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garden tripod A Redbubble Country Gardens come grow with us Group Members Magazine

Issue 6 A Festive Special


Cover Image

Poinsettia by Lois Bryan

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. Country Garden come grow with us 2012


garden tripod A Redbubble Country Gardens come grow with us Group Members Magazine O wow,wow, WoW ... issue 6 !! so we are 6 months old and looking good (even if I do say so my self) This issue we have a fantastic pull out (it would be a pull out if this was printed, so a little imagination please) magazine featuring the conservatories that have been photographed by Marilyn Cornwell, and can read about her own very special conservatory. We would like to welcome our new members and our challange winner and runners up.. a truley impressive range of photography entered this for the wildlife subject. Our office dog Princess Summer, is 7 months old now and looking good in her Christmas hat. We had a light dusting of snow this week and Princess Summer was not impressed.. with her feet getting cold she was not a happy Saluki going out for her walk. We have a feature on Hellebore the Christmas Rose, one of my favorite plants.. but very toxic, so do be careful when handling them. Also a little look at books and book art.. they make wonderful subjects to photograph or paint Our new office temp has written a great piece on birds in winter and how we can help them through these cold days. Then a fulley romantic view of the colours of Christmas.. Issue 7 will be in a new year !! and we have a wonderful new technical director who is working hard behind the the cover to get a Garden Tripod app, so the Garden Tripod can be viewed better on phones and tablets. So if any of you know someone wanting to sponsor our Garden Tripod Magazine .. do let me know. I would now like to wish all our members and followers a Safe and Happy Christmas.. May your new year be full of happiness. Reflexio & Agen

Garden Tripod 6


GARDEN TRIPOD

11

Welcome New Members

7

49

In to the Conservatory with  Marilyn Cornwell

Hellebore A Christmas Rose

43

Wildlife Country Garden Challenge Results


INDEX

46

around the bubble

71

The Colour of Winter Memories

81 59

book ART

8 Office News Hound

68

Ramblings from the Office Temp Birds in Winter


Editor TheAgency Contributors: Cover image Poinsettia by Lois Bryan news hound Saluki Portrait by BarbBarcikKeith Feature In to the Conservatory with Marilyn Cornwell Challenge Blue Tit by geoff curtis. Lunch..by tracielouise. just cleaning by Bhabes. "Left or Right?" by Sandra Fortier. Ruffled feathers by Celeste Mookherjee Watchful Rainbow Lorikeet by hans p olsen. Pelegrine Falcon - bird of prey - Australia by  Margaret Morgan (Watkins) I am Such a Happy Magpie by Elaine Teague. Spring Bluff by PhotosByG. Wood pecker latest capture by JDL15. My New Best Friend by Sonya Lynn Potts. Walking on the Sun byRedrose10. Smile by GailDouglas. Gold by EbyArts WOW! Did I Climb All That Way Up? by Eve Parry. Deer Drinking in Stream by Kenneth Hoffman. The Traveller by Holly Craft. Deer in the Garden, by AnnDixon. the golden jewel by Annette Holl. Pollen Lady by Yool. California Vineyard by Jerry L. Barrett A long way to go by Arie Koene. Around the bubble Castles 2 by JDL15 Red Fox in the Snow by Nigel Tinlin Eeyore Loves Christmas by Jared Revell Cuddles at Christmas by weecritter 'Christmas Post' by Martin Williamson (cobbybrook) Dreamin' of a White Christmas... by Lori Deiter And it's hello from me! by Squealia French horn. by Ellen van Deelen

Hellebore A Christmas Rose Hellebore by Wendi Donaldson Spotted Hellebore by Maureen Sparling Hellebore - Christmas Rose by Karen Martin IPA Helleborus orientalis - Lenten Rose by Cheryl Hodges After The Rain, Hellebore by MagsWilliamson Hellebore by lynn carter Hellebore by George Row Snowy Hellebores by Ann Mortimer Hidden Hellebore by Jacky Parker 'Helibore Gathering" by Madonna McKenna RHS Encyclopedia book ART Page Format No.1 Transitional Series by Kerryn MadsenPietsch Book of Threads (Installation View) by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch 'Contained' ~ 3 TPP Artist Books (1) by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch nesting by beverlylefevre A Pile of Books by  KUJO-Photo by Pascale Baud Symbolic Meeting - Part I by Pascale Baud Symbolic Meeting - Part I (open) by Pascale Baud Lettres aux Cubes : W - miniature book n°1 by Pascale Baud Lettres aux Cubes : W by Pascale Baud ils sont 7 by Pascale Baud Lettres aux Cubes : W - miniature book n°1 - open by Pascale Baud <untitled> (13) Manor F by Andrew Coogan Reliable Companions by RC deWinter Birds in winter The Holiday Serenade by Tammara WinterTime - Downy Woodpecker by Lynda McDonald A Red Poll -- Waiting Out The Storm by T.J. Martin Winter Wonders by GailDouglas Snow Bird by Paul Gitto Robin on an icy perch by Maria Gaellman Cardinals First Snow by Karol Livote Im depressed.... by Nicole W. The Colour of Winter Memories Rainbow Connection by urmysunshine Majestic Winter by Heather Waller-Rivet IPA rainbow trees by yvonne willemsen A Winter Walk by Dorothy Thomson Blue Christmas... by Carol Clifford Silent Night... by Yannik Hay A Winter's Walk by Angie Latham Night in the Sunken Garden (4) by George Cousins The Winter garden by Gisèle Bédard Tuscany Winter by marens Epitaph by Tom Newman Teddy Bear - A Christmas Past by clydeessex


Welcome New Members PB-SecretGarden

RC deWinter

GailDouglas

Yannik Hay

Jerry L. Barrett

enchantedImages

Kuzeytac

George W Banks

Rosehaven

JDL15

Karol Livote

Paul Gitto

Monnie Ryan

Cheryl Hodges

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A little word from our Office News Hound Hi Folks .. I am officially the office dog for the Garden Tripod Magazine. This will be my first ever Christmas, and I have heard a lot about it.. I have to be good or santa wont come ! I must not eat chocolate, grapes, currents and lots of other things that will be around at Christmas. But should be getting lots of my own treats that my people cannot eat .. think that may because they are vegetarian .. as my chews and treats taste yummy. I am a very lucky puppy as I have a warm home and fluffily sofa so .. spare a thought for others that are sat in re-homing kennels .. a little donation would go down well this time of year .. as they have Christmas to.. just no full time human mum or dad or comfy sofa to eat their Christmas dinner on ... What .. who said I cannot eat my dinner on the sofa !!!! This time I have chosen image that I think looks a little like me .. when I am all grown up. Stay Safe Princess Summer

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Saluki Portrait by BarbBarcikKeith

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In to the Conservatory with Marilyn Cornwell

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In to the Conservatory

with Marilyn Cornwell


Blossom Garden Under Magnolia Marilyn Cornwell

Furry Sings the Blues Marilyn Cornwell

Marilyn moved to Grimsby in October 2011. She took the conservatory with her. The same father and son team who moved the greenhouse in 1993 were engaged in July 2011. They dismantled and stored the metal structure and glass windows, and then put it together on the new foundation at her Grimsby home. Christopher Campbell has created a back garden design to showcase this beautiful structure.

All The Materials Contained are Š Marilyn Cornwell They May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images Do Not Belong To The Public Domain.


About

My garden photography mission is to capture a garden’s atmosphere, spirit, and beauty in evocative images that preserve garden memories. I seek out the essence of plants and gardens throughout the seasons looking to express the details, colour, texture, pattern, rhythm and form. My Toronto garden was an inspiration in this journey. It is located in Toronto’s west end, and is situated on the parkland bordering Mimico Creek. Its central feature was an antique conservatory greenhouse originally located in Forest Hill. Christopher Campbell, landscape architect, created the garden design including the Poet’s House tool shed and the central pergola surrounded by interconnected circular paths. The garden backs onto Toronto Conservation Authority property where Mimico Creek flows. The gardens were created starting in the late1980’s. Christopher Campbell, noted landscape architect, designed the backyard in 1999 with circle paths in a Celtic cross shape, leading you throughout the natural garden. The “Poet’s House” tool shed, with stained glass windows is his design. Its Victorian quality is emphasized with boxwoods and urn planters. The Conservatory was originally at a property in Forest Hill. It was dismantled, refurbished and repositioned on a new foundation at our house in 1993. (Christopher Campbell’s uncle was the original owner of the Conservatory). The Conservatory came via James Goad, Toronto’s Distillery District architect and co-developer. He designed the living room so that the conservatory adjoins it. Garden trees include Redbud Chinensis, Redbud Canadensis (front garden), Saucer and Star Magnolias, Carolina Silverbell, and Red Jade Crab Apple (front garden). The pergola is planted with Clematis, Wisteria, Roses and Laburnum. The ‘passed-on’ Corkscrew Hazel in the back has recently been planted with Clematis. The season I enjoy the most is spring. It begins with the earliest possible blooms – Snow Drops, Heather and Hellebores. The garden has large plantings of Crocuses, Tulips, Hyacinths and Daffodils. Spring lasts till June with the Alliums and Lily-flowered Tulips. The emphasis in the the garden is to create beauty through colour and scent, mostly using flowers, both perennials and annuals. My goal is to have change through the season, with something new always coming into bloom, so that there is a sense of wonder and delight. Plants are allowed to intermingle, leading to failures in following horticultural rules and principles. The flowering season lasts as long as possible, with frost tolerant flowers such as Salvia Victoria and Snapdragons. For me, the garden never stops blooming. The winter garden in the conservatory has blooming Jasmines, Camellia, Duranta, Hibiscus, and tropical plants. They move into the garden during the summer. Marilyn Cornwell

In this publication

In this publication we explore the wonders of 5 conservatories that are open to the public through the photography of Marilyn Cornwell Part 1 Longwood gardens conservatories with the different seasons displays and festivals Part 2 Christmas displays at the Allan Gardens The amazing festive display at the Centennial Park Conservatory Biltmore Estate Niagara Falls Greenhouse


1 In to the Conservatory

with Marilyn Cornwell


Longwood's Conservatory

Christmas

Longwood's Conservatory is one of the world's great greenhouse structures. It shelters 20 indoor gardens and 5,500 types of plants. The Conservatory was built in 1919 and has been periodically expanded and renovated. At present, there are 195,668 square feet— or 4.5 acres—of covered display, production, and research greenhouses. longwoodgardens.org

Throughout A Longwood Christmas, one of the highlights of the season is our light display featuring  over a halfmillion  twinkling LED lights in various colors. Creating this display takes months of hard work by various departments at Longwood. longwoodgardens.org

Display Gardens

Chrysanthemum Festival

Longwood is a display garden promoting the art and enjoyment of horticulture for the public, and the Gardens' Display and Design teams play an integral role in that mission by  developing the Gardens' eight horticultural displays throughout the year. Gardeners work with Production staff to ensure that our plants are grown and displayed in the best possible fashion in our frequently changing conservatories and outdoor gardens.  The end result showcases the combination of the art and science of horticulture! longwoodgardens.org

Exhibition Hall The Exhibition Hall has  the original,  sunken, marble floor which is usually flooded with a few inches of water for reflection. Australian tree ferns thrive in the humid environment. Occasionally the floor is drained and used for special displays and events. longwoodgardens.org

Experience a horticultural and  artistic feat unlike any you have  ever seen— featuring over 20,000 blooming chrysanthemums grown in extraordinary ways, preserving an ancient art form while innovating technique and display. longwoodgardens.org

Lilitopia Festival Longwood Gardens, Lilitopia Festival, 2011. At the entrance more than 400 stems create a fantasy arch. Inside, giant vases are filled with hundreds of stems. longwoodgardens.org

Orchid House This room houses the best of Longwood’s more than 3,200 different types of orchids. At any one time approximately 200 to 500 plants at peak bloom add color and scent the air. Ferns, ivies, and peace lilies (Spathiphyllum) provide a green backdrop for the myriad of blossoms. longwoodgardens.org

Longwood Gardens 5


Longwood Gardens The Grand Entrance 6


A Special Christmas Walk

Longwood Gardens Christmas 7


The Mediterranean Christmas Tree

8


Above: Longwood's Christmas Landscape Lower: Christmas Silhouettes

9


Christmas Silhouettes The Tree Worshippers Announcing Christmas

10


A Lavender View

Longwood Gardens Chrysanthemum Festival 11


The Thousand Flower Tree Why is a Thousand Bloom special? The method for growing the Thousand Bloom originated in China and Japan more than 200 years ago. A dying art form, there remains only a few growers in the entire world skilled in the techniques needed to grow a Thousand Bloom. Longwood Gardensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; team of growers is led by Yoko Arakawa, who has trained in Japan with the master chrysanthemum growers and continues to travel to Japan to advance her understanding of this rare art form.

How do you grow a Thousand Bloom? The exacting growing technique takes 15-18 months and involves meticulous watering, pinching and tying of the chrysanthemum to a customized frame to get the plant to grow into the desired form. After a wilting period to allow the stems to become more malleable, the blooms are meticulously arranged in a dome shape, with the goal of achieving as many uniform blooms as possible.

Is this the largest Thousand Bloom in the United States? YES! This year, Longwood will feature the largest Thousand Bloom in the United States, with 718 blooms. The largest Thousand Bloom ever was grown in Japan and had over 2,220 blooms. Facts from Longwood Gardens website:

12


The Thousand Flower Tree Splendid Reflections

13


Longwood Palm Court Reflections

14

Hey Look Me Over Heart of the Matter


Under the Floral Big Top

15


Longwood Gardens Lilitopia Festival 16


Together in the Palace of Dreams Lilitopia at Longwood - I

17


Longwood Gardens Spring Time 18


Longwood Gardens Orchid House 19


2 In to the Conservatory

with Marilyn Cornwell


Allan Gardens Allan Gardens Conservatory is over 100 years old with a garden-filled greenhouse that covers over 16,000 square feet. This garden is open to the public year-round. It contains tropical plants from all over the world from palm trees to cacti. There are also seasonal plantings throughout the year. torontobotanicalgarden.ca

Centennial Park Conservatory At the Centennial Park Conservatory, three glasshouses appeal to area botanists and plant-lovers alike. Containing more than 12,000 square feet of plant collections, the Conservatory is a perfect place for people to interact with the botanical objects of desire. torontoplus.ca

Biltmore Estate The conservatory on the Biltmore Estates. Glass was expensive in the nineteenth century, and the round top windows and the glass ceilings were signs of wealth and prosperity. learnnc.org

Niagara Falls Greenhouse The mainspring of any park development lies in its system of greenhouses. These structures with roofs and sides of glass to permit the passage of sunlight and heated to a temperature most conducive to the growth of flowers are used as propagating houses, forcing houses and conservatories. They are the center from which all gardener activities radiate in addition to supply plant material, may provide a source of pleasure and education to the general public. niagarafrontier.com


Stormy Allan Gardens - II

Allan Gardens 22


The inviting doors of the Allan Gardens Conservatory, Toronto Ontario, Christmas.

23


Allan Gardens Palm House The soaring Palm House ceiling at Allan Gardens,

Allan Gardens Christmas Festival I A gorgeous Christmas Festival each year!

24


A Christmas Living Room

Centennial Park Conservatory 25


Biltmore Estate 26


Biltmore Conservatory Greenhouse

27


Marilyn has been acquainted with the Niagara Falls Greenhouse since she was a child, living nearby in St. Catharines. She even managed to have her wedding photos taken in the greenhouse in 1970 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; generally not allowed at the time â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but somehow the gardener gave the OK. The greenhouse was built in 1946, following the construction of the tunnels for the hydro power generation and is a short distance from the upper portion of the Falls. Collections of orchids, succulents and other tropical plant species are on display throughout the year, along with floral shows that reflect the changing seasons. Flying throughout the greenery are colourful tropical birds.

Niagara Falls Greenhouse 28


The Niagara Falls winter garden display.

29


This was in the Niagara Falls Conservatory Greenhouse . The gardener said it was likely original to the greenhouse era (1946) so 40 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 60 years old.

30


Index 4

Longwood Gardens 7 11 16 18 19

20

At Christmas Chrysanthemum Festival Lilitopia Festival Spring Time Orchid House

Part 2 22 Allan Gardens 25 Centennial Park Conservatory 26 Biltmore Estate 28 Niagara Falls Greenhouse

In to the Conservatory

with Marilyn Cornwell


All The Materials Contained are Š Marilyn Cornwell They May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images Do Not Belong To The Public Domain.


ED

ET PL M

CO

22 Entries 125 Votes 1 Winner

Smile by GailDouglas was voted the most popular entry in this challenge with 15 votes. In the

Wildlife Country Garden Challenge Garden Tripod 6 43


Wonderful Wildlife

Blue Tit © geoff curtis. Lunch.. © tracielouise. just cleaning © Bhabes. "Left or Right?" ©Sandra Fortier. Congratulations your image was in the top ten

Ruffled feathers © Celeste Mookherjee Watchful Rainbow Lorikeet © hans p olsen. Pelegrine Falcon - bird of prey - Australia © Margaret Morgan (Watkins) Garden Tripod 6 44

I am Such a Happy Magpie © Elaine Teague. Spring Bluff © PhotosByG. Wood pecker latest capture © JDL15. My New Best Friend © Sonya Lynn Potts.


Challenge Entries

Walking on the Sun ©Redrose10. Smile © GailDouglas. Gold © EbyArts

WOW! Did I Climb All That Way Up? © Eve Parry. Deer Drinking in Stream © Kenneth Hoffman. The Traveller © Holly Craft.

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Deer in the Garden, © AnnDixon. the golden jewel © Annette Holl. Pollen Lady © Yool. California Vineyard © Jerry L. Barrett A long way to go © Arie Koene.


rainbow trees by yvonne willemsen

Top Left: Dreamin' of a White Christmas. .. by Lori Deiter Middle Left: And it's hello from me! by Squealia Lower Left: French horn. by Ellen van Deelen

Top Right: Eeyore Loves Christmas by Jared Revell Middle Right: Cuddles at Christmas by weecritter Lower Right: 'Christmas Post' by Martin Williamson (cobbybrook)

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Castles 2 by JDL15

around the bubble Red Fox in the Snow by Nigel Tinlin

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Wishing you all a very Happy Christmas From

garden tripod

Garden Tripod Magazine 6 Garden Tripod 6 48


Hellebore A Christmas Rose Garden Tripod 6 49


Hellebore by Wendi Donaldson

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Spotted Hellebore by Maureen Sparling

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Hellebore - Christmas Rose by Karen Martin IPA

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Helleborus orientalis - Lenten Rose by Cheryl Hodges

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Snowy Hellebores by Ann Mortimer

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After The Rain Hellebore by MagsWilliamson Hellebore by lynn carter Hellebore by George Row

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Hidden Hellebore by Jacky Parker

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'Helibore Gathering" by Madonna McKenna

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http://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/RHS-Publications/Journals/The-Plantsman/2009-Issues/December/Hellebore

An Interesting Read just cut and paste the address into your web browser for the free PDF booklet shown here

rhs.org.uk/Plants/ RHS-Publications/ Journals/ThePlantsman/2009Issues/December/ Hellebore Graham rice is the author, with Elizabeth Strangman, of The Gardenerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to Growing Hellebores. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of the RHS Encyclopedia of Perennials


book ART

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ŠTheAgency


Book of Threads (Installation View) by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch


Top: Page Format No.1 Transitional Series Lower: Book of Threads (Installation View) Left: 'Contained' ~ 3 TPP Artist Books (1)

In my art practice visual imagery, personal metaphors and symbols evolve through exploring influences that impact on my senses, memory and perception.

Š Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch Garden Tripod 6 61


Reliable Companions

© RC deWinter Garden Tripod 6 62


A Pile of Books

© KUJO-Photo Garden Tripod 6 63


Symbolic Meeting - Part I

Symbolic Meeting - Part I (open)

© Pascale Baud

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© Pascale Baud The name of this small very small books (2 × 2 cm) is “Micromanie”. Linocut – I’ve made 20 original prints for 20 books. It’s the first :)) The text is an original poem about letters : here is W. All the series of poems edited in "Les Cahiers de Poésie n °11 – editions Laurent FELS & Joseph O U A K N I N E , (collective work).

Top left: Lettres aux Cubes : W - miniature book n°1 Lower left: Lettres aux Cubes : W Top right: ils sont 7 Lower right: Lettres aux Cubes : W - miniature book n°1 - open

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<untitled> (13) Manor F

© Andrew Coogan

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nesting

Š beverlylefevre

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Birds in Winter Top : The Holiday Serenade by Tammara Middle : WinterTime Downy Woodpecker by Lynda McDonald Lower : A Red Poll -- Waiting Out The Storm by T.J. Martin

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Ramblings from the Office Temp Until I moved to the country, I totally took birds for granted. I heard them sing sometimes, but didn’t stop to enjoy it, I saw them fly around but never took the time to identify the species, and when winter came, I never thought about the struggle they had to go through. All that changed when I pointed my camera towards a sparrow for the first time. It was eating some of the chicken food that was lying around, and while keeping an eye on me, he came pretty close. I took a few shots. I knew they wouldn’t be good because I was using my macro lens, but looking at them later I realized I had never looked at a bird like that, and it looked beautiful! I felt a little ashamed for not knowing for sure what kind of bird it was… I am sure a lot of you are like that. So here I am….trying to achieve some awareness and maybe even interest in the creatures that need our help to get through the winter. Did you ever wonder where birds sleep? In trees, hedges, bushes of course. But did you know they are very grateful for our nestingboxes? They will use it for a bedroom in the winter because all those trees and bushes don’t provide much shelter if they don’t have leafs. So by all means, cover your garden in bird boxes, but consider a few things when you pick a place. First of all, birds that stay here in winter, don’t like to migrate. So if you put up a bird box, it should stay there for as long as it doesn’t fall apart. So the spot has to be right, and that means you have to consider the sun. Unless you want to end up with fried baby birds, keep the box away from direct sunlight. Second, papa and mama bird are extremely busy feeding the babies, care for them and protect them. Put their lives on the line, give away all the favorite snacks, and try to stay healthy themselves too. That would all be a waste if the new babies leave the nest for the first time and fall directly into the open mouth of your or your neighbors’ cat. Cats are not good at nursing baby birds you see. So make sure the nesting box is high up and not in your cats’ favorite tree. There is one more demand for a successful nesting box, it requires a good approach route. The birds have to be able to land in front of the opening, directly from flight. But at the same time, they like their nest to be a bit out of sight, and in a quiet place. Best you place bird boxes in September, and they might be occupied the next spring already. So …the bedroom issue resolved, think about food and water. Bird food is so easy to come by, in all shapes and sizes. You can go for the funny stuff where seeds are glued to funny shapes like hearts and stuff. They don’t care, that’s all for you. So here’s

another consideration before you buy bird food…. Do you want to just help the birds? Or do you want to help the birds and create the opportunity for yourself to photograph them….because if you want to make photos, you might not want food to show on them. It’s very easy to create a place where birds will come, especially in winter. Here’s what I did: I picked a spot where I could be in the house with the backdoor open, and use a 300 mm zoom lens to make photos. I used bricks to make a square on the ground, two layers high, covered the whole thing with rubber foil and put old boards, branches and moss to cover the edges. Voila….a birdbath, very natural looking and according to the amount of birds taking baths in it, a success. And because I just piled it up, and not use any cement or nails or whatever, I can just remove a few bricks and let the water out if it needs cleaning. So there I sit, on a little stool, camera on a tripod, curtains closed, lens sticking out, making incredible photos of birds feeding their young, taking a bath and doing all kinds of funny things that you wouldn’t see otherwise. So there’s an idea. But the main issue is providing food in times that it’s hard for birds to find it in nature. A setup like this requires food in ready mixes, special for wild birds. And the more different kinds of food you use, the greater the verity of birds that will come to visit. Add some fat products to it and you might even see bigger birds like woodpeckers. Add peanuts and Jays may enter your garden. There is a downside for the birds to this, and that’s bird of prey….It is inevitable. They need to eat too and a large amount of little birds coming together is something they can’t resist. So let nature take its course and sent your dog after him :-). But take pictures first. Providing food really does make a difference. The birds will be stronger when spring comes, more babies will be born and if you keep feeding the birds through the whole year, you will see an increase in numbers, just like I did. Sparrows are on my countries list of endangered species, and I tripled the community in my garden in just a few months. So when you are cuddled up on the couch by the fireplace with your family, opening your christmas gifts and eat way too much, consider the little ones outside that have a really hard time and help them out a little. They will thank you later with great photos and lots of singing!

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Birds Birds Birds Birds Birds

Top left Winter Wonders by GailDouglas Middle left: Snow Bird by Paul Gitto Lower left: Robin on an icy perch by Maria Gaellman

Top right: Cardinals First Snow by Karol Livote Lower right: Im depressed.... by Nicole W.

Birds Garden Tripod 6 70


The Colour of Winter Memories Garden Tripod 6 71


© Rachel Sonnenschein

Rainbow Connection by urmysunshine

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Majestic Winter

by Heather Waller-Rivet IPA

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© yvonne willemsen

rainbow trees

by yvonne willemsen

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A Winter Walk by Doroth Thomson

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ŠCarol Clifford

Blue Christmas... by Carol Clifford

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Top:

A Winter's Walk

by Angie Latham Lower:

Silent Night...

by Yannik Hay Garden Tripod 6 77


Night in the Sunken Garden (4) by George Cousins Garden Tripod 6 78


©marens

Top:

The Winter garden

by Gisèle Bédard Lower:

Tuscany Winter

by marens Garden Tripod 6 79


A Time for Remembrance

Epitaph Leave a flower on my grave and some love for me to save and in return, for you to know just how much I loved you so Remember not the bad of me forgiveness is my earnest plea And know forever my love of thee I am beside you evermore to love and cherish till we meet, once more..

Šsentimentum

Tom Newman

Epitaph by Tom Newman Teddy Bear - A Christmas Past by clydeessex Garden Tripod 6 80


Country Gardens come grow with us group and the Garden Tripod Magazine would like to wish all its members and followers a safe and Happy Christmas. We would also like to thank RedBubble and all its members for the support shown towards the Garden Tripod Magazine in this, our first year and I hope that 2013 will see the Garden Tripod grow in style, followers and design yours sincerely Reflexio & TheAgency

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Garden Tripod 6