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Reliever Tom Brouster taking Reliance Bancshares private | 4

Stephanie Leffler dishes on delegating, debt and decisions | 21

On loan

S an can w dr ece ith y ive ou dai r sm ly em artp ail hon up e dat es

MOHELA’s Ray Bayer floats $256 million bond offering | 6

St. Louis Business Journal stlouis.bizjournals.com 

VOL. 32, NO. 37 40 PAGES

May 4-10, 2012 $2.00

Medical malpractice insurer under fire Missouri Professionals Mutual trades suits with brokerage By Angela Mueller amueller@bizjournals.com

On May 2, Missouri Professionals Mutual prominently posted the following quote from President Tim Trout on its website: “The higher you fly, the more you’ll be shot at. Success breeds criticism. Prepare to be a target and prepare for bad news.” The posting comes as MPM, one of the state’s largest medical malpractice insurers, and its longtime broker, the Keane Insurance Group Inc., are parting ways amid a legal battle in St. Louis County Circuit Court. MPM filed suit against Keane Insurance and its president, C. John Keane Jr., March 30. Just a few days later, on April 3, Keane Insurance filed a countersuit against Trout and MPM. MPM filed its suit against Keane after the Keane Group, which has been MPM’s exclusive broker since 2003, gave the required 90-day notice of its decision to terminate its relationship with MPM, according to the March 30 suit. This decision, ac-

cording to Keane’s April 3 countersuit, was prompted by MPM’s transfer of millions in assets to MPM Insurance Co. of Kansas, a Kansas medical malpractice agency owned by Trout, as part of a reinsurance contract. Keane Insurance Group was “uncomfortable with certain financial transactions Defendant Timothy H. Trout has orchestrated,” the April 3 suit states. As a mutual comC. John Keane Jr. pany, St. Louisbased MPM is President, Keane owned by its poliInsurance Group cyholders, while the Kansas company is owned by Trout. MPM’s suit alleges Keane Group sent a letter to its clients March 23 informing them of its intention to end its relationship with MPM before notifying MPM or Trout MPM | 33

Reinsurance deal with Kansas insurer raises questions By Angela Mueller amueller@bizjournals.com

Missouri Professionals Mutual transferred more than $41 million of its reserves to MPM Insurance Co. of Kansas on Dec. 1, 2011, as part of what it described as a retroactive reinsurance contract. It was a move that cost the medical malpractice insurer its longtime broker and set off a legal battle still playing out in St. Louis County Circuit Court. According to a lawsuit filed April 3 against MPM President Tim Trout by the Keane Insurance Group Inc., the agency terminated its relationship with MPM because it was “uncomfortable with certain financial transactions Defendant Timothy H. Trout has orchestrated between Defendant MPM and MPM Kansas” in his position as managing agent for MPM and owner of MPM Kansas. The suit states that Trout “has transferred a substantial portion of the assets and all of the liabilities” of MPM to MPM Kansas. MPM is a 383 company, which means it is

A league of their own By Amir Kurtovic akurtovic@bizjournals.com

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transfer | 32

and River City Renegades (indoor football). Brian Matthews, 54, has learned from those mistakes. “It appears that St. Louis really is a baseball town,” he said. Their failed investments in sports teams notwithstanding, Brian Matthews wants to help debunk what he calls the myth that technology companies are very risky investments that tend to pay off only 10 to 20 percent of the time. And they plan on doing that through Cultivation Capital, a new venture capital fund they started with three partners: Jim McKelvey, cofounder of mobile payment processor Square, one of Silicon Valley’s hottest startups; Peter Esparrago, founder of crowd funding company Growspar; and Rick Holton Jr., partner at Holton Capital Group. Esparrago is one of the Matthews’ long-time business partners and served as CEO of IntraISP and as the president of River City Internet group. McKelvey is a longtime friend of both Brian and Carol Matthews. The couple has many pieces of

Matthewses, McKelvey, Esparrago, Holton create Cultivation Capital tech fund or early pioneers in the fantasy sports market, it’s not surprising that the technology entrepreneur husband and wife duo of Brian and Carol Matthews keeps track of their business ventures the way sports teams keep track of statistics. The bottom line of a spreadsheet detailing more than 20 years of companies they co-founded and investments they made shows that their team is batting exactly .400. That is, they co-founded 10 companies and successfully sold four of them for about $175 million. The number is impressive for both baseball batting averages and business startup success rates. Ironically, the four companies that didn’t work out were not even in the risky technology startup field. Instead, they were part of their effort to build the St. Charles Family Arena and fill it with sports teams like the St. Louis Swarm (basketball), St. Louis Steamers (indoor soccer)

a nonprofit corporation held by a coalition of physicians. Its obligations are not backed by the Missouri Property and Casualty Insurance Guaranty Association, as most insurers are. Instead, it can increase its assessments to current members if it needs money to pay claims. MPM Kansas is a traditional stock company owned by Trout. MPM transferred the $41 millionplus to MPM Kansas in order to secure “retrocession- Tim trout al reinsurance,” or President, Missouri insurance for rein- Professionals Mutual surers, according to its annual statement. The company went through MPM Kansas because “this type of coverage was not available to a 383 company,” according to MPM’s annual report.

Brian and Carol Matthews

matthews | 32 Brian cassidy

Ten questions to ask now to help you focus on looming tax law changes. Get your free report. wellsfargoadvisors.com/taxlaw © 2012 St. Louis Business Journal

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Watch those thumbs

Corner-office types will be picking up hammers and nails May 18 and June 29 to build houses as part of Habitat for Humanity Greg Edwards Saint Louis’ first CEO Build. “It is on a Friday, so we can recuperate gedwards@bizjournals.com on Saturday,” said Rick Bagy, president of First National Bank of St. Louis. Other top dogs who may end up a bit sore: Jeff Cook of ARCO, Ed Alizadeh of Geotechnology, Scott Goodman of Enterprise Bank & Trust, Stephen Hamilton of CSI Leasing and Bob Byrne of Byrne and Jones. Habitat has a $1.4 million sponsorship goal for 2012.

Danny boy

Restaurateur Danny Meyer, the John Burroughs grad who went on to conquer New York dining, is the cover boy on the May 31 edition of Wine Spectator. The 11-page, full-color feature details his “$120 million-a-year culinary powerhouse,” which includes the Union Square Cafe, Gramercy Tavern, Blue Smoke and Shake Shacks, which had estimated annual sales of $4 million at each location in 2009, compared with McDonald’s $2 million per location.

May 4-10, 2012

Shoptalk The consulting company opened an office here in February 2011 to serve two of its large national accounts, Wells Fargo and AT&T. But it is now working to woo other large St. Louis clients, said Carrie Nelson, vice president and office leader. The company, with 49 offices around the world and 2012 targeted U.S. revenue of about $300 million, added eight consultants in St. Louis last year.

Sweet dreams The Caramel House, a maker of caramel candies in what owner Janet Ansehl Shulman calls St. Louis flavors, is working on a new flavor for Laumeier Sculpture Park. Her current flavors incorporate Schlafly beer, Billy Goat chips, Dad’s cookies and Gus’ pretzels, among other local favorites. The confectionery, which launched in January 2011 with personal financing of $10,000, reached sales of $125,000 in 2011. The candy is sold at TheCaramelHouse.com, Straub’s, the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Fox Theater, Bowood Farms, Schlafly Bottleworks, the Contemporary Art Museum and state parks.

Moving in

R.A.I Dorsa LLC bought 10,000 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor of the historic timber Dorsa Lofts building at 1007 Washington Ave., for about $400,000. Kerry Chao, owner of the Yogoluv frozen yogurt stores in Creve Coeur and Columbia, Mo., is listed as the registered agent for R.A.I Dorsa. Ronny Cuka of Lord Partners represented R.A.I and will manage the commercial space. Mizu Sushi restaurant currently occupies 3,000 square feet in the building. Brian cassidy

On the hunt

which nearly doubled its volume in 2011 to $45.6 million, forecasts revenue of $55 million in 2012, President Eric Gowin said.

Contegra Construction Co. has snared Dennis Araujo for its executive ranks from Korte Construction Co., where he had worked 33 years and headed the St. Louis Growing in town office. In November, Contegra lured Jim North Highland’s St. Louis office, which Dearduff from S.M. Wilson to head its edu- recently celebrated its first anniversary, is B:10.5” targeting revenue of $3 million in 2012. cational construction division. Contegra,

Cousin power

Commerce Bank and UMB are tops in the Midwest in the J.D. Powers and Associates 2012 U.S. Retail Banking Satisfaction Study. In March, the two banks were ranked among the 45 best banks in of the decade based on earnings power in a Keefe Bruyette & Woods study. David Kemper is CEO of Commerce, and his cousin, Mariner Kemper, is CEO of UMB.

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Inside

Brian cassidy

Craig McElroy (left) and Matthew Porter, founders of tech company Contegix, face a lawsuit by Xiolink and its parent company, Infomedia. | PAGE 7

Lead Stories

Health Centers, plus insider trades and a look at local stock results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Reliance Bancshares plans to go private with Brouster, Dittrich at the helm . . . . 4 Soy sauce maker YiBo plans $5 million expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Polsinelli beefs up health-care practice with hires from Bryan Cave . . . . . . . . . . 5 MOHELA issuing $256 million in student loan asset-backed notes . . . . . . 6 Herndon lands $56 million federal contract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

People | Promotions and new hires . . . . . 13

Special Section Small Business | St. Louis has become

known for nurturing startup companies . . . 17

How To | Choose an accounting firm

that brings ideas to the table . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Advice | Harvey Mackay says to heed

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Viewpoint A Closer Look | Publisher’s note . . . . 31 Editorial | The judge gets an A . . . . . . . 36

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Batter Up: Dermatologist Dr. Lawrence Samuels has a baseball signed by every Cardinals team from 1928-2011. | 8

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May 4-10, 2012

Brouster, Dittrich taking Reliance Bancshares private by greg edwards gedwards@bizjournals.com

Reliance Bancshares Inc. plans to go private and name longtime bankers Tom Brouster as chairman and Gaines Dittrich as vice chairman. Both would become significant investors in the company, which operates Reliance Bank, though they declined to disclose the amounts of their investments, which are subject to regulatory approval. “I and others who have invested with me in the past are proposing to invest,” Brouster said. In effect, the other shoe is dropping at Reliance. Brouster, who has led 14 bank turnarounds in the last 35 years, including at Pioneer Bank and Trust, and Dittrich, who worked with him there, joined Reliance in mid-February on 90-day consulting contracts. Even then, speculation was that they would eventually take management and ownership stakes. Whatever the size of their proposed investments, a lot of capital is needed. “To get us in compliance with regulators today, $11 million needs to be raised — and that doesn’t account for future credit losses and growth in the bank,” Brouster said. Neither does it include the approximately $45 million that Reliance owes to the U.S. Treasury in bail-out money and interest. The company last had an injection of capital in 2009 and 2010, when it raised $4.5 million, said Allan Ivie IV, president and chief executive. “As with all banks with well-known problems, their ability to raise capital will be key to a turnaround,” said Jim Regna,

president and chief executive of Triad Bank. Going private will save money, Ivie and Brouster said, because the company won’t have to face the burdensome filings and regulations of a public company. Since Brouster’s arrival, Reliance, which has been weighed down by bad loans and is under regulatory restrictions, has shown marked improvement. For example, the holding company reported a first-quarter profit of $719,000, compared with a loss of $5.2 million in the first quarter of 2011. Although Ivie and Brouster are tickled by the profit, they acknowledge it was due to a one-time accounting event, a gain on the sale of bonds. And while they aren’t predicting the full year will be profitable, Ivie said, “We would expect it would continue to show significant improvement.” In addition, nonperforming loans totaled $105 million as of March 31, down from $132.8 million three months prior, Ivie said. Foreclosed property on the books, called other real estate owned, totaled $27.5 million as of March 31, down from $33.7 million the previous quarter, he said. Reliance’s Texas ratio, which calculates a bank’s credit troubles by dividing its nonperforming assets by the sum of its common equity capital and loan loss reserves, is shrinking, too, Ivie said. Any ratio of 100 percent or higher indicates severe risk. Reliance’s is just higher than that after the first quarter, 109 percent, Ivie said, but “the next quarterly ratio will be double digits.” What has changed since Brouster’s arrival? For one thing, he has a reputation for being, let’s say, persistent in collecting over-

due loans — a real pain in the you-knowwhat, bankers say. “That may be true, but I’m also fair,” he said, smiling. Furthermore, Reliance has found it easier to sell foreclosed property and loan notes it is owed to private equity firms, for example. “We’re seeing gradual changes in the economy,” Brouster said. While Reliance still has a lot of nonperforming loans, Ivie said that it had zero loans 30 days, 60 days or 90 days past due in March and April, a meaningful milestone because one category often leads to the next, and the loans can eventually fall into default. The bank also has reduced staff by 40 since Ivie’s arrival in July 2010 and currently stands at 175. Soon after his arrival, Ivie approached Brouster, with whom he had served on several boards, because of his history of successful turnarounds. Reliance had $980.2 million in total assets as of Dec. 31, sixth largest among commercial banks here. Brouster’s arrival prompted the resignation of Patrick Gideon, Reliance’s non-executive board chairman, in late February. “Brouster wanted me out of his way,” he wrote in his resignation letter. “My presence was threatening to him, and to other members of the board and management with whom my style of management and oversight conflicted.” In addition to Ivie, the remaining directors are Robert Cox Jr., a senior vice president in administration at Emerson; Barry Koenemann, chairman and chief executive of United Construction Ent. Co.; Scott Sachtleben, senior vice president of development

and general counsel at DESCO Group Inc.; Richard Demko, an orthodontist; Lawrence “Rusty” Keeley, president and chief executive of Keeley Construction Co.; Gary Parker, owner and founder of Center Oil Co.; and James SanFilippo, president and owner of Waylon Advertising.

Reliance Insiders Stock ownership of officers and directors as of March 21, 2010, the most recent information available. Gary Parker Richard Demko Lawrence Keeley Jr. Jerry Von Rohr Barry Koenemann Robert Cox Jr. James SanFilippo Patrick Gideon Allan Ivie IV Dale Oberkfell Daniel Brown Daniel Jasper William Springer David Matthews Scott Sachtleben Roy Wagman All officers and directors as a group

Shares

Percent owned

6,175,945 459,896 401,140 953,450 328,000 234,020 239,714 203,564 40,000 203,142 127,849 32,436 18,564 20,674 9,000 7,000

27.2% 1.8% 1.7% 1.3% 1.2% 1% .8% .7% .2% .2% .1% .1% .1% .0% .0% .0%

9,454,394

36.5%

Source: Securities and Exchange Commission

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Time is money.

YiBo plans $5 million expansion in Warrenton By Evan Binns ebinns@bizjournals.com

Soy sauce producer YiBo Inc., a local subsidiary of a Chinese conglomerate, is expanding its operations in Warrenton, Mo. YiBo, part of YiBo Foundation Hebei International Trading Co., which is based in Shijiazhuang, China, is spending $5 million to expand its manufacturing facility by

Scott Shockley Will expand YiBo’s manufacturing facility by 18,000 square feet

18,000 square feet before it begins soy sauce production, according to the company, which was founded in 2010. Ruiling Liu is president. Once the plant is operational, YiBo representatives said they expect the company to

generate estimated annual sales of about $3.2 million within three years. The soy sauce company currently owns a 16,500-square-foot plant in the Daniel Boone Industrial Park in Warrenton, which it acquired for about $2 million in late 2010. YiBo plans to invest another $5 million with its planned expansion, including construction costs, equipment and labor. The plant is YiBo’s first operation the United States. YiBo plans to begin its operations with 10 to 15 employees, eventually expanding that number to about 20, according to Michelle Schlenther, Warrenton economic development director. Shockley Construction, the building arm of Scott Shockley’s real estate company, Shockley Commercial/Industrial, has been tapped to build the expansion. Shockley Construction broke ground April 23. YiBo’s presence in Warrenton reinforces the metro area’s role as a leading player in the soy market. St. Louis is home to Bunge North America.; Solae LLC, a joint venture of Bunge and DuPont; Creve Coeur seed maker Monsanto; and the American Soybean Association. —Follow Evan Binns on Twitter @EvanBinns

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Polsinelli beefs up health-care practice, adds 7 from Bryan Cave By Evan Binns ebinns@bizjournals.com

Law firm Polsinelli Shughart has added six health-care lawyers from Bryan Cave in St. Louis, growing its local attorney count to 109. Polsinelli announced May 2 that it hired Jane Arnold, Mark Goran and Donna Ruzicka as shareholders as well as adding Erin Fleming Dunlap, Brett Heger and Margaret Hillman, all of whom came from Bryan Cave. The six St. Louis attorneys were joined by shareholder Mary Clare Bonaccorsi, a Chicago-based health-care litigator who also was previously with Bryan Cave. The addition of the health-care group follows the May 1 addition of 14 attor-

neys from former Clayton law firm Gallop, which imploded last month. Polsinelli Shughart’s national healthcare group now has 112 lawyers in offices ranging from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., making it the sixth-largest health-care practice in the nation, according to Randy Gerber, Polsinelli’s St. Louis managing director. The firm’s health-care group offers services to all types of health-care facilities, associations and more than 200 physician practice groups. Polsinelli Shughart has added 77 attorneys within the past six months, according to Chairman Russ Welsh. Recently, the firm expanded its services for clients by adding offices in Dallas and Los Angeles.

Correction A-B InBev Innovation Group A photo of the Anheuser-Busch InBev Innovation Group was incorrectly identified in the April 27 issue. The cutline should have read: Jill Vaughn (left), Pat McGauley and Val Toothman of the Innovation Group sample two to three product prototypes on a daily basis.

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Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP congratulates all of our friends at Sachs Electric Company. We are proud that you have been named as one of the top privately held companies in St. Louis. This great honor is well deserved. Cheers! Troy Kendrick Partner 7700 Forsyth Boulevard, Suite 1100 | St. Louis, MO 63105 | 314.719.3011 The choice of a lawyer is important and should not be based solely on advertisements.

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A d v e r t i s e m e n t

Are Small Businesses Paying Too Much for IT?

Elizabeth Elliott Niedringhaus President & CEO, SSE

More than half of an SMB’s IT budget goes to simply maintaining the organization’s technology - a function that does not add value to your organization.

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MOHELA floats bond offering for $256 million By E.B. SOLOMONT esolomont@bizjournals.com

MOHELA, the Missouri Higher Education Loan Authority, is issuing $256 million in student loan assetbacked notes. Proceeds of the sale will be used to refinance a $50 million line of credit with Bank of America, and refinance a $200 million line of credit MOHELA has through a conduit arrangement, said Executive Director Ray Bayer Jr. Proceeds also will enable MOHELA to refinance a certain amount of loans MOHELA has on its own books. Bayer said the bond sale, which closes May 10, was oversubscribed as of May 2. The Missouri Department of Higher Education and National Student Loan Program are the guarantee agencies. U.S. Bank is the trustee, and Morgan Stanley is the underwriter. The Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency is the backup servicer. Based in Chesterfield, MOHELA has 385 full-time employees and currently owns around $3.8 billion in student loans. Historically MOHELA, a state-

chartered nonprofit organization, worked closely with private student lenders, bought bank loans on the secondary market and originated a small percentage of loans itself. Last fall, MOHELA began servicing loans owned by the U.S. Department of Education, and currently services 500,000 accounts. Fitch Ratings on April 30 gave the new MOHELA bonds an expected rating of AAAsf based, in part, on high collateral quality. “The trust collat-

Ray Bayer Jr. Bond sale was oversubscribed as of May 2

eral comprises Federal Family Education Loan Program loans with guaranties provided by eligible guarantors and reinsurance provided by the U.S. Department of Education for at least 97% of principal and accrued interest,” analyst Steven Stubbs wrote. — Follow E.B. Solomont on Twitter @ebsolomont

May 4-10, 2012

Herndon lands $56 million contract By Diana Barr dbarr@bizjournals.com

Herndon Products received a federal contract worth up to $56 million to provide supply chain management at the Tobyhanna Army Depot in Pennsylvania, the Department of Defense’s largest, fullservice electronics maintenance facility. The contract has a three-year base term, plus two one-year options that would extend into 2017. O’Fallon, Mo.-based Herndon received the contract from the Defense Logistics Agency’s Land and Maritime operations to manage the Industrial Product-Support Vendor (IPV) Program at the depot. Herndon will have a team of workers at the depot managing inventory, such as electronic components and fasteners, on the maintenance line. “So we’ll order the parts, ship and inspect the parts, and place the parts in the bins on the production line for the mechanics to use,” said Herndon COO Dan Rodrigues. Herndon has been supplying such services for the Letterkenny Army Depot in Chambersburg, Pa., under a similar contract awarded in 2008. For the new contract, Herndon was selected as the “best value solution” after a 14-month evaluation from competitive bids by major defense contractors, the list of which typically is not disclosed. However companies that currently hold or compete for large IPV contracts include SAIC, Lockheed Martin and Raytheon. “This award will increase our man-

aged warehouse footprint by 50 percent near Scranton, Pa., and will add 16 new employees to our team,” according to Scott Herndon, the company’s president and CEO. “This brings the investment in our eastern distribution network to 65,000 square feet and just fewer than 40 employees.” Some of the new full-time employees will be hired through a subcontractor,

Dan Rodrigues Herndon will add 16 new employees for a total of 90-95 people

but the company’s workforce, including its St. Louis office, will total 90 to 95, Rodrigues said. About 94 percent of Herndon’s business is providing supply chain management products and services to federal government defense and defense logistics agencies. Herndon also serves domestic and international firms in the aerospace and defense industries. The privately-held company, one of St. Louis’ largest, posted 2011 revenue of $81.4 million, down 15.3 percent from the prior year as Congress delayed passing fiscal 2012 spending measures until mid-December.

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Contegix’s Porter, McElroy face lawsuit from Xiolink By Angela Mueller amueller@bizjournals.com

Data center firm Xiolink and its parent company Infomedia Inc. have filed suit against Matthew Porter and Craig McElroy, the founders of fellow tech company Contegix LLC, alleging they violated an operating agreement that existed among the three companies. Contegix is a cloud computing and co-location company launched in 2004 by Infomedia, Porter and McElroy. Infomedia holds a 25 percent stake in the company, and Metissian LLC, which is controlled by

Matthew Porter Plans to open data center that would compete with Xiolink, suit alleges

Porter, holds the remaining 75 percent, according to the suit. Infomedia is owned by Mike Palmer and Brad Pittenger, who is also chief executive of Xiolink. According to a May 12, 2004, operating agreement, Contegix cannot enter into any contract exceeding $50,000 without Infomedia’s consent, the suit states. However, Porter has negotiated a contract with Wayne, Pa.-based tech firm SunGard Availability Services Inc. that would exceed the $50,000 mark without Infomedia’s approval, according to the lawsuit. “Despite this lack of required consent, Porter has expressly told Infomedia that he will proceed to cause Contegix to enter into the contemplated contract with SunGard,” the suit says.

The suit also alleges that Porter is violating a noncompete clause between Contegix and Xiolink by planning to open a competing data center. “Porter has already begun discussions towards the acquisition of the necessary hardware and software to compete with Xiolink, and to solicit, attempt to divert, and appropriate, its customers,” the suit says. The lawsuit, filed April 26 in St. Louis County circuit court, asks that the court prevent Porter from entering into the contract with SunGard and from competing with Xiolink by entering into the Microsoft hosting market. Xiolink and Infomedia are being represented by Bill Corrigan and Daniel Nelson of Armstrong Teasdale. “We are asking the court to protect our client’s rights as an owner of Contegix and hope to resolve this dispute quickly,” Corrigan said. “We are confident that this suit will have no impact on Contegix’s continued service to its valued customers.” Contegix has been on a growth curve, expanding from two to more than 50 employees over the past seven years and achieving double-digit revenue growth for several years. The company topped $10 million in 2010 revenue, the most recent figure available. Porter did not return calls for comment. The company currently is building out 20,000 square feet of new office space at 500 N. Broadway, which it expects to be completed by the end of June. Contegix also will maintain its other locations at 900 Walnut St. and 1111 Olive St. The company plans to hire 40 to 45 more employees once its new offices are complete. Meanwhile, Xiolink is moving ahead with its $25 million expansion at 1111 Olive. The company added 10 people last year and plans to add 10 to 15 employees in 2012.

BSW grows with retail practice By Evan Binns ebinns@bizjournals.com

Accounting firm Brown Smith Wallace expects to bag a nearly 8 percent increase in revenue this year, hitting $28 million thanks to growth in its retail practice. Within the past two weeks, BSW has added department store chain Lord & Taylor to its client roster and recruited Rob Haggerty, a former May Department Stores tax pro, to the firm’s 20-person retail group. Haggerty joined BSW as a principal. “We’re already up 10 percent in the first quarter,” said Harvey Wallace, managing partner at BSW. “Based on that, $28 million is easily attainable.” If BSW hits its projected revenue of $28 million in 2012, it will be the second year in a row that the firm has posted an 8 percent increase. The accounting firm topped more than $26 million in revenue last year. In that time, BSW has grown to about 72 CPAs and nearly 190 employees. Wallace said the firm’s total employee count would reach 200 by midyear. Connections mattered in sealing the Lord & Taylor deal, according to Wallace. “Lord & Taylor was once part of May Department

Stores and their former CFO worked with both Marty Doerr, head of our retail group, and Rob while at May Co.,” he said. “We had been doing minimal consulting for them within the last year, and they reached out and said they’d like to move all of their tax work to us.” BSW’s retail practice is among the firm’s top three fastest-growing practice areas and is expected to generate more than $1 million this year, Wallace said, and that number is expected to double within the next 18 months. Wallace said landing tax work for New York-based Lord & Taylor, which is wholly owned by private equity firm NRDC Equity Partners, will provide a “big leap” for the retail practice, which already includes several larger public and private companies as clients, such as Express Scripts, First Banks, Schnuck Markets and Scottrade. BSW, headquartered at 1050 N. Lindbergh Blvd., is working with real estate firm Cassidy Turley to find new headquarters to accommodate its growth. The firm also moved its St. Charles office from North Main Street to the Streets of St. Charles mixed-use development, and opened its third area office Glen Carbon, Ill., last year.

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Character st. louis

8

St. Louis Business Journal

stlouis.bizjournals.com

May 4-10, 2012

By Sheldon Ripson

H

e doesn’t have one of the rare Honus Wagner cards, like the one featured in a St. Louisbased online auction that could fetch more than $1 million. But that’s about the only thing you won’t find in Dr. Lawrence Samuels’ vast baseball card collection. A nationally recognized hair transplant surgeon (He’s done more than 2,000), Samuels is chief of dermatology at St. Luke’s Hospital in Chesterfield. He also launched the RxSystems PF line of skin care products used by dermatologists and skin care professionals. On top of it all, Samuels, 61, is a collector of rare coins, fine wine and sports memorabilia. In addition to autographed jerseys and game tickets, Samuels has a baseball signed by every St. Louis Cardinals team from 19282011. Samuels was like any number of kids growing up who collected baseball cards, but he never stopped. He kept collecting through Ladue High School, University of Texas-Austin, even through medical school at Washington University and a 40-year marriage. He and his wife, Stephanie, have two daughters, Stacey and Julie and a son Michael. What is the scope of your collection? What my wife knows about or what I really have? When you mention the scope, it sounds like I need to talk to a psychiatrist. But if you take the modern day baseball cards, which probably began with the 1948 Bowman baseball set up to the present, I have a complete set every year from 1948 until 2012. Not only do I have that baseball run, but I also have it in hockey, football, and basketball. Basically with all modern sports, I have a complete set from every year. How many cards is that? Rather than put a number on it, let’s just look at the 1952 Topps baseball set, which is known around the world because it had Mickey Mantle’s rookie card. A complete set in nice shape is worth about $50,000. Now people my age reading that might say, “I threw one of those away!” It kind of gives you an idea.

But what about a Honus Wagner card? I do not have a Honus Wagner card, nor do Continued on next page

Dr. Lawrence

Samuels

Brian cassidy

When I finally managed to have a complete set of every sport for every year, I had options. I could quit collecting, which I don’t think is a genetic possibility. Or I could move to pre-war cards. So I traded some extra sets of my complete years and got into those like the 1933-1938 Gowdy sets and the T206 set, which was produced between 1909 and 1911 with players like Ty Cobb and Cy Young.


May 4-10, 2012

St. Louis Business Journal

9

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What They Say

From previous page

many people. You could buy a “beat up” one and it would be still worth a lot of money. But that would not make me happy. If you look at my cards, I do not have cards that have creases in them. So if I had that card, it would aggravate me. What got you interested in collecting? I call it collecting, but my wife calls it hoarding. There must be something when you are a collector that makes you collect things. Not only do you collect but you tend to want things that are in better condition. You want to keep them neat and organized. And collecting baseball cards made that very easy. From the time I can remember, which was about five or six years old, baseball was a big thing. So was collecting baseball cards. The cards back in the mid1950s were very colorful, actually pretty to look at even if you really didn’t enjoy baseball. But when you enjoyed baseball it made it even more fun. We played with the cards and made up games. We tossed cards so that when your card touched someone else’s in the pile, you won all the cards that were out there. I must have done well at that because I would end up with a lot of them. From about 1957 to the present are really my original owned cards. There’s an interesting time period there from about 1967 until about 1980 when I finished my training at

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Barnes. If you’re an adult and collecting baseball cards, that’s kind of a weird thing to be doing. I mean you’re an adult and collecting baseball cards? It seems like there might be a parallel here. From the collecting to dermatology there is probably a similar approach. And I think that probably crosses professions as well. When you look at how people behave in their professional life there is probably a reflection of that in their personal life as well. Why did you start the RX Systems skin products line? My wife came home one day with a bag of about 10 products. She told me they shined a black light in here face, told her what was wrong, and sold her some products to help. I asked her, “Didn’t you tell them you were married to a dermatologist,” and hopefully a pretty good one? She said yes, but the black light showed all these spots! So I thought if you are going to provide something, keep it simple. You really just need a cleanser for your skin, some type of cream for either rejuvenation or restoration, and then you need a facial moisturizer with sun screen. Then we looked at the science that existed and set out to make the best products available. That meant a cleanser, with a reparative agent and antioxidant in the same cleanser. You would

want a reparative cream, basically for women over 35 years of age. And then you would want a facial moisturizer with SPF. So part of it was trying to take the best qualities of each of these and make the best product. Is there a passion at work in both the collection and your profession? I love my Cardinals. And I love my patients. I love going to work every day. I love what I do. Part of it is helping people feel better about themselves. A dermatologist can help save lives, in the case of skin cancer for example. But as a rule dermatologists don’t make life and death decisions every day. So when you can help a person look in the mirror and feel better about themselves, it makes their health better. I actually tell people your skin is a reflection of your general health. You don’t see many people who look good who are on a lot of medication. The skin is truly your line of defense against the external environment. Do you have advice for people thinking about becoming a collector? If you are going to collect things, do it because you like it and it’s fun for you. If you are trying to do it because of some inherent value, you need to do your homework. Most “new” memorabilia is not worth very much. Of all the items in your collection, what is the dearest to you? My wife. All the rest of it is just “stuff.”

“His passion is playing golf. Don’t get me wrong, he’s a good golfer. His game will never be as good in reality as it is in his mind.” Dr. David Caplin, St. Louis plastic surgeon who has known Samuels since their residency at Washington University School of Medicine “He is a sports nut. We’ll have a board meeting scheduled, but he’ll call and say ‘The Cubs are in town so we can’t meet then.’ He’s been blessed with a nice business and contacts to allow him to pursue his collection.” Crest Oelke, president, RX Systems PF (Samuels’ skin care product company) “He’s probably a little obsessive-compulsive. When he gets into something, he really wants to know everything there is to know about the subject. Quality is far more important to him.” John Weiss, owner, Weiss Brentwood Volvo and Weiss Toyota Scion of South County, who rekindled a long friendship with Samuels through wine collecting


The List

Highest-rated LEED-certified buildings Ranked by LEED certification level and percentage of LEED points earned

RANK/ Prior year

Project Name Address | certification date

Certification level Percentage leed Points received

Total Cost Project type square footage

special features

Contractor(s) Architect(s)

LEED Consultant(S) Engineer(S)

11

Alberici Office Headquarters

Platinum 86.96%

$20,850,000 new construction 110,000

rainwater catchment system, specialty HVAC system, retention ponds

Alberici Constructors Mackey Mitchell Architects

Vertegy Stock & Associates, Guarantee Electrical 1

22

William A. Kerr Foundation Office

Platinum 84.06%

$2,000,000 new construction 4,800

energy-efficient lighting, no VOC paints, recycled wood, sustainable interior finishes

Trumpet Brothers TMA Architects

Vertegy Solutions AEC

3 3, tied

Crossroads College Prep - Science Wing and Library

Platinum 79.71%

$7,000,000 new construction 27,126

solar tube lighting, specialty HVAC, CO2 monitor, recycled construction waste

G.T. Lawlor TR,i Architects

Vertegy William Tao & Associates

a second look: the next 5

3 3, tied

Novus International Global Headquarters

Platinum 79.71%

$20,000,000 new construction 60,000

under-floor air distribution system, skylights and floor-to-ceiling windows

Clayco Forum Studio Inc.

Paul Todd Merrill Icon, Bieg Plumbing, Kaemmerlen 2

BJC Institute of Health at Washington University School of Medicine certification level: Gold percent of LEED points received: 57.38%

5NR

Staples Promotional Products

Platinum 76.36%

$1,150,120 3 commercial interior 25,000

90 percent of original shell reused, 75 percent construction waste diverted, white roof

G. S. & S. Inc. Treanor Architects

Treanor Architects Solutions AEC

6 5, tied

Cannon Design Powerhouse

1100 Clark Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63102 | July 14, 2009

Gold 66.67%

$6,000,000 new construction 33,000

bike storage, 98 percent of existing walls, floors and roof reused, native vegetation

R G Ross Construction Co. Cannon Design

Cannon Design Cannon Design

6 5, tied

St. Louis Community College - Wildwood Campus

Gold 66.67%

$18,100,000 new construction 73,000

green roof, light-reflecting membrane, 95 percent of construction waste diverted, recycled or reused

L.A. Schafer Construction Co. William B. Ittner Inc.

Vertegy William Tao & Associates

87

Washington University - Family Learning Center

Gold 66.00%

$5,300,000 new construction 19,900

90 percent direct sight to outdoors, low-energy HVAC, low-energy lighting, low VOC, recycled and regional materials

United Construction Ross Barney, KAI

Open Field Designs KAI Design & Build

98

Gateway Commercial/Page Business Center 4

Gold 65.57%

$7,000,000 core and shell 24,238

90.5 percent of building shell retained, no CFCs or HCFCs, recycled concrete

G S & S General Contractors Treanor Architects

Vertegy Solutions AEC

10 9, tied

BJC IS New Primary Data Center

Gold 65.22%

$24,000,000 new construction 38,988

35.2 percent annual water savings, 20.7 percent annual energy savings, low VOC

Clayco, Legacy Building Group Arcturis

Open Field Designs C&R Mechanical, CJL, KJWW, Paynecrest

10 9, tied

St. Louis Community College - William J. Harrison Education Center

Gold 65.22%

$10,000,000 new construction 31,000

energy-efficient HVAC, recycled materials, indoor chemical and pollutant source control

C. Rallo Contracting Co. Inc.5

William Tao & Associates

10 9, tied

Washington University - Genome Sequencing Data Center

Gold 65.22%

$9,700,000 new construction 15,716

metal reflective roof, 100 percent pre-construction and construction materials recycled, energy savings

Volk Construction TEC Plus Architects

NA William Tao & Associates

13 NR

Fireman’s Fund Insurance Corporate Office

Gold 64.41%

$7,000,000 commercial interior 112,000

day-lighting and occupancy lighting controls, reclaimed timber, energy-efficient fixtures

Contegra Construction Huntsman Architectural Group

Contegra Construction 6 Solutions AEC

14 12, tied

Bick Group iBuilding

Gold 63.77%

$5,000,000 new construction 49,183

specialty HVAC, automatic temperature, humidity control, energy-saving lights

Bick Group Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects

Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Bick Group

14 12, tied

Washington University - Brauer Hall

Gold 63.77%

$60,000,000 new construction 150,000

84 percent of construction waste diverted, reuse of underground brick sewer

Clayco RMJM Hillier

Open Field Designs William Tao & Associates, KPFF 7

16 14

Progress Point Center Office Building

Gold 62.30%

DD core and shell 128,460

two-story tinted glass atrium

Contegra Construction Gray Design Group

Contegra Construction Gray Design Group, Stock & Associates

17 15

Roberts Office Expansion

Gold 61.40%

$500,000 commercial interior 12,000

motion-controlled lighting, energy-saving HVAC, low VOC, bamboo flooring

Alberici Constructors Roberts Bros. Cos.

Vertegy DD

18 NR

Shaw Nature Reserve Edgar Anderson Center

Gold 59.42%

$2,200,000 new construction 22,651

wood boiler fueled by wood harvested on-site, 95 percent construction waste salvaged

BSI Constructors Polanik Architects

Energy Solutions Inc. Architectural Design Guild

18 16

Washington University - Danforth University Center

Gold 59.42%

$41,500,000 new construction 115,880

light sensors, low-flow faucets, water-conserving toilets and 50,000-gallon rainwater tank

Clayco TSOI/Kobis & Associates

Open Field Designs Woolpert, KPFF, Bell Electrical, Murphy Co.8

20 17

BJC Progress West Medical Office Building

Gold 59.02%

$12,000,000 core and shell 60,800

40.9 percent annual water savings, energy-efficient lighting, low VOC

Clayco, Legacy Building Group Arcturis

Open Field Designs CGL Engineering

21 18, tied

BioMerieux Building 6 - Research and Development

Gold 57.97%

$8,000,000 new construction 38,500

100 percent daylight views, 90 percent of construction waste diverted, carpool and future electric car parking

Alberici Constructors Cannon Design

Cannon Design Cannon Design

21 18, tied

Emerson Global Data Center

Gold 57.97%

$50,000,000 new construction 35,000

7,800 square-foot rooftop photovoltaic array, 82 percent construction waste diverted

Musick Construction Fox Architects

Fox Architects Clive Samuels & Associates

21 18, tied

Frieze Harley-Davidson

Gold 57.97%

$4,000,000 new construction 33,000

wind turbine, solar light tubes, renewable bamboo flooring, re-used motor oil for heating

Trumpt Builders Karasek Architects

Vertegy OX2 Engineers

21 18, tied

Washington University - College Hall and South 40 House Phase 2 9

Gold 57.97%

$2,700,000 new construction 6,282

green roof with indigenous, drought-tolerant vegetation, high-efficiency plumbing, HVAC, advanced irrigation

Clayco Mackey Mitchell Architects

Open Field Designs Ross & Baruzzini

21 18, tied

Washington University - Eliot B Hall

Gold 57.97%

$17,600,000 new construction 77,275

green roof with indigenous, drought-tolerant vegetation, high-efficiency plumbing

Clayco Mackey Mitchell Architects

Open Field Designs Ross and Baruzzini

Page 10 | May 4-10, 2012 Researched by Rebecca Wohltman rwohltman@bizjournals.com

Cassidy Turley St. Louis Headquarters certification level: Gold percent of LEED points received: 57.27% Landis + Gyr/Cellnet Technology certification level: Gold percent of LEED points received: 56.14% Building One - BRDG Park at the Danforth Plant Science Center10 certification level: Gold percent of LEED points received: 55.74% Express Scripts Headquarters Building II certification level: Gold percent of LEED points received: 55.74%

Notes Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) is a third-party certification program and the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high-performance green buildings developed by the U.S. Green Building Council in 2000. 1. Additional engineers include Corrigan Co. 2. Additional engineers include Alper Audi Inc. and Stock & Associates Consulting Engineers Inc. 3. Cost is for interior finish only and does not include core and shell renovations and interior systems furniture. 4. Listed previously as 8610 Page. 8606 and 8610 Page comprise the $7 million Page Business Center, developed by Green Street Properties. The 8610 Page complex has two office spaces. 5. Additional contractors include Wachter Inc., Simms Building Group and Birkel Electric. 6. Huntsman Architectural Group was an additional LEED consultant on the project. 7. Additional engineers include Cole, EDAW and GPR. 8. Corrigan Co. was an additional engineer on the project. 9. College Hall and South 40 House are two separate buildings connected by a walkway. 10. BRDG stands for the BioResearch & Development Growth Park at the Danforth Plant Science Center. NR — Not Ranked, NA — Not Applicable DD — Declined to Disclose Source: U.S. Green Building Council and the listed companies.

electronic book of lists To order call (800) 486-3289

8800 Page Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63114 | July 8, 2005

21 O’Fallon St., St. Louis, Mo. 63102 | July 26, 2007

500 DeBaliviere Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63112 | Jan. 13, 2010

20 Research Park Drive, St. Charles, Mo. 63112 | April 22, 2009

8610 Page Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63114 | Oct. 28, 2011

2645 Generations Drive, Grover, Mo. 63040 | Feb. 5, 2008

1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Mo. 63130 | Jan. 25, 2011

8610 Page Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63114 | June 24, 2009

2 Progress Point Parkway, O’Fallon, Mo. 63368 | Aug. 1, 2010

3140 Cass Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63106 | June 28, 2011

222 Newstead Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63110 | Oct. 2, 2009

1 Progress Point Court, O’Fallon, Mo. 63368 | March 23, 2011

12969 Manchester Road, St. Louis, Mo. 63131 | Aug. 14, 2008

1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Mo. 63130 | Sept. 20, 2010

1 Progress Point Parkway, O’Fallon, Mo. 63368 | Oct. 26, 2009

1408 N. Kingshighway, St. Louis, Mo. 63113 | Dec. 7, 2007

Highway 100 and I-44, Gray Summit, Mo. 63039 | April 30, 2011

1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Mo. 63130 | Dec. 29, 2008

2 Progress Point Parkway, O’Fallon, Mo. 63368 | June 18, 2010

595 Anglum Road, Hazelwood, Mo. 63042 | April 21, 2010

8060 W. Florissant Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63136 | Feb. 12, 2010

1560 N. Green Mount Road, O’Fallon, Ill. 62269 | June 19, 2008

1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Mo. 63130 | Oct. 27, 2010

1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Mo. 63130 | Oct. 27, 2010

KAI Design & Build

KAI Design & Build, J.R. Grimes


May 4-10, 2012

St. Louis Business Journal

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Improving The Built World Through: Art & Science, Discovery & Ingenuity, Intelligence & Ambition.

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12

On Background

St. Louis Business Journal

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Stock Moves

Proxy Corner: public company overview

Following are the top and bottom five local public companies in terms of the stock’s weekly percentage change from April 25-May 2, 2012.

MEMC Electronic Materials Inc. (WFR) Stock value

501 Pearl Drive St. Peters, Mo. 63376 (636) 474-5000 www.memc.com

Chatila

Develops, manufactures and markets silicon wafers for semiconductor and solar applications; develops and markets photovoltaic energy solutions.

230,816,183 $3.61 $833,246,421

Total common shares of stock outstand- ing as of April 5, 2012 Value of one share of common stock as of May 2, 2012 Approximate market value of firm as of May 2, 2012

$12.00 $3.31

12-month high 12-month low

Olin Corp. Centene Corp. Arch Coal Post Holdings

Directors Name Cash & stock awards Peter Blackmore $256,090 Robert Boehlke $269,090 Ahmad Chatila NA Emmanuel Hernandez $261,090 John Marren $294,090 Michael McNamara $253,090 William Stevens $294,090 Marshall Turner $263,090 James Williams $268,090

Current position President and CEO, ShoreTel Inc. Former executive vice president and CFO, KLA-Tencor President and CEO of the company Former CFO, SunPower Corp. Chairman of the company; partner, TPG Capital CEO of Felxtronics International Ltd. Chairman, BBI Group Inc. Former interim CEO and interim SVP of the company Partner, TPG Capital

2011 Executive compensation Name and position Ahmad Chatila, President and CEO Mark Murphy, SVP and CFO4 Denis McCarthy, former interim prinicpal financial officer4 Kenneth Hannah, EVP and President-Solar Materials Shaker Sadasivam, EVP and President-Semiconductor materials Carlos Domenech, EVP and President-SunEdison

-12%

Stock awards2 -- $2,783,520 $153,023

Total3 $957,000 $3,241,228 $483,353

$475,000

$134,000

$1,300,215

$1,909,215

$409,231

$91,500

$950,061

$1,450,792

$418,269

$591,589

$1,200,436

$2,210,294

Previous year (2011) % of common shares6 13,732,777 10.9%

Previous year7 6.0%

NA — Not Applicable. Directors who are also employees of the company receive no additional compensation for board service. 1 Includes amounts listed in the company’s proxy both as “bonus” and as “non-equity incentive plan compensation.” 2 Includes the value of stock and option awards. 3 Excludes company-made payments to retirement savings plans, relocation reimbusrements, contributions to long-term disability plans, special bonuses, accrued time off payouts, and other perks. 4 Denis McCarthy served as the company’s interim principal financial

537,557 251,392 Not Listed Not Listed 2,041,912

* * * * 1.4%

* * Not Listed Not Listed *

officer until Mark Murphy became chief financial officer effective January 2011. McCarthy also served as principal accounting officer until Murphy also took over that role in August 2011. McCarthy remains vice president and CFO of the company’s semiconductor materials business unit. 5 Includes options. 6 Refers to 230,816,183 shares outstanding as April 5, 2012. 7 Refers to 230,254,573 shares outstanding as Feb. 16, 2011. * Less than 1 percent

Source: MEMC Electronic Materials’ 2012 and 2011 proxy statements. Researched by Nicholas Ledden.

On Board: nonprofit overview Grace Hill Health Centers Inc. 2524 Hadley St., St. Louis, Mo., 63106 (314) 898-1700 | www.gracehill.org A Federally-Qualified Health Center providing health-care services at multiple locations, primarily to the uninsured or low-income population.

Top administrators Alan Freeman, president, CEO Barbara Bailey, VP, COO James Anderson, 1 VP, chief information officer Alice Boon, VP, HR Dr. Yolette Brown, VP, clinical affairs Yvonne Buhlinger, VP, commuFreeman nity health services Veronica Richardson, VP, quality improvement Janet Voss, VP, CFO

Fiscal year figures Fiscal year ended 12/31/10 Total revenue $29,821,001 Total expenses $30,148,666 Comp/benefits (excl. payroll taxes) $18,109,527 Revenue less expenses

($327,665)

1 Joined the organization in March 2012. 2 Reflects total compensation. Includes bonus and incentive comp:

-6%

Furniture Brands International Huttig Building Products

Aegion Corp. Spartech Corp. -4% -2% 0% 2% 4%

6%

8%

10%

Research Reports Compiled by Joe Dwyer. Sigma-Aldrich Corp. April 24, $70.24 Robert W. Baird & Co. Analyst: Quintin Lai

PrivateBancorp Inc. April 24, $15.01 Robert W. Baird & Co. Analyst: David George

Sigma-Aldrich Outperform: posted solid first-quarter results with organic sales growth of 3 percent, which was ahead of our 1.2 percent estimate. End markets remain healthy. We were pleased to see Research sales growth get back to 4 percent, despite continued uncertainties in academic funding and Europe. Asia Pacific/Latin America again led the way with 9 percent organic growth. India and China were strong double-digit growth geographies, and Japan grew 7 percent. eCommerce sales grew 8 percent organically as website visits grew 25 percent. Sigma-Aldrich’s consumables-only business model is showing good consistency, and we remain confident on the company’s ability to hit/exceed its 2012 guidance. We are maintaining an Outperform rating and $77 price target.

Neutral: Solid loan growth, net-interest-margin expansion, and fee income growth were the highlights of firstquarter 2012 results. Asset quality was more mixed as the company continues to aggressively reduce non-performing assets, but leading credit indicators improved. Core fee income increased about 11 percent quarter over quarter driven by growth in capital markets and loan/credit-related fees. While asset disposition activity will remain elevated, management expects further declines in credit costs given the sustained improvement in leading credit indicators. Favorable guidance for loan growth and credit quality helped drive gains in its stock price. However, we believe near-term upside is limited. We reiterate our Neutral rating. Price target: $16.

Insider Trades

Largest sources of revenue Program service fees Contributions, gifts and grants

-8%

American Railcar Industries

Information is considered reliable but its accuracy cannot be guaranteed by Wells Fargo Advisors. This is not a solicitation to purchase any security referred to herein. Stocks selected by the St. Louis Business Journal. Some stocks continue to trade in after-hours trading and therefore the closing price may vary slightly from the daily closing prices issued by stock exchanges.

Bonus1 $207,000 $65,400 $51,099

Name of beneficial owner Total common shares Thornburg Investment 25,150,243 Management Inc. Kenneth Hannah 625,495 Ahmad Chatila 498,972 Shaker Sadasivam 357,509 Carlos Domenach 212,259 Directors and officers as a group 3,120,289

-10%

Energizer Holdings

Stock table information provided by Wells Fargo Advisors.

Salary $750,000 $392,308 $279,231

Significant stock ownership5

May 4-10, 2012

$19,684,784 $10,164,639

Independent contractors Quest Diagnostics, lab services Arcturis, architects BKD LLP, accounting

$879,224 $304,625 $144,055

Highest-paid and/or key employees 2 Alan Freeman, president, CEO $235,342 Dr. Yolette Brown, VP, clinical affairs, pediatrician $234,528 Dr. Shulamit Portnoy, pediatric neurologist $211,817 Dr. Margaret Baum, OB-GYN $203,234 Dr. Amy Ravin, OB-GYN $199,573 Dr. Bridget Rutledge, OB-GYN $189,105 Dr. Melissa Tepe, OB-GYN $166,254

Current officers of the board Joan D’Ambrose, chair; community volunteer Peter Bunce, vice chair; community volunteer Jean Frazee, treasurer; CPA, self-employed Vickie Lomax, secretary; community volunteer Freeman, $10,100; Brown, $6,408; Portnoy, $9,014; Baum, $4,033; Ravin, $4,379; Rutledge, $2,733; and Tepe, $1,523.

Source: latest Internal Revenue Service filing and organization. Researched by Diana Barr.

The following purchases or sales of stock in St. Louis-based companies or in companies with local subsidiaries have been reported to the SEC by officers, directors and owners of more than 10 percent of stock. Arch Coal Inc. Jeffrey Strobel, officer, purchased 1,000 shares March 29 at $10.51 per share and now holds 10,400 shares. Sheila Feldman, officer, exercised options for 9,334 shares March 28 at $8.72 per share. On the same date, she sold 9,334 shares at $10.71 per share and now holds 8,668 shares. Robert Jones, general counsel, exercised options for 58,400 shares March 15 at $11.30 per share. On the same date, he sold 58,400 shares at $11.80 per share and now holds 22,668 shares. John Eaves, president, exercised options for 71,900 shares March 15 at $11.30 per share. On the same date, he sold 71,900 shares at $12.31 per share and now holds 128,074 shares. Belden Inc. Glenn Kalnasy, director, exercised options for 1,000 shares March 28 at $24.96

per share. On the same date, he sold 1,000 shares at $39.28 to $39.30 per share and now holds 32,132 shares. Steven Biegacki, officer, sold 5,417 shares March 19-27 at $39.70 to $40.17 per share and now holds 15,123 shares. Naresh Kumra, officer, exercised options for 50,663 shares March 16-19 at $11.92 to $21.70 per share. Hendrikus Derksen, chief financial officer, exercised options for 2,865 shares March 9 at $11.92 per share. He sold 3,271 shares March 16 at $39.78 to $40 per share and now holds 8,591 shares. Wells Fargo & Co. Directors Judith Runstad, Susan Engel, Cynthia Milligan and Philip Quigley each exercised options for 6,398 shares April 16 or April 17 at $25.11 per share. Susan Swenson, director, exercised options for 5,303 shares April 16 at $30.29 per share.


May 4-10, 2012

St. Louis Business Journal

stlouis.bizjournals.com

People on the Move

Banking/ finance

Rhonda HammNiebruegge of Lambert-St. Louis International Airport was named to the Transportation Industry Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. John Laughlin was named to Midwest BankCentre’s Southeast Missouri regional board.

campus director of The Art Institute of St. Louis.

Energy

Arch Coal elected Deck Slone as senior vice president, strategy and public policy, effective June 1, and promoted Jennifer Beatty to vice president, investor relations.

Media

as a welder and James Walls as an industrial electrician.

Marketing

Hot In The Kitchen hired Judy Kerr-Landeck as executive account director.

Goodman as marketing director and James Compton as manager of individual giving and events.

St. Louis Magazine hired Kristin Kellogg as associate art director.

Nonprofit Judy Kerr-Landeck

Stages St. Louis promoted Susan Mintz to development director, and hired Kristen

Services Kristin KellogG

Clean promoted Jason Cook to route sales manager.

Jason Cook

Health care

Dr. David Jaffe of Washington University School of Medicine was elected president of the Academic Pediatric Association.

Hospitality

John Laughlin

Connie Duglin Linens hired Lori Holt Majewski as an account executive.

Distribution

Legal

Education

Manufacturing

Cummins MidSouth hired Jeff Wahl as director of sales - power generation.

David Hofmann was appointed

Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard PC hired Dennis Harms and Maggie Moore as associates. EPIC Systems Inc. hired Albert Ruck

People On The

Move ...a user-generated feature of the St. Louis Business Journal

Know of a Professional Recognition, New Hire, Promotion or Board of Directors change that the St. Louis Business Journal should publish? 1. Go to stlouis.bizjournals.com 2. Scroll down to PEOPLE section 3. Click on “Submit People”

The new Enterprise Bank in Creve Coeur. A new place for business banking.

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his new office is now a convenient place for our customers, both old and new, to do business in the growing Creve Coeur area. It’s also a reflection of our growth. We are the largest publicly held bank headquartered in St. Louis, with $3.4 billion in assets. Please stop by.

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13


14

St. Louis Business Journal

stlouis.bizjournals.com

May 4-10, 2012

How to: Choose an Accounting Firm

Accountant should bring ideas, interest to the table By Diana Barr dbarr@bizjournals.com

Largest Accounting Firms

Finding the right accounting firm is about more than just hiring someone to crunch your numbers. Jim Scheetz, CFO of appliance parts distributor Marcone Supply, said to look for an accounting firm whose size, skills and experience match your needs. “Do they do a lot of work with distributors, or specialty chemical companies, if that’s your business?” he said. Your bank might need to approve your accounting firm, and a business might use more than one accounting firm where there’s a need for further independence, Scheetz pointed out. “Your tax accountant doesn’t necessarily have to be your auditor,” he said. Research the accounting firm’s reputation. “Ask for referrals and follow up on them,” he said, finding out from clients how the accounting firm’s field work went, and how flexible and “real world” the firm is. Scheetz said hiring an accountant is “a long-term personal relationship,” and to meet the team in a social setting to gauge rapport. “You find out a lot about a person on a golf course,” he said. David Brown, founder and president of cloud computing and colocation ser-

FIRM

Local Cpas

RubinBrown LLP PwC Ernst & Young KPMG LLP Deloitte LLP

180 156 130 118 102

Source: Business Journal research, August 2011

vices provider Datotel, said that he looked at an accounting firm’s level of experience in both accounting and auditing, as well as its reputation in the community. “We asked our other trusted advisers if they’d worked with the candidate firms, pros and cons, since they all have to work together at some point,” he said. Arrange to meet the accounting firm’s entire team, including “the people you’ll be working with day in and day out, not just the main partner,” he said. Look for skills that will complement those of your in-house team. “We have a finance team, but we don’t know much about tax code,” Brown said. Consider not only an accounting firm’s technical skills, but its creativity. “If we’re not asking the right questions,

Ask the Experts Jim Scheetz

we want them to tell us the questions we should be asking,” Brown said. David Busker, president and CEO of real estate firm Koch Development, said to get referrals to accounting firms from your own network. “With accounting firms, the essence of how they perform is how good their processes are and what their approach to client engagement is,” he said. “Because they’re dealing with a lot of detail, check that they have processes in place, so that everything gets covered.” Look for an accounting firm that has enough of its own resources that it doesn’t need to lean on your business for technical information and other support, said Busker. An accounting firm should understand your business and have done a lot of work for clients in your industry, he said. In the case of real estate, for example, “You want someone who’s worked on a TIF [tax increment financing] transaction, or understand how those work, so you don’t have to educate them.” Busker said, “It’s a service, so it comes down to relationships and how well they take an active interest,” adding that his firm appreciates “direct attention from the decision maker or partners.”

CFO, Marcone Supply

• CHECK out referrals • MEET in a social setting

David Brown President, Datotel

• LOOK for complementary skills • CONSIDER creativity

David Busker President and CEO, Koch Development

• CHECK processes • GAUGE interest in your business

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May 4-10, 2012

St. Louis Business Journal

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Advice

“E

Lou Holtz’s three rules of life

verybody needs four things in life: “Something to do, someone to love, someone to believe in and something to hope for.” I wish I had said that, but it was my very close friend Lou Holtz. I recently invited Lou to speak to a professional group I am mentoring and he was his usual outstanding self. It’s no wonder that the Washington Speakers Bureau calls Lou one of the best speakers in the world. I’ve heard Lou speak a hundred times, and he still amazes me with his practical, down-toearth, plain and simple advice. For example, we have all kinds of rules and laws. By Harvey We’ve got federal Mackay laws, state laws, corporate laws, bylaws… you name it. Holtz simplifies things by following three simple rules. Rule No. 1 – Do right. “Just do the right thing,” Lou says. “We’ve all done dumb things and wish we hadn’t done them, but you can’t go through life with an albatross around your neck saying, ‘I made a mistake.’ Say you’re sorry, make amends and move on.” He added: “I think it’s wrong to be bitter. We all have a reason to be bitter. We’ve all had injustices done to us by society, by a spouse, by a friend, but you can’t go through life being bitter. We’re always blaming someone else. Wherever we are, it’s because of the choices we make.” Rule No. 2 – Do everything to the best of your ability with the time allotted. Lou says: “Not everybody will be an All-American. Not everybody will be first team. Not everybody will be great. But everybody can do the best they can with the time allotted.” Rule No. 3 – Show people you care. I have seen this rule in action many times. Lou is constantly asking people, “How can I help you? How can I assist you?” And he means it. He has a deep-down burning desire to help people. Lou Holtz says he can get by with only three rules because the people you meet have three basic questions. The first question: Can I trust you? “Without trust, there is no relationship,” Lou said. “Without trust, you don’t have a chance. People have to trust you. They have to trust your product. The only way you can ever get trust is if both sides do the right thing.” The second question: Are you committed to excellence? Lou explained that “When you call on a customer, you send a message

that you are committed to certain standards. How much do you know about your company and what opportunities your company offers to satisfy people’s needs? The only way that can ever be answered is if you do everything to the best of your ability.” The third question: Do you care about me? Holtz said: “Do you care about me and what happens if your product doesn’t do what it’s intended to do? Caring about people is not making their life easy. Caring about people is not being their friend. Caring about people is enabling them to be successful.” A few years ago I was asked to help raise money for a Lou Holtz statue at Notre Dame. On the pedestal, his players had chosen three words — Trust, Commitment, Love. Those words represent Lou’s core values. If people follow these three simple rules, their self-confidence grows. They don’t worry when the phone rings. They have no doubt about what they are doing. They lift everyone up in their organization. These three rules help hold organizations together. Holtz then finished with this exercise. He asked us to pick two people. Pick someone you love, admire and re-

Do right. Do everything to the best of your ability with the time allotted. Show people you care. spect. Then take someone you’ve got a problem with. Ask these three questions about both people. Just a simple yes or no. “I guarantee you, the person you admire and respect, you said yes to all three questions,” Holtz said. “The person you’ve got a problem with, you pinpointed a problem. Either you can’t trust them, they aren’t committed, or they don’t care.” When you have a problem with someone who falls into these three categories you have to decide if you can change it or live with it. If you can’t do either, your only other choice — and probably the right choice — is to divorce yourself from the problem or the individual. I never said it was easy. Harvey Mackay is author of the New York Times No. 1 bestseller “Swim With The Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive.” He can be reached at harvey@mackay.com, through his website at www. harveymackay.com or by writing him at MackayMitchell Envelope Co., 2100 Elm St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414.

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16

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May 4-10, 2012

Introducing AT&T

in St. Louis. With speeds up to 10x faster

than 3G.

AT&T MOBILE HOTSPOT ELEVATE 4G

AT&T USBCONNECT MOMENTUM 4G Limited 4G LTE availability in select markets. Deployment ongoing. 4G LTE device and data plan required. Claim compares 4G LTE download speeds to industry average 3G download speeds. LTE is a trademark of ETSI. Learn more about 4G LTE at att.com/network.

1.866.MOBILITY – ATT.COM/ LTEDATADEVICES – VISIT A STORE Scan this code to get more information about these and other LTE data devices. Go to scan.mobi on your mobile phone to get the FREE AT&T Code Scanner. Data rates apply. ©2012 AT&T Intellectual Property. Service provided by AT&T Mobility. All rights reserved. AT&T and the AT&T logo are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property. All other marks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.


PAGES 17-24

may 4-10, 2012


18

small business

St. Louis Business Journal

May 4-10, 2012

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Ready. Set. Startup!

I

n recent years, St. Louis has become a hot bed for startup companies of all makes and sizes. Whether they are focused on technology, Internet applications or, in one case, brain-boosting energy drinks, local startups are making themselves known in their markets. Thanks to organizations like the St. Louis County Economic Council and its launch of the $7.5 million life-science incubator called the Helix Center, and the St. Louis Arch Angels, who have invested $26 million in area startups since the group began in 2005, St. Louis is taking the next step to becoming a haven for startups. So we created this section with the startup in mind. Not

only do we profile a few local startups that have established themselves (on page 21), we also introduce you to the five area companies that you need to know about (page 19). Rounding out our coverage are a pair of articles on the work that it takes behind the scenes to launch and maintain a startup. The first deals with the process of obtaining and securing a patent while examining new litigation that many startups face (page 24). The second details the work that local investors do to keep promising startups afloat financially (page 23). As for the startups themselves, you might want to check back with the Business Journal to see how far they go. — Vince Brennan, section editor


small business

May 4-10, 2012

St. Louis Business Journal

19

stlouis.bizjournals.com

Startups gain recognition in a crowded space By Amir Kurtovic akurtovic@bizjournals.com

Rooted in Tradition.

Y

ou only have to walk the halls at one of St. Louis’ science or technology incubators or listen to aging serial-entrepreneurs-turned-investors to know that there’s a buzz in the air. Entrepreneurs representing dozens of small and innovative startups are toiling away, perfecting their computer code, marketing materials and 30-second elevator pitches. Among these startups are many potential winners, and maybe just as many looming failures. But within the small community of entrepreneurs and investors in St. Louis, the following five companies are seen as having the potential to become success stories in the immediate future. Brian cassidy (2)

LockerDome

I

f the games of tape ball and a fully stocked bar inside the LockerDome office on Washington Avenue sound enticing, the mattresses in the conference rooms for extended work sessions are proof that it’s not all fun and games at LockerDome. CEO Gabe Lozano recently moved his staff of 12 into the ground floor office in the center of downtown’s bar and nightlife district from its previous office in the Westport area. The larger office space comes after the company raised more than $1.2 million in the last year, mostly from local investors. Jim McKelvey, the co-founder of mobile payment company Square Inc., is an investor and sits on the LockerDome’s board of directors. LockerDome, a social network for athletes, fans, coaches, agents and scouts, has been growing at a breakneck pace and is now attracting 500,000 active monthly users, Lozano said. “Right now we are the fastest-growing sports property in the country,” he said. LockerDome is working with 10 sports agencies and hosts networks for more than 70 professional athletes, including St. Louis Cardinals third baseman David Freese. The company earns revenue through subscription fees (ranging from $5 to $99 per

Systematic Revenue

W

hile Systematic Revenue has not yet garnered much attention, many in the St. Louis tech community expect great things out of this startup. Don Breckenridge Jr. and Jim Siverts, who built up and sold another startup in the past, founded Systematic Revenue in De-

Don Breckenridge Jr.

Sustained by Talent. Providing sound business advice and innovative solutions to clients’ diverse business and legal needs for more than 30 years.

Gabe Lozano month) it charges to amateur and professional sports leagues and is working on its first sponsorships with national brands, a new revenue stream for LockerDome. The key to success for the sports-themed social network is to give athletes and fans a unique way to express their sports persona digitally, and in turn give sports brands a new way to reach customers, Lozano said.

cember 2010. Their previous effort, Sendouts, an application that allows third-party recruiters to manage all of their clients, job openings and candidates, was sold for an undisclosed sum to St. Louis-based private equity firm FTL Capital Partners in 2009. With Systematic Revenue, Breckenridge and Siverts want to help small businesses thrive by creating an effective and affordable marketing automation software. Breckenridge said Systematic Revenue will use its own software to track potential clients and automate marketing and sales efforts. “We will capture visitors to our website through online forms and nurture them with educational marketing campaigns,” he said. Systematic Revenue has raised $430,000 in funding, mostly through independent investors and self-funding, and is now working to raise an additional $500,000. The company is housed in the T-REx technology incubator at the Railway Exchange Building and is part of the Capital Innovators seed fund and incubator program. Systematic Revenue currently has about 25 small businesses enrolled in a beta testing program and will launch by June, Breckenridge said. Subscriptions for the service will start at $99 a month. Continued on next page

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20

small business

St. Louis Business Journal

May 4-10, 2012

stlouis.bizjournals.com

From previous page

Brian cassidy (3)

Robert Paul

Mark Sawyier

Bonfyre (Off Campus Media)

B

onfyre is a geo-location app and social media network strictly for college students. Users can only register with a valid school email address from an approved university. The company behind the app, Off Campus Media, was started by Washington University students Mark Sawyier and Ray Gobberg as a website to help college student move off campus by providing apartment listings and information. Though the company is mum on fundraising, the Business Journal reported that the St. Louis Arch Angels invested $500,000, and an additional $250,000 came from several other investors. Like its sports-themed social media companion LockerDome, Off Campus Media is also advised by McKelvey.

With Bonfyre, Sawyier and his team of 10 full-time employees wanted to create a network to help college students organize activities around campus. Launched in October 2011, the app has already gone through a major upgrade and has been adopted by more than 25 percent of Washington University students. Bonfyre is also available for students of Saint Louis University, University of Missouri-St. Louis and University of Missouri-Columbia. With the release of version 2.0, Bonfyre has expanded to campuses at the University of Illinois, DePaul University and University of California-Berkeley. Sawyier said the Bonfyre team is working to recruit ambassadors to more campuses over the summer to prepare for a national rollout of the app in the fall semester.

Nawgan Products

A

s a clinical neuropsychologist at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Robert Paul has spent his career studying the brain and authoring more than 150 published research articles on its complexities. With his startup Nawgan Products, Paul wanted to put all of that knowledge to use and develop a drink that stimulates “optimal brain function” using ingredients that have a solid footing in scientific knowledge. “When you look at the market, Gatorade was the last time we had an infusion of science in the consumer beverage space, and that was in the ‘70s,” Paul said. The company was founded in 2007, and Paul spent several years developing the drink recipe before taking it to the local market in 2007.

Nawgan now has nine full-time employees and has raised about $7 million to date. The vast majority of that money came from Kirin Holdings, a Japanese beverage company that took a minority stake in Nawgan for $6 million. The remainder was raised from friends and family and investments made by the nonprofit BioGenerator and St. Louis Arch Angels investment group, Paul said. With an established distribution network locally, Nawgan is now in the process of rolling out its drinks nationwide. The product, which comes in three flavors, is being introduced in Florida and Arizona and has a presence in southern California, Paul said. “We have a lot of work to do to become a dominant brand in the U.S.,” Paul said. “After we are established nationwide, we will tackle the international market.”

Aisle411

W

hen Nathan Pettyjohn spent 15 minutes in a store looking for a surge protector, and had three sales associates direct him to wrong locations, he had the light-bulb moment that led to his startup. When he saw another customer walk out because the sales associate didn’t know where a product was, he knew companies would be interested in the product. It turns out, Pettyjohn said, that various studies have shown that retailers lose up to 20 percent of potential sales because customers either can’t find what they’re looking for or because they don’t have the patience to wait for somebody to help them locate it. Aisle411 is a smartphone app that allows users to navigate inside stores and guides them to the exact location of a product. For example, a user can enter a grocery list and get a map that takes

them to all of the products on the list in the most efficient way. “Many people have likened it to a Google Maps for the indoor world,” Pettyjohn said. Aisle411 was started in 2008 and works in about 2,000 retail locations. But Pettyjohn said the company will soon announce a partnership with a top-10 national retailer that will greatly increase the reach of the software. By the end of the year, he expects Aisle411 to be working at 12,000 retail locations around the country. The company, which was founded by Pettyjohn and his partner Matthew Kulig, has raised about $5.5 million to date, mostly through local investors. Aisle411 has 18 employees and has opened a satellite office in Palo Alto, Calif., to have a presence in Silicon Valley.

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May 4-10, 2012

St. Louis Business Journal

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Roundtable: St. Louis startup veterans offer coaching advice for novices Economic rEcovEry springs forward

Aaron stone

Stone, 39, CEO and co-founder of Netelligent Corp., a Chesterfield-based networking, telephone, collaboration/video, data center/servers/storage, virtualization and wireless solutions provider founded in 2003.

Stephanie leffler

matthew porter

Leffler, 30, CEO of CrowdSource, a division of Juggle LLC, a Swansea, Ill.-based business incubator which she co-founded in 2008 and which spawned several spinoffs, including workflow management company CrowdSource.

If a friend of yours told you he or she was starting a business and asked you for your top three pieces of advice, what would they be? Stone: One, find and join a peer group specific to your industry so that you can more quickly learn what works and what doesn’t. Two, use key benchmark data. Join a group like Entrepreneurs Organization, as associating with fellow entrepreneurs helps not only with business but also personal growth, and helps remind you that you’re not crazy — just different. Three, find and read as many business books like “E-Myth” and “Great By Choice” as you can before you start. Then continue reading and referencing those books to improve your organization over time. Leffler: One, never give up. Things inevitably will go wrong. It is all about how you react when things do go wrong. Two, hire dedicated, smart people who are able to create value rather than just doing a job. Three, set the bar high. Everyone will rise to the level of your weakest team member.

Porter, 35, CEO and cofounder of Contegix LLC, a downtown St. Louis-based Internet infrastructure and web hosting company founded in 2004.

Jeffrey keane

Keane, 45, CEO and founder of Coolfire Media, a St. Louis-based design and production studio established in 2002. Information compiled by William Poe

cessful. Third, be fearless and relentless in your pursuit of success. Your approach must be an absolute refusal to fail.

Leffler: Yes! You don’t know everything, and taking the advice of others is the best way to make better decisions quickly.

Do you need to check your ego at the door and listen to what others have to say about your plan or your business?

Porter: You need to have enough ego and confidence to pursue the dream and vision. This is what will drive the long nights to finalize a presentation or beta product. This is what will inspire people to work with you. The trick is not to have

Stone: You are only fooling yourself if you’re not open to advice. There is no benefit to driving over the same potholes as others, so listen even if it bruises your ego along the way.

Continued on next page

Do you know a remarkable business woman? Nominate her today!

Porter: One, people and their commitment make the difference. On the personal side, make sure you have a support system in place. This could be your family, friends and advisors. On the business side, make sure you learn how to select the right people — as employees and vendors. Two, draft and know your business plan. Then, realize that you will probably need to pivot as the world changes around you. Be flexible and agile enough to know that your business plan will need to change. Your customers are always changing. You should be able to as well. Three, select and develop good relationships with your banker, attorney and accountant. You will need them when things are good and when they’re challenging. Keane: First, make sure you truly have the stomach for being in business for yourself. It’s not for everyone. There are a lot of ups and downs and there will inevitably be some sleepless nights. But, if you’re successful, there is nothing better than owning your business. Second, have a clear vision for where you want to take your company but be flexible along the way. Opportunities will come up, and you’ll need to be open and willing to embrace them. It’s this improvising along the way that has allowed us to be suc-

www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/nomination/7511

Sponsored by

Sally Roth Area President Regions Bank

The adage, “No matter how long the winter, spring is sure to follow,” reminds us that despite a very difficult three years, we are seeing signs of economic recovery blossoming, and that is very welcoming news. It’s likely that this recovery — in which GDP growth of 2-3% is the norm — will feel unlike recent ones. That growth harkens to banking and commerce from years ago, with growth fueled by local commerce and activity rooted in personal relationships and simple business practices. There are ample reasons for optimism in our economic recovery. Lending demand is beginning to thaw, with demand up over eight percent from this period last year. Manufacturing is modestly increasing and consumer spending is up. Unemployment continues on a slow path downward. Although we are seeing positive indicators, fuel costs and the subsequent increase in consumer goods will continue to place a drag on recovery. Banks will remain a vehicle to provide the fuel for economic growth. Sound financial management plus reasonable and disciplined approaches to risk are hallmarks of the best investments of capital. With rates at all-time lows, businesses with the capacity and strength to expand can count on fierce competition for their business. Consumers who have yet to refinance homes or other credit can greatly improve their financial situation if they do so now. It’s a season that promises more capital to lend, more financial products and services to meet the needs of the community, all provided in a way that fuels growth and guards our future at the same time.


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small business

St. Louis Business Journal

May 4-10, 2012

stlouis.bizjournals.com From previous page

so much ego that you stop listening to those that want you to succeed, like a customer, an employee or advisor. Keane: I think it is wise to have a small group of trusted advisors to help you see the flaws in your plan and to give you some idea of what to expect. These should be men or women who have done it before.

WITH GRATITUDE The St. Louis Public School District would like to thank the following individuals and organizations for sponsoring 18 NEW early childhood classrooms across the City of St. Louis. Individuals & Organizations

School Benefiting

Anonymous Donors

Ashland Elementary School Peabody Elementary School

Friends and Family of Thomas M. Stenger

Wilkinson Early Childhood Center

Chartwells-Thompson Hospitality & Friends of Former Principal Jimmie Irons

Farragut Elementary School

Friends of Former Principal Sandra Wilson

Ashland Elementary School

Lewis, Rice & Fingersh L.C.

Hodgen College Bound Academy Jefferson Arts Integration Elementary

The Dana Brown Charitable Trust

Laclede Elementary School Oak Hill Elementary School Woodward Elementary School

First Student & The Deaconess Foundation

Jefferson Arts Integration Elementary School

The Kwame Foundation

Herzog Pilot Academy

Build-A-Bear Workshop Foundation & The Maxine Clark & Robert Fox Charitable Foundation

Mason School of Academic & Cultural Literacy

The PNC Foundation

Bryan Hill Elementary School Clay Community Education Full Service School Froebel Elementary School

The Saigh Foundation

Herzog Pilot Academy (2 classrooms)

Because of their generosity, more than 360 three- and four-year-olds will receive free preschool instruction from certified teachers, preparing them for a bright and successful academic future. For individuals and organizations interested in supporting the further addition of early childhood classrooms at SLPS, please contact the St. Louis Public Schools Foundation at (314) 436-2025.

How do you know when you have enough capital or cash on hand to begin a business? Stone: The key is building a pro forma budget and tying it (against) benchmark financial ratios for your industry. This will allow you to see the impact that things like sales, accounts receivables aging and expenses have on capital requirements. Leffler: Build a profit and loss statement model and ensure that you have four to six months more cash than you think you need. Porter: The level of capital needed is aligned directly with the requirements of the business and people in it. Break down what is specifically needed for the company to start and what the people involved are going to need. Too many people think they can start a business and not draw a livable salary. This leads to burn out. The business will eventually need to reach a stage where everyone is paid competitive salaries. Keane: Do a detailed business plan. Determine how much cash you think you will need. Double it. And then you still won’t have enough. What are the best and worst sources for start-up capital? Stone: If your initial focus is on offerings that are not capital intensive, I recommend self or bootstrap funding as much as possible to avoid the distraction of external investors. Over time, you can reinvest your retained earnings to invest in more capital-intensive offerings. Leffler: The best source is a bank line of credit. This allows you to only take what you need, when you need it. In my opinion, the worst source is selling stock in your company to a nonvalue-adding investor. If the investor is going to help you grow your business, then it is a good idea to take on outside investment. Porter: I don’t believe sources of capital are inherently good or bad, with certain obvious exceptions. It’s always a matter of the risk profile associated with the source and the ability to provide a return on the capital, as necessary. Capital is being provided with the expectation of a return and result. This is true of the 3 Fs (friends, family and fools), a bank or even yourself. Keane: The best is a combination of bank debt financing via a revolving line of credit and equity financing to establish the initial balance sheet strength of the company. The worst: credit cards. How important is it to delegate, whether to employees or to outside contractors? Stone: It’s a common trap to buy into the adage that “if you want something done right, do it yourself.” You cannot grow if you can’t delegate either internally or externally.

801 N. 11th Street | St. Louis, MO. 63101 | 314-231-3720 | www.slps.org

Leffler: It is essential to delegate to others. You simply can’t run a business without being a good delegator. An ideal business leader delegates everything and spends their

time holding accountable the people to whom they have delegated. Porter: It becomes critical to delegate to others, especially as you grow and scale. In the beginning, it’s easy to want to tackle everything yourself especially when financial capital is limited. The downside to this is that you can spend too much time and resource capital instead of innovating and growing the business. I personally believe too many companies spend too much time on the tasks and responsibilities that do not make them unique. Keane: In order to be successful, you need to delegate. Your business has no chance of growing until you let go of some things. So, my philosophy has always been to hire the best people I can possibly find, empower them to do their jobs, and then get out of their way and let them succeed. What revenue did your business generate by the end of its first year? Stone: $250,000. Leffler: Close to $1 million during its first year of operation. Porter: The business that eventually became Contegix did less than $20,000 its first year. Keane: $250,000 What was your revenue in fiscal 2011? Stone: $32 million. Leffler: Approximately $7 million. Porter: We prefer not to disclose. Keane: $7 million. Which is harder: starting the business or growing it? Stone: I believe there are peaks and valleys along the way. I would say the most challenging (aspect) is making it through a period of “no man’s land” where you are too big to be small, yet too small to be big as there are many expensive and arduous hurdles to overcome, such as back office investments and management teams. And from experience, I can unfortunately say there is not a single “no man’s land” but a recurring series of them as you continue to grow. Leffler: I think starting is the hardest. Once you get over the startup hump and start generating revenue, it is easier to create efficiencies and focus your time on the right things. Before you have revenue, it is easy to get distracted and spend time on things that won’t ultimately create a great return. Porter: The reality is that growing a business is similar to starting a new business at certain levels. A company is fundamentally different at $1 million versus $5 million. This continues to be the case until you reach a certain point. At each stage, it is the start of a new business which has the positive and sometimes negative assets of the previous stage. I think the harder part is growing yourself and the people around you at each level. Keane: Definitely starting it. There are so many details that you would never think of until you get in and roll up your sleeves. It takes a lot of time, energy and money to get started. Once you get it started, if you hire the right people and consistently provide a great product or service, the growth will take care of itself.


May 4-10, 2012

small business

St. Louis Business Journal

stlouis.bizjournals.com

Investors grow funding options for local startups By Angela Mueller amueller@bizjournals.com

S

t. Louis entrepreneurs have seen a number of new funding options emerge recently, with the focus on everything from financial firms to tech-savvy startups. “I’m flat out excited about what is going on,” said Gil Bickel, chairman of the St. Louis Arch Angels investment group. The Arch Angels invested $3 million into 11 local startups last year, the largest number of investments the group has made since its inception in 2005. The group has put more than $26 million into 28 companies since its launch. “We’re seeing a tremendous amount of collaboration that has not been in existence before,” Bickel said. “Finally all the stars seem to be lining up, and we seem to be getting everybody going the same direction.” Among the new groups looking to invest in local startups is FinServe Tech Angels, a new angel investment group focused on startups in the financial services industry. The group was put together by Kyle Welborn, former client services manager for the Chicagoland Entrepreneurial Center and a Kirkwood native. The group, which launched in the fall, plans to make investments of between $250,000 and $1.5 million in early-stage companies. FinServe’s advisory board includes Trey Goede, founder of Affinity Wind LLC; Jim Brasunas, director of the St. Louis Information Technology Entrepreneur Network; and

St. Louis Arch Angels have invested $26 million into 28 companies since 2005. Kevin Willer, president and CEO of the Chicagoland Entrepreneurial Center. Newly formed venture capital fund Cultivation Capital recently announced its first investments, which included $250,000 each for LockerDome, a social networking company for athletes, and JBara Software, a customer-management analytics firm. Cultivation Capital, led by partners Brian Matthews, Jim McKelvey, Peter Esparrage and Rick Holton Jr., plans to invest in early-stage companies trying to get to the next level. The St. Louis County Economic Council has launched a partnership with JumpStart America, an group that will work with local business development leaders and entrepreneurs to create a framework for funding and supporting startups. JumpStart will work to pull together state, federal and community dollars to fund entities such as business incubators and venture capital funds. Capital Innovators, an accelerator venture fund launched last year, currently is accepting applications for its next round of investments, with an application deadline of June 15. Capital Innovators focuses mainly on tech-based startups that have a prototype product or an idea that is close to being turned into a prototype. The fund makes a $50,000 equity investment in each seed company, and in return, the companies must complete Capital Innovators’ accelerator program, where they work with business

Join Us For The awards dinner recognizing Those who love nUmbers

Brian cassidy

Judy Sindecuse of Capital Innovators said the value of the company’s portfolio has grown 225 percent in less than a year.

mentors to advance their companies. Capital Innovators has two classes a year and targets five companies per class. The fund has completed two classes thus far, with seven in its fall class and five in its spring class. Judy Sindecuse, CEO and managing partner of Capital Innovators, said the value of the companies in Capital Innovators’ portfolio already has grown 225 percent in less than a year. The companies have brought in about $7 million in follow-on funding after Capital Innovators’ investments and are now generating about 300 jobs, Sindecuse said. “We have community partners — accounting firms, law firms, marketing firms — that help these companies,” Sindecuse said. “We build connections for them for business development and connections for them to follow up on for capital.” Having the support of an organization such as Capital Innovators can be important for companies that are seeking funding, particularly from individual investors or angel investment groups. “It’s important to have that validation, because we’ve come in and looked under the hood. We know their strengths and weaknesses,” Sindecuse said. “For us to come in and recommend a company is a big boost.” Capital Innovators connects companies with individual investors with whom the group has personal contacts, both in St. Louis and outside in areas such as Silicon Valley and New York. They also introduce the companies to local investment sources such as Cultivation Capital, the Arch Angels and the newly formed Arch Grants program. Bickel said the Arch Angels are looking to grow the number of investors in its group from 52 to 100 to enable it to invest more in the growing number of local startups. The group had 20 potential new investors attend its latest meeting to get a look at the group and how it works. The additional investors and investment options in St. Louis benefits everyone involved in the process, from the companies to the funders, Bickel said. “My philosophy has always been that I really don’t care where the money comes from to support the entrepreneurs,” he said. “Whatever the source is, I’m excited to have the company financed.”

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23


24

St. Louis Business Journal

small business

May 4-10, 2012

stlouis.bizjournals.com

Patent, copyright security essential for startup success By Annemarie Schumacher

W

hile imitation can be the highest form of flattery, it can also be the most expensive. That’s especially true for a small-business owner whose company’s lifeblood and revenue are built upon a unique invention, a distinctive brand or an original work, all of which fall into the vast area of law known as intellectual property. “Intellectual property is a very broad category of law that gives the holder rights in a variety of intangible assets including patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets,” said Jennifer Hoekel, a partner at St. Louis-based Armstrong Teasdale and a registered U.S. patent attorney. According to Hoekel, a patent consists of an exclusive set of rights granted to an inventor for limited duration in exchange for the public disclosure of an invention. Trademarks protect a distinctive name, word, phrase, logo, symbol, image or a combination of those elements that identify the source of goods or services. A copyright gives the creator of an original work exclusive rights for a limited time, typically decades. The process of securing intellectual property protections, which at first blush could seem daunting to the small-business owner or startup entrepreneur, is of critical importance. “Traditionally many small businesses were reluctant to invest in intellectual property protections because the costs and barriers to enforcement were high,” Hoekel said. “But there are a variety of less expensive and alternative options available today to assist smaller businesses.” In addition, with the

Businesses need to review every type of communication, even through social media. Brian Diekhoff| Polsinelli Shughart

globalization of today’s economy and the increased reliance on venture funding, intellectual property protections are critical. “Venture funding wants to know if the barriers to entry for competitors are in place. Intellectual property rights are a pivotal piece of those barriers,” Hoekel said. Securing rights at the earliest stage possible is essential for startup businesses. “Patent rights may be forfeited if the business publically displays or sells its products before the filing of a patent application,” said Brian Diekhoff, a member of the science and technology law group in the St. Louis office of Polsinelli Shughart. “Often, many businesses are in such a rush to attract investors or to begin making sales that the implications of their marketing and promotional activities are overlooked.” And businesses need to be mindful of any type of communication materials, including forms of social media, he said. Diekhoff ran into this situation recently while assisting a large manufacturing company with an investigation of a small business for a licensing agreement for the small

Brian cassidy

Armstrong Teasdale’s Jennifer Hoekel said intellectual property protections are vital to securing investors and outside funding.

business’s patent application and product. The small business had been prudent, filing the appropriate patent application. However, Diekhoff discovered a YouTube video posted several years earlier than the patent filing that described the small business’ product in detail through a simple Internet search. “The YouTube video pretty much destroyed the small business’s chances of obtaining meaningful patent protection,” Diekhoff said. “Unfortunately for the small business, without the availability of patent protection, the value of the licensing deal with the larger manufacturer was greatly diminished.” In addition to avoiding potentially disastrous situations such as diminished revenue, filing earlier rather than later is a good practice. It is much easier to change names and branding, if needed, before advertising materials are printed, websites are developed and signage is constructed. Many of the headaches encountered by trademark owners are avoided by selecting the best trademark at the beginning of the business’s lifecycle, Diekhoff said. Budgets are often tight at small businesses and startups, and decisions can be tough when weighing the costs versus the benefits of filing for protections. Fees range from a few hundred dollars for copyright protections to thousands of dollars for patent applications prosecuted through the issuance from a patent office. Enforcing patent and trademark rights is also very expensive, ranging from tens of thousands for a small copyright or trademark case to multiple millions for a complex patent case. However the recently enacted federal America Invents Act (AIA) contains a useful provision that could help small and startup businesses decrease their initial filing fees. “There is a provision within the AIA called ‘micro-entity’ status, which provides for a 75 percent reduction in filing fees at the patent office,” Hoekel said. To qualify, the microentity must not have been named as an inventor on more than four filed U.S. patent applications, as well as meeting other established financial and income criteria. Annemarie Schumacher is a St. Louis freelance writer


May 4-10, 2012

Leads

St. Louis Business Journal

25

stlouis.bizjournals.com

Definitions

Business Leads is designed to keep you informed and help you grow your business. It is a weekly compendium of information compiled by American City Business Leads, unless otherwise noted. Published liens are for $5,000 or more. Published real estate transactions and permits are for $300,000 or more. This information is available via e-mail subscription, by calling (877) 593-4157.

Legal listings Bankruptcies.............................................................. 25 Bankruptcies recently filed in the Eastern District Court of Missouri. Chapter 7 — A “straight” liquidation bankruptcy involving a sale of all assets to pay creditors and trustee fees. Chapter 11 — A process which allows a business to gain temporary relief from paying debts in order to attempt a successful reorganization.

Mechanics’ liens......................................................... 25 A statement that a contractor has performed improvements on a property and has not been paid full. They are filed in circuit court in Missouri and in the recorder’s office in Illinois.

Tax liens-federal......................................................... 25 Recently filed by the Internal Revenue Service against assets of a business for unpaid income or payroll taxes. They are recorded with the recorder of deeds office in Missouri and in the recorder’s office in Illinois.

Tax liens-state............................................................. 25 Liens for unpaid income, sales and use, payroll or county taxes. These are recorded with the recorder of deeds office in Missouri and in the recorder’s office in Illinois.

Lawsuits....................................................................... 26 Civil only; filed against businesses.

Judgments................................................................... 27 Filed against businesses.

Prospecting listings New businesses........................................................... 27 Supplied by Business Research Bureau.

New branches/locations........................................... 27 Supplied by Business Research Bureau.

New corporations....................................................... 28 New corporations registered with the state.

Construction proposed..........................................29 Supplied by Sorkins Directories/Business Research Bureau.

Construction under way........................................29 Supplied by Sorkins Directories/Business Research Bureau.

Assumed names.......................................................... 29 Supplied by American City Business Leads.

Bankruptcies Eastern District of Missouri/St. Louis Division Chapter 7

ISIMS Inc., 1168 W. Gannon Drive, Festus 63028; assets, $1,072; debts, $703,311; major creditor, Simplex Grinnell, $132,029; attorney, Natalie C. Phillips; case #12-43696, 04/18/12.

Chapter 11

Roberts Hotels Spartanburg LLC, 1408 N. Kings Highway Suite 300, Saint Louis 63113; assets, $10,000,001 to $50,000,000; debts, $1,000,001 to $10,000,000; major creditor, not shown; attorney, A. Thomas DeWoskin; case #12-43756, 04/19/12.

Southern District of Illinois/East St. Louis Division Chapter 11

Handy Feed/Handyscape Inc., 419 S. Jefferson St., Millstadt, Ill. 62260; assets, $0 to $50,000; debts, $500,001 to $1,000,000; major creditor, Illinois Department of Agriculture, $130,729; attorney, Donald M. Samson; case #1230775, 04/23/12.

Mechanics’ liens City of St. Louis

Plaintiff: Mushells Realty Group LLC, Defendant: One Source Properties LLC, (amount not shown), on property at 2616-18 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, case #1222 ML00015, 04/16/12.

St. Clair County

Claimant: Laurent Construction Co. Inc., Contractor: Oak Stone Properties LLC, $35,102, Owner: Oak Stone Properties LLC, on property at 5016 N. Illinois, Fairview Heights 62208, Book/ Page A02308039, 03/30/12.

Federal Tax liens City of St. Louis

Stars BP Inc., 3182 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis 63118, $33,514, (941), Book/Page 03302012/157, 03/30/12.

St. Louis County

Heartland Construction & Excavating Inc., 1920 Cherokee Trail, Florissant 63031, $54,041, (940/941/6721), Book/Page 19915/21, 03/23/12. Paul J. McCarthy, 808 Stable Ridge Lane, St. Louis 63122, $22,173, (6672), Book/Page 19923/638, 03/29/12. Tom Kelley Enterprises LLC, 8212 Manchester, St. Louis 63144, $6,393, (941), Book/Page 19923/662, 03/29/12. Kennedy Construction Container Corp., 1353 Craig Road, St. Louis 63146, $84,942, (941/1120/6721), Book/Page 19923/666, 03/29/12.

Barry R. Todd, 2100 Barrett Station Road, St. Louis 63131, $235,436, (6672), Book/Page 19923/660, 03/29/12. Margaret L. Boureois, 3318 Tom Sawyer Drive, Florissant 63033, $31,057, (941), Book/Page 19923/654, 03/29/12. Midland Auto Services Inc., 1604 Morven Ave., Overland 63114, $22,316, (6721), Book/Page 19923/674, 03/29/12.

St. Charles County

Hawkins Mechanical Corp., 1579 Josephville Road, Wentzville 63385, $43,127, (941), Book/Page 5752/1068, 04/02/12. Raymond F. Trout, 931 Hemingway Lane, St. Charles 63304, $29,448, (CIVP), Book/ Page 5752/1070, 04/02/12. Frontenac Dental Group Corp., 705 Hemingway Lane, Weldon Spring 63304, $69,263, (941/1120/6707A), Book/Page 5752/1071, 04/02/12. Dennis W. Convy, 5 St. Libory Court, O’Fallon 63366, $44,837, (6672), Book/Page 5752/1073, 04/02/12. Convy Fire Protection Inc., P.O. Box 88, St. Charles 63302, $26,987, (941), Book/Page 5752/1072, 04/02/12.

Releases of federal tax liens City of St. Louis

Time-Out Sports Bar & Grill Inc., 4140 Gravois Ave., St. Louis 63116, $8,094, (941), Book/Page 03302012/170, 03/30/12.

St. Louis County

JCS Home Health Care Service Inc., 1442 Chambers Road, St. Louis 63135, $101,869, (940/941), Book/ Page 19923/616, 03/29/12. Ivan James & Associates Inc., P.O. Box 1716, Ballwin 63011, $5,268, (941), Book/Page 19923/607, 03/29/12. Ronald B. Norris/Greentree Lawn & Landscape Services, 122 Arlene Drive, Fenton 63026, $20,231, (941), Book/Page 19923/594, 03/29/12. National Medical Billing Services LLC/Lisa Rock, 16759 Main St., Suite 220, Wildwood 63040, $24,562, (941/1065), Book/Page 19923/634, 03/29/12. St. Louis Physical Therapy LLC, 17300 N. Outer Forty Road, Suite 20, Chesterfield 63005, $11,136, (940/941), Book/Page 19923/628, 03/29/12.

St. Charles County Madison County

Robert Bacon, 103 Niagara St., East Alton 62024, $46,733, (6672), Book/Page 2012R12896, 03/26/12. Jennifer L. Frauenfelder, 6438 Lebanon Road, Collinsville 62234, $31,581, (6672), Book/Page 2012R13824, 03/30/12.

St. Clair County

Big Mamas Barbeque Inc., 5110 N. Belt W., Belleville 62226, $14,843, (941), Book/Page A02307886, 03/29/12. Carla R. Lewis DDS Inc., 3129 State St., East St. Louis 62205, $21,225, (940/1120), Book/Page A02307888, 03/29/12. Village of Brooklyn Corp., 312 S. Fifth St., Brooklyn 62059, $36,633, (941), Book/Page A02307887, 03/29/12. BCL Zapata Inc./Zapata’s Mexican Restaurant, 2615 N. Illinois St., Swansea 62226, $23,497, (941), Book/Page A02307907, 03/29/12. Komeshak Chiropractic Ltd./ Live Well Wellness Center Corp., 3030 Frank Scott Parkway W., Suite 1, Belleville 62223, $6,426, (1120), Book/Page A02308267, 04/02/12. Michael S. Geller/G-H-S, 2737 Lake Lucerne Drive, Belleville 62221, $8,615, (941), Book/Page A02308266, 04/02/12. Henry J. Gasser Construction Co., 5500 Bohleysville Road, Millstadt 62260, $15,256, (941), Book/Page A02308268, 04/02/12. Yarber Construction Inc., 1575 Green Mount Lane, Belleville 62220, $18,537, (941), Book/Page A02308270, 04/02/12.

CW Welding & Fabrication Inc., 853 Midpoint Drive, O’Fallon 63366, $24,199, (941), Book/Page 5750/1081, 04/02/12. CSM Construction Inc., 424 N. Second St., St. Charles 63301, $49,781, (941), Book/Page 5752/1080, 04/02/12.

Madison County Michael F. Sapp, 8120 Green Hedge Road, Edwardsville 62025, $17,839, (6672), Book/Page 2012R12738, 03/23/12. Living The Dream LLC, 1101 First Ave., Edwardsville 62025, $23,782, (941), Book/Page 2012R13650, 03/29/12. Animal Emergency Center P.C., 2005 Mall St., Collinsville 62234, $84,212, (940/941), Book/Page 2012R13841, 03/30/12.

St. Clair County

Donald V. Lillis, 8710 Old St. Louis Road, Belleville 62223, $18,233, (941), Book/Page A02307894, 03/29/12. Diamonds Inc./Classic Tires, 1601 State St., East St. Louis 62205, $7,104, (941), Book/Page A02307918, 03/29/12. Janis Schneider, 2635 Old State Route 3, East Carondelet 62240, $10,969, (CIVP), Book/Page A02308272, 04/02/12. Citizens For The Future Inc., 327 Missouri Ave., Suite 417, East St. Louis 62201, $18,894, (941), Book/Page A02308276, 04/02/12.

State tax liens City of St. Louis

Ability Building & Restoration, $5,137, (withholding), Book/Page 03262012/217, 03/26/12.

Madison County

Humgrafra Inc., 7032 Winona Ave., St. Louis 63109, $33,054, (sales & use), Book/Page 03272012/270, 03/27/12.

Complete Concrete LLC, 8316 Burlington Drive, Troy 62294, $6,814, (withholding), Book/Page 2012R14189, 04/03/12.

RBF Acquisition Corp., 5055 Natural Bridge Ave., St. Louis 63115, $24,525, (sales & use), Book/Page 03272012/329, 03/27/12.

Brian Martin, 11486 Reding Road, Alhambra 62001, $9,792, (withholding), Book/Page 2012R14191, 04/03/12.

St. Louis County

Mansfield Nursery Inc., 15977 Manchester, Ellisville 63011, $7,025, (sales & use), Book/Page 19913/36, 03/22/12. Air One Worldwide Logistics, 3781 Corporate, St. Louis 63045, $17,430, (sales & use), Book/Page 19913/13, 03/22/12. Robert T. Burke, 103 Hutchinson, Ellisville 63011, $10,611, (sales & use), Book/Page 19913/22, 03/22/12. James Donnelly, 2303 Clifton St., St. Louis 63131, $16,090, (sales & use), Book/Page 19913/25, 03/22/12. Lawrence Samuels, 11 Westwood Court, St. Louis 63131, $16,090, (sales & use), Book/Page 19913/38, 03/22/12. Joshua W. Alt, 419 N. Rockhill, St. Louis 63119, $10,611, (sales & use), Book/Page 19913/16, 03/22/12. Advanced Med Spa LLC, 11 Westwood Court, St. Louis 63131, $16,090, (sales & use), Book/Page 19913/10, 03/22/12. Theodore E. Hooss, $6,608, (withholding), Book/Page 19915/206, 03/23/12. Demand Electric Inc., $13,977, (withholding), Book/Page 19915/152, 03/23/12.

St. Charles County

Java Girls 636 LLC, 1551 Batters Box, O’Fallon 63366, $5,589, (sales & use), Book/Page 5753/2370, 04/03/12. JB5 Now Inc., 2087 Seven Oak, St. Charles 63303, $12,406, (sales & use), Book/Page 5753/2371, 04/03/12. EIO & Co. Inc., P.O. Box 371, Grover 63040, $59,736, (sales & use), Book/Page 5753/2367, 04/03/12.

St. Clair County

Fast Development LLC/BP Fairview Heights, 6400 N. Illinois St., Unit 5262, Fairview Heights 62208, $180,029, (sales & use/ E911 surcharge), Book/Page A02308515, 04/02/12.

Releases of State tax liens City of St. Louis

Car Wash Products & Service Inc., 917 S. Fifth St., St. Charles 63301, $10,479, (sales & use), Book/Page 03262012/103, 03/26/12. Midwest Security Inc., P.O. Box 510176, St. Louis 63125, $10,710, (sales & use), Book/Page 03262012/104, 03/26/12. Paulis Trattoria Inc., 333 W. Port Plaza, St. Louis 63146, $6,768, (sales & use), Book/Page 03272012/42, 03/27/12. Roberts Hotels CWE Management LLC, 1408 N. Kingshighway Blvd., St. Louis 63113, $5,369, (sales & use), Book/Page 03272012/43, 03/27/12. RR Donnelley & Sons Co., $6,186, (withholding), Book/Page 03272012/67, 03/27/12. Associated Consultants & Trainers Inc., 5880 Enright Ave., St. Louis 63112, $61,169, (sales & use), Book/Page 03272012/84, 03/27/12.

St. Louis County

Professional Industries Inc., 9655 Dielman Rock Island, St. Louis 63132, $11,969, (sales & use), Book/Page 19909/47, 03/20/12. Professional Industries Inc., 9655 Dielman Rock Island, St. Louis 63132, $18,108, (sales & use), Book/Page 19909/49, 03/20/12.

2 TS LLC, 2001 E. Terra Lane, O’Fallon 63366, $38,789, (sales & use), Book/Page 5753/2379, 04/03/12. Pauline P. Cella, 409 Greenfield, Olivette 63132, $5,769, (sales & use), Book/Page 5753/2366, 04/03/12. Gregory L. Beyer, 3003 S. Roca St., Gilbert, Ariz. 85296, $5,589, (sales & use), Book/Page 5753/2364, 04/03/12. Planthaven Farms LLC, 705 Olive St. S., St. Louis 63101, $5,769, (sales & use), Book/Page 5753/2374, 04/03/12. John G. Cella, 409 Greenfield, Olivette 63132, $5,769, (sales & use), Book/Page 5753/2365, 04/03/12. Jenean Salameh Bahhur, 3225 Turtle Circle, Dallas, Texas 75219, $48,776, (sales & use), Book/Page 5753/2363, 04/03/12. Kathleen G. Avery O.D., 2984 Westborough, St. Charles 63301, $15,260, (sales & use), Book/Page 5753/2361, 04/03/12.

Michael J. Randolph, 31 Arundel Place, Clayton 63105, $7,142, (sales & use), Book/Page 19909/51, 03/20/12. Andrew J. Sommer, 7804 Somerworth Court, St. Louis 63119, $5,217, (sales & use), Book/Page 19909/65, 03/20/12. Sommerwinds LLC, 11489 St. Charles Rock Road, Bridgeton 63044, $5,217, (sales & use), Book/Page 19909/67, 03/20/12. Village China Wok II Inc., 2213 White Elm Court, Chesterfield 63017, $6,349, (sales & use), Book/Page 19909/81, 03/20/12. Village China Wok II Inc., 2213 White Elm Court, Chesterfield 63017, $6,353, (sales & use), Book/Page 19909/83, 03/20/12

St. Charles County

Car Wash Products & Service Inc., 917 S. Fifth St., St. Charles 63301, $10,479, (sales & use), Book/Page 5750/1914, 03/29/12.

Continued on next page


26 St. Louis Business Journal MBA AD3 [STLBJ INK DENSITY]_Layout 1

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4/23/12 9:20 AM Page 1

May 4-10, 2012

From previous page David S. Parrish, 23224 Buck Track Lane, Warrenton 63383, $26,370, (sales & use), Book/Page 5750/1915, 03/29/12. Dimensional Security Systems Inc., 6 Hemingway Court, Weldon Spring 63304, $19,108, (sales & use), Book/Page 5754/540, 04/03/12. Dimensional Security Systems Inc., 6 Hemingway Court, Weldon Spring 63304, $12,666, (sales & use), Book/Page 5754/541, 04/03/12.

LOAD UP ON KNOWLEDGE, NOT DEBT.

Golder Associates Inc., 3730 Chamblee Tucker Road, Atlanta, Ga. 30341, $22,143, (sales & use), Book/Page 5754/545, 04/03/12. Golder Associates Inc., 3730 Chamblee Tucker Road, Atlanta, Ga. 30341, $12,250, (sales & use), Book/Page 5754/546, 04/03/12.

CAN’T THINK OF A BETTER BUSINESS DECISION.

William L. Hiatt, 617 Country Village Drive, Lake St. Louis 63367, $7,311, (sales & use), Book/Page 5754/547, 04/03/12.

TOP-RANKED, HALF THE COST.

William L. Hiatt, 617 Country Village Drive, Lake St. Louis 63367, $7,304, (sales & use), Book/Page 5754/548, 04/03/12. David Mitchell, 1203 Elm Court, Wildwood 63005, $10,497, (sales & use), Book/Page 5754/551, 04/03/12. RBF Acquisition Corp., 5055 Natural Bridge Ave., St. Louis 63115, $25,933, (sales & use), Book/Page 5754/555, 04/03/12.

Monthly info sessions available now at umsl.edu/pmba or mba@umsl.edu

Serious education. Serious value.

New lawsuits filed City of St. Louis

City of St. Louis vs. International Catering, suit on account, case #1222-AC05014, 04/02/12. City of St. Louis vs. Lilley Printing, suit on account, case #1222-AC05019, 04/02/12. City of St. Louis vs. Lilley Printing, suit on account, case #1222-AC05020, 04/02/12. Proudly SPonSored by

A CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

City of St. Louis vs. 3152 Magnolia/2804-08 Compton LLC, suit on account, case #1222-AC05023, 04/02/12. City of St. Louis vs. 3152 Magnolia/2804-08 Compton LLC, suit on account, case #1222-AC05025, 04/02/12. City of St. Louis vs. RPR Properties LLC, suit on account, case #1222-AC05029, 04/02/12.

UNDER thiRty

Adrienne Weiss vs. City of St. Louis/Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District, personal injury, case #1222-CC01759, 04/02/12.

Is there someone in your office who you think is the next wunderkind? Is there a corporate high-flyer that you would like to recognize?

Tonia R. Coleman vs. WC&D Enterprises Inc./Walter Knoll Florist, employment discrimination, case #1222-CC01767, 04/02/12.

Look no further than the St. Louis Business Journal’s “30 Under 30” award. This prestigious award recognizes up-and-coming stars on the local business scene.

To submit your nomination, visit www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/nomination/7521

Tonia R. Coleman vs. WC&D Enterprises Inc., personal injury, case #1222-CC01768, 04/02/12. Mark Lynch vs. Anheuser Busch Inc., personal injury, case #1222-CC01772, 04/03/12.

For questions, contact Vince Brennan, section editor, at 314.421.8323 or vbrennan@bizjournals.com.

Batesville Casket Co. vs. Officer Funeral Home Inc./ Marion E. Officer Jr., breach of contract, case #1222-AC05298, 04/04/12.

NomiNatioNs must be received by may 18 to be coNsidered.

Orville James/Leola James vs. McCoy’s Inc., personal injury, case #1222-CC01781, 04/04/12.

Candidates must be under the age of 30 as of July 13, 2012.

AT&T Advertising L.P. vs. McCloskey P.C., suit on account, case #1222-CC01783, 04/04/12. Jasleen Dhillon vs. Farmers Insurance Co. Inc., personal injury-vehicular, case #1222CC01789, 04/04/12. Talana Burton vs. Geico Casualty Co., personal injuryvehicular, case #1222-CC01790, 04/04/12. Greg Vialton vs. Nucetrick Britt/Midwest Transportation Group/Sodrel Holdings, personal injury-vehicular, case #1222CC01791, 04/04/12. William A. Ball vs. Lumiere Casino & Hotel, (type not shown), case #1222-AC05353, 04/05/12. Golden Glow Cookie Co. Inc. vs. Taste N Tell International LLC, suit on account, case #1222-AC05363, 04/05/12. Joan Linton/Sharon Linton/ James Linton et al. vs. Owens Illinois Inc./Owens Brockway Glass Containter Inc., wrongful death, case #1222-CC01793, 04/05/12. Ruth Jayne vs. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co., personal injury, case #1222CC01794, 04/05/12. Faerber & Anderson P.C. vs. West Publishing Corp., breach of contract, case #1222-CC01795, 04/05/12. Jersi Skinner/Telisa Morris vs. Barnes Jewish Hospital, personal injury-malpractice, case #1222-CC01798, 04/06/12. Union Electric Co. vs. Aegis Energy Syndicate 1225, breach of contract, case #1222-CC01801, 04/06/12. Rolanda D. Pearson vs. State Farm Insurance, personal injuryvehicular, case #1222-CC01810, 04/06/12.

St. Louis County

Hein Law Firm L.C. vs. Porter Dry Cleaning and Laundry Inc./ John Kasper, breach of contract, case #12SL-AC11596, 03/28/12. Irene M. Goldman vs. IESI MO Corp./CT Corp. Systems, property damage, case #12SLAC11597, 03/28/12. Stephen Moerger vs. Long Station Inc., tort damages, case #12SL-AC11432, 03/29/12. The Herkert Law Firm P.C. vs. 8000 Maryland Avenue LLC, breach of contract, case #12SLAC11480, 03/29/12. Paul Cassimus vs. Park-Mark Inc., tort damages, case #12SLAC11488, 03/29/12. Keith Blythe/Vera Blythe vs. Heab Development LLC dba Legacy Custom Homes, tort damages, case #12SL-AC11511, 03/29/12. Inland Western Town and Country Manchester LLC vs. Hou Co. LLC/Nancy J. Hou and Scott Hou dba Bellacinos, breach of contract, case #12SLAC11645, 03/29/12. Hilliker Corp. vs. Gutter Helmet of St. Louis LLC, contract account, case #12SL-AC11657, 03/29/12. Mary R. Wolff Real Estate Management Co. vs. Planet Sun Inc., contract account, case #12SL-AC10047, 04/02/12.

Broadcast Music Inc. vs. Barn Partners LLC dba Sky Music Lounge, contract account, case #12SL-AC11236, 04/02/12.

Sherwin-Williams Co. vs. Copeland Investments LLC, suit on account, case #12SL-AC11552, 04/04/12.

Joe Fazio’s Bakery Inc. vs. Red Enterprises LLC dba Redz BBQ, contract account, case #12SL-AC11242, 04/02/12.

FA Cooperative Inc. vs. Inland Tri Tech Inc., contract account, case #12SL-AC11818, 04/04/12.

Fry Wagner Moving & Storage Co. vs. Ray’s Moving & Storage Ltd., contract other, case #12SL-AC11268, 04/02/12. BMO Harris Bank N.A. vs. STL Dies Inc./Bonnie M. Apple/ James M. Apple et al., promissory note, case #12SL-CC01213, 04/02/12. Tracy Wolf/August Wolf vs. SSM Health Care St. Louis dba DePaul Health Center/ Northwest Anesthesia L.C. et al., personal injury-malpractice, case #12SL-CC01220, 04/02/12. Michael Devey vs. Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., personal injury-vehicular, case #12SLCC01221, 04/02/12. Nancy M. Beem/Lydia H. Lark vs. Pecoraro Limousines LLC dba Jed Limousines/Will Morgan Jr., personal injuryvehicular, case #12SL-CC01222, 04/02/12. Karen Smith vs. Quick Trip Corp., personal injury, case #12SL-CC01231, 04/02/12. Laura L. Solsten vs. Hammond Floor & Contract LLC/Andre Hammond, money owed, case #12SL-SC00503, 04/02/12. Donald Stanfield vs. First Missouri Credit Union, money owed, case #12SL-SC00505, 04/02/12. Marvin Greenberg vs. Tax Shepherds LLC, landlord complaint, case #12SL-AC10001, 04/03/12. Laclede Gas Co. vs. Ervin Cable Construction of Florida LLC, tort damages, case #12SLAC11267, 04/03/12. Quark Mechanical LLC vs. O Lee LLC, suit on account, case #12SL-AC11343, 04/03/12. AAF-McQuay Inc. dba McQuay Factory Service vs. Kohner Properties Inc./Grandview Tower LLC, contract account, case #12SL-AC11370, 04/03/12. Anthony Parisi vs. Wehrenberg Inc. dba Des Peres Cinema, personal injury, case #12SLCC01229, 04/03/12. Machine Maintenance Inc. vs. Generac Power Systems, breach of contract, case #12SLCC01236, 04/03/12. K and S Associates Inc. vs. Construction Services 2000 Inc., other miscellaneous actions, case #12SL-CC01239, 04/03/12. Frank W. Notheis vs. Aspen Ridge Condominium Section I Association, money owed, case #12SL-SC00506, 04/03/12. Frank W. Notheis vs. Aspen Ridge Condominium Section I Association, money owed, case #12SL-SC00507, 04/03/12. Julia E. Pratt vs. A+ Nails, money owed, case #12SLSC00508, 04/03/12. Thomas B. Dooling vs. MarPhil Enterprises Inc. dba Allen Transmission, money owed, case #12SL-SC00509, 04/03/12.

Invention House LLC vs. Innovative Energy Inc., breach of contract, case #12SL-AC11838, 04/04/12. Audrey Stroud vs. Weston American Inc., property damage, case #12SL-AC12042, 04/04/12. Morris Kahn vs. Del Cornado Investment, property damage, case #12SL-AC12046, 04/04/12. zZipline LLC vs. Solutions Group Inc./James S. Berry/ James J. Berry, declaratory judgment, case #12SL-CC01244, 04/04/12. Richard J. Azar vs. Missouri Auto Auction Inc., personal injury, case #12SL-CC01248, 04/04/12. Aarnarian Snow vs. Woloco Inc., personal injury-vehicular, case #12SL-CC01253, 04/04/12. Nicole Vaughn vs. SAANJ dba McDonald’s Restaurant et al., personal injury, case #12SLCC01254, 04/04/12. Jeff Baker vs. Ascentra Community Credit Union, money owed, case #12SLSC00511, 04/04/12. Amanda Vernadee Flevin vs. Blossom Wood Day School, money owed, case #12SLSC00516, 04/04/12. Wolf Pack Inc. vs. Mule Pack Movers Service, money owed, case #12SL-SC00517, 04/04/12. Kalichee Nelson et al. vs. Golds St. Louis LLC, personal injury, case #12SL-AC10288, 04/05/12. Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. dba AT&T Missouri vs. Tope Inc. dba Tope Plumbing Co., contract account, case #12SL-AC11572, 04/05/12. Mayre Aguirre/Sonia Aguirre vs. Olathe Millwork Co./Shawn Howerton, property damage, case #12SL-AC11908, 04/05/12. Kanya Townsend (minor) vs. Parc St. Louis LLC dba Nascar Speed Park St. Louis dba Nascar Speed Park St. Louis Mills Mall, personal injury, case #12SL-CC01261, 04/05/12. Joseph Pisciotta/Denise Pisciotta vs. St. Luke’s Hospital/Chesterfield Orthopedics PC/James Walentynowicz M.D., personal injury-malpractice, case #12SLCC01267, 04/05/12. Petr Gordin vs. Papa Johns USA Inc., other tort, case #12SLCC01270, 04/05/12. Laura Austin vs. ElectrorepEnergy Products Inc./ Electrorep Inc./Gene Bates, employment discrimination, case #12SL-CC01271, 04/05/12. Raymond Puricelli vs. Seal St. Louis Inc., money owed, case #12SL-SC00518, 04/05/12. John Silas Jr. vs. Auto Zone, money owed, case #12SLSC00519, 04/05/12. Sulaney Parks vs. Courtyard LLC, money owed, case #12SLSC00522, 04/05/12.

Continued on next page


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May 4-10, 2012 From previous page McKnight Investors LLC vs. Sree LLC/SRI Sainath LLC/ Belmils LLC et al., landlord actions, case #12SL-AC10659, 04/06/12. BSP Golub Creve Coeur LLC vs. D&K Holdings Inc., rent and possession, case #12SL-AC10668, 04/06/12. Barry Simon vs. Sebco Companies Inc., rent and possession, case #12SL-AC10669, 04/06/12. A&N Auto Sales Inc. vs. G&R Auto Sales LLC, breach of contract, case #12SL-AC12162, 04/06/12. Curators of The University of Missouri vs. Supplied Industrial Solutions Inc./ Jeff City Industry Inc./Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. et al., breach of contract, case #12SLCC01276, 04/06/12. (plaintiff not shown) vs. The Wyman Center Inc./Timothy Kjellesvik, personal injury, case #12SL-CC01277, 04/06/12. First Choice Surgical Products Inc. vs. Lafont Spine/Ortho Solutions LLC/Lance Lafont, breach of contract, case #12SLCC01283, 04/06/12. Michael S. Light vs. Safeco Insurance Co. of Illinois, personal injury-vehicular, case #12SL-CC01288, 04/06/12. Richard Gsell vs. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., money owed, case #12SL-SC00524, 04/06/12.

Angelica L. and Laurence J. McAteer vs. Sharon Pratt/River Bend Properties Inc., fraud, case #12 L 384, 03/28/12. Cheryl Raines Individually and Admin. vs. Walmart Stores Inc./Michael Coop, negligence, case #12 L 391, 03/29/12. Hope Crooks Est. vs. Gateway Regional Medical Center/ Granite City Illinois Hospital Co. LLC/Illinois Indiana EM-I Medical Services S.C., wrongful death, case #12 L 397, 03/29/12. Mary Bond vs. Wright Medical Technology Inc./ Wright Medical Group Inc., product liability, case #12 L 410, 04/02/12.

Randall N. Lindbren vs. Mild To Wild, money owed, case #1211SC00088, 04/05/12. Scott’s Exteriors LLC vs. Kniess Construction LLC, contract account, case #1211AC02437, 04/06/12. Ronald L. Horst vs. 3 Seas Transportation LLC, personal injury, case #1211-CC00354, 04/06/12.

Madison County

Jeaneeta McClintock vs. Walgreen Co./dba Walgreens Store #3714, negligence, case #12 L 381, 03/26/12. Jonathan Baker vs. Hireright Solutions Inc./fka USIS Commercial Services/Woods Basement Systems Inc., defamation of character, case #12 L 375, 03/27/12. Calvin Bristow vs. Smart Choice Auto Sales Inc., negligence, case #12 L 382, 03/28/12.

Contegra Construction LLC vs. Joseph Knox dba Copious Technologies, 1099-F Beltline Road PMB 104, Collinsville 62234, $18,172, plaintiff, case #10 AR 925, 03/27/12.

St. Clair County

Mark Moerchen vs. Kevin Strange Ind. and dba Kelco Custom Homes Inc., (address not shown), $17,373, plaintiff, case #08 CH 1059, 03/29/12.

New businesses

StL Auto, for internet auto sales, opened at 17351 Manchester Rd., Wildwood 63038.

27

Dollar Deals World, a discount variety store, opened at 12792 Olive Blvd., St. Louis 63141.

Sogo Trade, a discount stock market brokerage, opened at #1 McBride & Son Center Dr., Chesterfield 63005.

Galleria Bras & Intimates, for retail sales of women’s undergarments, opened at 12405 Old Halls Ferry Rd., Suite 105, Florissant 63033.

New branches/ locations

Zumiez, for retail sales of sporting apparel, footwear, accessories and sporting equipment, will open at 1600 Mid Rivers Mall Dr., St. Peters 63376.

Community Choice, a provider of care and services for individuals with development disabilities and their families, will move to 9666 Olive Blvd., St. Louis 63132.

Construction Appliance, for sales of household appliances, will move to 1694 Larkin Williams Rd., Fenton 63026.

Bi-State Development Agency, a mass transit system, will open a new branch at 3140 Pershall Rd., St. Louis 63136.

Home Care Assistance of St. Louis, for in-home care, moved to 12125 Woodcrest Executive Dr., Suite 210, St. Louis 63141.

Ideal Image, a call center for a laser hair removal business, opened a new branch at 4 City Place Dr., Suite 200, St. Louis 63141.

Metro Shooting Supply, a shooting range with retail sales of shooting supplies, opened a new location at 11434 St. Charles Rock Rd., Beidgeton 63044. Avon, for sales of Avon products, opened a new branch at 794 Gravois Bluffs, Fenton 63026.

J. Eckstein Enterprises, a fertilizer manufacturer, opened a new branch at 462 Eckstein Rd., Beaufort 63013. Café Telegraph, a café and bar, will open a new branch at 2650 Telegraph Rd., St. Louis 63125.

Continued on next page

Steven Norbury vs. Highland Ready Mix Concrete Inc., (type not shown), case #12 L 423, 04/04/12.

St. Clair County

Kyron C. Taylor vs. Charter Communications, (type not shown), case #12 L 153, 03/23/12.

St. Charles County

Missouri Employers Mutual Insurance Co. vs. Midwest Dream Homes LLC, contract account, case #1211-AC02415, 04/05/12.

First Community Credit Union vs. Jennings Printing Inc./ Jeffrey R. Jull/Roseann Jull, 8641 Jennings Station Road, St. Louis 63136, $31,353, plaintiff, case #11SL CC04806, 04/17/12.

Sage Creek Development LLC vs. Kevin L. Sievers/Niccol Development Co. Inc., 900 N. Adams St., Gillespie 62033, $26,594, plaintiff, case #12 AR 28, 04/02/12.

Charles T. Gammon vs. Moto Italia Inc., negligence, case #12 L 422, 04/04/12.

Lonnie Ewing vs. Trans Am Trucking/Henry A. Gill, (type not shown), case #12 L 157, 03/27/12.

Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. dba AT&T Missouri vs. Turnkey Solutions Inc., suit on account, case #1211-AC02399, 04/04/12.

Bankliberty vs. Pontus Industries LLC/David Pan, 36 Four Seasons Shopping, No. 128, St. Louis, Texas 63107, $452,685, plaintiff, case #11SL CC04025, 04/17/12.

Madison County

Grayell Slusher vs. Mayco Industries, wrongful discharge, case #12 L 414, 04/03/12.

David Reid vs. Beelman Truck Co., (type not shown), case #12 L 155, 03/26/12.

Victoria Dabney vs. Johnson Law Firm/Vincent L. Johnson/ National Healthcare Collections LLC, other tort, case #1211AC02393, 04/04/12.

PNC Bank N.A. vs. Resource Electric Inc./Sherman McCoy/ Cheryl McCoy, 12739 Carrollton Industrial Drive, Bridgeton 63044, $54,578, plaintiff, case #11SL CC03468, 04/16/12.

Eric J. Kloepper vs. Geico Casualty Co., breach of contract, case #12 L 413, 04/02/12.

Thomas Mitchell vs. Alex Autoplex LLC, money owed, case #12SL-SC00525, 04/06/12.

Ann Junge vs. Cataract and Eye Disease Specialists Inc./ Paul F. Nichols M.D., personal injury-malpractice, case #1211CC00344, 04/03/12.

St. Louis Business Journal

stlouis.bizjournals.com

Judgments City of St. Louis

Jasmine R. Falls vs. Skate King Corp., 6025 Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis 63120, $167,888, plaintiff, case #1222 CC00299, 04/11/12. State of Missouri/Chris Koster vs. Internet Technology Partnerships Inc./Jesse Levine, 264 E. Main St., Norristown, Pa. 19401, $35,000, plaintiff, case #1122 CC09218, 04/19/12.

St. Louis County

Morton Community Bank vs. S&M Property Management LLC/Rajiv K. Shah/Medhavi R. Shah/Ghanshyam K. Mehta/ Shital G. Mehta, 3 Stonecroft St., St. Charles 63304, $124,845, plaintiff, case #12SL CC01174, 03/29/12. Stark Truss Co. Inc. vs. Gateway Panel Inc./Grau Contracting Inc./Gerald B. Schierding, 122 Towne Park Drive, Foristell 63348, $153,026, plaintiff, case #12SL CC01269, 04/05/12. Rockwood Bank vs. Tri-State Building Enterprises LLC/ Robert V. Shallenberger/ John Cavanagh, 600 W. Main, Jefferson City 65102, $1,281,817, plaintiff, case #11SL CC00577, 04/10/12. Xtra Lease Corp. vs. Utilis Group Inc., 15420 Ridge Park Drive, Suite A, Houston, Texas 77095, $37,308, plaintiff, case #11SL CC04926, 04/11/12.

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28

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St. Louis Business Journal

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Global Brew Tap House & Lounge, a bar with sales of bar accessories, clothing and gifts, will open a new branch on Regency Park Dr., O’Fallon 62269. Local Harvest Grocery, Café & Catering, for catering and a café, will open a new location at 1309 Old Big Bend Blvd., St. Louis 63122. Sweet Art Bakeshop & Art Studio, a bakery and café, will move to 2800 Shenandoah Ave., St. Louis 63104.

St. Elizabeth Adult Daycare Center, a daycare center for 56 adults, moved to 3683 Cook Ave., St. Louis 63113. Sherman Auto Sales Inc., an indoor automobile sales facility, will move to 519B Rudder Rd., Fenton 63026.

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From previous page

Yeti Gaming, for retail sales of games, moved to 361 Watson Plaza, St. Louis 63126.

All entrees are priced at $5

Tri State Valve Instrument Co., a supplier of pressure relief valves and control valves, opened a new branch at 11139B South Towne Square, St. Louis 63123.

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SCORE, a nonprofit organization providing educational programs and counseling to small businesses, will open a new branch on St. Louis University’s campus, St. Louis 63103.

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Mercy Hospital, a hospital, will open a new location in the 1800 block of Zumbehl Rd., St. Charles 63303. Mattress Firm, for retail sales of mattresses, box springs and related products, will open a new branch at 6917 S. Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis 63125.

Official account of the

Sushi Ai, a Japanese sushi restaurant, opened a new branch at 729 W. Hwy 50, Suite B, O’Fallon 62269. Subway Sandwiches & Salads, for sub sandwiches and salads, will open a new branch at 6150 Howdershell Rd., Hazelwood 63042. Pickleman’s Gourmet Café, a restaurant, will open a new location at 20 N. Central Ave., St. Louis 63105.

Every life matters! The St. Louis Business Journal is a great resource for us and our clients to stay on top of business world news. It helps us serve and inspire our community. We feel that it is extremely important for tomorrow’s leaders to stay on top of today’s business and that is why Northwestern Mutual purchased subscriptions for Rockwood Summit High School.

New corporations St. Louis County

Steward-Rothstein Corp., 2533 Mariner Drive, Unit 706, St. Louis 63129.

Chip Hallsten, Northwestern Mutual-Clayton

Bright Shot Photography LLC, 6775 China Lake Drive, St. Louis 63129.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! 314.421.6200

Affordable Computers LLC, 2739 Mountain Top Drive, St. Louis 63129.

Prelude Professional Consulting LLC, 865 Vista Pointe Drive, St. Louis 63138.

Bosnian Sport and Cultural Association, 6922 Colonial Woods Drive, No. 87, St. Louis 63129.

Casemark Realty Advisors LLC, 6922 Plateau Ave., First Floor, St. Louis 63139.

R.J. Frederick LLC, 103 Susan Road, Oakville 63129.

Fix It With Fridley LLC, 6604 Villa Ave., St. Louis 63139.

Minnesota 7423 Property LLC, 1 Idecker Court, St. Louis 63129.

That’s What She Said LLC, 6945 Arthur Ave., St. Louis 63139.

K&C Distribution LLC, 5212 Camelot Estate Drive, St. Louis 63129.

Profit Growth International LLC, 1016 Tamm Ave., St. Louis 63139.

Good Girlz LLC, 7418 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis 63130.

Complete Auto Recycling Services Inc, 5923 Witt St., St. Louis 63140.

The Brown Girl LLC, 6269 Cabanne Ave., Apt. 1-W, University City 63130.

H2OH Media LLC, 275 N. Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis 63141.

Lexdata LLC, 13361 Kings Glen Drive, St. Louis 63131.

Ubuckle Inc., 320 N. Mosley Road, St. Louis 63141.

AUM Hospitality Group LLC, 1610 Des Peres Road, Suite 100, St. Louis 63131.

Access to Data LLC, 11901 Olive Blvd., Suite 312/P.O. Box 419002, St. Louis 63141.

Doug’s Electrical Service Inc., 1650 Des Peres Road, Suite 150, St. Louis 63131. Jennifer Belden LLC, 12215 Roger Lane, St. Louis 63131. Celebrate You LLC, 19 Portland Drive, St. Louis 63131. Gateway Properties Management LLC, 12910 Topping Way Drive, St. Louis 63131. Smokescape LLC, 13344 Buckland Hall Road, Town and Country 63131.

Core Academy of Tennis LLC, 2158 East Drive, St. Louis 63131. Mid Missouri Products LLC, 8252 Appleton Drive, St. Louis 63132. JAG Recordings LLC, 8652 Richard Court, St. Louis 63132. Meridian Liquor Inc., 9950 Page Ave., Overland 63132.

Regal Nails LLC, 14488 Brittania Drive, Chesterfield 63017. Vics Nails & Spa LLC, 14488 Brittania Drive, Chesterfield 63017. Cheapship LLC, 14300 Cobble Court, Chesterfield 63017. Pensive Liquidation Services LLC, 1250 Woodchase Lane, Apt. D, Chesterfield 63017. Dittmer Home LLC, 14798 Brook Hill Ridge Drive, Chesterfield 63017. Labtest LLC, 14222 Reelfoot Lake Drive, Chesterfield 63017. Eurochic LLC, 13651 Rivervalley Court, Chesterfield 63017. DNSW Inc., 2199 Sycamore Hill Court, Chesterfield 63017. STL Party Bus LLC, 833 Garonne Drive, Manchester 63021. IZ Software LLC, 978 Imperial Point, Manchester 63021.

ABS Holding LLC, 8 Spoede Acres, Creve Coeur 63141.

STLCIS LLC, 1300 Mautenne Drive, Manchester 63021.

Imaging Management Systems LLC, 842 New Ballas Road, Suite 102, St. Louis 63141.

Classic Wings LLC, 1120 Ridge Road, Wildwood 63021.

Cockrell Trucking LLC, 12101 Woodcrest Executive Drive, Suite 300, St. Louis 63141.

HoNu Look Construction LLC, ri Woodcrest 12101 Executive Drive, Suitez300, onSt. Louis 63141. Lombardo Homes t of St. Louis LLC, 12312 OliveaBlvd., Suite 100, l St. Louis 63141. Jenki LLC, 7354 Manchester Road, Maplewood 63143.

Federal Mining Co. LLC, 318 Woodlawn Terrace Court, Ballwin 63021. Seams So Easy Sewing LLC, 545 Huntley Heights Drive, Ballwin 63021. Auburn Farms LLC, 1011 Seasons View Drive, Fenton 63026. The Best Bargain Store LLC, 631 Winter View Circle, Fenton 63026. Farajat LLC, 15 Florisota Drive, Florissant 63031.

Fangtastic LLC, 1401 S. Brentwood Blvd., Suite 575, St. Louis 63144. Fox Farm Landscaping and Construction LLC, 2308 Hilton Ave., Brentwood 63144.

Elysium Interiors Inc., 3561 Heather Trail Drive, Florissant 63031. Investiny Inc., 3561 Heather Trail Drive, Florissant 63031.

Arch Import Group LLC, 111 Westport Plaza, Suite 505, St. Louis 63146.

BNK Construction Inc., 1330 S. Lafayette, Florissant 63031.

Ruvinskiy Law Firm LLC, 11120 Bonjour Court, St. Louis 63146.

Autocenters Service LLC, 2128 Lehne Court, Florissant 63031.

Unique Staffing Agency Inc., 8557 Airport Road, St. Louis 63134.

Patient Benefit Services LLC, 1001 Craig Road, Suite 260, St. Louis 63146.

JA White Inc., 2709 Emerald Creek Court, Florissant 63031.

STL Elite Automotive LLC, 6827 Georgeland Ave., Berkeley 63134.

Vitality Health LLC, 473 Pine Bend Drive, Chesterfield 63005.

Samantha Jones Designs LC, 357 S. Marguerite Ave., St. Louis 63135.

Frac Rack LLC, 18330 Edison Ave., Chesterfield 63005.

Richard Katz Designs LLC, 9734 Bonhomme Estates Drive, St. Louis 63132.

Hirsch Lawncare & Landscaping LLC, 208 Elbing Drive, St. Louis 63135. Med-Star Transportation LLC, 10210 Lynncrest Court, St. Louis 63136.

Affordable Computers LLC, 2739 Mountain Top Drive, St. Louis 63129.

Raymond Brickhouse DPM LLC, 5937 W. Florissant Ave., St. Louis 63136.

Bosnian Sport and Cultural Association, 6922 Colonial Woods Drive, No. 87, St. Louis 63129.

E&B Management Service Co. Inc., 2265 Luxmore Drive, St. Louis 63136.

R.J. Frederick LLC, 103 Susan Road, Oakville 63129.

Wilson’s Sound LLC, 10346 Nashua Drive, St. Louis 63136.

Minnesota 7423 Property LLC, 1 Idecker Court, St. Louis 63129.

Mackjoyner A to Z BBQ Pit Corp., 10445 Lord Drive, St. Louis 63136.

K&C Distribution LLC, 5212 Camelot Estate Drive, St. Louis 63129. circ101

May 4-10, 2012

New Rock M.B. Church, 2525 McLean, St. Louis 63136.

Steward-Rothstein Corp., 2533 Mariner Drive, Unit 706, St. Louis 63129.

St. Louis Public Tutors LLC, 12245 Fontaine Lane, St. Louis 63138.

Bright Shot Photography LLC, 6775 China Lake Drive, St. Louis 63129.

Peterson Halo Transport LLC, 1807 San Luis Drive, Apt. A, St. Louis 63138.

The National Black College Student Government Association, 11940 Kingshead Drive, Florissant 63033. Jinxx Bags LLC, 700 Preakness Lane, Florissant 63033.

Brandboards Inc., 17209 Chesterfield Airport Road, Chesterfield 63005.

Kling Kamera Booth LLC, 4 St. Pius Court, Florissant 63033.

Clawson Design Studio LLC, 1322 Virginia Drive, Ellisville 63011. Cypress Real Estate LLC, 317 Clarkson Road, No. 103, Ellisville 63011. Traveling Home Rescue Transport LLC, 110 Coral Terrace, No. 9, Ballwin 63011. Edwin Watts Golf Shops LLC, 13986 Manchester Road, Ballwin 63011.

Greenhouse Records Music Group Inc., 11312 Bristol Rock Road, Florissant 63033. Williams Catering & Foods LLC, 2380 Bluegrass Lane, Florissant 63033. Wizard Pool LLC, 2216 Dunhill Way Court, Chesterfield 63005. Scott Peterson P.C., 17843 Orrville Road, Chesterfield 63005.

MJM Lawn And Land LLC, 1438 Thomas Mason Place, St. Louis 63011.

NB Marketing LLC, 333 Ozark Trail Drive, No. 40 Clarkson/ Clayton Center, Ellisville 63011.

Blossom Enterprises LLC, 488 Manorcrest Lane, Ballwin 63011.

Sun Properties International LLC, 168 Lucerne Place Drive, Ballwin 63011.

Katswalk Projects LLC, 828 Woodruff Drive, Ballwin 63011. Janrose LLC, 36 Four Seasons, Suite 250, Chesterfield 63017. Spitzer Benefit Strategies LLC, 1350 Elbridge Payne Road, Suite 208, Chesterfield 63017.

Blue Cat LLC, 173 Kehrs Mill Bend Drive, Ballwin 63011. Factor Z LLC, 173 Kehrs Mill Bend Drive, Ballwin 63011. Finny LLC, 173 Kehrs Mill Bend Drive, Ballwin 63011.

Continued on next page


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May 4-10, 2012

St. Louis Business Journal

29

stlouis.bizjournals.com From previous page Fajman LLC, 2007 Emerald Crest Court, Chesterfield 63017.

S.I.S. Prays Inc., 16431 Hampden Place, Florissant 63034.

JEF Enterprises LLC, 14823 Pleasant Ridge Court, Chesterfield 63017.

Sound Foundations LLC, 16431 Hampden Place, Florissant 63034.

Stellarcare LLC, 14452 Bantry Lane, No. 1, Chesterfield 63017.

Ellipses LLC, 3878 Grand National Drive, Florissant 63034.

Sova Xpress Inc., 14508 Tienda Drive, Chesterfield 63017.

The Handyman Can Lawn Care Plus LLC, 18341 Westwood Drive, Glencoe 63038.

Benskin & Hott Talent Consulting LLC, 16253 Swingley Ridge Road, Chesterfield 63017.

R. Rowland Inc., 17014 Old Hollow Drive, Grover 63040.

Ohbaby LLC, 16630 Old Chesterfield Road, Chesterfield 63017. Midwest Design & Engineering LLC, 42 Four Seasons Center, Suite 110, Chesterfield 63017.

Nidhitech Systems LLC, 1208 Arbor Bluff Circle, Ballwin 63021. Richard Homire LLC, 1249 Red Oak Plantation Drive, Ballwin 63021. Lisa Lauber Photography LLC, 1630 Brandon Park Drive, Apt. E, Ballwin 63021. Dixie Bowen Fitness Consulting LLC, 930 Barbara Ann Lane, Ellisville 63021. Mill Valley Construction Shop LLC, 112 Covert Lane, Ellisville 63021. Hunter Contracting & Development II Inc., 305 Covenant Place Court, Ballwin 63021. Empowerment Counseling Center LLC, 448 Chamberlin Drive, Ballwin 63021. Za Oggi! Pizza Brands LLC, 91 Hilltop Village Center, Eureka 63025. Hitting LLC, 904 Windgate Court, Fenton 63026. Meadling LLC, 904 Windgate Court, Fenton 63026. Paper LLC, 904 Windgate Court, Fenton 63026. Yellow LLC, 904 Windgate Court, Fenton 63026. Amitee Therapeutic Massage & Wellness LLC, 1185 London Circle Lane 102, Fenton 63026. A-1 Lock Inc., 743 Riverhills Drive, Fenton 63026. Simple Touch LLC, 1710 Kilmory Drive, Florissant 63031. St. Louis Lions LLC, 714 Mediterranean Drive, Florissant 63031. DMGZOZO Inc., 653 St. Antoine St. Florissant, Florissant 63031. DK’s Closet LLC, 6971 Candlewick Way, Florissant 63033. The Grass Guy Lawn Service LLC, 11220 W. Florissant, No. 368, Florissant 63033. Church Hill-Church Of Christ, 3829 Secretariat Drive, Florissant 63034. NFLPA Former Players St. Louis Chapter, 28 Behlmann Lake Court, Florissant 63034. AM Food LLC, 3643 Rosant Court, Florissant 63034. One Way Training & Professional Development Services LLC, 14808 94th Ave., Florissant 63034. Midwest Pellet Grills LLC, 3640 Ange Drive, Florissant 63034. Samantha Joe’s LLC, 3640 Ange Drive, Florissant 63034.

Professional Fitness LLC, 11681 Celestial Drive, Maryland Heights 63043.

Construction at St. Louis Army Ammunition Plant, for redevelopment of the former ammunition plant into a retail development, Goodfellow Blvd. at I-70, St. Louis 63120, was proposed. Construction at Ferguson Community Center, for renovation of the former church into a community center, 921 Smith Ave., St. Louis 63135, was proposed.

Construction at Keeven Elementary School, for an elevator, marker and tackboard replacement, VCT replacement and stair removal, 11230 Old Halls Ferry Rd., St. Louis 63126, was proposed. Construction at Kirkwood High School-West Building, for installation of 2 rooftop air handling units, roof curbs, chilled water and heating hot water piping, electrical power and control wiring, 801 W. Essex Ave., St. Louis 63122, was proposed.

Construction at Northwest Middle School, for exterior wall replacement and HVAC renovations, 1805 Shackelford Rd., Florissant 63031, was proposed. Construction of O’Fallon Mo. Skate Park, for a new skate park and parking lot at Westhoff Park, Sheppard Dr., O’Fallon 63366, was proposed. Construction at WFD Training Center, for construction of a new building for the Washington Fire District with a fire training classroom and fire apparatus bays, M. L. Unnerstall Dr., Washington 63090, was proposed.

Construction under way

Assumed Names

Genoa Healthcare of Illinois LLC, 50 Northgate Industrial Drive, Granite City 62040.

Construction is under way at Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville, for an addition and renovations to the engineering building, Edwardsville 62026.

Madison County

PS Taste This, 5 Barbara Court, Granite City 62040.

Construction is under way at St. John’s Hospital, for a new hospital, SE corner of N. Poplar St. and Troxler Ave., Highland 62249. Construction is under way at Lindenwood UniversityBelleville, for renovations to the former Township Stadium, Belleville 62226.

Life Tree Fitness, P.O. Box 982, Edwardsville 62025. Speedy School Supplies, 48 Brenda St., Glen Carbon 62034. Vision For Life, 2220 S. State Route 157, Suite 350, Glen Carbon 62034. Custom Iron, 2717 W. Delmar Ave., Godfrey 62035. Tab Frame & Body Repair Inc., 5506 Dial Drive, Granite City 62040.

WIRG LLC, 3460 Hollenberg Drive, Bridgeton 63044.

Diversified Construction Services, P.O. Box 193, Wood River 62095. Runyan Enterprises, 104 Eula Ave., Apt. 4, Wood River 62095. The Roofing Crew, 105 Eagle Creek, Collinsville 62234. WC Broyles & Associates, 216 E. Main St., Collinsville 62234. J. Henry Trucking, 758 Mary Maye, Collinsville 62234.

E THE VE AT SA D

MyGolfInstructor.com LLC, 561 Crown Pointe Estates Court, Wildwood 63021.

Roy Robinson Agency LLC, 8844 Santa Bella Drive, Hazelwood 63042.

Construction of Rhine River Commercial, for a new commercial building, W. Front St., Washington 63090, was proposed.

Microgrid Solar LLC, 13397 Lakefront Drive, Second Floor, Earth City 63045. The Go To Guys LLC, 11344 Gardenview Lane, No. 4, St. Ann 63074. Musicality LLC, 3436 Charleston Place Court, Manchester 63088. Jerrin L. Deloatch Entertainment Inc., 800 Washington Ave., Suite 163, St. Louis 63101. S4U LLC, 1006 Olive St., Suite 303, St. Louis 63101. Balabas Family Eyecare LLC, 100 N. Broadway, 14th Floor, St. Louis 63102. Geodata IT LLC, 507 N. 13th St., Unit 307, St. Louis 63103. M&M Contracting STL LLC, 1226 Olive, No. 502, St. Louis 63103.

#social madness Social Media for Business

Brain Meats LLC, 1627 Locust St., Suite 702, St. Louis 63103.

American City Business Journals is rolling out its “Social Madness” corporate social media challenge – a first time program for the Business Journal! It will measure the growth of a company’s social presence and spotlight the best social media programs of companies in 43 markets in the US.

Construction proposed

To prepare for this rollout, you’re invited to attend this St. Louis Business Journal seminar and learn how to use social media more effectively for business. These experts will give you strategies to increase your brand awareness through social media.

Construction at Grand Center Arts Academy, for renovation of the existing music hall, 711 N. Grand Blvd., St. Louis 63103, was proposed. Construction of CVS Pharmacy, for a new pharmacy, 450 Truman Rd., Crystal City 63019, was proposed. Construction at Hazelwood Central High School, for two 12,000 sq. ft. additions and renovation of 60,000 sq. ft. of existing facilities, 15875 New Halls Ferry Rd., Florissant 63031, was proposed.

Dan Curran President/Founder

Patrick Powers Director of Digital Marketing and Communications

Donna Vandiver President and CEO

Construction at Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville, for installation of attics in the Cougar Village housing complex, Edwardsville 62026, was proposed. Construction at Mount Carmel Senior Living, for converting 14 existing independent living units into assisted-living units, 723 First Capitol Dr., St. Charles 63301, was proposed. Construction of Rhine River Townhouses, for construction of a townhouse development, W. Front St., Washington 63090, was proposed. Construction at the Saint Louis Zoo, for an addition at the River’s Edge, One Government Dr., St. Louis 63110, was proposed. Construction of National Tire & Battery, for an 8-bay store, 10779 Lincoln Tr., Fairview Heights 62208, was proposed.

May 11, 2012

Missouri History Museum 7:30 - 8:00 am Continental Breakfast 8:00 - 9:00 am Panel Discussion Q&A immediately following session

ADMission is free But reservAtions Are reQuesteD.

to reserve a seat at this beneficial seminar, log onto http://stlouis.bizjournals.com/stlouis/event/ or email stlevents@bizjournals.com.


30

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St. Louis Business Journal

May 4-10, 2012

Get Your Business in the Social Media Game Follow, like, and connect to a broader audience for your company. Nominate your business before May 15th by visiting www.socialmadness.com.

presented by

The St. Louis Business Journal announces Social Madness: A Corporate Social Media Challenge presented by Capital One Spark Business. Compete against other local companies by making new connections through top social media platforms and our Social Madness page.

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For official rules go to www.socialmadness.com/rules


May 4-10, 2012

St. Louis Business Journal

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stlouis.bizjournals.com

The Pulse www.stlouis.bizjournals.com/stlouis/poll

We asked: How far will the Blues go in the NHL playoffs?

A CLOSER

LOOK

THE THINKING PERSON’S GUIDE TO THE BUSINESS JOURNAL

Stanley Cup Champions

43%

They’ll win the conference semifinal.

15%

They’ve gone as far as they can go.

15%

Conference Champions

27%

893 people voted in this poll.

You said: “Objectively they already had a hard time with the Kings. The Kings beat the Presidents’ Trophy winner, and the way they handled us in game one makes me think they are a team of destiny.”

“GO AHEAD, make me drink champagne from a BLUES coffee cup, and get all my fan clothes out of the closet...”

Accidental entrepreneurs Brian and Carol Matthews are accidental entrepreneurs. In fact, it was the games they played that led to their serial successes and the creation of Cultivation Capital, a new venture capital fund for early stage tech firms, according to this week’s Page One story by Amir Kurtovic. The Matthews met at McDonnell Douglas where he was an engineer and she was a software developer. The game was fantasy baseball and they played with aerospace workers across the nation. Disgruntlement with the algorithm used to calculate results led the Matthews to form a league of their own. (Remember this was 1991 when most of us didn’t know how to spell algorithm, much less write one.) Three years later CDM (CBC Distribution and Marketing), the company they created with Charlie Wiegert was in such demand, all three quit their day jobs. Fantasy sports lead to Primary Network, an early Internet provider in the St. Louis region. Companies were sold and bought back. Not everything the Matthews touched turned to gold. Minor league sports teams and the St. Charles Family Arena did not turn out to be best field to showcase

Opportunities for: Software developers; Engineers; Fantasy leagues.

their investments. What you don’t see in the Matthews’ story is a lot of whining about the lack of resources in the region or the omnipresence of bureaucratic efforts to support entrepreneurs. These are two extremely bright people who saw opportunity through the lens of their talents. Now they’re joining with others to afford more companies the same chance. We’ve focused on investors like the Matthewses in recent months, including Sage Capital, Tom Hillman and RiverVest. These are great stories to tell. They’re the sagas of risk takers who made money through investing in other risk takers. And they’re willing to do it again and again. After all, the Matthewses may have started in fantasy sports but they’re in the big leagues now. Have a great week. Ellen

For more comments, visit www.stlouis.bizjournals.com/stlouis/poll

This week’s Pulse question:

Who should Mitt Romney pick as his running mate? Go to stlouis.bizjournals.com

I can live for two weeks on a good compliment. — Mark Twain


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May 4-10, 2012

Matthews: After hitting a home run in fantasy baseball, the duo set their sights on local startups continued from page 1

his glass art at home, a profession McKelvey was successful at while Mira Digital Publishing, one of his early tech startups, was struggling to generate revenue in the early ‘90s. Holton, an Anheuser-Busch heir, is a partner at venture capital fund Holton Capital Group and a co-founder of Classic Car Studio, a vintage car restoration and sales business. Together they claim a track record of starting more than 25 companies that have raised more than $200 million. Brian Matthews said he expects to see at least a 50 percent rate of success for earlystage technology companies Cultivation Capital will invest in. He should know since he’s been there himself.

“By the time April (1994) rolled around, we had so many entries that we all had to quit our jobs to run the company,” Wiegert said. The decade-long ascension of CDM as a leader in fantasy sports was threatened in 2004, when Gannett Co., publisher of USA Today, wanted to buy the company.

Charlie Wiegert CDM’s business took off after placing an ad in The Sporting News

Built on fantasy

Brian and Carol Matthews caught the entrepreneurial bug in 1991. He was an engineer and she a software developer for aerospace manufacturer McDonnell Douglas, where they met. They played in a fantasy baseball league with other aerospace workers around the country and didn’t like the algorithm the league used to calculate results. They developed software to manage a fantasy sports league. The company that resulted, CBC Distribution & Marketing (CDM), had its big breakthrough in 1993 after a partnership with The Sporting News, a sports publication that at the time was based in St. Louis, said Charlie Wiegert, one of the cofounders at CDM Fantasy Sport. (The Sporting News is now owned by American City Business Journals, parent company of the St. Louis Business Journal.) CDM ran a six-page ad in the magazine allowing players to fill out their roster and mail in the entries. “We wound up getting about 4,000 entries from that magazine ad,” Wiegert said. “There was enough going on then that it became a full-time job for Carol to manage.” Carol Matthews, 47, ran the business out of the couple’s basement for several months, before the volume became too much to handle. Eventually CDM would require a call center with 100 employees to process all of the changes to fantasy sports rosters people from around the country were calling in. The leagues had an entry cost of $99, and transaction fees were charged each time a change was made.

“As part of our letter of intent to sell the company, we had to get all of our licensees to sign over the licenses to Gannett, and Major League Baseball refused to sign over the license,” Brain Matthews said. A lawsuit ensued over whether the MLB could control who could use game statistics and whether it was a freedom of the press issue, since the information was publicly available. In August 2006, a federal judge ruled that baseball could not claim ownership of the names of players and public information such as statistics. An appeals court upheld the ruling and the Supreme Court refused to hear it. Gannet was out of the picture, but CDM was sold weeks after winning its case to Toronto-based Fun Technologies, majority owned by Liberty Media, in a deal valued at up to $10 million. While Brian and Carol Matthews won their case and managed to sell CDM, there were some regrets. In the heady days before the dot-com bust, Brian Matthews said they had received a $100 million offer for the company. But their timing would prove better in other business ventures. The fantasy sports business, while it was relatively high-tech for the early ‘90s, led the couple into their real big score. It was this new technology called the Internet. They started Primary Network, an early Internet service provider in St. Louis, in 1995 partly out of a desire to streamline op-

erations at CDM. By 1999, they had 100,000 customers and developed one of the first high-speed DSL Internet circuits in St. Louis. That year, Primary Network raised $53 million to expand: $50 million came from Everest Capital, a hedge fund controlled by financier George Soros, while the remaining $3 million came from friends and family. By 2000, the company had expanded to offering dial-up Internet, DSL, Voice over IP and long distance services in the St. Louis, Kansas City and Oklahoma City markets. The company received a $250 million offer from Mpower Communications in early 2000, with $100 million in cash and $150 million in stock. Brian Matthews said the tech bubble was getting ready to pop at that time and Mpower’s board voted down the original offer and instead gave them $140 million in stock. The deal closed on June 21, 2000, and Mpower stock was trading for $33 a

Sales of the Matthews’ startups have totaled $175 million. share, he said. It would reach a peak of $59 by July, before bottoming out at $9 per share a few months later amid the dot-com bust. But the Matthewses had sold most of their shares and gotten out before the stock dropped. In 2001, Mpower was trying to shed debt and asked if the Matthewses wanted to buy back some of the assets they had sold only a year earlier. They did, and the result of the purchase the company is now called River City Internet Group, which offers a mix of Internet access options, hosting and data services. River City has three data centers in St. Louis with 30,000 square feet of floor space and serves about 7,500 business customers. Revenue for the company was not disclosed. When the Matthewses are not running their company or investing in new startups they travel, sometimes to California’s wine country and other times to their home in Florida. Another passion is collecting and drinking wine. They have a collection of 1,800 bottles and are constantly adding to it.

CULTIVATING THE NEXT CROP

With CDM and Primary Network sold, and the successful sales of two other businesses they co-founded, web design and consulting company Primary Webworks and Internet service provider IntraISP, Brian Matthews said he has more time to focus on other things, such as investing in more tech companies. He is a mentor through the Capital Innovators tech incubator for two early-stage tech companies in St. Louis — Systematic Revenue and Dining Circle. He is also on the board of LockerDome, a social networking website for athletes, which was one of the first companies to receive funding through Cultivation Capital. Carol Matthews is vice president of operations and helps streamline sales and marketing efforts for the startup. The new fund held its first investment meeting on April 15 and announced three investments, $250,000 a piece for LockerDome and JBara Software, a customer-management analytics company. The group also invested an undisclosed amount in Capital Innovators, the early-stage seed fund and incubator program. Though the amount under management by Cultivation Capital was not disclosed, Matthews said that in addition to the four general partners, the fund has attracted 10 other St. Louis investors who have pledged to contribute up to $7 million over the next five years. They hope to secure $5 million of annual investments within the next five years, he said. They expect to create more local sources of funding for technology companies and to help St. Louis investors realize that there is money to be made — putting to rest the descriptor that when it comes to tech “local investors have deep pockets and short arms.” Judy Sindecuse, CEO of Capital Innovators, said Cultivation Capital’s investments are important because they come at that crucial stage when a company is coming out of an accelerator program like the one she runs or an investment from the St. Louis Arch Angels investment group. “It allows the companies to keep growing without having to look for venture capital funds outside of St. Louis, which might require them to move,” she said. Letting companies move out of St. Louis would be antithetical to the Matthewses, as all of their successes and failures, have been homegrown.

Transfer: MPM reported $31.1 million in direct premiums written, a drop of 16.8% from 2010 continued from page 1

The retrocessional reinsurance will provide up to $100 million of loss adjustment and indemnity coverage for claims against physicians insured by MPM, according to MPM’s annual report. Trout sent out a letter to those insured by MPM on March 2 announcing the reinsurance policy. On March 7, the Keane Group sent a letter to its clients saying it was going to “analyze the situation and determine what this change in structure means going forward.” In response, Trout sent a second letter to MPM insured customers on March 16 saying MPM received expressions of support from more than 20 percent of its customers. “I am acutely aware that many so-called ‘insurance professionals’ do not fully understand the complexities of this sophisticated and progressive retrocessional reinsurance agreement, and as such, they are likely to

criticize what they cannot comprehend,” Trout said in the letter. Trout went on to include comments from those he referred to as “true insurance professionals,” such as James Streff, president of Red Wing, Minn.-based Streff Insurance Services, who is quoted as saying, “The retrocessional reinsurance contracts placed by MPM means no insured physician can be assessed additional premium for losses that were higher than expected.” Streff is one of the four members of MPM Kansas’ board, which also includes Trout, his wife Lynn, and Lawrence Niemann, owner of St. Louisbased L.V. Niemann Consulting Group, which provides accounting and financial services for both MPM and MPM Kansas. MPM Kansas entered a retrocessional reinsurance contract with Ironshore Inc. covering 100 percent of pre-Dec. 31, 2010, losses, and a second contract with Aspen Insur-

ance Holdings Ltd. to cover claims from Jan. 1, 2011, forward, according to a report in industry publication SNL Financial. In the March 16 letter, Trout, who could not be reached for comment, stated that the retrocessional reinsurance agreements eliminate all liabilities of MPM. “I can assure you, those who take a shortterm view in the long-tail liability business will find an even shorter career,” he said in the letter. “MPM plans to be around for a long time.” Bob Hansen, spokesman for the Kansas Insurance Department, said the transfer of funds from MPM to MPM Kansas did not require approval of the state. “The transfer of reserves from the mutual company to the stock company is not uncommon,” he said. MPM had a surplus of $1.6 million at the end of 2011, as compared with $17.8 million at the end of 2010, according to the organi-

zation’s annual statements filed with the Department of Insurance. MPM Kansas ended 2011 with a surplus of $8 million as compared with $2.4 million at the end of 2010. Travis Ford, spokesman for the Missouri Department of Insurance, said insurers face regulatory action only if they have a negative surplus. He declined to comment further. MPM, lost its market-leading position in Missouri’s medical malpractice market in 2011 after four years in the top spot, according to SNL Financial. The company reported $31.1 million in direct premiums written, a 16.8 percent decline from 2010. Meanwhile, Jefferson City-based Missouri Hospital Plan and its Medical Liability Alliance affiliate, which are both part of the Healthcare Services Group, reported $37.5 million in premiums last year, SNL reported. —Follow Angela Mueller on Twitter @Angela_Mueller


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MPM: Keane Group alleges it lost business because Trout, MPM went after its clients directly continued from page 1

of its decision, an allegation Keane denies. A previous letter, which Keane sent to its clients March 7, claimed Keane had “just been made aware” of MPM’s reinsurance contract, but the suit alleges Keane had known about the transaction since Dec. 1, 2011. “The statements contained in that letter were harmful to MPM, as they attempted to portray MPM as conducting secretive and potentially harmful business without keeping its insureds or its exclusive agent informed of changes to the company’s reinsurance structure,” MPM’s suit states. MPM claims the letter prompted numerous calls and letters from concerned clients. Over the course of 2011, MPM lost more than 80 accounts to other insurers and has lost 10 accounts so far in 2012, “representing hundreds of thousands of dollars in premiums,” according to the suit. In December, MPM and the Keane Group updated their compensation agreement, with the Keane Group receiving 10 percent of the premiums received if the premium base was less than $25 million and going up to 13 percent if the base exceeded $30 million. The amended agreement also included a one-time payment of 3 percent of the premium base as of Nov. 20, 2011. As a result, MPM paid John Keane $562,924 on Dec. 11, and the Keane Group received 13 percent of the premium base as of Dec. 1.

‘John Keane and the Keane Insurance Group exhibited opportunistic behavior.’ Lawsuit filed by Missouri Professionals Mutual

The suit alleges that John Keane told MPM that if it upped his commission he would bring in $30 million in premiums by March 31, 2012, and that the Keane Group would dedicate a “significant portion” of its staff to selling MPM products. The MPM suit alleges that “John Keane and the Keane Insurance Group exhibited opportunistic behavior when they agreed to increased compensation under the Keane Agreement Amendment, and then failed to use their best efforts to aggressively and diligently market and promote MPM.” MPM contends that Keane offered to provide MPM clients comparison quotes from other companies it represented and was “actively marketing other insurers’ policies” to MPM clients. The suit alleges Keane and his agency took these actions to retaliate for not being named the exclusive broker for MPM of Kansas. In its May 1 answer to MPM’s suit, Keane denies these allegations and states that the agency’s agreement with MPM excluded it from marketing only other malpractice insurers organized as mutual companies under Missouri’s Chapter 383 code, as MPM is. MPM also alleges the Keane Group was not relaying premium payments from MPM clients to MPM in a timely manner. Keane Group admits it did remit premium payments to MPM when they were due from the insured rather than when they were collected but alleges that MPM previously was aware of this practice and that in 2011, MPM, Trout and Keane Group agreed to change the payment practice so that MPM was paid when the premium was collected. MPM is requesting an accounting from Keane of all premiums paid by policyhold-

ers, as well as unspecified damages, court costs and attorneys’ fees. In its April 3 countersuit, Keane Group alleges it has lost clients because Trout and MPM have solicited the clients to place their insurance directly with MPM or with MPM of Kansas, which it claims is a violation of its contract. The suit claims that Trout and MPM made “statements to the client that are false and reasonably likely to be harmful.” Specifically, Keane’s suit claims Trout and MPM told clients that the Keane Group terminated its relationship with MPM after

being denied a higher commission. “Due to the ‘personal service’ nature of the relationship between insurance broker and client, it is extremely unlikely Plaintiff can win back any clients it loses as a result to the unlawful conduct” of Trout and MPM, the suit says. The suit asks that Trout be restrained from contacting any Keane Group clients who are insured with MPM and soliciting their business. Keane referred questions to attorney Paul Brown of Thompson Coburn, who said his

client did not want to comment beyond what was on the public record. He said Keane Group gave the required 90-day notice of its termination as MPM’s agency, and “during the 90-day period which runs through June 21 it intends to honor the terms of the contract,” which includes not making any comments that might be harmful to the interest of MPM. Trout could not be reached for comment. MPM is being represented by Robert Selsor, John Challis, Lisa Weixelman and Lauren Tucker McCubbin of Polsinelli Shughart.


................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. .................

34

Classifieds

St. Louis Business Journal

Career Opportunities Manager, R&D sought by SigmaAldrich Corp. in St. Louis, MO to lead team in dvlpg biochemistry product lines & technologies for research reagents, biotechnology & pharmaceutical mkts. Must have PhD deg in Biochem. or Chem. plus 2 yrs of sr/principal scientist exp. in: biotech R&D & new tech dvlpmt; managing scientists & lab techs in industrial setting; lab research w/ biochem, protein chem, organic chem, protein biology, protein assays, immuno-assays, immuno-chemistry, analytical chemistry, protein mass spectrometry & proteomics; ISO 9001:2008 & cGMP/GLP; delivering presentations to staff, customers & sr mgmt; reading, interpreting, & evaluating relative patents. Must submit cvr ltr & resume to: Dave Dugan, SigmaAldrich Corp., 2909 Laclede St., St. Louis, MO 63103.

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Auctions

Real Estate/Residential

May 4-10, 2012

STONEWOLF

Cut Postage Costs! Zip Mail Services, Inc. (314) 645-5055 x 119 www.zipmailservices.com

Golf Course Lots Auction

BID NOW! AUCTION Bidding Ends May 9 at 5 PM

Bids

ONLINE ONLY

LACLEDE STATION ROAD 1.................................................... RECONSTRUCTION 2.................................................... Sealed bids for the Laclede Sta3.................................................... tion Road Reconstruction will be 4.................................................... received by the Office of the Direc5.................................................... tor of Public Works, City Hall, 7601 6.................................................... Manchester Avenue, Maplewood, 7.................................................... Missouri, until 10:00 a.m. (prevailing 8.................................................... central time) on Tuesday, May 29, 9.................................................... 2012 and will thereafter be publicly 10.................................................. opened and read aloud. The project 11 .................................................. consists of the removal and recon12.................................................. struction of approximately 1,150 feet 13.................................................. Auctioneer: Eric Iman of concrete street pavement, curbs, 14.................................................. sidewalks, property restoration and 15.................................................. ● other necessary appurtenances. A 16.................................................. pre-bid conference will be held at 17.................................................. 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, May 22, 18.................................................. Commercial Land Clayton Properties 2012 at Maplewood City Hall. All 19.................................................. prospective bidders are urged to at20.................................................. tend. Bid packages will be available 21.................................................. Missouri River Bottom Farm Building sites after 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, May 1500 ac m/l Tillable 6601, 6611-6619 and 22.................................................. 6621 Clayton Road on the bluffs of 8, 2012. The bid packages may be 23.................................................. Montgomery County, MO reviewed at no cost on the internet 24.................................................. the Mississippi. 1638 contiguous acres more/less at the electronic plan room of Drex25.................................................. 92% Tillable with 4% Return 8 min from 314.421.8316 el Technologies: http://planroom. 26.................................................. downtown. drexeltech.com/View/Default.aspx 27.................................................. alindsey@bizjournals.com 629-8899 or may be purchased from Drexel 28.................................................. Technologies for a non-refundable 29.................................................. Purchase as a Portfolio or Individually fee of $40.00 per set of plans, speci30.................................................. fications and bidding documents. 31.................................................. Call for Price — Offering Information 800-895-4430 The City of Maplewood, with Mis32.................................................. www.MissouriLandAndHome.com Prime Chesterfield Land! souri Department of Transportation 33.................................................. SCott MehlMan On Wild Horse Creek Rd, 41 Acres concurrence, reserves the right to 34.................................................. 314-265-1386 Dropped to $25k per Acre!! reject any or all bids and to waive 35.................................................. smehlman@mehlmanrealty.com Must sell - 314-504-3446 informalities therein. 36.................................................. 37.................................................. 38.................................................. Bids 39.................................................. 40.................................................. ROAD WORK ROAD WORK 1.................................................... ROAD WORK 1.................................................... 41.................................................. NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 2.................................................... NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 2.................................................... 42.................................................. Paper bids not exceeding a monetary value3.................................................... of $250,000 and electronic bids Paper bids not exceeding a monetary value 3.................................................... of $250,000 and electronic bids Paper bids not exceeding a monetary value of $250,000 and electronic bids 43.................................................. submitted through the BidExpress website for constructing or improving submitted through the BidExpress website for4.................................................... constructing or improving Route 4.................................................... submitted through the BidExpress website for constructing or improving Route Routes Various, Job J6P2404, St. Louis, St.5.................................................... Charles, Franklin, and Jefferson 270, Job J6I2397, St. Louis County, will be received by the Commission until I-4444.................................................. Outer Rd., Job J6P2306, St. Louis County, will be received by the Com5.................................................... 45.................................................. Counties, will be received by the Commission until 11:00 o’clock a.m. (prevail- 11:00 o’clock a.m. (prevailing local time) on 5/25/2012. Paper bids not exceed6.................................................... mission until 11:00 o’clock a.m. (prevailing local time) on 05/25/2012. Paper 6.................................................... 46.................................................. ing local time) on 5/25/2012. Paper bids not7.................................................... exceeding a monetary value of ing a monetary value of $250,000 addressed7.................................................... to: bids not exceeding a monetary value of $250,000 addressed to: 47.................................................. $250,000 addressed to: 8.................................................... 8.................................................... 48.................................................. STATE OF MISSOURI, acting by and through 9.................................................... STATE OF MISSOURI, acting by and through 9.................................................... 49.................................................. STATE OF MISSOURI, acting by and through THE MISSOURI HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 10.................................................. THE MISSOURI HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 10.................................................. 50.................................................. THE MISSOURI HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Jefferson City, Missouri 11 .................................................. Jefferson City, Missouri 11 .................................................. Jefferson City, Missouri 12.................................................. 12.................................................. to the Commission in the Mis13.................................................. will be received at the office of the Secretary will be received at the office of the Secretary to the Commission in the Mis13.................................................. will be received at the office of the Secretary to the Commission in the Mis- souri Department of Transportation Central Office Building, 105 West Capitol 14.................................................. souri Department of Transportation Central Office Building, 105 West Capitol 14.................................................. souri Department of Transportation Central Office Building, 105 West Capitol Avenue, Jefferson City, Missouri. 15.................................................. 15.................................................. Avenue, Jefferson City, Missouri. Avenue, Jefferson City, Missouri. 16.................................................. 16.................................................. add signals on the above state 17.................................................. The proposed work includes: Widen ramp and The proposed work includes: Bridge deck removal on the above state road 17.................................................. The proposed work includes: Install flashing 18.................................................. yellow arrows on the above state road at the Rt. 67 interchange in Hazelwood,18.................................................. the total length of the improveover the Meramec River near Route 66 State Park, the total length of the road at various intersections in the St Louis district, the total length of the ment being 0.369 miles. 19.................................................. 19.................................................. improvement being 0.227 mile. improvement being 0 miles. 20.................................................. 20.................................................. by the Americans with 21.................................................. Special Needs: If you have special needs addressed Special Needs: If you have special needs addressed by the Americans with 21.................................................. Special Needs: If you have special needs addressed by the Americans with Disabilities Act, please notify Pamela Harlan,22.................................................. Secretary to the Commission, at 22.................................................. Disabilities Act, please notify Pamela Harlan, Secretary to the Commission, at Disabilities Act, please notify Pamela Harlan,23.................................................. Secretary to the Commission, at (573) 751-2824 or through Missouri Relay System, TDD 1-800-735-2966, at (573) 751-2824 or through Missouri Relay System, TDD 1-800-735-2966, at 23.................................................. (573) 751-2824 or through Missouri Relay System, TDD 1-800-735-2966, at least five (5) working days prior to the bid opening you plan to attend. 24.................................................. least five (5) working days prior to the bid opening you plan to attend. 24.................................................. least five (5) working days prior to the bid opening you plan to attend 25.................................................. 25.................................................. . been predetermined as re26.................................................. The wage rates applicable to this project have The wage rates applicable to this project have been predetermined as re26.................................................. The wage rates applicable to this project have been predetermined as re- quired by law and are set forth in the appendices. When federal wage rates 27.................................................. quired by law and are set forth in the appendices. When federal wage rates 27.................................................. quired by law and are set forth in the appendices. When federal wage rates to the “Work Hours Act of 28.................................................. are applicable and included, this contract is subject are applicable and included, this contract is subject to the “Work Hours Act of 28.................................................. are applicable and included, this contract is 29.................................................. subject to the “Work Hours Act of 1962,” (P.L. 87-581, 76 State. 357) and implementing regulations. 1962,” (P.L. 87-581, 76 State. 357) and implementing regulations. 29.................................................. 1962,” (P.L. 87-581, 76 State. 357) and implementing regulations. 30.................................................. 30.................................................. be given on other than Federal 31.................................................. By virtue of statutory authority, preference shall By virtue of statutory authority, preference shall be given on other than Federal 31.................................................. By virtue of statutory authority, preference shall be given on other than Federal Aid Projects, to materials, products, supplies, provisions, and other articles, 32.................................................. Aid Projects, to materials, products, supplies, provisions, and other articles, 32.................................................. Aid Projects, to materials, products, supplies, provisions, and other articles, produced, manufactured, made or grown within the state of Missouri, where 33.................................................. produced, manufactured, made or grown within the state of Missouri, where 33.................................................. produced, manufactured, made or grown within the state of Missouri, where same are of a suitable character and can be34.................................................. obtained at reasonable market 34.................................................. same are of a suitable character and can be obtained at reasonable market same are of a suitable character and can be obtained at reasonable market prices in the state and are of a quality suited 35.................................................. to the purpose intended and can 35.................................................. prices in the state and are of a quality suited to the purpose intended and can prices in the state and are of a quality suited36.................................................. to the purpose intended and can be secured without additional cost over foreign products or products of other be secured without additional cost over foreign products or products of other 36.................................................. be secured without additional cost over foreign products or products of other states. 37.................................................. 37.................................................. states. states. 38.................................................. 38.................................................. it will affirmatively insure that 39.................................................. The commission hereby notifies all bidders that The commission hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that 39.................................................. The commission hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, minority business 40.................................................. in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, minority business 40.................................................. in any contract entered into pursuant to this 41.................................................. advertisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to41.................................................. submit bids in response to this enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, 42.................................................. invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, 42.................................................. invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, religion, creed, sex, age, ancestry, or national origin in consideration for an 43.................................................. religion, creed, sex, age, ancestry, or national origin in consideration for an 43.................................................. religion, creed, sex, age, ancestry, or national origin in consideration for an award. 44.................................................. 44.................................................. award. award. 45.................................................. 45.................................................. the offices of the Commission 46.................................................. Plans and specifications may be inspected in Plans and specifications may be inspected in the offices of the Commission 46.................................................. Plans and specifications may be inspected 47.................................................. in the offices of the Commission at Jefferson City, or the district engineer at Town and Country, Missouri. Plans at Jefferson City, or the district engineer at Town and Country, Missouri. Plans 47.................................................. at Jefferson City, or the district engineer at Town and Country, Missouri. Plans Com48.................................................. may also be viewed on the Internet at http://modot.indoxservices.com/. may also be viewed on the Internet at http://modot.indoxservices.com/. Com48.................................................. may also be viewed on the Internet at http://modot.indoxservices.com/. Com- plete instructions to bidders and bidding documents may be obtained at the 49.................................................. plete instructions to bidders and bidding documents may be obtained at the 49.................................................. plete instructions to bidders and bidding documents may be obtained at the Jefferson City office. All questions concerning the bid document prepara50.................................................. Jefferson City office. All questions concerning the bid document prepara50.................................................. Jefferson City office. All questions concerning the bid document prepara- tion shall be directed to the Central Office – Design Division at (573) 51.................................................. tion shall be directed to the Central Office – Design Division at (573) 51.................................................. tion shall be directed to the Central Office – Design Division at (573) 751-2876. 52.................................................. 52.................................................. 751-2876. 751-2876. 53.................................................. 53.................................................. Bids must be on forms provided. 54.................................................. Bids must be on forms provided. 54.................................................. Bids must be on forms provided. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids. 55.................................................. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids. 55.................................................. The right is reserved to reject any or all 56.................................................. bids. 56.................................................. COMMISSION 57.................................................. THE MISSOURI HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION THE MISSOURI HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 57.................................................. THE MISSOURI HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Chief Engineer 58.................................................. 58.................................................. Chief Engineer Chief Engineer 59.................................................. 59.................................................. 60.................................................. 60.................................................. 61.................................................. 61.................................................. 62.................................................. 62..................................................

Zoned Residential w/Commercial Potential IL Highway 159 Frontage Location: Fairview Heights, Illinois

UCWallingford.com

Sell-IT!!! April Lindsey

Prime Clayton Properties

FOR SALE

314-882-6708


..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....

classifieds

May 4-10, 2012

St. Louis Business Journal

35

stlouis.bizjournals.com

Distinctive Homes

11 denny lane Colorado contemporary on 3-acres suitable for horses with direct access to the Bridle Trails. Neighborhood is surrounded by 50 acres of equestrian property and 3-acre minimum zoning. Home features vaulted ceilings and open spaces with a rustic flavor. Main living spaces have a southern exposure overlooking pool and property. Kitchen and master suite beautifully updated. Great room adjoins kitchen and breakfast rooms. Walkout lower level has spacious game room, exercise area, half bath and extensive storage. Outdoor spaces include deck, screened porch, patio and pool area. Home Protection Plan. 4,198 sq. ft. plus approx. 1,300 sq. ft. finished in lower level for a total of 5,400 sq. ft. of living space.

Approximately

10.9 acres

New Custom Homes and Building Lots 3 Briar Oak • 1.5 story • Ladue • 1.4-acre • $1,575,000 211 Clion Drive • 1.5 story • Creve Coeur • 1.32-acre • $899,999 5 Downey Lane • 1.5 story • Olivette • Under Construction • $1,165,000 343 Rose Lane •2 story • Kirkwood • To be built • $439,500 424 Maelln Drive • 2 story • Webster Groves • To be built • $429,500 148 Frontenac Forest • Building Lot • Frontenac • .99/ace • $574,900 21 Frontenac Estates • Building Lot • Frontenac • .98/acre • $510,000 304 North Central • Building Lot • Clayton • .38/acre • $999,500

For more information about this property, please call

JOHN RYAN & ANNE RYAN

bridle ridge lane

huntleigh, MO

Kirkwood School District

Coldwell Banker Gundaker Ladue Office 314-993-8000 or 314-810-0581 (Direct Line) www.theryantradition.com

In our market, experience translates to dollars. A trusted and proven name in St. Louis Real Estate...Steve Mathes.

offered at $1,195,000

Bids ROAD WORK 1.................................................... NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 2.................................................... Paper bids not exceeding a monetary value3.................................................... of $250,000 and electronic bids submitted through the BidExpress website4.................................................... for constructing or improving Route 44, Job J6I1967 and Route 64, Job 5.................................................... J6P2199, St. Louis County, will be received by the Commission until 11:00 o’clock a.m. (prevailing local time) 6.................................................... on 5/25/2012. Paper bids not exceeding a 7.................................................... monetary value of $250,000 addressed to: 8....................................................

ROAD WORK NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Paper bids not exceeding a monetary value of $250,000 and electronic bids submitted through the BidExpress website for constructing or improving Route I-170, Job J6I2308, St. Louis County, will be received by the Commission until 11:00 o’clock a.m. (prevailing local time) on 05/25/2012. Paper bids not exceeding a monetary value of $250,000 addressed to:

13.................................................. will be received at the office of the Secretary to the Commission in the Mis14.................................................. souri Department of Transportation Central Office Building, 105 West Capitol 15.................................................. Avenue, Jefferson City, Missouri. 16..................................................

will be received at the office of the Secretary to the Commission in the Missouri Department of Transportation Central Office Building, 105 West Capitol Avenue, Jefferson City, Missouri.

9.................................................... STATE OF MISSOURI, acting by and through 10.................................................. THE MISSOURI HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 11 .................................................. Jefferson City, Missouri 12..................................................

17.................................................. The proposed work for Job J6I1967 includes:18.................................................. Pavement repair and Resurfacing with BP-1 and SP on the above state road on the NOR, W/of Rte. 141 to 19.................................................. E/of Lone Elk Park near Fenton., the total length of the improvement being 20.................................................. 1.439 miles. 21.................................................. 22.................................................. The proposed work for Job J6P2199 includes: Pavement repair and resurfac23.................................................. ing with BP-1 on the above state road on the24.................................................. North Outer Rd. west of Rt. 340 in Chesterfield, the total length of the improvement being 2.36 miles. 25.................................................. Combination bids will be Required on the following: 26.................................................. Route 44, Job J6I1967, St. Louis County27.................................................. Route 64, Job J6P2199, St. Louis County 28.................................................. 29.................................................. Special Needs: If you have special needs addressed by the Americans with 30.................................................. Disabilities Act, please notify Pamela Harlan,31.................................................. Secretary to the Commission, at (573) 751-2824 or through Missouri Relay System, TDD 1-800-735-2966, at 32.................................................. least five (5) working days prior to the bid opening you plan to attend. 33.................................................. 34.................................................. The wage rates applicable to this project have been predetermined as re35.................................................. quired by law and are set forth in the appendices. When federal wage rates 36.................................................. are applicable and included, this contract is subject to the “Work Hours Act of 37.................................................. 1962,” (P.L. 87-581, 76 State. 357) and implementing regulations. 38.................................................. 39.................................................. By virtue of statutory authority, preference shall be given on other than Federal 40.................................................. Aid Projects, to materials, products, supplies, provisions, and other articles, 41.................................................. produced, manufactured, made or grown within the state of Missouri, where 42.................................................. same are of a suitable character and can be obtained at reasonable market 43.................................................. prices in the state and are of a quality suited44.................................................. to the purpose intended and can be secured without additional cost over foreign products or products of other 45.................................................. states. 46.................................................. 47.................................................. The commission hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that 48.................................................. in any contract entered into pursuant to this 49.................................................. advertisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this 50.................................................. invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, 51.................................................. religion, creed, sex, age, ancestry, or national origin in consideration for an 52.................................................. award. 53.................................................. 54.................................................. Plans and specifications may be inspected 55.................................................. in the offices of the Commission at Jefferson City, or the district engineer at Town and Country, Missouri. Plans 56.................................................. may also be viewed on the Internet at http://modot.indoxservices.com/. Com57.................................................. plete instructions to bidders and bidding documents may be obtained at the 58.................................................. Jefferson City office. All questions concerning the bid document prepara59.................................................. tion shall be directed to the Central Office – Design Division at (573) 60.................................................. 751-2876. 61.................................................. 62.................................................. Bids must be on forms provided. 63.................................................. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids. 64..................................................

65.................................................. THE MISSOURI HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 66.................................................. Chief Engineer 67.................................................. 68.................................................. 69.................................................. 70.................................................. 71.................................................. 72.................................................. 73.................................................. 74.................................................. 75.................................................. 76.................................................. 77..................................................

need contract workers for a job? advertise your bids in the classifieds. ContaCt april lindsey 314.421.8316 or alindsey@bizjournals.Com

STATE OF MISSOURI, acting by and through THE MISSOURI HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Jefferson City, Missouri

The proposed work includes: Guardrail and guard cable improvements on the above state road from I-270 to Rt. D near St Louis, the total length of the improvement being 6.462 miles. Special Needs: If you have special needs addressed by the Americans with Disabilities Act, please notify Pamela Harlan, Secretary to the Commission, at (573) 751-2824 or through Missouri Relay System, TDD 1-800-735-2966, at least five (5) working days prior to the bid opening you plan to attend. The wage rates applicable to this project have been predetermined as required by law and are set forth in the appendices. When federal wage rates are applicable and included, this contract is subject to the “Work Hours Act of 1962,” (P.L. 87-581, 76 State. 357) and implementing regulations.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS!

By virtue of statutory authority, preference shall be given on other than Federal Aid Projects, to materials, products, supplies, provisions, and other articles, produced, manufactured, made or grown within the state of Missouri, where same are of a suitable character and can be obtained at reasonable market prices in the state and are of a quality suited to the purpose intended and can be secured without additional cost over foreign products or products of other states. The commission hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, religion, creed, sex, age, ancestry, or national origin in consideration for an award. Plans and specifications may be inspected in the offices of the Commission at Jefferson City, or the district engineer at Town and Country, Missouri. Plans may also be viewed on the Internet at http://modot.indoxservices.com/. Complete instructions to bidders and bidding documents may be obtained at the Jefferson City office. All questions concerning the bid document preparation shall be directed to the Central Office – Design Division at (573) 751-2876. Bids must be on forms provided. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids. THE MISSOURI HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Chief Engineer

OUR CLASSIFIEDS ARE ONLINE.

For added EXPOSURE to readers of 41 Business Journals coast to coast. stlouis.bizjournals.com

ContaCt april lindsey at 314.421.8316 or alindsey@bizjournals.Com to reserve an ad or For more inFo.


36

Our Turn

St. Louis Business Journal

stlouis.bizjournals.com

May 4-10, 2012

St Louis Business Journal .

Old Post Office | 815 Olive St., Suite 100 St. Louis, Mo. 63101 (314) 421-6200 | Fax (314) 621-5031 stlouis@bizjournals.com

The judge gets an A

Publisher: Ellen Sherberg | 421-8310

Editorial Editor: Patricia Miller | 421-8326 Managing Editor: Joe Dwyer III | 421-8324 Section Editor: Vince Brennan | 421-8323

J

udge David Lee Vincent may have single-handedly saved the St. Louis city public schools. And possibly some neighboring districts as well, not to mention the public system in Kansas City, which, like the city schools and those in Riverview Gardens, lost its state accreditation. Judge Vincent ruled that students who attend nonaccredited schools do not have the right to Some argue transfer to neighboring disthat blowing tricts for free, a up the system right granted under Missouri is the best way law. judge, to to reinvent hisThecredit, ruled quality on the basis of the Hancock education. We Amendment to Missouri think there the Constitution should be a which forbids manplan B. unfunded dates. He did not get involved with more subjective matters of educational quality and racial and economic inequality. His ruling, which the attorney general promises to appeal, was based on the financial stability of school districts. The St. Louis district predicted that if it had to pay for the education of its students in neighboring districts, nearly 85 percent of its budget would be depleted. That would be the end of the city schools, as we know them. Some argue that blowing up the system is the best way to reinvent quality education. We think there should be a plan B. It certainly isn’t the answer for the suburban schools that are ill prepared to handle a massive influx of students. It could be the end of those districts as we know them, as well. Judge Vincent decided in favor of the schools. Now it’s up to the rest of us to provide the support for public education that our children deserve, in the city and in the suburbs.

Web Editor: Greta Weiderman | 421-8309 Associate Editor: Diana Barr | 421-8332 Reporters: Evan Binns | 421-8321 Rick Desloge | 421-8335 Greg Edwards | 421-8325 Matthew Hibbard | 421-8385 Amir Kurtovic | 421-8391 Angela Mueller | 421-8320 E.B. Solomont | 421-8334 Researcher: Nick Ledden | 421-8380 Contributing Columnist: Mark Vittert

Cosmic helmets, glowing ties

T

he school I attended would always provide a “suggested” reading list for the summer. And, in some cases, there was “required” reading. So, early each June, we’d secure the appropriate books for my summer reading and then place them in the trunk that was accompanying me to camp. Needless to say, to no one’s surprise, those books returned home in August in the same condition and in precisely the same place they had been put into the trunk. I had found a higher calling in the field of literature, one Reflections that appealed much more to my abilities and interests — comic books. Mark Vittert At Camp Wah-kon-dah, snuggled deep in the Ozarks, there was a one-and-a-half-hour period each day, I think it was 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., where we had to rest. You had to lie in your bunk and nap, or read — no talking. Well, the decisions were really tough — was it “Moby Dick” or Batman, was it “Wuthering Heights” or Superman, was it Archie or, heaven help us, “Silas Marner?” Well, those comic books were like treasures. And, as a plus, some of the finest products and services of our times were advertised in our favorite comics. Those ads, although giving rise to a youngster’s healthy skepticism, nevertheless would give hope to those who wished to be muscle-bound, or glamorous, or even invisible. Recently, Andy, a friend of mine, gave me a wonderful book, “Hey Skinny,” written by Beller and Leibowitz, published by Chronicle Books, that reprinted many of those old ads that promised you just about anything. Looking through this book brought back lots of memories — and now I wonder why I didn’t send away for the Invisible Helmet. Here are some examples of all of our favorite ads from the 1940s and ‘50s: • “Hey, Skinny, your ribs are showing.” This is probably the most famous comic book ad of all, in which Charles Atlas, holder of the title “The World’s Most Perfectly Developed Man,” promises that through “dynamic tension” he can make you a new man in but 15 minutes a day, so that you can return to the beach and pummel that fellow who kicked sand in your face. • “Pimples dry up in three days — love can be yours again.” Clear-X would do wonders. And there I was, putting Clearasil on my face every night, washing my

face with that icky cream called Phisohex and sitting under a heat lamp. Should have ordered Clear-X. • And then there’s the “Lucky grab bag for 98 cents.” Sold by, of course, the Honor Co. They would include “many famous brands, Parker, Boliva, Kodak,” in their wonderful grab bag, where some of the things “used to cost at least $10.” • “The Invisible Helmet.” Frequently known as the “Cosmic Vision Helmet,” where, of course, you could put it on and see everybody but people couldn’t see you. The price on this helmet was a mere $1.98. • “Draw Me.” There was a picture of a pretty girl, and if you could draw her to the judge’s satisfaction, you would be entitled to a $280 art course. I wonder if they sent any special offers to all the people who didn’t win the Draw Me contest. • “Fat men and women who are normally overweight will be amazed to discover this safe, pleasant, scientific way to lose ugly fat.” All you need to do is chew Kelpidine Chewing Gum. “Reduce up to five pounds a week with Dr. Phillip’s reducing plan. No drugs, no starving, no massage, no exercise, no steaming, no laxatives.” The price: $5.95 for a 509-day supply of the gum. • “Skinny girls are not glamour girls. How to add glamorous curves to your figure by Numall in order to add pounds and pounds of firm, attractive flesh to your figure. When the postman delivers Numall, in a plain wrapper, pay him only $2 plus postage and COD fees. Skinny men are not attractive, either. This product was medically checked and approved by Numall’s own medical director for accuracy.” • “Hi, I’m Uncle Harry. I will send you prizes like these (guitar, basketball, bicycles) without 1 cent of cost. All you need to do is sell my famous vegetable and flower seed packs.” • “World’s tiniest dog at almost no cost. I’ll be happy to send you, without even paying a penny, this lovable, amazing miniature dog that is so tiny you can carry it in your pocket or hold it in one hand.” • “Girls can’t resist this ‘kissme’ necktie as it glows in the dark. By day, a lovely, swank tie — by night, a call to love in glowing words. The glowing words in the dark say, ‘Will you kiss me in the dark, baby?’” Irresistible for $1.49. Well, there are plenty of others in this book that are just as good, if not better, but I can’t help wondering why I never ordered that Clear-X pimple cream, the Invisible Helmet, and certainly the glow-in-the-dark tie. Maybe they’ll all make a comeback. From time to time we reprint a favorite Reflections.

Creative Creative Director: Michael Behrens | 421-8388 Production Director: Garrett Van Dyke | 421-8387 Advertising Graphics: Dan Schriber | 421-8379 Photography Editor: Brian Cassidy | 550-0907 Graphic Designer: Alison Green | 421-8369 Coordinator: Barbara Richards | 421-8333

Advertising Director of Advertising: Glynelle Wells | 421-8340 Associate Advertising Manager: Matt Ceresia | 421-8343 Marketing Consultants: Judith Anderson | 421-8339 Bruce Hoskins | 421-8341 Mark Shocklee | 421-8314 Jennifer Orgel Tompras | 421-8344 April Lindsey | 421-8316

Audience development Director of Audience Development: LaTonja Thomas-Evans | 421-8328 Assistant Director of Audience Development: Bonnie Weinacht | 421-8318 Audience Development Consultants: Carlos Giles | 421-8349 Debrah Monks | 421-8342 James Danchus | 421-8337

Administration Business Manager: Viola Breunig | 421-8374 Receptionist: Bonnie Parks | 421-8301 Special Projects: Debbie Beck | 421-8315 Administrative Assistant: Tina Young | 421-8329 Special Events Coordinator: Kelly Rowland | 421-8307

Serving the St. Louis metropolitan area including eastern Missouri and southern Illinois. Founders: Mark Vittert, Andrew Newman 1980 The St. Louis Business Journal is a publication of American City Business Journals Inc., 120 W. Morehead St., Suite 400, Charlotte, N.C. 28202 Whitney Shaw, President & CEO Ray Shaw, Chairman (1989 to 2009)


May 4-10, 2012

Your Turn

St. Louis Business Journal

37

stlouis.bizjournals.com

Protect tax credits that benefit the most vulnerable

T

ax credits have been given a bad rap lately. Legislators are looking for ways to cut the state’s budget and tax credits seem to be a big target. However, there is a special class of benevolent tax credits that promote charitable giving to programs serving Missouri’s abused and neglected chilGuest dren. Allowing donors to utilize these Columnist benevolent tax credits can reduce the impact on taxpayer resources in the future. The Children in Crisis (CIC) tax credits increase private giving to Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) programs, By Jan Huneke Child Advocacy Centers and Crisis Care Centers. These tax credits have enabled them to raise much needed funds to help foster children in Missouri. Unfortunately, these tax credits are set to end on Aug. 28. CASA advocates for the best interests of abused and neglected children so they can thrive in safe, permanent homes. There are 22 local CASA programs throughout Missouri and four serving the St. Louis area. The unclaimed portion of the Special Needs Adoption Tax Credit finances the CIC tax credit. Since its inception,

the CIC tax credit has enabled CASA programs to raise over $900,000 which is needed to provide critical advocacy to our most vulnerable children. To allow the tax credits to end would be a huge detriment to Missouri’s most vulnerable children. CASA volunteers are appointed by judges to advocate for foster children, to make sure they don’t get lost in the overburdened child welfare system or languish in foster care. Volunteers help to expedite critical health, mental health and educational services and ensure the child is placed in a safe, permanent home. For many abused children, their CASA volunteer will be the one constant adult presence in their lives. National studies have shown that children with a CASA volunteer are half as likely to spend time in long-term foster care. CASA advocacy

saves taxpayer dollars as well. If the median length of stay were shortened for children in foster care by just one month, it would realize a national savings to taxpayers of approximately $2.75 billion. Missouri has approximately 1,300 volunteers across the state serving over 2,200 children. As of February 2012, there were 10,604 children in foster care in Missouri. The funds raised with the help of the CIC tax credits are critical for CASA

programs to give child victims a strong voice. These benevolent tax credits should not be allowed to end. Missouri’s foster children depend upon it. Jan Huneke is CEO of Voices for Children, which advocates for abused and neglected children and youth in St. Louis. The nonprofit recently merged with CASA of St. Louis County.

Payday petition would shortchange Missouri Editor: By now, just about every Missourian has heard about — or even been faced with signing — the hotly debated “Payday Loan Ballot Initiative,” which seeks to cap interest rates on payday loans at 36 percent. However, the deceptive ballot language not only doesn’t mention “36 percent,” it fails to tell voters that it doesn’t just include payday lenders, but all small-dollar lenders in Missouri. This initiative purposely blurs the lines between payday loans and traditional installment loans (TILs), when in fact the two are radically different. I’ve made it my personal mission to educate the public about this difference and the drastic impact the initiative will have on Missouri’s economy if this petition moves forward. TILs are high quality, affordable loans that allow consumers to manage household expenses without depleting their savings. They require a rigorous review process, allowing lenders to schedule reasonable monthly payments that the borrower can afford

without disrupting their overall budget. The key words here are “monthly payments.” TILs have been a noncontroversial, responsible source of credit for decades. Payday loans, however, are typically repaid within the borrower’s next payday cycle and without structured payment plans. The requirement is to pay the entire balance — or balloon payment — at maturity. Payday loans are the exact opposite of TILs. Yet, somehow, this initiative has grouped the two forms of loans together, to the potential detriment not only of Missouri’s residents, but of its business community. So, how exactly will a 36 percent cap on small-dollar loans impact Missouri? For starters, the other week, the Cole County Court ruled against the Payday Loan Initiative because of its misleading language. The court found that the effect of the initiative would be to eliminate the entire small-dollar loan industry, costing the state millions of dollars in lost tax revenue. TILs provide a safe and manageable source of

credit for consumers when they face a sudden financial crisis, such as major roof repairs or key appliances breaking. Many people don’t want to deplete their savings to handle these issues, but they know they can afford to make manageable monthly payments. In the business community, TILs have long been a greatly needed resource, not only in helping small businesses get off the ground, but also in keeping them afloat in tough economic times. When banks fail Missouri business owners, TILs are there to give them the opportunity to rebuild or sustain their operations. These loans are safely structured with fully amortized equal payments and transparent terms. Small businesses are the backbone of our communities, and TILs help keep them open and thriving. For many of our family members, friends and neighbors, these loans have helped make the American Dream a reality. Even more so now, as the tide turns on Missouri’s economy, it’s essential that homegrown enterprises continue to

flourish. If they’re denied access to the resources needed to stay in business, to drive and sustain job growth, and to support our cities and towns, we all pay the price. Don’t forget that consumers and businesses who take out TILs purchase items from other retailers — auto shop owners, construction companies, plumbers and appliance manufacturers — which also improves and sustains our economy. The Payday Loan Ballot Initiative would force TILs and other traditional lenders to leave Missouri, devastating the state’s ability to create a flourishing local merchant base. As the state of Missouri continues on its path to recovery, it must reform some aspects of the economy while taking care to view the bigger picture. It’s crucial to understand what matters and what is necessary to this process. And for Missouri’s consumers and businesses, TILs are necessary. Tom Hudgins President & CEO Stand Up Missouri


38

St. Louis Business Journal

Every Thursday

stlouis.bizjournals.com

May 4-10, 2012

Calendar

The Downtown St. Louis Rotary Club: Thursday Lunch Meetings Noon to 1 p.m. Missouri Athletic Club 405 Washington Ave., 2nd Floor St. Louis, Mo. 63102 (314) 894-1759 deniseh@rotarystl.org

Monday, May 7

NAWBO St. Louis Celebrate Small Business Week Honorees 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Market Grill 728 Lafayette St. Louis, Mo. 63104 www.nawbostl.org

Tuesday, May 8

Dialogue with the Fed Sovereign Debt - A Modern Greek Tragedy 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis 1 Federal Reserve Plaza St. Louis, Mo. 63102 www.stlouisfed.org/dialogue Missouri Procurment Technical Assistance SBA Loans: Keys to Your Financial Success 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Small Business Administration 1222 Spruce St. St. Louis, Mo. 63103 (314) 241-1511 missouri.ecenterdirect.com/Conferences.action

Thursday, May 10

PRSA St. Louis: Compelling Communication with Steve Hughes of Hit Your Stride 5:30 p.m. to 7:”30 p.m. Blackfinn American Grille 1147 Saint Louis Galleria St. Louis, Mo. 63117 (636) 346-3434 www.prsastlouis.org

Technology & Resource Center 3611 S. Grand Blvd., Suite 105 St. Louis, Mo. 63118 (314) 539-6600, ext. 242 www.stlscore.org

Events

Wednesday, May 16

Chesterfield Chamber of Commerce: May General Meeting with Jill Farmer 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Forest Hills Country Club 36 Forest Club Drive Chesterfield, Mo. 63005 (636) 532-3399 info@chesterfieldmochamber.com www.chesterfieldmochamber.com St. Louis Business Journal: Archiving, eDiscovery and Defensible Disposal 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. Ritz Carlton - Amphitheatre 100 Carondelete Plaza St. Louis, Mo. 63105 (314) 436-2233 www.wgcinc.com HR, People & Strategy St. Louis: Transformative HR: How Great Organizations Use Evidence-Based Change for Sustainable Advantage 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Hilton Frontenac 1335 S. Lindbergh St. Louis, Mo. 63131 MMarshall@vandover.com

latonja thomas

Information about events the Business Journal hosts is at bizjournals.com/stlouis, under “Events.” For more information, contact Director of Circulation and Special Events LaTonja Thomas, (314) 4218328, ltthomas@bizjournals.com. For information about event sponsorship, contact Advertising Director Glynelle Wells, (314) 421-8340, gwells@bizjournals.com.

Nominations Nominations for awards given by the Business Journal, such as 40 Under 40 or Best Places to Work, can be made by clicking on the “Events and Nominations” box on the right side of bizjournals.com/stlouis

On The Web Business news, around the nation

We search media outlets across the country every morning for news you need to know. Sign up at bizjournals.com/stlouis and click on “Receive Morning Call.”

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Online Edition

Subscribers to the newspaper can access the paper online every Friday morning through an online account. Go to bizjournals.com/stlouis and click on “Premium Content.”

Thursday, May 17

Missouri Venture Forum: Where’s the Cash? 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sheraton Clayton Plaza 7730 Bonhomme Ave. Clayton, Mo. 63105 (314) 241-2683 www.MissouriVentureForum.org

Social Media Fan us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter: St. Louis Business Journal @stlbj Publisher Ellen Sherberg @ellensherberg Editor Patricia Miller @trishbizjournal

Mobile App New for iPhone, BlackBerry, Android, iPad or Galaxy Tab.

Friday, May 11

St. Louis SCORE Workshop: Protect Your Intellectual Property 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

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May 4-10, 2012

St. Louis Business Journal

39

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Index Huneke, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

A, B, C, D

I, J, K, L

Alizadeh, Ed . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Anderson, James . . . . . . . . 12 Araujo, Dennis . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Arnold, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Bagy, Rick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Bailey, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . 12 Baum, Dr. Margaret . . . . . . 12 Bayer, Ray Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Beatty, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . 13 Bickel, Gil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Biegacki, Steven . . . . . . . . . 12 Blackmore, Peter . . . . . . . . 12 Boehlke, Robert . . . . . . . . . 12 Bonaccorsi, Mary Clare . . . 5 Boon, Alice . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Brasunas, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Breckenridge, Don Jr. . . . . . 19 Brouster, Tom . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Brown, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Brown, David . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Brown, Dr. Yolette . . . . . . . 12 Brown, Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Buhlinger, Yvonne . . . . . . . 12 Bunce, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Busker, David . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Byrne, Bob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Caplin, Dr. David . . . . . . . . . 9 Challis, John . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Chao, Kerry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Chatila, Ahmad . . . . . . . . . 12 Compton, James . . . . . . . . . 13 Cook, Jason . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Cook, Jeff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Corrigan, Bill . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Cox, Robert Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Cuka, Ronny . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 D’Ambrose, Joan . . . . . . . . 12 Dearduff, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Demko, Richard . . . . . . . . . . 4 Derksen, Hendrikus . . . . . . 12 Diekhoff, Brian . . . . . . . . . . 24 Dittrich, Gaines . . . . . . . . . . 4 Doerr, Marty . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Domenech, Carlos . . . . . . . 12 Drone, Tim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Dunlap, Erin Fleming . . . . . 5

E, F, G, H Eaves, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Engel, Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Erhart, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Esparrage, Peter . . . . . . 1, 23 Feldman, Sheila . . . . . . . . . 12 Frazee, Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Freeman, Alan . . . . . . . . . . 12 Freese, David . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Gerber, Randy . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Gideon, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Gobberg, Ray . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Goede, Trey . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Goodman, Kristen . . . . . . . 13 Goodman, Scott . . . . . . . . . . 2 Goran, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Gowin, Eric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Haggerty, Rob . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Hamilton, Stephen . . . . . . . 2 Hamm-Niebruegge, Rhonda 13 Hannah, Kenneth . . . . . . . 12 Harms, Dennis . . . . . . . . . . 13 Heger, Brett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Hernandez, Emmanuel . . . 12 Herndon, Scott . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Hillman, Margaret . . . . . . . . 5 Hoekel, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . 24 Hofmann, David . . . . . . . . . 13 Holton, Rick Jr. . . . . . . . 1, 23 Hudgins, Tom . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Ivie, Allan IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Jaffe, Dr. David . . . . . . . . . . 13 Jasper, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Jones, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Kalnasy, Glenn . . . . . . . . . . 12 Keane, C. John Jr. . . . . . . . . . 1 Keane, Jeffrey . . . . . . . 21, 22 Keane, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Keeley, Lawrence Jr. . . . . . . . 4 Kellogg, Kristin . . . . . . . . . . 13 Kemper, David . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Kemper, Mariner . . . . . . . . . 2 Kerr-Landeck, Judy . . . . . . 13 Koenemann, Barry . . . . . . . 4 Kratzer, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Kulig, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . 20 Kumra, Naresh . . . . . . . . . . 12 Laughlin, John . . . . . . . . . . 13 Leffler, Stephanie . . . . 21, 22 Liu, Ruiling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Lomax, Vickie . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Lozano, Gabe . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Slone, Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Soros, George . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Springer, William . . . . . . . . . 4 Stevens, William . . . . . . . . 12 Stone, Aaron . . . . . . . . 21, 22 Strobel, Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . . 12 Swenson, Susan . . . . . . . . . 12 Tepe, Dr. Melissa . . . . . . . . . 12 Toothman, Val . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Trout, Tim . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 32

{ HOLMES M UR

People

Y& PH

ASSOCIATE S

YEARS

Affinity Wind LLC . . . . . . . 23 Aisle411 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Alberici . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Alberici Constructors . . . . 10 Alper Audi Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 10 American Railcar Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 American Soybean Association . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Anheuser-Busch InBev . . . . 5 Arch Coal Inc. . . . . . . . 12, 13

Byrne and Jones . . . . . . . . . . 2 C. Rallo Contracting Co. Inc. . . . . 10 C&R Mechanical . . . . . . . . 10 Cannon Design . . . . . . . . . . 10 Capital Innovators . . . . . . . 19 Caramel House . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CASA of St. Louis County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Cassidy Turley . . . . . . . 7, 10 Cellnet Technology . . . . . . 10

Datotel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 DESCO Group Inc. . . . . . . . . 4 Dining Circle . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

E, F, G, H EDAW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Emerson . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 10 Energizer Holdings . . . . . . 12 Energy Solutions Inc. . . . . 10 Enterprise Bank & Trust . . . 2

fresh approach

Want a to old insurance challenges?

{

As your valued partner, Holmes Murphy will exceed your expectations with solid property and casualty solutions and affordable employee benefits — delivered with a true understanding of your company’s challenges and opportunities. For a complete line of value-added services, call Holmes Murphy — the nation’s 22nd-largest* broker.

M, N, O, P, Q Majewski, Lori Holt . . . . . . 13 Marren, John . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Matthews, Brian . . 1, 23, 32 Matthews, Carol . . . . . . 1, 32 Matthews, David . . . . . . . . . 4 McCarthy, Denis . . . . . . . . . 12 McCubbin, Lauren Tucker . . . . . . . . . 33 McElroy, Craig . . . . . . . . . . . 7 McGauley, Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 McKelvey, Jim . . . . . . 1, 19, 20, 23, 32 McNamara, Michael . . . . . 12 Meyer, Danny . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Milligan, Cynthia . . . . . . . . 12 Mintz, Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Moore, Maggie . . . . . . . . . . 13 Murphy, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Nelson, Carrie . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Nelson, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Niemann, Lawrence . . . . . 32 Oberkfell, Dale . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Oelke, Crest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Palmer, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Parker, Gary . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Paul, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Pettyjohn, Nathan . . . . . . . 20 Pittenger, Brad . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Porter, Matthew . . . . . 21, 22 Porter, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . 7 Portnoy, Dr. Shulamit . . . . 12 Quigley, Philip . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Ravin, Dr. Amy . . . . . . . . . . 12 Regna, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Richardson, Veronica . . . . 12 Rodrigues, Dan . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Ruck, Albert . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Runstad, Judith . . . . . . . . . 12 Rutledge, Dr. Bridget . . . . . 12 Ruzicka, Donna . . . . . . . . . . 5 Sachtleben, Scott . . . . . . . . . 4 Sadasivam, Shaker . . . . . . 12 Samuels, Dr. Lawrence . . . 8, 9 Samuels, Stephanie . . . . . . . 8 SanFilippo, James . . . . . . . . . 4 Sawyier, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Scheetz, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Schlenther, Michelle . . . . . . 5 Selsor, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Shulman, Janet Ansehl . . . . 2 Sindecuse, Judy . . . . . 23, 32 Siverts, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Mike Kilker Vice President

Steve Huetsch Vice President

Mike Kniepman Vice President

Adam Lohse Account Executive

Jennifer Triller Account Executive

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Trout, Timothy . . . . . . . . . . 33 Turner, Marshall . . . . . . . . 12

V, W, X, Y, Z R, S, T, U

Matt McGrath Division Vice President

Vaughn, Jill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Vincent, David Lee . . . . . . . 36 Von Rohr, Jerry . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Voss, Janet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Wagman, Roy . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Wahl, Jeff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Wallace, Harvey . . . . . . . . . . 7 Walls, James . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Weiss, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Weixelman, Lisa . . . . . . . . . 33 Welborn, Kyle . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Welsh, Russ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Wiegert, Charlie . . . . . . . . . 32 Willer, Kevin . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Williams, James . . . . . . . . . 12

Companies A, B, C, D Aegion Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

* Business Insurance, July 2011.

Architectural Design Guild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 ARCO Construction Co. . . . 2 Arcturis . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 12 Armstrong Teasdale . . 7, 24 Art Institute of St. Louis . . 13 Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 AT&T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Belden Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Bell Electrical . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Bick Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Bieg Plumbing . . . . . . . . . . 10 BioGenerator . . . . . . . . . . . 20 BioMerieux . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Birkel Electric . . . . . . . . . . . 10 BJC Institute of Health at Washington University School of Medicine . . . . . 10 BJC Progress West . . . . . . . 10 BKD LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Bonfyre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Bowood Farms . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Brown Smith Wallace . . . . . 7 Bryan Cave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BSI Constructors . . . . . . . . 10 Bunge North America . . . . 5

Centene Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Center Oil Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CGL Engineering . . . . . . . . 10 CJL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Classic Car Studio . . . . . . . 32 Clayco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Clive Samuels & Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Cole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Commerce Bank . . . . . . . . . . 2 Connie Duglin Linens . . . . 13 Contegix LLC . . . . . . 7, 21, 22 Contegra Construction Co. . . . . 2, 10 Contemporary Art Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Coolfire Media . . . . . . . 21, 22 Corrigan Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Crossroads College Prep . . 10 CrowdSource . . . . . . . 21, 22 CSI Leasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Cultivation Capital . . .1, 23, 32 Cummins Mid-South . . . . . 13 Danforth Plant Science Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

EPIC Systems Inc. . . . . . . . 13 Express Scripts . . . . . . . 7, 10 Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 FinServe Tech Angels . . . . 23 Fireman’s Fund Insurance10 First Banks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 First National Bank of St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Forum Studio Inc. . . . . . . . 10 Fox Architects . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Fox Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Frieze Harley-Davidson . . . 10 FTL Capital Partners . . . . . 19 Furniture Brands International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 G S & S General Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . 10 G.T. Lawlor . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Gallop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Gannett Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Geotechnology . . . . . . . . . . . 2 GPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Grace Hill Health Centers Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Gray Design Group . . . . . . 10

Growspar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Guarantee Electrical . . . . . 10 Helix Center . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Herndon Products . . . . . . . . 6 Holton Capital Group . 1, 32 Hot In The Kitchen . . . . . . 13 Humanity Saint Louis . . . . . 2 Huntsman Architectural Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Huttig Building Products . 12

I, J, K, L Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Infomedia Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 7 IntraISP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 J.R. Grimes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 JBara Software . . . . . . 23, 32 John Burroughs . . . . . . . . . . 2 Juggle LLC . . . . . . . . . . 21, 22 Kaemmerlen . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 KAI Design & Build . . . . . . 10 Karasek Architects . . . . . . 10 Keane Group . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Keane Insurance Group Inc. . . . . . . 1, 32, 33 Keeley Construction Co. . . . 4 KJWW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Koch Development . . . . . . 14 Korte Construction Co. . . . . 2 KPFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 L.A. Schafer Construction Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 L.V. Niemann Consulting Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Ladue High School . . . . . . . 8 Lambert-St. Louis International Airport . . . 13 Landis + Gyr . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Laumeier Sculpture Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Legacy Building Group . . . 10 LockerDome . . . 19, 20, 23, 32 Lord Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

M, N, O, P, Q Mackey Mitchell Architects . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Marcone Supply . . . . . . . . . 14 MEMC Electronic Materials Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 12 Metissian LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Midwest BankCentre . . . . . 13 Missouri Botanical Garden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Missouri Department of Higher Education . . . . . . . 6 Missouri Higher Education Loan Authority . . . . . . . . . 6 Missouri Professionals Mutual . . . . . . . . . 1, 32, 33 Monsanto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Murphy Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Musick Construction . . . . . 10 Nawgan Products . . . . . . . 20 Netelligent Corp. . . . . 21, 22 North Highland . . . . . . . . . . 2 Novus International . . . . . 10 Off Campus Media . . . . . . . 20 Olin Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Open Field Designs . . . . . . . 10 OX2 Engineers . . . . . . . . . . 10 Paul Todd Merrill . . . . . . . . 10 Paynecrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Pioneer Bank and Trust . . . 4 Polanik Architects . . . . . . . 10 Polsinelli Shughart 5, 24, 33 Post Holdings . . . . . . . . . . . 12 PrivateBancorp Inc. . . . . . . 12 Progress Point Center . . . . 10 Quest Diagnostics . . . . . . . 12

R, S, T, U R G Ross Construction Co.10 R.A.I Dorsa LLC . . . . . . . . . . 2 Reliance Bancshares Inc. . . 4 Reliance Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 River City Internet . . . . . . . . 1 RMJM Hillier . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Roberts Bros. Cos. . . . . . . . 10 Ross & Baruzzini . . . . . . . . . 10 Ross Barney . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 RxSystems PF . . . . . . . . . . 8, 9 S.M. Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Saint Louis University . . . . 20 Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard PC . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Schlafly Bottleworks . . . . . . 2 Schnuck Markets . . . . . . . . . 7 Scottrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Sendouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Shaw Nature Reserve . . . . 10 Sigma-Aldrich Corp. . . . . . 12 Simms Building Group . . . 10 Solae LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Solutions AEC . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Spartech Corp. . . . . . . . . . . 12 Square Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 1, 19 St. Louis Arch Angels . . . . . . . . 18, 20, 23 St. Louis Cardinals . . . . 9, 19 St. Louis Community College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 St. Louis County Economic Council . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 23 St. Louis Information Technology Entrepreneur Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 St. Louis Magazine . . . . . . . 13 St. Luke’s Hospital . . . . . . . . 8 Stages St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . 13 Stand Up Missouri . . . . . . . 37 Staples Promotional Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Stock & Associates . . . . . . . 10 Straub’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Systematic Revenue . 19, 32 TEC Plus Architects . . . . . . 10 TMA Architects . . . . . . . . . 10 TR,i Architects . . . . . . . . . . 10 Treanor Architects . . . . . . 10 Triad Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Trumpet Brothers . . . . . . . 10 Trumpt Builders . . . . . . . . . 10 TSOI/Kobis & Associates . . 10 UMB Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Union Square Hospitality Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 United Construction . . 4, 10 University of MissouriSt. Louis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

V, W, X, Y, Z Vertegy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Voices for Children . . . . . . . 37 Volk Construction . . . . . . . 10 Wachter Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Washington University . . . . . . . 8, 10, 20 Washington University School of Medicine . . . 9,13 Waylon Advertising . . . . . . . 4 Weiss Brentwood Volvo . . . . 9 Weiss Toyota Scion of South County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Wells Fargo & Co. . . . . . 2, 12 William A. Kerr Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 William B. Ittner Inc. . . . . . 10 William Tao & Associates . 10 Woolpert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Xiolink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 YiBo Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Yogoluv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2


MOVED QUICKER SO HIS CLIENTS COULD TOO. ANOTHER DAY. ANOTHER VICTORY.

99

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Meet Craig, a knowledgeable agent specializing in first-time home buyers and relos. When business got slow, Craig got inspired. He found the communications amenities his office had been seeking: Charter Business Internet and Phone. Now, with speeds up to six times faster than standard DSL,† Craig uploads virtual tours and manages listings in a fraction of the time. And his out-of-town or out-of-state clients are never out of touch, thanks to unlimited long distance.‡ Talk about your win-win situations.

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©2012 Charter Communications. *$99 offer available to new customers only with 12-month term and includes Charter Business Essentials20 with custom hosting and three desktop security licenses, and Charter Business Phone with Unlimited Long Distance and Advanced feature pack. †Speed comparison as of 3/14/12. Internet speeds may vary. ‡Unlimited Long Distance available only to Charter local customers and applies only to direct-dial calls within the U.S., Puerto Rico, and Canada. Offer expires 7/29/12 and is subject to change. Restrictions apply. Call for details.


May 4, 2012