, they are also integrated into the daily streetscape, with the idea of transportation hubs as meeting points, park spaces serve as conference rooms, and coffee shops as offices, as a strong focus within the development. These layered constructs bound by continuous green space form a series of interactive community meeting points encouraging the relationship between culture, technology, and nature as integral components of a Livable Community.

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15 minutes to everything Walk, Bike, Ride - Streetcar, Bus, Sun rail Alternative modes of transportation prevent the need to expand interstate 4 and promote a sustainable way of life


Symbolsis Spring 2011 Critic: Prof. Lucky Tasih

A lamps function is not only to light our path, but to define and cultivate our spatial boundaries. It can also define space, as for this lamp, which beings to defines a space for two people. The interaction between two materials are expressed through the light, creating a warm environment for two people coming together. The materials were drawn from the context and aid in creating a warm sensation with the rich yellow light. The luminaire aids in lighting the room while providing a beautiful piece of art. The simple, unique qualities of the lamp project a style of elegance and appreciation for the hand crafted. Due to the intimacy of the space along with the various different types of materials, incandescent light bulb seemed appropriate to represent the correct accuracy in rendering different materials.

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Gottfried Semper states that architecture derives its reasoning forms from predetermined motives originating from the first signs of human settlement, therefor the Site is eliminated from the equation in order to better understand and articulate the idea of presence and anthropology though construction. The proportions of the calligraphy allow the understanding of the human scale.

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Tertiary System

Semperian Anthropological Pavilion

Spcrates Sculpture Park, NY Spring 2011 Critic: Prof. Alfonso Perez-Mendez

The Semperian pavilion begins with a concept of “making� through the lens of anthropology. The pieces and connections that make up the tectonic system celebrate construction and come together to make a whole that is more interesting than the parts themselves, while expressing human presence and sociology. The Semperiod Pavillion began with the deconstruction of an orange peel. This translated into a seamless transition between the ground, walls, and floor. Generating from these ideas, was a three system construct, where each system supports the others. This allows for the pavilion to be prefabricated, and adaptable to different sites

Secondary System

Primary System

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Noguchi Lamp Installation

New York, New York Spring 2011 Critic: Prof. Alfonso Perez-Mendez

The Second phase of this project consisted of placing the pavilion in a site for a Noguchi Lamp exhibition. The pavilion was placed cantilevering off the ground to give a feel of an extension into nature, with water beneath.

To support the lamp exhibition understanding the poetics of structure and construction of the roof, begins to show musicality, circulation, and calligraphy that would aid in discovering the function and form that transcended into partition walls.

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Through the use of Digital technology the sense of gravity is lost, therefor I used a laser cutter to cut out all the pieces. With the idea that this model will be transported and placed in various sites, my goal was to create a model without the need of glue. All the pieces were designed to interlock with each other.

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choeff + levyp.a. architecture interior design

Luis Isaias Residence Residential Home Miami Beach, FL Firm: Choeff+Levy P.A. In collaboration with Ralph Choeff Ruben Gomez Javier Sanchez

3D Model, Render and Assisted with Design | Christopher Fernandez

My role in this project was to 3-dimensionalize and design, with the assistance of Ruben Gomez, a Sketchup model based off hand sketches from Ralph Choeff of the first and second floor plan. After resolving the building’s form, we than updated the floor plans to reflect the Sketchup model. I then took the model and rendered a front and back perspective for the client. The client was extremely satisfied with the what the render captured and moved the project straight into the design development phase . This project has only in the schematic phase for a week.

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3D Model, Render and Assisted with Design | Christopher Fernandez


Phone: 305.434.8338 Fax: 305.892.5292

JACUZZI

OUTDOOR DINING

CLOSET STAFF BATH

BREAKFAST

CARPORT PANTRY

FORMAL DINING

POWDER ROOM

8425 biscayne blvd, suite 201 miami, florida 33138

KITCHEN

UTILITY / LAUNDRY

STAFF BEDROOM

POOL DECK

POOL

Isaias Residence

CLOSET

www.choefflevy.com AR0009679 AR0094779

BBQ

132 Paloma Drive Coral Gables, FL 33143

LIVING ROOM

ENTRY FOYER

ENTRY

CLOSET

CL.

A/V CLOSET

FIREPLACE

ELEVATOR

CLOSET BEDROOM #6 / OFFICE

BATH #5

MEDIA ROOM

COVERED TERRACE

comm no.

1232 date:

BATH #6

BEDROOM #5

12-10-12

revised:

sheet no.

A-1

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choeff + levyp.a. architecture interior design

Irvine/Bosch Residence Residential Project Miami Beach, FL CO-OP: Spring 2012 In collaboration with Ralph Choeff Ruben Gomez Javier Sanchez

Schematic Design Phase: I started in the schematic design phase of this project, assisting Ruben Gomez. My role in this project was to 3-dimensionalize and adjust the preliminary design per client request. A SketchUp model was created based off Ralph Choeff’s hand sketches of the first and second floor plan. The client was extremely satisfied with the render and the project moved straight into design development after being in the office for a little over a week.

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3D Model, Render and Assisted with Design | Christopher Fernandez


A/V CLOSET

CLOSET

UTILITY

STAIR #1

AHU #2

AHU #3

ENTRY FOYER

ENTRY

CONC. WALK

DRIVEWAY

FIREPLACE

AHU #1

FAMILY ROOM

CLOSET

POWDER ROOM

JACUZZI

BRIDGE

Phone: 305.434.8338 Fax: 305.892.5292

428 South Hibiscus Drive Miami Beach, FL 33139

OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM

Bosch / Irvine Residence

POOL

www.choefflevy.com AR0009679 AR0094779

3 CAR GARAGE

8425 biscayne blvd, suite 201 miami, florida 33138

STAIR #2 STAFF BEDROOM

choeff + levyp.a. architecture interior design

STAFF BATH

MEDIA ROOM

POOL TABLE

LIVING ROOM

DINNING ROOM

POOL DECK

comm no.

KITCHEN

1240 date:

ELEVATOR

11-07-12

revised: CABANA

CABANA BATH

PANTRY

STAIR #3

sheet no.

A-1

DWG: Choeff + Levy Team

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BEDROOM #6

HER TOILET ROOM

BALCONY

MASTER BEDROOM

BATH #6

BATH #7

BALCONY BEDROOM #7

CL.

HIS TOILET ROOM

CL.

MASTER SUITE

STAIR #1

Phone: 305.434.8338 Fax: 305.892.5292 www.choefflevy.com AR0009679 AR0094779

MASTER CLOSET

8425 biscayne blvd, suite 201 miami, florida 33138

MASTER BATH

choeff + levyp.a. architecture interior design

BALCONY

UTILITY

BEDROOM #5

428 South Hibiscus Drive Miami Beach, FL 33139

GYM

Bosch / Irvine Residence

CLOSET

BALCONY

AHU #5

CL.

BALCONY

BATH #5

BATH #4

BEDROOM #2

BEDROOM #4

BALCONY

CLOSET

BATH #2

comm no.

BEDROOM #3

1240

AHU #4

date:

11-07-12

ELEVATOR BATH #3

revised: W.I.C.

STAIR #3

sheet no.

A-2

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transfered sketches to Autocad Christopher Fernandez


3D Model, Render and Assisted with Design | Christopher Fernandez

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4

2

3

Traasdahl Residence

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COMP #3

FAMILY / MEDIA ROOM ARTS & CRAFTS ROOM

AHU #1

BATH #6

AHU CLOSET #1

MOTOR COURT (DRIVEWAY)

COVERED ENTRY

ENTRY FOYER

LIVING ROOM COVERED TERRACE

MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139

COMP #2

OPEN CLOSET

ZEN COURT

POOL

Construction Documents and Administration phase- My role in this project started at Design Development phase. I had to completely revise all the floor plans, elevations and details per client and Design Commity of the City of Miami suggestions. I followed this project through Design Development into Contruction Documents to Adminstration. I assisted Raphael Levy in coordinating with the structural and MEP engineers.

Phone: 305.434.8338 Fax: 305.892.5292

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SPA

TRAASDAHL RESIDENCE 25 EAST RIVO ALTO

Residential Home Miami Beach, FL In collaboration with Choeff+Levy P.A. Ralph Choeff Rapheal Levy Christopher Fernandez

www.choefflevy.com AR0009679 AR0094779

1

choeff + levyp.a. architecture interior design

1

8425 biscayne blvd, suite 201 miami, florida 33138

choeff + levyp.a. architecture interior design

WINE

STAIR #1

POWDER ROOM

WINE

AHU #2

AHU CLOSET #2

FIREPLACE WINE

COVERED LOUNGE

REF.

OVENS

KITCHEN

AHU #3

ELEVATOR (SEE G/A-12 FOR NOTES)

STAFF ROOM GAS OVEN / COOKTOP DW

CABANA BATH

CL.

W

1

LAUNDRY D

STAIR #2 DW

2

POND

AHU CLOSET #3

LINEN DINING ROOM

STORAGE

1207

FZR.

1

1

comm no.

GARAGE REF.

1

BATH #7

date:

09-17-12

revised:

10/9/12 1 B.D. COMMENTS 11/5/12 2 OWNER REV'S 12/10/12 3 B.D. COMMENTS 1/15/13 4 OWNER REVISION

sheet no.

A-1

Dwgs done by Christopher Fernandez under Rapheal Levy supervision


MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139

TRAASDAHL RESIDENCE 25 EAST RIVO ALTO

Dwgs done by Christopher Fernandez under Rapheal Levy supervision 1

sheet no.

A-5

8425 biscayne blvd, suite 201 miami, florida 33138

www.choefflevy.com AR0009679 AR0094779

Phone: 305.434.8338 Fax: 305.892.5292

choeff + levyp.a. architecture interior design

1

1207

comm no.

date:

revised:

09-17-12

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BangKok Cultural Center Bangkok, Thailand In collaboration with KPF Trent Tesch partner Forth Bagley director Richard Hyun-Soo Kim associate

Assisted in the master planning, and design for a 55,000 SQ. M. world-class cultural center with the city’s largest performance hall, galleries, bookstore and a Museum of Thai food with agricultural terraces that cascade and extend into Lumphini Park. The client desired a design that incorporates Thai culture. My role in the project was to assist in the concept, design, modeling, renderings, diagrams, square footage calculation, and drawings. The project went through several interventions based on the clients budget and needs. Roof Terraces

Cultural Center

ILL

ural y’s largest galleries, Museum gricultural ade and hini Park.

Lumphini Park

Event Space

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CULTURAL CENTER

TOR OPTION 2

TOR OPTION 2

PLAN

PLAN

CULTURAL CENTER L1

CULTURAL CENTER L2

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Thank you!! To God for the amazing people that he placed in my path, and for giving me the strength to overcome life’s obstacles To my fiance, for supporting everything that I am passion about, and being there through difficult times Rebecca Nychyk To my family for their loving support Mom, Trent, Tim Nychyck, Nona Nychyk, Jessica, and Destiny. To the staff at the University of Florida for guiding me. Prof. Steven Bender, Prof. Alfonso Perez, Prof. Albertus Wang, Prof. Tony White, Prof. Sanders, Prof. Peter Prugh, Prof. McGlothlin To the staff at the University of Cincinnati John E. Hancock, Prof.Terry Boiling, Prof. Bob Burnham, Prof. Hancock, Prof, Dominic Laccubucci To all my fellow classmates who push me to do better!

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Christopher Fernandez Chrisfz87@gmail.com

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| 239.898.7549


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