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Initial Level The Developmental Teaching Portfolio

Patricia Copeland


Initial Level The Developmental Teaching Portfolio

Patricia Copeland Elementary Special Education Department of Curriculum and Instruction Clemmer College of Education East Tennessee State University

Spring, 2014


Table of Contents SECTION ONE: BACKGROUND INFORMATION Introduction Working Resume Statement of Philosophy Program of Study Unofficial Transcript ACT or Praxis I Scores SECTION TWO: SELECTED ENTRIES Planning and Teaching Strategies: Bloom’s Taxonomy Assignment Lesson Plans Actual Teaching: Assessment and Evaluation: Performance-Based Grading Rubric Learning Environment: Guided Observation #1 – Contextual Factors Guided Observation #2 – Physical Arrangements Guided Observation #5 – Placement and Grouping Professional Growth: STEA Membership Praxis 1 Workshop Communication: Letter to Teacher PBL Presentation SECTION THREE: PROFESSIONAL EVALUATION Field Placement Journals Field Placement Evaluations Timesheets Concluding Reflection

 


SECTION ONE: BACKGROUND INFORMATION                        


Introduction My name is Patricia Copeland. I am currently studying at Walters State Community College. Upon graduation, I hope to transfer to East Tennessee State University’s Clemmer College of Education in order to pursue a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Special Education. The following is my Developmental Teaching Portfolio. Included are various activities and projects along with assessments that were completed during the course of my study at Walters State Community College. Special Education holds a special place in my heart as a member of my family has downs syndrome. I feel led to pursue special education because of the impact this individual has had on me. As I grew up watching him interact with others and saw the impact this individual had on my family, I knew I wanted to help others have the same positive experiences that I was able to have. I hope to take the knowledge I have gained from these experiences and apply them to my professional career.                      


Patricia Copeland 424 Northview Dr Kodak TN, 37764 (865) 216-6435 / prcopeland@starmail.ws.edu Professional Objective: To obtain a teaching position in K-12 Comprehensive Special Education. Education: 2014-2016

Bachelors of Science in Elementary Special Education, East Tennessee State University

2012-2014

Associate of Science in Elementary Special Education Walters State Community College

2010-2012

General Studies at the University of Tennessee Knoxville Transferred to Walter’s State Community College

2006-2010

High School Diploma, The King’s Academy

Honors and Awards: Summer 2013 Walters State President’s List Related Educational Experience/Professional Experience: Spring 2014 Service Learning, Parkway Academy 1st-12th Grade Behavior Classroom Fall

2013

Spring 2013

Service Learning, Boyd’s Creek Elementary School K-3 Extended Resource Service Learning, Ridgedale Alternative School K-12 Alternative School

Summer 2012 Computer Applications College Related Professional/Academic/Service Activities: 2013-2014 STEA Member 2012-2013

STEA Member

Additional Work Related Experience: 2012-2014 Sevier County Board of Education Summer 2011/2012

Tennessee Smokies Baseball Stadium


May 2010

Smokey Mountain Brewery, Pigeon Forge

Placement File: Please contact the ETSU Career and Internship Services Office. Website: http://www.etsu.edu/careers , BucLink TEL: 423-439-4450 FAX: 423-439-6176                                      


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Philosophy of Education Date: Spring, 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is my Philosophy of Education paper that I completed in EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education class.


Philosophy of Education Effective teachers have many characteristics in common. As I observe educational professionals in preparation for my career, I am beginning to recognize characteristics in these teachers that I desire to implement in order to become an effective teacher. Through my employment with the school system and various observations required during my course work, I believe that my interpersonal skills, innovative instructional techniques, and classroom management style will help me become a successful teacher. One of the most important skills a teacher needs is the ability to collaborate with other professionals in order to best meet the needs of students. With the growing population of diverse students in public schools, the co-teaching model of instruction is gaining momentum. It is more important now than ever for a person to have strong interpersonal skills. I have already experienced many situations that have helped me develop these skills. I attended a small high school whose student body represented around twelve different countries. The school encouraged social situations that introduced you to other student’s culture. Although many students did not fluently speak the same language, everyone was expected to work together. I was exposed to teaching and guiding other students at a young age. My first experience teaching was at a dance school where senior dancers modeled and instructed younger dancers. Dance provided multiple opportunities for me to cultivate my interpersonal skills while also performing and competing locally, nationally and internationally. Together, these past experiences, as well as my continued education, have further developed my interpersonal skills that I believe will be invaluable to me as a teacher. My experiences working in education and the various observations I have completed have also given me some innovative instructional ideas that I believe will help me be an effective


teacher. With the magnitude of changes currently in education, a teacher cannot plan to do things the same way they have always been done. My dance experience and knowledge of yoga are elements I want to include in my classroom. I believe that kinetics is a very important aspect of learning for some students that many teachers do not utilize. Implementing a variety of physical activities throughout the school day can have a positive impact on student learning and behavior. By creatively combining many mental as well as physical elements I have learned in dance as well as yoga, I believe I can help many students achieve academic success. Another crucial aspect to being an effective teacher is positive classroom management. Throughout my education, I have exposed myself to as many different classroom settings possible. I have worked with and observed several teachers that implement successful behavior systems that I believe I will be able to adapt to my classroom. After careful consideration, I have taken what I have seen and compiled a list of things “to-do” and “not-to-do” in my future room. My observations, past experiences working with foreign students, as well as instructing younger students in dance class makes me feel that I will be able to construct a successful behavior management program. It is important to be effective at your job while also standing apart from the crowd. Through my employment with the school system and various observations required during my course work, I believe that my interpersonal skills, innovative instructional techniques, and classroom management style will help me become a successful teacher.      


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Program of Study Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is my program of study from the classes I have had and will take.

                             


Community College  &  ETSU  Collaborative  Undergraduate  Degree   Program  in  Special  Education-­‐  Comprehensive  and  Modified   REVISED      Special  Education  Cohort  Program  of  Studies   Highlighted  courses  are  completed  through  Walters  State  Community  College,  Sevier  County   Campus  (or  other  local  community  college).    All  others  will  be  completed  through  East   Tennessee  State  University  in  Sevierville,  Greenville,  Kingsport,  or  Morristown.   Part  1:  Complete  General  Education  Core  Courses   Fall  

Spring Spring  2012  (6  credits)   WSCC   SPCH  1010   HIST  2010   Spring  2013  (9  credits)   WSCC   EDUC  2010   PHIL  2020   ENGL  1020  

Fall 2012  (6  credits)   WSCC   MATH  1530   ENGL  1010  

Summer 1   Summer  I  2012  (7  credits)   WSCC   BIOL  1020/1021  (4  credits)   PSYC  2130  (online)   Summer  I  2013  (7  credits)   WSCC   MUSC1030   PSYC  1030  

Summer 2   Summer  II  2012  (6  credits)   WSCC   SOCI  1010  (online)   INFS  1010   Summer  II  2013  (6  credits)   WSCC   HLTH  2310   HIST  2020  

Part 2:  Complete  Education  Courses  Required  for  Teaching  License  in  Special  Education   Fall  

Spring

Fall 2013  (7  credits)   (at  WSCC  Sevierville  campus)   PHED  1137  (1  credit)   SPED  2010   BIOL  1010/1011  

Fall 2014  (9  credits)   (ETSU  in  Sevierville)   SPED  3300   SPED  3400   SPED  4825   MEDA  3570  

Fall 2015   (11cr  Comp)   (ETSU  in   Sevierville)   SPED  4587   SPED  4750   SPED  4710-­‐          R1  

or

Fall 2015   (11credits)   (ETSU  in   Sevierville)   SPED  4567   READ  4437   SPED  4710  –          R1  

Spring 2014  (9  credits)   (at  WSCC  Sevierville  campus)   EDUC  2300   ENG  Lit   Math  1410  or  1420-­‐  can  be  taken  at  a   community  college  or  online  at  ETSU     *Admission  boards  before  Summer  1   Sp  2015  (10  cr   or   Sp  2015  (10  cr   Comp)   Modified)   (ETSU  in   (ETSU  in   Sevierville)   Sevierville)   SPED  4767   SPED  4757   SPED  4367   SPED  4497   SPED  4825   SPED  4825   SPED  3445   SPED  3445   Spring  2016  (8  credits)   SPED  4850  R2    

Summer 1  

Summer 2  

Summer I  2014  (6   credits)   (ETSU  in  Sevierville)   SPED  4302   Social  &  Beh  Sci  

Summer II  2014  (6   credits)   (ETSU  in  Sevierville)   Read  3100   EDFN  3310  

Summer I  2015  (6   credits)   (ETSU  in  Sevierville)   SPED  4753   EDFN  3301  

Summer II  2015  (6   credits)   (ETSU  in  Sevierville)   CUAI  4517   SPED  4470   SPED  4425-­‐Pre  R  1  

Evidence of  completing  ONE  of  the  following  must  be  presented  BEFORE  Admission  Boards   ACT: 22 - E,R,M, & S only (21 prior to 10/89) OR   SAT: 1020 - R (old V) & M only (920 prior to 4/1/95) OR PRAXIS I: Reading Math Writing

174 173 173


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Transcript Date: Fall 2010- Spring 2014 Courses: All Courses Description: This is an unofficial copy of my current transcript.


Transcript Data STUDENT INFORMATION Birth Date: Oct 20, 1991 Student Type:

Continuing

Curriculum Information Current Program Associate of Science Program:

AS Elementary Education

College:

Behavioral Social Science

Major and Department:

Elementary Education Option, Education

***This is NOT an Official Transcript***

TRANSFER CREDIT ACCEPTED BY INSTITUTION

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Fall Univ Tennessee Knoxville* 2010:

Subje Course ct

Title

Grade Credit Qualit Hours y Points

R

BIOL

1010

General Biology I

TD

3.000 0.000

E

BIOL

1011

General Biology I Lab

TD

1.000 0.000

E

CHEM 1010

Introductory Chemistry

TC

3.000 0.000

CHEM 1011

Introductory Chemistry Lab

TC

1.000 0.000


ENGL 1010

Composition I

TA

3.000 0.000

MATH 1830

Calculus A

TW

3.000 0.000

TRAN 9999

First Year Studies

TC

1.000 0.000

Attem Passe Earne GPA Qualit GPA pt d d Hours y Hours Hours Hours Points

Current Term:

15.000

8.000 8.000 0.000 0.000

0.000

Unofficial Transcript Sprin Univ Tennessee Knoxville* g 2011:

Subje Course ct

Title

Grade Credit Qualit Hours y Points

ENGL 1020

Composition II

TNC

PSYC 1030

General Psychology TD

3.000 0.000

SPCH 1010

Fundamentals of Speech Communi

TC

3.000 0.000

TRAN 9999

Intro Organic/Biochemistr y Attem Passe pt d Hours Hours

TD

4.000 0.000

3.000 0.000

Earne GPA Qualit GPA d Hours y Hours Points

R


Current Term:

13.000 10.000 10.00 0.000 0.000 0

0.000

Unofficial Transcript Fall Univ Tennessee Knoxville* 2011:

Subje Course ct

Title

Grade Credit Qualit Hours y Points

R

BIOL

1010

General Biology I

TD

3.000 0.000

E

BIOL

1011

General Biology I Lab

TD

1.000 0.000

E

MATH 1530

Probability and Statistics

TF

3.000 0.000

POLI

1120

Intro to American Government

TD

3.000 0.000

SOCI 1010

Intro to Sociology

TB

3.000 0.000

Attem Passe Earne GPA Qualit GPA pt d d Hours y Hours Hours Hours Points

Current Term:

13.000

6.000 6.000 0.000 0.000

Unofficial Transcript INSTITUTION CREDIT

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Term: Spring Term 2012 College:

Behavioral Social Science

Major:

Elementary Education Option

Student Type:

New Transfer

0.000


Academic Standing: Subje Cour Campus ct se

HIST

Good Standing Lev Title el

2020 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Grade Credit Qualit Start R Hours y and End Points Dates

American History II

D

3.000 0.000

PSYC 2130 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Life Span Psychology

C

3.000 6.000

SOCI 1010 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Intro to Sociology

B

3.000 9.000

SPCH 1010 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Fund of Speech Communication

B

3.000 9.000

E

Term Totals (Undergraduate) Attem Passe Earne GPA Qualit GPA pt d d Hours y Hours Hours Hours Points

Current Term:

12.000 9.000 9.000 9.000 24.000

2.666

Cumulative:

12.000 9.000 9.000 9.000 24.000

2.666

Term: Summer Term 2012 College:

Behavioral Social Science

Major:

Elementary Education Option

Student Type:

Continuing

Academic Standing:

Good Standing

Subje Cour Campus ct se

Lev Title el

Grade Credit Qualit Start R Hours y and End Points Dates


INFS

1010 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Computer Applications B

3.000 9.000

Term Totals (Undergraduate) Attem Passe Earne GPA Qualit GPA pt d d Hours y Hours Hours Hours Points

Current Term: Cumulative:

3.000 3.000 3.000 3.000 9.000

3.000

15.000 12.00 12.00 12.000 33.000 0 0

2.750

Term: Fall Term 2012 College:

Behavioral Social Science

Major:

Elementary Education Option

Student Type:

Continuing

Academic Standing:

Good Standing

Subje Cour Campus ct se

HIST

Lev Title el

2010 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

MATH 1530 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Grade Credit Qualit Start R Hours y and End Points Dates

American History I

B

3.000 9.000

Probability and Statistics

F

3.000 0.000

E

Term Totals (Undergraduate) Attem Passe Earne GPA Qualit GPA pt d d Hours y Hours Hours Hours Points

Current Term: Cumulative:

6.000 3.000 3.000 3.000 9.000

3.000

21.000 15.00 15.00 15.000 42.000 0 0

2.800


Term: Spring Term 2013 College:

Behavioral Social Science

Major:

Elementary Education Option

Student Type:

Continuing

Academic Standing:

Good Standing

Subje Cour Campus ct se

Lev Title el

Grade Credit Qualit Start R Hours y and End Points Dates

EDUC 2010 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Psy of Hum Dev for Tchrs

B

3.000 9.000

PHIL

Self and Values

A

3.000 12.000

2020 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Term Totals (Undergraduate) Attem Passe Earne GPA Qualit GPA pt d d Hours y Hours Hours Hours Points

Current Term: Cumulative:

6.000 6.000 6.000 6.000 21.000

3.500

27.000 21.00 21.00 21.000 63.000 0 0

3.000

Term: Summer Term 2013 College:

Behavioral Social Science

Major:

Elementary Education Option

Student Type:

Continuing

Academic Standing:

Good Standing

Additional Standing:

President's List

Subje Cour Campus ct se

Lev Title el

Grade Credit Qualit Start R Hours y and End Points Dates


BIOL

1010 Walters State UG CC, Main Campus

Introductory Biology I A

3.000 12.000

I

BIOL

1011 Walters State UG CC, Main Campus

Introductory Biology I A Lab

1.000 4.000

I

BIOL

1020 Walters State UG CC, Main Campus

Introductory Biology II A

3.000 12.000

BIOL

1021 Walters State UG CC, Main Campus

Introductory Biology II A Lab

1.000 4.000

HIST

2020 Walters State UG CC, Main Campus

American History II

A

3.000 12.000

HLTH 2310 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Safety and First Aid

A

3.000 12.000

MUS

Music Appreciation

A

3.000 12.000

1030 Walters State UG CC, Main Campus

I

Term Totals (Undergraduate) Attem Passe Earne GPA Qualit GPA pt d d Hours y Hours Hours Hours Points

Current Term:

17.000 17.00 17.00 17.000 68.000 0 0

4.000

Cumulative:

44.000 38.00 38.00 38.000 131.00 0 0 0

3.447


Term: Fall Term 2013 College:

Behavioral Social Science

Major:

Elementary Education Option

Student Type:

Continuing

Academic Standing:

Good Standing

Subje Cour Campus ct se

Lev Title el

Grade Credit Qualit Start R Hours y and End Points Dates

ENGL 1020 Walters State UG CC, Main Campus

Composition II

B

3.000 9.000

I

MATH 1530 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Probability and Statistics

A

3.000 12.000

I

PHED 1137 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Power Walking

P

1.000 0.000

SPED 2010 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Introduction to Special A Educat

3.000 12.000

Term Totals (Undergraduate) Attem Passe Earne GPA Qualit GPA pt d d Hours y Hours Hours Hours Points

Current Term:

10.000

9.000 10.00 9.000 33.000 0

3.666

Cumulative:

54.000 47.000 48.00 47.00 164.00 0 0 0

3.489

Unofficial Transcript TRANSCRIPT TOTALS (UNDERGRADUATE)

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Attem Passe Earne GPA Qualit GPA pt d d Hours y Hours Hours Hours Points

Total Institution:

54.000 47.000 48.00 47.00 164.00 0 0 0

3.489

Total Transfer:

41.000 24.000 24.00 0.000 0.000 0

0.000

Overall:

95.000 71.000 72.00 47.00 164.00 0 0 0

3.489

Attem Passe Earne GPA Qualit GPA pt d d Hours y Hours Hours Hours Points

Institution Combined:

54.000 47.000 48.00 47.00 164.00 0 0 0

3.489

Transfer Combined:

41.000 24.000 24.00 0.000 0.000 0

0.000

Overall Combined:

95.000 71.000 72.00 47.00 164.00 0 0 0

3.489

Unofficial Transcript COURSES IN PROGRESS

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Term: Spring Term 2014 College:

Behavioral Social Science

Major:

Elementary Education Option

Student Type:

Continuing

Subje Cour Campus ct se

Lev Title el

EDUC 2300 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Foundations of Education

Credit Hours Start and End Dates

3.000


ENGL 2420 WSCC Sevier UG Co Campus

Western World Literature II

3.000

MATH 1410 RODP

Number Concepts and Algebraic Structure

3.000

Unofficial Transcript

           

UG


Context Statement Type of Artifact: ACT Scores Date: February 2010 Courses: All Courses Description: This is an unofficial copy of my ACT scores.


Test Date: February 2010 Test Location: National Test Option: ACT (NO WRITING)

Printer-friendly version Using Your ACT Results Score

Composite Score :

25 Does your score meet the ACT College Readiness Benchmark?

This is not an official ACT score report and is intended only for your informational use.

English

29

Usage/Mechanics Rhetorical Skills

14 16

Mathematics

17

Pre-Algebra/Elem. Algebra Algebra/Coord. Geometry Plane Geometry/Trig.

Reading Social Studies/Sciences Arts/Literature

Science

09 09 09

28 12 18

24

         

Yes. But you can further improve your English skills.

No. Learn how to get ready for college-level classes in mathematics.

Yes. But you can further improve your reading skills.

Yes. But you can further improve your science skills.


SELECTION TWO: SELECTED ENTRIES                    

 


PLANNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES                                    


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Bloom’s Taxonomy Activity Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is the Bloom’s Taxonomy Activity we did in EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education.


Name: Blooms Taxonomy Date: April 22, 2014 Class: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Semester: Spring, 2014 Bloom’s Taxonomy Activity 1. Targeted grade level: Kindergarten 2. Subject area: Math 3. Specific content to be taught: Shapes: Triangles, Squares Circles 4. Questions: a. Remembering 1. Can you name this shape? 2. Can you match these shapes? 3. Can you sort these shapes in to groups? b. Understanding 1. Can you (describe) tell me about this shape? 2. What shape is this item? 3. Can you find an item that is this shape? c. Applying 1. Can you give me an example of each shape? 2. Can you draw a: triangle, circle, and square? 3. Can you change a triangle into a square? d. Analyzing 1. What is the same about these shapes? 2. What is different about these shapes? 3. Can you select the shape to complete the pattern? e. Evaluating 1. Can you arrange the shapes in a pattern? 2. Can you assemble an object with these shapes? 3. What do you think would happen if you combined a circle and a triangle? f. Creating 1. Build an object using circles, triangles and squares and explain it. 2. Design a picture using only circles, triangles and squares. 3. Collect a variety of shapes from the room and explain a different use for them.


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Lesson Plan Assignment Date: Spring, 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is the lesson plan I completed to accompany my Bloom’s Taxonomy Activity.


Name: Patricia Copeland Title of Lesson: Shapes Grade: Kindergarten Date: April 22, 2014 Materials Needed: • Paper • Pencils, crayons, colored pencils, markers • Various circle, square, triangle shaped blocks Goals: •

The student will be able to identify, reproduce and manipulate shapes: circle, square and triangle.

Objectives: • TSW draw a picture of a structure using only the shapes: circle, triangle, and squares. • TSW evaluate each other’s drawing and using a rubric decide if the structure can be built. • TSW attempt to build the structures and indicate on the rubric if the students were able to build the structure or not. Instructional Procedures: 1. The teacher will begin by reviewing the shapes with the class and assessing that the students do recognize the shapes, and are able to identify and reproduce them on paper. 2. The teacher will model how to draw a structure using these shapes. 3. As a class, a rubric will be completed to model the expectation for the students. 4. Finally, the students will attempt to build the model drawn by the teacher and complete the rubric. 5. Ask higher level thinking questions. 6. Observe and assist the students in building the structures 7. Evaluate the rubrics Questions: • (See Bloom’s Taxonomy assignment) Closure: • •

The teacher will end the lesson by discussing with the class the reasons some of the structures could be built and why others could not. The teacher will ask the students for input about what could be done differently next time to make the structures that could not be built buildable.


Adaptations to meet Individual Needs: • Various sizes of paper • Writing instruments • Blocks

Evaluation Assessment: • See attached rubric

                               


ACTUAL TEACHING                          


ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION                        


Type of Artifact: Rubric Date: Spring, 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is the rubric I used with my Blooms Taxonomy lesson plan.                                              


Identifies three   basic  shapes:   Circle,  Square,   Triangle  

      NUMBER  OF   POINTS  EARNED:     TOTAL  SCORE:                                  

Below Basic   0-­‐25   Shows  limited   understanding  of   the  concept.  

Basic 0-­‐25   Identifies  circle,   square,  and   triangle  

Proficient 0-­‐25   Identifies  and  can   draw/create  a   circle,  square,  and   triangle  

Advanced 0-­‐25   Identifies,   describes,  and   finds  a  circle,   square,  and   triangle  in  their   environment    


LEARNING ENVIRONMENT                


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Guided Observation #1 Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is a Guided Observation #1 that I completed in Russell Allen’s room at Parkway Academy for EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education.


Guided Observation #1 – Contextual Factors Name: Patricia Copeland Date: March 12, 2014 Course: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education School: Parkway Academy Interview your mentoring teacher to obtain the demographics about the school. Write a response for each question in a paragraph format. 1. Record the number of males, females, and ratio of ethnicity within the classroom. Mr. Allen’s class included eight total students: six male and two female. The class was 100% Caucasian. 2. What are the development levels of the students within the classroom you are observing? All students served in Mr. Allen’s class were identified as students with learning disabilities. The students ranged from first grade to freshman in high school. 3. How is the instruction modified to meet the diverse needs of the students? Students are sent to Parkway Academy with individualized work from their home school. When a student needs help on an assignment, he or she is provided one-on-one assistance. 4. Research the school and the Tennessee State Government web site to obtain information about the school community, school report card, and school population. Due to the nature of this alternative setting, the requested information is not open to public access. Each student’s personal information remains at his or her home school. 5. What are the specialized programs/activities found within the school that would assist special needs children, those who need enrichment activities, or remediation? List the specific programs that are available. Parkway provides group and one-on-one therapeutic counseling for their students. They also have computer-based programs that individual students may use based on their academic or therapeutic needs.


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Guided Observation #2 Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is Guided Observation #2 that I completed in Russell Allen’s room at Parkway Academy for EDUC 2300.


Guided Observation #2 – Physical Arrangement Name: Patricia Copeland Date: March 12, 2014 Course: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education School: Parkway Academy Instructions for the Observer: First, draw a map of the classroom you are observing, including seating arrangements, placement of furniture, computers, telephone, and other equipment. Give a brief critique of the effectiveness and use of: technology, lighting, traffic patterns, instructional displays, management, and motivational elements. Then design your own perfect classroom 1. Draw classroom map:

2. Effectiveness of: a) Technology: Parkway has several iPads that can be used for lessons or rewards. The iPads are equipped with educational games and other apps to help improve student success. The room also contains a smart board that Mr. Allen is able to use during whole group instruction. Staff members have a computer for work related business that remains in the corner while students have a separate computer that can be used for research or reward time.


b) Traffic Patterns: Aside from two tables in the center of the room, most items of furniture line the walls of the classroom. This provides designated personal areas for each student while also allowing a reasonably open floor plan in case of behavior outburst or emergency. c) Instructional Displays: Due to the emotional outbursts that occur in Mr. Allen’s room, very few things are on display or hanging on the walls. Often times, these distractions tend to contribute to students’ digressing behavior. However, in the student’s personal area, he or she is allowed to hang small items that are important to him or her. Items range from pictures of their favorite things to graded assignments. These items can be removed or replaced based on student achievement d) Classroom Management: Mr. Allen is trained in Therapeutic Crisis Intervention. He implements the behavior models and intervention techniques from this program to manage his classroom on a daily basis. Mr. Allen makes behavior the primary focus in order to gain academic success once the adverse behaviors have been corrected. e) Motivational Elements: Through therapy and social role-play, Mr. Allen focuses on teaching his class the value of intrinsic motivators. Although students are rewarded on occasion, it is understood that the privileges they receive depend entirely on the choices they have made over any given period. These periods frequently change in order to prevent students from behaving a certain way with the sole intent of receiving a reward. The students are taught they are responsible for the choices they make. They will be held accountable by the reward they receive or the consequence they suffer for their actions. 3. Draw your perfect classroom:


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Guided Observation #5 Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is Guided Observation #5 that I completed in Russell Allen’s room at Parkway Academy for EDUC 2300.


Guided Observation #5- Placement and Grouping Name: Patricia Copeland Date: Spring 2014 Course: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education School: Parkway Academy Guided Observation Five – Placement and Grouping 1. Though whole-group instruction may be used more frequently, when, if at all, does the teacher use small group instruction? Parkway’s design focuses on individualized and small group learning. If student behavior permits, whole group instruction and other group activities may be used as part of their reward system. This often includes an activity called “Talk Time” where they are allowed to watch a video and discuss appropriate social behaviors that can be modeled or corrected from the example they are given. 2. When students are placed in small groups, how is grouping formed? Heterogeneously or by some other method? What representation of ability grouping or distribution do you note? Due to behavior hurdles, students are required to maintain a level of appropriate behavior before they are offered the opportunity to work with peers. When the privilege is earned, age, personality, and ability level are considered when developing small groups. 3. Does the teacher review and adjust groups often, moving students when achievement levels change? Small groups and seating arrangements are very fluid in this environment. Mr. Allen takes careful consideration when planning placement of the students. Not only does he monitor academic progress, he also focuses on the social growth they make during their time in his room.

     


PROFESSIONAL GROWTH                        


Context Statement Type of Artifact: STEA Membership Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is proof of my STEA membership.


COMMUNICATION                          


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Letter to Teacher Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is a letter to a classroom teacher thanking him or her for allowing me to observe in his or her room.


March 14, 2014 Dear Teacher, Thank you so much for allowing me to complete my service learning hours in your room. Through my time with you, I will gain invaluable experience that will help me as I continue my education and pursue my degree. I am eager to learn from your teaching style and classroom management procedures. I realize that you are extremely busy dealing with the daily demands of running your classroom. I greatly appreciate you taking time out of your day to facilitate my continued education. Thank you, Patricia Copeland Patricia Copeland

             


Context Statement Type of Artifact: PBL Presentation Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is a copy of the PBL presentation we gave in EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education.

                                     


This is where my PBL presentation will go when finished (ASAP).                                          


SECTION THREE: PROFESSIONAL EVALUATION                            


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Field Placement Journals Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2010 Psychology of Human Development for Teachers. Description: This is the field placement journal I completed at Ridgedale School for EDUC 2010 Psychology of Human Development for Teachers.                                          


EDUC 2010  Psychology  of  Human  Development  for  Teachers  

Service Learning   Journal  Entries  

Patricia Copeland   4/4/2013    


VISION FOR MY FUTURE Here is what I want to accomplish this year: Education: This year my plan for college is to finish out a strong semester with good grades. I will then be prepared to face a couple of tough semesters in order to have myself on track for the ETSU special education cohort plan. Throughout this year, I will work on my study habits and time management skills in order to better prepare for upcoming classes. Career: At the beginning of June, I will have completed my first successful year as a special education assistant for Catlettsburg Elementary. This summer I will not work so that I can continue my education with Walter’s State. In the fall, I look to return to Catlettsburg unless they decide to transfer me within the county. Family and Friends: Throughout this year I will work to help my family find a permanent home. I will also be sure to make myself available for my family as we face many changes this year. As for friends, I will make sure maintain my relationships and keep close contact especially as school becomes more demanding. Involvement and Service to My Community: I would like to become more involved with a church I have been attending locally. Through this, I hope opportunities will arise where I can reach out in to the community and serve others in a Godly manner. Personal Growth: In my personal life, I hope to bring myself closer to God and dig deeper into His word. This will constantly be a goal in my life as I will always seek His guidance and yearn to understand His will. I would also like to continue with my health goal by maintaining my gym attendance and working towards my weight loss and fitness goal.


Service Learning Project

Name: Patricia Copeland Course Title: EDUC 2010 Date: April 8, 2013 Agency Name: Ridgedale School Agency’s Mission Statement/ Grades Served/ Community Needs: “Our mission is to motivate students to problem solve and make positive choices that will enhance academic, social and behavioral capacities by fostering supportive relationships in safe, caring and academically appropriate environment.” Ridgedale School serves a variety of K-12 students in an alternative learning environment. Prologue: What do you expect to get from your service learning experience (i.e., how will this experience help YOU develop)? How will it impact your learning and link to class materials? How do you think the students and staff will perceive you? What goals do you have for the semester’s Service Learning experience? What fears do you have (if any) about service learning?

Coming into this service-learning project, I have a very open mind. I hope to see and directly apply many of the things discussed in our EDUC 2010 class. Seeing various teachers’ classroom management techniques, I hope to identify what will be most productive for not only my future students but also my staff. I am fortunate to have been able to volunteer with a variety of grade levels and classroom settings. With this experience in my repertoire, I hope the students and faculty I encounter will find it easy to work with me and use me as an effective part of their day. I am anxious to see what this opportunity will reveal for me.


Ridgedale School

Day One: (Overview of Events) My morning began much different from a usual workday. I am usually up much earlier to make it to Sevierville by 8am. Ridgedale however, does not begin their day until about 8:30 and is much closer to my apartment. I somehow still managed to get to Ridgedale at 7:55 even though I only wanted to be there by 8:15. After staying in my truck to drink my morning coffee, (until 8:15), I finally went in to the school. I was met at the door by a very kind SRO to whom I quickly introduced myself and proceeded to the office. ABCs of Reflections Affect: I was slightly anxious as I made my way through the school. Upon entering the office, I was greeted with warm smiles that helped ease my nerves and boost my confidence. I was beginning to let them know who I was and what I was there for when a lady in the office quickly interjected, “We know exactly who you are and we have been looking forward to having you!” Immediately I was reassured, and knew I was going to enjoy my time at Ridgedale. The lady then told me I would be in three different classrooms throughout my visit and directed me to my first room. I was eager to dive in and start the day! Behavior: On my first day I was assigned to an elementary CDC classroom. I entered the room and introduced myself to the teacher and the support staff. I was dressed very professionally and was confident as I spoke. Although I was a little nervous, I maintained my composure and tried not to talk too fast. I stood in a corner near Ms. Harris’ desk, to avoid being in the way, and prepared to take instruction at any moment. Once the students were settled, Ms. Harris guided me to a group and allowed me to follow them through their daily routine. Cognition/Content: In EDUC 2010 we have talked about many types of parenting styles, (in our case classroom management styles). Ms. Harris demonstrates a sort of authoritative style. Her class is designed around a very specific schedule and her room is tidy and organized. I observed her using the scaffolding technique in her science lesson about parts of a flower. To guide her students, Ms. Harris gave them a handout of a flower with blanks to label each part. She then drew a flower on her smart board and talked through the worksheet step-by-step, frequently asking each student questions to make sure everyone was following along and thoroughly understanding the task. I enjoyed my time in Ms. Harris’ room and want to mirror many of the things that she has chosen to implement in her room.


Ridgedale School Day Two: (Overview of Events) After a great day yesterday, I was so excited to begin a new day! I was still there too early but thankfully not quite as bad. The ladies in the office directed me to today’s classroom, a high school CDC-A class taught by Mr. Kimmel. Affect: This was my first experience with a male special Ed teacher. Admittedly, I was a little apprehensive. I have heard from others that many male special Ed teachers act more like “coaches” and “friends” to students. I strongly hoped that would not be the case with Mr. Kimmel. I introduced myself to Mr. Kimmel and his staff and everyone was extremely friendly. Everyone I encountered seemed to be very surprised that I chose a school like Ridgedale for my service learning, since it is considered a more challenging environment. I was informed that Mr. Kimmel’s room is a CDC-A classroom with many severe behavior issues. I hope to show that I am prepared to handle any situation that arises. Behavior: As the students entered the classroom I chose to step back and simply observe how each student would respond to basic morning tasks. Right away, I was able to identify which students would be more likely to have an episode throughout the day. Having this information, I felt much more prepared to serve the students at my fullest potential. Although I had been a little nervous about the potential behavior issues I would encounter, I maintained a calm yet authoritative demeanor. By watching Mr. Kimmel, I was able to follow his lead and handle each child the way that made them most successful. Mr. Kimmel has a very light and fun personality, but it is evident that the rules and expectations have been established in his room for quite some time. When an issue arose, Mr. Kimmel never raised his voice and always kept himself calm even as a student shoved a desk over and chose to cuss at the top of his voice. I could tell that the way Mr. Kimmel handled the child not only kept everyone safe, but also helped the child deescalate without any additional stress or trauma. Cognition/Content: Despite my worries, Mr. Kimmel definitely exhibited the authoritative style discussed in our EDUC 2010 class. I learned some subtle yet meticulous techniques to use with behavior students by simply observing him throughout the day. In most cases where I have seen authoritative teachers, the same tough love delivered by Mr. Kimmel was delivered much differently. I had never seen anyone be so firm in such an inconspicuous manner. Although many of his students should have been in Piaget’s formal operational stage, several of them remained in the preoperational or concrete operational stages. Despite these cognitive limitations, it was clear that Mr. Kimmel and his support staff had spent an extensive amount of time creating ways to keep the students involved in active forms of learning.


Ridgedale School Day Three: (Overview of Events) After receiving my instructions from the office, I made my way to the final classroom of the week. The last class I was placed in was Ms. Darter’s CDC elementary room. This class is primarily filled with behavior students trying to work their way back to their home schools. Affect: I knew today was going to be much different from the rest by 8:40 in the morning. At this time, I had yet to lay eyes Ms. Darter or any other member of her team. Knowing by now that students should be arriving from the busses, I made my way to the cafeteria to meet them. I then found one of the four people I had been looking for. This assistant was very happy to see me and apologized that no one had been there to greet me. She then informed me that she is usually the only one there to meet the students. Ridgedale staff is supposed to be present by 8:30 AM. I was a little perturbed by this, but quickly relieved that I could now get to work. The two of us then took the students to breakfast and began meeting each other. It was not until almost 8:50 that Ms. Darter and one other assistant made their way to assist with breakfast (McDonalds bags in tow). My first impression was not a good one. There was a very negative attitude that came with their presence and a very sarcastic tone. I knew at this time I would have to remain as professional as possible and abstain from revealing my distaste. Behavior: Since I was upset with the situation, I was unsure how to handle things. I stepped back and let the teacher take control of the class. The teacher spent much of her time yelling, using a sarcastic tone, and talking down to others. After doing an abbreviated calendar lesson, she then passed out doughnuts to celebrate the transfer of a student back to their home school. While the students ate, the teacher worked on things completely unrelated to the students or work and even kicked her feet up on the desk (with no shoes on). After a significant amount of time had passed, she finally instructed the students to get out their science books so they could “read the chapter and do the questions or whatever”. I admit that I spent most of this morning in shock and only absorbed what was going on around me. I could not believe what I was seeing and I knew I never wanted my class to look this way. Cognition/Content: In EDUC 2010 we continuously stress the importance of classroom management. Today’s experience showed me just how important this is. Ms. Darter not only demonstrated poor classroom management but also exhibited many of the permissive parenting traits. Although this was a bit of a disappointing day, I still feel that there is a lot I can take away from the time I spent observing in this classroom setting. I felt that the assistants’ attitudes were a direct reflection of the classroom teacher. This is something I will never forget. I want my attitude to have a positive impact on my students and staff.


Epilogue: Reflect on your semester’s service learning experience. As an overall experience, I am thrilled with the service learning project. Through this project, I was able to “think outside of the box” and choose a placement that I had not had much exposure to. I have spent time with all grade levels in several counties and have worked with students in settings such as worked based learning programs, resource, CDC, and CDC-A. Since I wanted to find something different, I chose Ridgedale School. At Ridgedale, I was able to work with elementary CDC, high school CDC-A, and behavior students. Revisit the prologue. Have your expectations been met?

My experience with Ridgedale School far exceeded my expectations. I had already thought I would enjoy my time at a new school but I never dreamed I would fall in love with a school in a short three-day period. By visiting three different classroom settings, I saw how the different parenting styles were demonstrated by the teachers and support staff. It was nice to see both sides and see exactly why some things simply do not work in a classroom. How have you been surprised, delighted, or dismayed by the experience? Give specific examples. This experience took me through a wide range of emotions. I was surprised by Ridgedale’s willingness to let me serve in various settings throughout the school. It made me feel that my time spent with them would be maximized. I was delighted to meet so many diverse students in such a short amount of time. Although Ridgedale is a very different environment from other schools I have been in, I can see many similarities in all. I was only slightly dismayed during my time at Ridgedale, but I am comforted to know that so many other things are going right at that school. This is an experience I will greatly treasure and never forget. How could this experience be improved? Although I thoroughly enjoyed this opportunity, I would have liked to have more success getting in to work with a Sevier County School. With the struggle to initially get things off the ground, I found myself overstressing and worried. I feared I would not get to be in placement I felt I would learn from the most. Of course, as soon as everything worked out, it was if a huge weight had been lifted and I was more than prepared to take on the challenge at hand.


VISION FOR MY FUTURE Here is what I want to accomplish in the next five years: Education: In the next five years I want to conclude my studies with Walter’s State, continue to ETSU, and graduate with a strong grade point average. Upon graduating with my bachelor’s degree, I will prepare to find an appropriate graduate program and further my education. Career: Until I earn my teaching degree, I will continue as an assistant with the Sevier County School System and build professional relationships throughout the county. In doing so, I will make myself more marketable as a future educator. When the time comes, I look forward to having a classroom of my own where I will finally be able to serve students and their families to the best of my abilities. Family and Friends: In the coming years, I want to remain close to my friends as we go out in to the world to start our own lives. Many of my friends will be getting married and having children and I hope to support them each step of the way. I also want to remain close to my family so I will always be able to help them in their times of need, and celebrate during times of joy. Involvement and Service to My Community: In five years I hope to be serving my community as an educator. I want to not only educate my students, but also be able to provide support to their families in situations where I am able and it is appropriate. Personal Growth: In five years I would like to be engaged and married to the love of my life. As we take these steps, it will be important that we grow together and provide support for each other as we prepare to spend the rest of our lives together. I want to be at a stable place financially and know how I am going to make things work.


REFLECTIONS Here are the Knowledge and Skills that I have acquired as a direct result of taking part in this Service Learning project: Most importantly, I have learned first-hand about classroom management and the affect it has on everyone. Without proper classroom management, many other things will be affected. I also learned how important it could be to keep a watchful eye, while also having a silent tongue. During my project, I picked up several instructional tools that I feel will be very useful when I begin to apply them to my own classroom. Here is how this Service Learning project ties in with my EDUC 2010 Psychology of Human Development for Teachers class: This service learning project takes the material we are shown in class and lets us see it first hand in a real classroom setting. Piaget’s stages of cognitive development can be witnessed first-hand in a classroom and can help a teacher design his or her lesson plans. Parenting styles can open up insight to handling classroom behaviors in order to receive positive results. My Contribution to the Community I have devoted 23+ hours to my Service Learning project. Here are four lasting experiences that are an outcome of my Service Learning project:

1. Through this experience, I know without any doubt that I will strive to be an authoritative educator. 2. I learned that as I implement an authoritative teaching style I could deliver my point in alternative ways that may work better for an individual student. 3. I know that when I have a classroom of my own, I want the visitor to feel as comfortable and confident in my classroom as I was with most of my experience at Ridgedale. 4. Thanks to Ridgedale, I now believe that I will look further in to working with not only special Ed students, but also behavior students.

         


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Field Placement Journals Date: Spring 2014 Courses: SPED 2010 Introduction to Special Education. Description: This is the field placement journal I completed at Boyd’s Creek Elementary School for SPED 2010 Introduction to Special Education.                                          


Sped 2010  

Reflective  Journal  

Patricia Copeland   11/13/2013    


Prologue Patricia Copeland SPED 2010 Introduction to Special Education Boyd’s Creek Elementary School Boyd’s Creek Elementary School’s mission is to build an environment which promotes academic and social growth, create respectful and productive citizens, encourage personal and academic responsibility, and support students in reaching their individual potential. Boyd’s Creek serves approximately six-hundred students kindergarten through eighth grade. The Boyd’s Creek community is of average socioeconomic status with minimal racial diversity. During my time at Boyd’s Creek I will be working with Elaine Jordan. Elaine began teaching in 1978, before the Sevier County School System provided inclusive education for special needs students. Mrs. Jordan was responsible for teaching the very first self-contained classroom in the county. I hope to benefit from Mrs. Jordan’s unique experiences and apply them to my career. I want to learn her behavior management techniques and her methods of differentiating instruction. I have heard much about her collaboration with the regular education staff and will be learning how she manages working in an inclusive setting. The goals I have mentioned are teaching techniques we discuss in SPED 2010. I am eager to learn from a pioneer in special education and look forward to my time at Boyd’s Creek Elementary School.


Patricia Copeland October 1, 2013 8:00 am -3:00 pm K-3 Extended Resource I began my day at Boyd’s Creek Elementary School by meeting the lead teacher, Ms. Jordan. Ms. Jordan explained that she served as the extended resource teacher for Kindergarten to third grade. Currently, Ms. Jordan serves two kindergarteners, two first graders, three second graders, and nine third graders. Throughout the day, each of these students rotates between their homeroom class and the resource room. When the homeroom class starts a new subject, the students return for fifteen minutes of whole group instruction. When the students return to Ms. Jordan, work from their homeroom is modified to the individual learner’s level. If possible, Ms. Jordan works with the exact assignment the homeroom has assigned with as few modifications as possible. If the student does not succeed in this manner, the same material is presented in a way that is specific to their learning style. Today I observed this process. Reflection: • Affect – I was a little disappointed due to my desire to work in a more hands on program. I love that Ms. Jordan fosters independence in her students and holds high expectations, but my professional desire is to work in a comprehensive developmental classroom. However, this is my first experience with resource in a pull out setting. I enjoyed seeing the differentiated instruction Ms. Jordan managed with such a diverse group and I hope to see more of this in detail. When discussing disabilities in the room it became clear that there were no significant deficits directly affecting students learning abilities. Since this student population is so young, many of the students are simply considered developmentally delayed. • Behavior – Throughout the day, I spent much of my time getting a feel for the dynamics in the room. I was able to interact with each of the grade levels and see samples of their current work. Ms. Jordan and her assistant were very inviting and eager to answer any questions I had. Although this was my first day, I felt as if I were an extension of their team rather than a simple observer. When I have a classroom of my own, I hope to create an environment where students and adults alike are made to feel welcome. • Content – Ms. Jordan exemplifies INTASC Principle #3. Throughout the day, Ms. Jordan remains in contact with each of her grade level’s homeroom teacher if there needs to be any clarification. With that being said, it is clear that she collaborates with each regular education teacher prior to the school day. This allows their day to flow smoothly and maintain a consistent routine.


Patricia Copeland October 8, 2013 8:00 – 3:00 K-3 Extended Resource Day 2 at Boyd’s Creek Elementary had a nice and smooth start. I had already met many of the staff members so I was able to head straight to Ms. Jordan’s room to get to work. Within the first few minutes of the day, several students had entered the room and started their morning routine. Since I was more aware of their daily routine due to my last visit, I was able to better focus my attention to specific learning strategies being used. The main activity that caught my attention was the kindergarten morning writing. Right away, I noticed the assignments had been scaffold appropriately for each student. When Ms. Jordan realized the assignment had caught my attention, she began to explain how and why each student’s assignment was designed the way it was. At the beginning of the year the assignment is presented in it’s most basic form, with the greatest amount of support. As the student’s master certain skills, the scaffolding is slowly removed. These adaptations allow students to progress at an individual pace appropriate to their abilities. Reflection: • Affect -- Being that is was my second visit to Ms. Jordan’s room; I felt more at ease and was able to see the classroom in a different perspective. Now that I had a better feel for the classroom and its dynamics, I was able to slow down and look for specific things we have discussed in our lectures. It was amazing how much detailed differentiated instruction was going on without initially being aware. • Behavior – With my attention now focused on a specific teaching strategy and a mentor open to discuss, I quickly took the opportunity to question and learn as much as possible. When the kindergarten writing assignment was discussed in more depth, I realized that an overwhelming number of skills were being addressed on a single sheet of primary lined paper. Ms. Jordan also directed my attention to a group of first graders working on the same assignment in order to point out how much growth occurs between the two grades. Being able to see this in action, while also looking at past work samples, helped me realize the importance of focusing on the details that are easily overlooked. • Content – Ms. Jordan’s morning writing routine addresses INTASC Principle #1 of Learner Development. The way each student’s assignment was tailored to their specific needs shows he profound level of understanding she has for the children. Although her expectations are high, Ms. Jordan remains positive and content no matter what progress is presented by the child.


Patricia Copeland October 15, 2013 8:00 – 3:00 K-3 Extended Resource Day 3 at Boyd’s Creek was met with mixed emotions. Although I was very excited to spend the day in the classroom, I was sad to realize it was my last day. In such a short amount of time, I had been made to feel like part of a team. Due to this level of comfort, I feel I was able to learn so much more. I felt that this was an appropriate time to ask Ms. Jordan how she prepares differentiated work based on the homeroom assignments. Ms. Jordan took me over to the cubbies where she had several folders laid out. Some folders had the student’s name on the front while others had subjects. In order to help me understand, she opened up a student’s folder as an example. Ms. Jordan explained that she always begins by trying to use the original assignment. If she finds an assignment is too much, she refers to the folder where she has already prepared assignments and worksheets based on the week’s topic. Her goal is not to change what is being taught, just the manner in which it is presented. If a specific student’s folder does not quite have what she is looking for, then she is able to refer to the specific subject folder as a backup. Reflection: • Affect – I hated this to be my last day, but I was eager to absorb as much information as I could in my last day. Instead of just observing, I came equipped with specific questions that will help me in the future. My focus was on her techniques for preparing work from another teacher. I know this is something I will face in the future, and I wanted insight as to the best manner of achieving this. • Behavior – Ms. Jordan was eager to answer my questions and was very pleased that I was willing to ask. I felt good having a specific goal for the day. I have been in many classrooms, and have learned so much from simply watching that I was interested to see what I could learn when I presented a question that could receive specific answers. I love how comfortable Ms. Jordan made me feel. She was eager to share her knowledge and answer any questions I had. When I have a classroom of my own, I hope to do the same thing for an upcoming student. • Content – Ms. Jordan was able to help me learn more about INSTASC Principle number 7. Her methods of planning for instruction were very thorough and effective without being overwhelming. The types of assignments provided in the folders were all very different in order to serve each student and allow them to succeed based on their own skills and interests.


Epilogue When I began this project, I knew I would have the opportunity to learn a lot. Even with these expectations, my experience was above and beyond what I could have hoped for. Elaine Jordan was an eager mentor and shared as much of her knowledge as possible. When I had questions, she was willing to discuss them and continued until she was confident that my questions were answered. Ms. Jordan’s behavior management techniques were so much a part of her daily routine that there appeared to be few behavior issues when I initially met her class. Once I became more involved, I realized the underlying behavior issues that were being managed on an ongoing basis. Unlike many self-contained classes I have observed in, the behaviors in this class were less obvious to someone who was unfamiliar with their routine. Ms. Jordan’s planning and differentiating of instruction was equally well managed. I hope to take what I have learned from her apply it to a classroom of my own. Her techniques help the classroom run smoothly while allowing students to transfer in and out of their homeroom settings with ease. The love Ms. Jordan has for her students radiates in everything she does. Years from now I hope to be as positive and effective in my job as she is after thirty-five years as an educator. She has not only taught me how important classroom management skills are, she has also shown me how important it is to be a mentor. Allowing a student in to her room and making them feel like a part of an already established team can be a challenging task that many people would not want to even consider. Because of this experience, I am even further assured that I have chosen the career path meant for me. I have completed 21 hours of service learning. Here are four lasting experiences as a result of my Service Learning Project: 1. I have learned how to implement powerful yet subtle behavior management techniques. 2. I have learned how effective teachers collaborate with their colleagues. 3. I have learned strategies for differentiating instruction. 4. I have learned that a veteran teacher can still be effective if their heart is in it.              


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Field Placement Journals Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Description: This is the field placement journal I completed at Parkway Academy for EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education.                                          


EDUC 2300  Introduction  to  Education  

Service Learning   Journal  Entries  

Patricia Copeland   3/14/2014    


VISION FOR MY FUTURE Here is what I want to accomplish this year: Education: This semester, I will complete my final semester at Walters State Community College. This summer, I will have my entrance interview with the College of Education at East Tennessee State University and begin my first summer term as a Buccaneer. I plan to stay focused and dedicated to my education and continue to make progress towards my diploma. Career: This year, I will complete my second year as a special education assistant at Catlettsburg Elementary. This summer, I will not take a job in order to focus all of my time on my courses with ETSU. In the fall, I plan to return to Catlettsburg and expand my knowledge of behavior management unless the Sevier County Board of Education decides to transfer me within the county. Family and Friends: Throughout this year, I will spend part of my time helping my cousin with her three children. As two of them approach their pre-school and kindergarten years, I will help them develop the skills they need for the next chapters of their lives. As for friends, several of my friends will be moving in to new homes and getting married. I will take time to be part of their new experiences while helping them in any way possible. Involvement and Service to My Community: My job holds many opportunities for me to help in my community. I will take those opportunities and build on them to the fullest extent. Now that I have found a church to call home, I will also be participating in their community outreach programs. Personal Growth: In my personal life, I have been focusing on finding peace and furthering my relationship with God. I will continue to try to keep my stress at bay and find a positive twist on anything that is thrown at me. This will be very important as I am finishing school and moving on to new areas in my life. I will be engaged within the next year or two, and my goal is to prepare myself to be the best wife I can be.


Service Learning Project Name: Patricia Copeland Course Title: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education Date: March 12, 2014 Agency Name: Parkway Academy Agency’s Mission Statement/ Grades Served: Due to the nature of this alternative setting, the requested information is not open to public access. However, during my time at Parkway Academy, I observed a predominately white 1st12th grade student body. The student to teacher ratio was roughly 1:3. Prologue: What do you expect to get from your service learning experience (i.e., how will this experience help YOU develop)? How will it impact your learning and link to class materials? How do you think the students and staff will perceive you? What goals do you have for the semester’s Service Learning experience? What fears do you have (if any) about service learning? As the beginning of this service learning project approaches, I find myself very excited. I hope to see and apply many of the things discussed in our EDUC 2300 class. Completing my observation in an alternative setting like Parkway Academy will allow me to see more in depth behavior intervention than in a normal educational setting. During my time working for the Sevier County School System, I have found myself wanting to learn more about managing student behavior and the interventions used to create a positive and successful learning environment despite the situation. I hope the students and faculty I encounter will find it easy to work with me and use me as an effective part of their day. I am anxious to see what this opportunity will reveal for me.


First Agency Visit: (Overview of Events) I began my day at Parkway Academy meeting the teacher, Russell Allen. Although I arrived early to speak with him before class, I met him around 8:15 when he had completed his bus route. Mr. Allen teaches elementary grades in an alternative setting. He currently has eight students: six boys and two girls. He seemed surprised that I wanted to complete my service learning in an alternative setting. ABCs of Reflections Affect: Over the last year, I have become very interested in working with students with extreme behaviors. I was very excited to start the day. Mr. Allen was very welcoming but was also very interested in discussing why I desired to come to Parkway. He quickly welcomed me into the class, and the day began. My excitement continued as I was introduced to the group. Mr. Allen explained each student’s personality and how they were selected for intervention at Parkway. Behavior: Mr. Allen immediately allowed me to begin working with the students. I was very excited to get involved with the individuals in the class. The students were all working on independent work provided by the teachers from their individual home schools. The academic expectations in this room do not appear to be the primary focus as in most settings due to Parkway’s therapeutic nature. The students are provided counseling throughout the day in small groups and on a one on one basis depending on the individual student’s need. Mr. Allen spent some time explaining the methods they use and the reasons for it. I am very interested in the information he provides. Cognition/Content: While I have learned and used many teaching strategies throughout my various service learning placements, this placement is very different. While some students stay focused and completed the work they are assigned, others seem to complete no work at all. Due to the individual circumstances, this behavior appears to be allowed. The focus of this setting is therapeutic. The primary goal is to help the individual student learn to manage his/her behavior before increasing the expectations to include academics. Parkway is a temporary placement. Therefore, the students arrive and depart depending on their status and progress.


Second Agency Visit: (Overview of Events) Knowing Mr. Allen’s morning routine, I arrived at my placement a little bit later in order not to be in the way of others as they began to prepare for their day. As the students enter the school, their personal belongings are checked and any dress code issues are immediately addressed. I enjoyed watching the staff interact with the students as they rolled with anything that was thrown at them. ABCs of Reflections Affect: While I am still excited to be at Parkway, I do have some concerns. Although I want to be part of behavior intervention, I also want to maintain focus on academics. I feel that maintaining academic expectations will be key when the time comes to return the students to their home school. I must say that I am surprised that it is not a larger part of their day. Behavior: Today was very much like my first day. I was able to work with the students on academics while also having the opportunity to observe group and one-on-one therapy sessions. I also had the opportunity to implement some of the behavior management language that is used in my building as I interacted with the students. I enjoy seeing how the staff approaches each student’s specific needs and the techniques they use for behavior management. Cognition/Content: The school I work in uses the same behavior management system that is used here. I feel I am learning a lot about implementing this system in more extreme settings. A lot of the TCI training is not necessary to implement in my home school. We generally do not have students with extreme behaviors in my building. The behaviors I deal with on a day-to-day basis are minor when compared to the behaviors in this building.


Third Agency Visit: (Overview of Events) I have mixed feelings going in to my last day. Although I have learned a lot, I have a lot to consider when it comes to learning about the behavior management side of education. I will definitely leave this setting equipped with a new perspective and set of questions that will help guide me through my educational growth. ABCs of Reflections Affect: I am not as excited as I originally was about this placement. While I am still very interested in working with students with extreme behaviors, I think I would prefer to do behavior intervention in a regular school setting. However, I kept a positive attitude and looked for further opportunity to gain experience. Behaviors: The days here flow pretty much like any other building. The students know the expectations. With little exception, they do what they are supposed to do. However, when a student does act out, it is to the extreme. During a behavior episode, one person is left to maintain the others while the focus is on the one student. I stayed in the class with an assistant for most of the day trying to keep everyone on task and to complete the assignment they had been given. Naturally, the whole group was distracted and had the tendency to act out more, because they were aware of the episode going on in the building. Cognition/Content: Due to the nature of this setting, I did not have the opportunity to observe any different educational strategies. The techniques used most often in this setting are one-on-one and small group. The theory that I was able to observe was behavior management. I believe that I learned a lot from this placement. I have been trained in the TCI (Therapeutic Crisis Intervention) method but had not had the opportunity to implement it fully or to see it implemented to its complete potential until now. I believe that having had the opportunity to observe it this environment has been very beneficial to me.


Epilogue: Reflect on your semester’s service learning experience. Over all, I am satisfied with this semester’s service learning project. During my time in Mr. Allen’s room, I was able to see first-hand how intense TCI is implemented in our county. Being in a setting that primarily focuses on behavior gave me a new outlook on behavior intervention. While I enjoy working with students that exhibit extreme behaviors in a regular education setting, I did not fully enjoy the method of handling academic achievement. I feel that there needs to be a balance between the behavior and academic expectations in order to achieve optimum student success. Revisit the prologue. Have your expectations been met? Overall, my expectations were met. I had been in a behavior placement in another county and had also experienced first-hand intervention in a regular school setting; however, it was nice to be able to see what Sevier County Schools has to offer for extreme behavior intervention and therapy. How have you been surprised, delighted, or dismayed by the experience? Give specific examples. As I have mentioned, I had hoped to see higher expectations academically. Although these students have behavior issues that need to be addressed immediately, academics should not take a back seat in order for these things to be addressed. I will focus on maintaining a healthy balance between the two when I have a classroom of my own. How could this experience be improved? Due to my position as an assistant for the Sevier County School System, it is very difficult for me to take time away from my job and my students in order to complete such an involved project. I hope that one day there will be a solution for other students like myself who are working full time while also being part of a cohort program.


VISION FOR MY FUTURE Here is what I want to accomplish in the next five years: Education: In the next five years, I want to complete my studies with East Tennessee State University and graduate with my bachelor’s degree. After I have completed this, I hope to find a program to continue my studies towards a master’s degree. Career: As I earn my teaching degree, I will continue working as an assistant with the Sevier County School System and build professional relationships throughout the county. In doing so, I will make myself more marketable as a future educator. When the time comes, I look forward to having a classroom of my own where I will finally be able to serve students and their families to the best of my abilities. Family and Friends: In the coming years, I want to remain close to my friends as we go out in to the world to start our own lives. Many of my friends will be getting married and having children. I hope to support them each step of the way. I also want to remain close to my family so I will always be able to help them in their times of need and celebrate during times of joy. Involvement and Service to My Community: In five years I hope to be serving my community as an educator. I want to not only educate my students, but also be able to provide support to their families in situations where I am able, and it is appropriate. Personal Growth: In five years, I would like to be engaged and married to the love of my life. As we take these steps, it will be important that we grow together and provide support for each other as we prepare to spend the rest of our lives together. I want to be at a stable place financially and know how I am going to continue building my future.                


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Field Placement Evaluations Date: Spring 2013 Courses: EDUC 2010 Psychology of Human Development for Teachers. Description: I completed 23 hours of service learning at Ridgedale School. The evaluation documents were not returned to me.                                          


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Field Placement Evaluations Date: Fall 2013 Courses: SPED 2010 Introduction to Special Education Description: I completed 21 Hours of service learning with Elaine Jordan at Boyd’s Creek Elementary School. The evaluation documents were not returned to me.                                          


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Field Placement Evaluations Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education. Description: This is a copy of the evaluation form completed by Russell Allen at Parkway Academy.                                          


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Timesheets Date: Spring 2013 Courses: EDUC 2010 Psychology of Human Development for Teachers. Description: I completed 21 hours of service learning at Ridgedale School. The timesheets were not returned to me.                                        


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Timesheets Date: Fall 2013 Courses: SPED 2010 Introduction to Special Education. Description: I completed 21 hours of service learning with Elaine Jordan at Boyd’s Creek Elementary School. The timesheets were not returned to me.                                        


Context Statement Type of Artifact: Timesheets Date: Spring 2014 Courses: EDUC 2300 Introduction to Education. Description: This is a timesheet showing that I completed 21 hours of service learning with Russell Allen at Parkway academy.      


Concluding Reflection Thank you for taking time to review my portfolio. My portfolio is a collection of lessons, reflections, and vital information that documents my continued journey toward becoming a special education teacher. In developing my portfolio, I have been able to refine my goal of becoming a special education teacher to a more focused goal of working with students that exhibit extreme behaviors. As I continue to work toward this goal, I look forward to the challenges and rewards that I will experience. Â

E portfolio Patricia Copeland  
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