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GARRET T CALLEN ARCHITECTURE P O R T F O L I O


Garrett Callen

(512) 289-2675 Garrettjcallen@gmail.com Garrettcallen@tamu.edu 8412-6 Denali Pkwy Austin, Texas 78726 USA

Education

Work Experience

2011-2016

Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

Spring 2015

Barcelona Architecture Center (BAC), Barcelona, Spain

Bachelors of Environmental Design (Graduation: May 2016)

Study Abroad Program

2011-2012

Blinn College, Bryan, TX

2007-2011

Cedar Park High School, Cedar Park, TX

Software Skills Adobe InDesign Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Autodesk Revit Trimble Sketchup AutoCAD Microsoft Word Microsoft Power Point Microsoft Excel

06|11-08|13

Vanguard Studio Inc., Austin, TX

05|15-09|15

Spoons Yogurt, College Station, TX

Summer intern: Schematic design, site visits, CAD work, organized and filed construction documents, maintained Vanguard Studio Inc. website as well as Houzz page

Cashier

Activities Good Advanced Advanced Good Advanced Good Good Good Good

11|13-09|14

Fish Camp Chairperson

02|12-10|13

Fish Camp Counselor

2011-2015

The Big Event

11|13-05|14

Freshmen Aggies Spreading Tradition Big

Interviewed, selected, and managed 24 camp counselors from an applicant pool of 2000

Advised and mentored two groups of 10-15 new students throughout two camps

Participated in the largest one-day community service project in the nation

Mentored and guided freshmen as they transitioned into their first year of college


Projects Olympic Gymnastics Training Facility The Hidden Room Langford Parametric Wall Blue Star Cultural Hub La Escocesa: Vertical Garden Personal Photography

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OLYMPIC GYMNASTICS TRAINING FACILITY Year: Fourth Year Fall 2015 Location: Huntsville, Texas Professor: Ray Holliday, Shelley Holliday, Juan-Carlos Baltazar Partner: Brett Lagerberg Time: 15 weeks

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OLYMPIC GYMNASTICS TRAINING FACILIT Y Our design was inspired by the similarities and differences in preparation and performance. In gymnastics there is a certain structure and rigor to training that is common place across the sport. The same moves, the same vaults, over and over provide the repetition to convert any routine to muscle memory. Similar yet completely different from practice is performance, a display taking attention away from the training and only concerning eyes with what is immediately before them. Performance is more of an eclectic expression of acrobatic maneuvers that define the individual and their larger counterpart. Derived from preparation and performance, we developed two forms. One form that represents the structure and repetition of training and one that offers a focal point, eclipsing the preparation. In this case the preparation is the horizontal band and the performance is the gymnasium space, with no two angles exactly the same just like no two performances are identical.

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The initial scheme was derived from a crystalline structure, one that formed naturally with flat planes on many axis. In itself, these forms would house the entire programmatic requirements. Scheme 02 provided a more sound approach to the previously stated proposition. The main adaptation that occurred was the addition of a circulation space around the core(Artistic Gym). This circulation space would house all the support and program that the facility needed. Scheme 03, the final, fixed the problems addressed with the previous two solutions. In this version, the two forms, the circulation form and the gym forms, were entirely structurally independent on each other to allow a more true building. True in the sense that the same experience is felt on the inside and outside. True in the sense that the gym forms penetrate the circulation core only to terminate at the ground. This opened up more spaces for programmatic use and also created a semi-private barrier between the athletes and the public.

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Topography

Water

Tree Density

Sun Path

Wind Direction

The organizing tool for the site plan are two axis; rest and action. Living quarters as well as a recreational pool are located along the rest axis while the action axis houses action programs such as soccer, tennis and the gymnastics facility itself.

Site Profile

Axis of Action Axis of Rest


Skin Square Footage Gym Space

Artistic Gym Rhythmic Gym Trampoline Gym Lockers Weights

Administration

Reception Coaches Meeting Rooms

Nutrition

Kitchen Cafeteria Treatment

Housing

Apartments Mass Living

Visitor

Giftshop Lobby Cafeteria

Public

Private

Support Space

Common Space Mechanical Janitorial Storage

The building skin is given shape by its louvers that cover the entire facade.

Structure The gym structure is framed by steel tubes and a iconic cross-bracing diagrid system.

Gyms The gyms are shaped and placed to draw relationships, both visually and physically, to each other.

Circulation Circulation space surrounds the core of the building and supports its many programs.

Circulation Programmatic support Coaches offices Athlete only space Fire escape stairs

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In architecture, the less decisions the user has to make increases the enjoyment of their experience. To expand on this, we adopted a floor plan with long open sight lines as well as large way finding type to embody a contemporary feel while guiding patrons to their end destination, stress free.

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2

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1

4

Grade Floor Plan

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8 11

07

10

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1. Administration/Lobby 2. Gift Shop 3. Conference Room 4. Men’s Restroom 5. Women’s Restroom 6. Common Area 7. Cafeteria 8. Kitchen 9. Women’s Restroom 10. Men’s Restroom 11. Mechanical Room


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The first floor of the complex is halfway under ground to fit the natural contour of the site while allowing space for programs that don’t necessarily need an abundance of natural light or site lines to the public eye(Mechanical, Janitorial spaces and Locker rooms). To keep the gym volumes a focal point, moments in the floor above were eliminated to make 2 story spaces, framed by the iconic louvered wall. In all instances, throughout the perimeter of the gym volumes, views to the training and competitions are easy and frequent.

Below Grade Floor Plan 15

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12. Storage 13. Mechanical Room 14. Women’s Locker Room 15. Artistic Gym 16. Rhythmic Gym 17. Trampoline/Tumbling Gym 18. Mechanical Room 19. Medical Treatment Room 20. Weight Room

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Steel Rods

Louvers

Steel Tube Structure 1/2� Glass Spider Connection

Louver Detail

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An early yet pressing issue was to make this building honest architecture while letting the form go through the circulation space and only terminating at its bounds or the ground itself. Simple glass volumes would not be enough to see the form and differentiate the two volumes. Metal paneling would fix this problem however, no views to the action could be had from inside the complex. Our solution, similar to an LTL project, the New Taipei Library, we decided to cover the form in louvers. This 6 piece louvered system was enough to easily see the two forms while still allowing views from inside and outside. The density of the louvers were increased in areas to reflect off unwanted solar gains and decreased in areas designed to allow more transparency between the viewers and the activity being held at that time.


A

B 24’

C 28’

D 48’

E 48’

15’

G

F 24’

I

H 28’

28’

J 28’

K

A 24’

28’

1

D

C 28’

48’

E 33’

F G

12’ 15’

I

H 24’

28’

K

J 28’

28’

L 28’

1 37’

37’

2 3

B

2 3

16’

16’ 37’

37’

4

4 32’

32’

5

5 28’

28’

6

6

37’

37’

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7

37’

37’

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8

40’

40’

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9

Floor 2 Framing Plan

Roof Framing Plan

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Athlete Living Column Detail

Athlete Floor Plan Level 1

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Camper Floor Plan Level 1

Camper Floor Plan Level 2

Separated by different axis, the living and the gymnasium facility are two different styles. While the gyms, on the axis of action, are more of an iconic testament to gymnastics and technology, the living areas are more reflective of their own axis, rest. Further expanding on the axis of rest, these buildings are constructed with simple pitched roofs and a warmer materiality. Enough elements and styles are shared between the two types to relate them to each other such as the same pallet of grays and a high tech triad of pin connection members that can also be found in the main facility.

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Circulation Space Section

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Glass Elevator Section

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THE HIDDEN ROOM Year: First Year Spring 2013 Location: Marshall County, Kansas Professor: Erica Quinones Time: 5 weeks

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T H E

H I D D E N

R O O M

The objective of this project was to create an abstract structure with four room and one “hidden� room. The hidden room takes up 10 percent of the total square footage. The concept of the herringbone floor plan comes from the herringbone pattern, Commonly found in wood flooring. The concept remained the same throughout the entire design process, but became more complex through the addition of different elements. The building has three main design elements, level changes through different portions of the structure, axial wall materials (frosted glass and cast in-place concrete). These elements work together to provide a unique experience for all people inside the building. The small openings on the interior, exterior and roof provide natural light throughout the building.

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A

B

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Section A

Section B 20


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LANGFORD PARAMETRIC WALL Year: Second Year Spring 2014 Location: College Station, Texas Professor: Mark Clayton Partner: Brett Lagerberg and Brooks Van Essen Time: 5 weeks

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L A N G F O R D PA R A M E T R I C WA L L The objective of this project was to create a parametric installation that could reduce the reverberation time in a small lecture space located in the Langford Architecture Center at Texas A&M University. Sound absorption is affected by the relationship between surface area and the overall volume of the space. The larger the surface area the more opportunity sound has to be absorbed, reflected, and redirected (ultimately reducing reverberation time). We were able to increase the surface area by 150 percent as well as reduce the reverberation time from three seconds to just over one and a half seconds, which is ideal for a small lecture space. Real architecture can be found at the intersection of function and design. This creation is a by-product of a harmonious relationship best illustrated as visual music. Much like music, architecture is experience driven. This form was designed with smooth transitions and parameterized crests and troughs. The difference are both subtle and vast. The reach in engulfing. The stretch in infinite. The form, together, is an experience.

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Created through a series of crests and troughs, the wooden parametric wall was formed to appear as an integrated piece of the existing wall. The design of the form came from the idea of waves engulfing the small space, as well as the harmony of musical notes. CNC’d out of 3/4 inch plywood panels the individual pieces of plywood can be taken apart with ease.

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Surface

Existing Room Condition The small lecture space/classroom located in the Langford Architecture Center has a reverberation problem causing echoing throughout the space.

Room with Installation With the plywood parametric wall installed the reverberation time is reduced from 2.9 seconds to 1.6 seconds. This new reverberation time is acceptable for small classroom spaces like this.

Length (Feet)

Back Wall Front Wall East Wall West Wall Floor Ceiling Total

26 26 30 30 26 26

Back Wall Front Wall East Wall West Wall Floor Ceiling

26 26 30 30 26 26

Width (Feet)

14 14 14 14 30 30

14 14 14 14 30 30

Surface Area (Feet^2)

Surface Type

Coefficent of Absorption

Total Absorption

0.07 0.07 0.07 0.07 0.02 0.07

25.48 25.48 29.40 29.40 15.60 54.60 179.96

364 364 420 420 780 780 3,128

Concrete Concrete Concrete Concrete Carpet Concrete

364 364 420 420 780 780

Concrete Concrete Concrete Concrete Carpet Concrete

0.07 0.07 0.07 0.07 0.02 0.07

25.48 25.48 29.40 29.40 15.60 54.60

3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood 3/8" Plywood

0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09

12.05 11.64 11.31 11.11 11.03 10.92 10.41 9.42 8.46 7.62 6.84 6.03 5.14 4.31 3.77 3.43 3.29 3.22 3.11

Room Sabine Reverberation Volume Formula Time (seconds) (Feet^3) Constant

Existing Reverberation Time

10,920

0.049

10,920

0.049

2.973

Installation Slats: 133.9 129.3 125.7 123.4 122.6 121.3 115.7 104.7 94.0 84.7 76.0 67.0 57.1 47.9 41.9 38.1 36.6 35.8 34.6

Reduced Reverberation Time

Total Improvement

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4,718

323.09

1.656 1.317

44.3%


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BLUE STAR CULTURAL HUB Year: Third Year Fall 2014 Location: San Antonio, Texas Professor: Sarah Deyong Partner: Brett Lagerberg Time: 15 weeks

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B L U E

S TA R

C U LT U R A L

H U B

The objective of this project was to create a new community center, bringing together two neighborhoods in an urban context, as well as linking the site to the natural ecology of the adjacent river. The site includes three patches along the San Antonio River and is situated between the historical King Williams district and the Southside neighborhoods. The site for this project is located next to Blue Star, a growing contemporary arts complex south of downtown San Antonio. The programs include a cafe, art exhibition space, basketball courts, play space, and an open field for various activities.

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Basketball Courts Art Gallery

Cafe

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Play Space


Roof Plan

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Art Gallery Grade Level

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Cafe Grade Level


Art Gallery Below Grade Level

Cafe Below Grade Level

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LA ESCOCESA VERTICAL GARDEN Year: Third Year Spring 2015 Study Abroad Location: Barcelona, Spain Professor: Miguel Roldรกn and Ivan Llach Time: 15 weeks

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LA ESCOCESA: VERTICAL GARDEN La Escocesa is a former industrial complex in the district of Poblenou, Barcelona. Since 1999 it has become a creation space and meeting point for artists of different disciplines. Our objective was to create an environment to sustain and revitalize an industrial urban area that was previously abandoned. The vertical farm, proposed as the new frontal facade of La Escocesa, grows food close to where it is needed, putting the consumer in easy reach of fresh, healthy produce. Rather than requiring acres of land, the vertical farm brings cultivation of produce into the urban setting through new methods, such as hydroponic farming. The conceptual design brings together sustainability, food production, and education on vertical urban farming. Combined with living space for the artists who currently live in La Escocesa in the horizontal bar, the modern high rise is a perfect way to honor La Escocesa’s industrial heritage.

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Industrial

Business

Open Space

La Ecocesa (Site)

Residential

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Initial proposal

Part of the existing building was removed in order to provide an inviting entrance to La Escocesa, rather than original facade which was closed off to the public.

The state of La Escocesa has decreased significantly throughout the years. Doors and windows have been boarded up and the front facade is not inviting.

1. Existing La Escocesa front facade

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2. Remove existing structure to allow entrance into site

3. Vertical addition for hydroponic garden program

4. Programmatic elements divided into vertical space

5. Structural core and sustainable elements added


Public Space Semi-Public Space Private Space

Rooftop terrace

Wind power

Open to below

Juice bar

Vertical Hydroponic system room

Hydroponic table room

Artists Living Space

Hydroponic table room

Open to below Artists Living Space

Seed lab Vertical hydroponic system room

Open to below

CA

R

R RE

DE

PE

RE

IV

Resident lobby

Stair core

Aquaponic columns/Lobby

Elevator core

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Longitudinal Section

Short Section


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Algae Panel Facade

Solar Panel Facade

More efficient than electricity and more sustainable than wood, algae is ideal kindling for producing heat, especially since it can be grown on-site. Moreover, the water in which the algae grows also collects solar energy, providing an additional supply of heat.

Energy collected from the photovoltaic solar panels can be used for the Vertical Farm and the rest of La Escocesa. Solar power cells convert sunlight into electricity, using the energy of speeding photons to create an electrical current within the solar panel.


Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wind turbines convert kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical power. This mechanical power can be used for specific tasks or a generator can convert this mechanical energy into electricity.

VertiCrop Vertical Farming System Providing up to 20 times the yield of normal field crops, while using only 8% of the water typically required for soil farming. VertiCrop provides optimal exposure to either natural or artificial light.

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P E R S O N A L

P H O T O G R A P H Y

This is a collection of personal photographs from around the world. I picked up my passion of photography from my mom, who is a photographer and has been since I was young. The second I got interested into photography I instantly had to know everything about it. I learned everything from how to shoot with a film camera to post processing in Photoshop. This passion of mine has carried over into my world of architecture in many ways. I look at buildings in a unique perspective in order to capture the essence of the structure. Photography has also helped my rendering skills tremendiously. Applying the rule of thirds and understanding depth of field has helped me produce better quality renderings. Photography is not only a hobby, but a passion, of mine and I do not expect to lose this desire for a long time.

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Garrett Callen (512) 289-2675 Garrettjcallen@gmail.com Garrettcallen@tamu.edu 8412-6 Denali Pkwy Austin, Texas 78726 USA


Garrett Callen- Undergraduate Portfolio