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SPRING 2014

DESTINATION Where life blooms â„¢

the

SERVICE issue

p. 38

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ways to mak better worlde a


letter from the editor

IT ALL STARTS WITH SERVICE

E

ach issue of Destination: Garden Spot Village has a unifying theme. The last two issues have focused on two of our organization’s core values: teamwork and excellence. The current issue continues that trend, with a focus on our core value of service—in the sense of making an impact on the lives of others and the world. I love this value, because the concept of service gets to the very heart of the culture at Garden Spot Village. How does an organization do teamwork well? By serving each other and the customer! How do you achieve excellence? By serving each other and the customer! The wonderful thing about this value is that the Garden Spot Village team members aren’t the only ones who embrace service. The people who live here are committed to service as well. What’s more, the leadership team looks beyond the boundaries of the campus to serve the local and global community. In this issue, you’ll discover how and why the value of service has such deep roots within the Garden Spot Village culture. You’ll get a glimpse into a variety of the many extraordinary volunteer initiatives that engage Villagers. You’ll see how our skilled nursing team has developed a model of hospitality so exceptional that delegations from as far as Ireland and China have come to find out how it works. You’ll find out how Garden Spot Village is serving the industry and helping shape the regulations that govern care. You’ll also learn how Garden Spot Village and its residents team up with local businesses and non-profits to serve the surrounding area. I personally believe that our culture of service is one of the reasons why people come from all across the United States to live on this beautiful 104-acre campus in Lancaster County. It’s also one of the reasons why many of the people who have moved to Garden Spot Village over the last three years are Baby Boomers in their 60s. You might be surprised to learn that, not only are Baby Boomers moving to Garden Spot Village, but some are still working full- or part-time. They serve professionally both on and off the clock. People who serve and volunteer 2

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tend to lead fuller lives. They are forward thinking. Their lives matter. They craft their legacy. They live with a sense of purpose and selflessness that influences the world around them. They are a wonderful group of people. It’s a blessing to be in their company.

People who serve and volunteer tend to lead fuller lives. They are forward thinking. Their lives matter. They craft their legacy.

Two thousand years ago a group of young servants distributed fish and bread to 5,000 men plus their families. Those people were served physically, mentally and spiritually. As this issue’s cover illustrates, Garden Spot Village seeks to serve people in a similar way. Come, explore these pages. Read on. You’re invited to think forward, contemplate your legacy, consider your appetite for service and how the next chapters of your life might unfold. Imagine the possibilities at Garden Spot Village... We’re at your service! ENTHUSIASTICALLY,

SCOTT MILLER Editor & Chief Marketing Officer


We welcome your feedback. Please write to us and let us know what you think about Destination Garden Spot Village. If you’ve had a chance to visit the Garden Spot Village campus, please tell us about it. We want to hear from you!

table of c o n t e n t s 4

MEET YOUR NEIGHBORS

Bob & Mickey Adams

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SOCIALLY SPEAKING

Meet the Mountain View Vision & Design Team

10 GIVING

Moongazer honors exceptional partnership

12 TASTE OF GARDEN SPOT

A casual Saturday supper

14 TEAM SPOTLIGHT

Deborah Fast, Director of Volunteer Services

16 EVENTS CALENDAR

32 DESTINATION: GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE

How is Garden Spot Village like a vacation spot?

34 GOOD NEIGHBORS

Garden Spot Village forges strong local partnerships

38 7 WAYS TO MAKE A BETTER WORLD

Make an impact in the second half of life

42 REACHING OUT

Villagers touch lives and build community

Fun things to see and do at Garden Spot Village. For residents. For family. For the community

18 THE ROOTS OF SERVICE

E-MAIL:

CathieCush@comcast.net POST:

Scott Miller, editor Destination: Garden Spot Village 433 South Kinzer Avenue New Holland, PA 17557 FACEBOOK:

Log in, search “Garden Spot Village” and join in the conversation. Or follow us on twitter @gsvcommunities.

Intention shapes the culture of the community

20 SERVING SENIORS AROUND THE WORLD

Garden Spot Village makes a positive impact on the industry

24 HOSPITALITY STARTS AT HOME

Putting people first makes all the difference

28 VOLUNTEERS MAKE THE VILLAGE

Opportunities to get involved abound on and off campus

ONLINE:

gardenspotvillage.org TELEPHONE:

717.355.6000 Please send address changes to our move-in coordinator Caren Creek at CCreek@gardenspotvillage.org. All photos by Jeremy Hess Photographers unless otherwise noted. Spring 2014

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meet your ne i g h bor s

BOB & MICKEY ADAMS –­ A FEELING OF FAMILY FROM THE FIRST DAY CORKY MOVED INTO THE COTTAGE AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE, HE FELT RIGHT AT HOME. SO DID BOB AND MICKEY ADAMS, WHO BROUGHT THE HANDSOME BLACK-AND-WHITE “TUXEDO” CAT WITH THEM WHEN THEY MOVED IN LAST SEPTEMBER.

“The folks at Garden Spot Village have been phenomenal,” says Mickey. “From the minute we selected this cottage, our future neighbors got in touch with us and included us in all their social activities, like the monthly breakfast at Yoder’s. We felt like we already knew them when we moved in.” It also helped that they could move in at their own pace. “The policies here are such that we could move in before we sold our home,” says Bob. After Garden Spot Village painted and installed new flooring, countertops and appliances, Bob and Mickey further customized their home, tweaking the paint and turning a second bedroom into a studio to accommodate his surround sound system and her crafts. “We brought our belongings in a number of car trips rather than cramming everything into one moving day,” he says.

BOB AND MICKEY ADAMS AT HOME IN GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE

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A CRAFTY CONNECTION TO THE COMMUNITY

Children of Baptist preachers, both Bob and Mickey lived in several states while growing up. They met at church when she was 16. He was 19 and the college advisor to the youth group. They married in 1970, after she finished college, and both taught in the public schools. Bob taught high school math; Mickey taught fifth and sixth grade and served as choral director. They adopted two children from Korea, who are both now grown.

“There’s a spirit here that I attribute wholly to the management. It’s a Christian environment, and that’s always a plus.”

The couple, who lived in Douglassville for the past 11 years, learned about Garden Spot Village from Bob’s sister and her husband, who also plan to move here. About four years ago, Bob and Mickey got on the waiting list— and got involved in the community. Mickey, an avid and talented handicraft enthusiast, decided to volunteer and was assigned to help the craft club at Mountain View about two years ago. The women in the group fell in love with some cards that Mickey had made using a paper craft technique called teabag folding. Out of that grew the Mountain View Vision & Design Team.

“They made some folded paper designs to sell at the Fall Festival, and a buyer from Ten Thousand Villages saw them,” says Mickey. The Mountain View group now develops ideas for artisans in Bangladesh, who produce and sell them through the global fair trade retailer. The experience has given Mickey an opportunity to get to know some of the women in Mountain View.

and Design team, reads and enjoys music. Bob’s hobbies include reading, current events and the classic ’67 Olds Cutlass 442 in the garage. They both find time to enjoy the camaraderie they find here. “From the CEO on down, the staff is just so cordial and caring, and the residents are happy,” says Bob. “There’s a spirit here that I attribute wholly to the management. It’s a Christian environment, and that’s always a plus.”

“Things here are well done, thought through, with a lot of caring,” Mickey says. “My opportunity to see behind the scenes at Mountain View helped me see that it’s not just public relations. It’s real.” Mickey mentions a December snowstorm, when she spotted Scott Weaver, Director of Campus Services, shoveling snow with members of his team. “He probably could have been sitting in a warm office, but you could see he was having a good time working with his staff. That says a lot,” she says. In the spirit of service, the couple has volunteered as tour guides for prospective residents and opened their cottage to be shown during Look & Learn tours. “We hope to inspire others to come here,” says Bob.

“I have had some fun experiences with the ladies who are much older than I am,” she says. “My mother is 89 and lives in an apartment by herself. I wish she could move into a place like this.” MAKING A PROACTIVE MOVE

Making the move in their own time removed a lot of pressure. “I’m glad we didn’t wait until something happened. That would really be a test of nerves,” Bob says. “When we retired from many years of teaching, it was time to make some decisions,” says Mickey. “We had a family history where relatives hadn’t made proactive choices, and we didn’t want to do that to our kids.” At Garden Spot Village the two “preacher’s kids”— who joke that neither had a hometown—are at home. Mickey still volunteers with the Mountain View Vision Spring 2014

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socially s p e a k i n g

HOLLACE TAFEEN, GALDYS ZIEGENFUS, AND MICKEY ADAMS WORK TOGETHER TO DESIGN AND CRAFT THE SIGNATURE CARDS.

ME­­­ET THE MOUNTAIN VIEW VISION & DESIGN TEAM “service” sounds synonymous with “drudgery,” you haven’t lived at Garden Spot Village, where giving back and having fun are often one in the same. Many of the Village’s more than 40 “official” interest groups and many informal ones give back in many ways—some of them quite unique. Take, for example, the women of the Mountain View Vision & Design Team. While bonding over their love of handicrafts, this group of dynamic and delightful women is supporting the Garden Spot Village Benevolent Fund, participating in the global fair trade movement and changing the face of personal care.

if

STARTING WITH SOAP

When the Mountain View personal care community began its culture change journey in 2008, leadership encouraged team members to draw on their personal talents and abilities to develop activities. Denise Hoak, Director of Personal Care Services, brought in her soap-making supplies, and a group of women made soap to sell at a craft table during the Garden Spot Village Fall Festival. Thus was born the Mountain View Vision & Design Team. 6

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This group of dynamic and delightful women is participating in the global fair trade movement and changing the face of personal care.

“The soap was a big hit, and we have made it for the Fall Festival ever since. The women make the soap and then wrap it and decorate it using flowers we have pressed during the summer,” says Diane Pechart, Activities Director at Mountain View. The women also make notecards and frame wall art using pressed flowers. In time for Christmas 2012, with encouragement from Deborah Fast, Director of Volunteer Services, the women really began to spread their wings.


“Deborah liked our soap very much, so she talked to Diane, ” said Gladys Ziegenfus, who moved to Garden Spot Village from Palmerton, Pa., in 2009. The Team developed a line of soap exclusively for the Village Store. “We had no idea it would take off like it has” The women make the soap in a variety of scents, such as English lavender, eucalyptus mint, and oatmeal honey, plus limited-edition scents like Winter Solstice. They also make lotions in scents like “Choc-ORaz” and “Mountain View Breeze.” Their packages bear a butterfly motif. (The community raises and releases butterflies every year.) Last summer the group did a Spa Day at the Village Store, using their Mystic Mint lotion to give hand massages. REACHING AROUND THE WORLD

About two years ago, a volunteer taught the group the art of tea bag folding, making intricate designs out of folded paper. A buyer from Ten Thousand Villages, the global fair trade retailer that grew out of Mennonite Central Committee, saw the designs—and the group’s potential. Today, in addition to making soaps, lotions and other crafts, the group develops folded paper designs and product prototypes to inspire a group of artisan women in Bangladesh who sell their handmade items through Ten Thousand Villages, in order to support their families and their communities. “Thanks to Garden Spot Village’s openness to innovation, what began as a tea bag folding project has really grown into something much broader,” says Deborah Fast. The team has a core of four or five members, ranging in age from early 60s to 100-plus, who get together every other week. They meet with Melissa Hand, a buyer from Ten Thousand Villages, about twice

LEFT: THE TEAM GETS CREATIVE WITH CARD DESIGNS. RIGHT: A CHRISTMAS CARD CURRENTLY IN PRODUCTION IN BANGLADESH.

“When we get together, the ideas just flow. The energy and enthusiasm have a positive effect on all of us.”

a year. Other members join in, depending on the project at hand. “When we get together, the ideas just flow. The energy and enthusiasm have a positive effect on all of us,” says Ziegenfus. “It’s a real team effort.” The first Mountain View design, to go through the long development process, is a card featuring a folded paper Christmas tree. The design is currently in production in Bangladesh and is expected to be available on the Ten Thousand Villages website and in its retail stores this fall. The card uses paper that the artisans make from water hyacinths, a weed that clogs waterways.

from the sale of the Christmas tree card and other items gives them a source of income. Closer to home, sales of the Mountain View Vision & Design Team soaps and lotions in the Village Store support the Garden Spot Village Benevolent Fund, which benefits other residents who, for reasons beyond their control, need financial assistance. What’s more, team members are helping shatter stereotypes and inspiring those around them, to enhance their lives by serving regardless of age or healthcare status. Not least of all, they are showing that service can be a lot of fun. “We genuinely like each other and have fun doing it,” says Ziegenfus. “I feel surrounded by love all the time.”

SERVING MANY

READ MORE

Most of the artisans involved in the handmade paper project are female heads of household who have no land or assets. Revenue sharing

tenthousandvillages.com

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Live with

If you need short-term rehab you’ll be happy to know a new model of person-centered care has come to Maple Farm in Akron. When a medical professional asks you about your short-term rehabilitation preference— tell them Maple Farm. 604 OAK STREET, AKRON

destination Spring 2013 8 destination Fall Spring Spring 2013 2013 2014

717.859.1191


PERSONAL CARE SUITES

PERSONAL CARE SUITES AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE ARE INVITING AND UNIQUE—AND SO ARE THE RESIDENTS!

Live with

Mountain View Personal Care and Laurel View Memory Support offer a world of amenities, but what sets us apart is our specially trained staff who form family-like bonds with each individual. Residents also develop close friendships with others in a true community environment. Plus, all the amenities of Garden Spot Village are available for everyone! Call 717.355.6272 to learn more and schedule a visit!

ADULT DAY SERVICES

ADULT DAY SERVICES AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE PROVIDES A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITY

Adult Day Services provides a secure, protective environment for older adults who need supervision and assistance during the day. Plus the amenities of Garden Spot Village offer unique opportunities for activity and engagement. Call 717.355.6226 to learn more or schedule a 1 day no-charge trial

THE AREA’S FINEST HOME CARE SERVICES ARE AVAILABLE TO EVERYONE

Garden Spot Village at Home provides personalized in-home services to help people live with purpose and significance at all stages of life. We’ll help with the activities of daily living like getting up, dressed, and ready for the day; running errands and much more, so you can do the things that are meaningful to you! Call 717.355.6031 to learn more or visit GardenSpotVillageAtHome.org A service of Garden Spot Village Lancaster County, PA

433 SOUTH KINZER AVENUE NEW HOLLAND, PA 17557

717.355.6000 GARDENSPOTVILLAGE.ORG Spring 2014 destination 9


g ivi n g “I SEE THE MOON, AND THE MOON SEES ME…”

“MOONGAZER” STATUE HONORS EXCEPTIONAL 70-YEAR PARTNERSHIP Stroll through the Legacy Garden and you’ll see a 12-year-old girl gazing up to the sky. Cast in bronze, she embodies the spirit of June Juanita Yarger Fahnestock and stands in tribute to an enduring love. “I thought she was the most beautiful girl,” says Bob Fahnestock, Garden Spot Village resident since 2008. He commissioned the statue to honor “her continuing confidence in and love for me.” Fahnestock first spied June in an Oklahoma bowling alley in December 1941, while he was training in aeronautics. He asked her if she’d like him to teach her to bowl, and a whirlwind courtship ensued. In March, faced with leaving to rejoin his bombing squadron, he asked her to marry him. SECRETS AND SEPARATIONS

“June wanted time, but I said, ‘I don’t have it,’” Fahnestock says. She found a preacher who married them on the night of his graduation. They were able to honeymoon for two nights before he had to rejoin the squadron. Because he was a fighter pilot in training, they initially had to keep the union a secret. Their first son was born while Fahnestock was still in training. A year later, he went overseas on a series of perilous and often-secret missions. He flew 86 missions, including 68 combat missions, as an Army Air Force pilot in the Himalayas. He survived several sabotage attempts, including a train wreck on his way to Fort Wayne, Ind., before he had even left the country. “I did not know whether I was going to survive, but I couldn’t tell her,” he says. He couldn’t get in touch or tell her where he was—at least, not directly. “I knew Chanel No. 5 was her favorite perfume, so I’d send a bottle and not sign it. If it came from Calcutta or some such place, she’d say, ‘Aha, that’s where he is.’” He was out of touch for a year. Coming home, it took 19 days to reach San Francisco from China aboard a Liberty ship. When he came ashore, he called the number he remembered for the couple’s apartment in Tulsa. The operator told him she couldn’t find that number. It was December 23, and he desperately wanted to be home for Christmas. He finally got through to a supervisor who agreed to locate June and place the call. “They rang her phone, and I said, ‘Honey, I’m home,’ and she said, ‘Who is this?’” he says. “I said, ‘Honey, it’s Bob,’ and she said, ‘It doesn’t sound like you.’” He said he didn’t look like she remembered either. He had lost a lot of weight and was yellow from anti-malaria medication. But he told her 10

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things only he could know. When he rang the doorbell at midnight, she said, “You don’t smell so good and you don’t look good.” But he was

She had waited for him and been true to him despite not knowing if she would ever see him again. home, and they were together for Christmas. Most importantly, he says, she had waited for him and had been true to him despite not knowing if she would ever see him again. A LIFE WELL LOVED

They eventually moved east and raised three boys and a girl. After leaving the military, Fahnestock pursued a career in retail. With an executive-level position, he still traveled most weekdays—but at least his secretary could let June know where he was. “June had a beautiful way of handling all the necessary things without complaining and still had time for me,” Fahnestock says. “She made our married life a constant joy.” When he decided to commission the statue in her honor, he remembered


their time in Oklahoma. As part of getting to know her, he had asked her to show him the places that were important in her life. One of the spots was on the grounds of her old school.

give love. If you want generosity, do it, and it will come to you. There’s nothing complicated about it. We were just average persons who had great love and respect for each other.”

“She said, ‘Here’s where I would sit under the trees and read. I’d come out here at night and never missed a full moon,’” he says. He shared that memory with sculptor Becky Ault, who created the sculpture based on interviews with Fahnestock and his sons.

To learn more about gifts to honor or remember a loved one, please contact Linda Dodge, CFRE, director of development, at 717-355-6215; LDodge@gardenspotvillage.org

gardenspotvillage.org/charitablegiving BOB FAHNESTOCK

PHOTO © RON FAHNESTOCK, USED WITH PERMISSION

“I didn’t know June at that age,” says Fahnestock, but he knew that the seeds of the woman she would become were planted early. “Because I had the privilege of walking with her through her growing up places, it was easy for me to convey that to the artist, and Becky was sharp enough to get it.”

READ MORE

“We all have the ability and imagination, but we’re not always willing to make the effort. Love is one of the most difficult, most rewarding things.”

The finished piece was dedicated in November 2013 in a ceremony in the Legacy Garden. As is customary, along with the statue, Fahnestock also gave a generous gift to the Garden Spot Village Benevolent Fund. He appreciates the team who helped him make his vision a reality—including Linda Dodge, Director of Development; John Farber, Chief Operating Officer, and Scott Weaver, Director of Campus Services. “I had a running conversation with Linda, who is very nice to work with,” says Fahnestock. “When I described what I was hoping to be able to do, they all cooperated so well with me, particularly to accommodate the location.” Since the dedication ceremony, Fahnestock is often asked the secret of such a long and happy marriage. In response, he says, “We all have the ability and imagination, but we’re not always willing to make the effort. Love is one of the most difficult, most rewarding things. If you think of your relationship in terms of the law of response, if you want love, you Spring 2014

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taste of

gar de n s pot

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hether you’re having a causal get-together or want an easy supper after a busy day, savory chili and crispy cole slaw hit the spot. Emily Enright, General Manager of Dining Services, shares these recipes from the kitchen at Garden Spot Village.

WHAT’S COOKIN’

All recipes serve six.

Homemade Rice Pudding

Low-fat, Gluten-Free Turkey Chili Tri-Color Slaw

A CASUAL SATURDAY SUPPER FOR SIX Low-Fat, Gluten-Free Turkey Chili Packed with protein—and flavor. 2 lbs. ground turkey 1 tbsp. olive oil 1 medium sweet onion, diced 1 medium green bell pepper, seeded and diced 1 medium red bell pepper, seeded and diced 1 tbsp. minced garlic 2 15-oz. cans crushed tomatoes 1 c. water 1 15-oz. can pinto beans, drained but not rinsed 1 15-oz. can black beans, drained but not rinsed ¼ c. chili powder 2 tbsp. ground cumin Chipotle pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper, to taste Salt & pepper, to taste In a large soup pot, sauté the garlic, onion and turkey in olive oil. Break the turkey into fine pieces. Add remaining ingredients and simmer for one hour. Serve with glutenfree corn tortilla chips and Tri-Color Slaw.

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LOW-FAT, GLUTENFREE TURKEY CHILI


AT LEFT: TRI-COLOR SLAW AND HOMEMADE RICE PUDDING.

Tri-Color Slaw

Homemade Rice Pudding

A delicious side dish that’s a feast for the eyes.

A sweet way to end a meal.

/4 lb. green cabbage, chopped.

½ c. uncooked rice (not instant)

3

/4 lb. red cabbage, chopped

4 c. whole milk

1 medium carrot, shredded

4 eggs, separated

1 c. broccoli florets, cut into bite-sized pieces

½ c. and ¼ c. sugar

1 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped

¼ tsp. salt

¼ c. green onion, chopped fine

2 tsp. vanilla

½ tbsp. dried dill weed

½ c. raisins (optional)

For the dressing: ¼ c. apple cider vinegar

In the top of a large double boiler, heat milk to 165 degrees. Add rice and cook until tender, (for about 45 minutes).

½ c. sugar

Separate the eggs and set aside the whites.

3

1 c. mayonnaise

¼ c. milk 1 c. sour cream 1 tbsp. lemon juice Use a food processor to chop the cabbage. It is important to process each cabbage individually to avoid “color bleeding,” which will create a pink salad. After processing the cabbages, combine all slaw ingredients by hand. Combine the dressing ingredients and pour over the slaw mixture. Toss. Serve chilled.

To the yolks, add salt and the ½ cup of sugar. Beat well. Stir some of the hot rice/milk into the yolk mixture to temper the yolks. Next, combine both mixtures into the same double boiler and cook for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. If you are using raisins, add them now. Remove the mixture from the heat and add the vanilla. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites and ¼ cup of sugar until the egg whites are stiff. Gently fold the egg whites into the rice pudding mixture. Serve warm or chilled.

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team spotli ght

DEBORAH FAST: IT TAKES A VILLAGE WHEN MOST FOLKS WANT TO MAKE A CAREER CHANGE, THEY ASK THEMSELVES WHAT WORK THEY WANT TO DO. WHEN DEBORAH FAST WAS READY TO MAKE A TRANSITION, SHE INSTEAD ASKED HERSELF WHOM SHE WANTED TO WORK WITH.

“The answer that came to me clearly was ‘older adults’,” says Fast, who joined the Garden Spot Village team as Director of Volunteer Services in January 2012. Fast brings a world of experience— literally—to the job. A native of Canada, she spent four years as a volunteer in Kenya. She lived in Jordan, where she served as a Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) representative. As a buyer for Ten Thousand Villages, the global fair trade retailer that grew out of MCC, she worked with artisans in East Africa, South Africa, Bangladesh and Nepal. “I loved this work, which involved visiting the artisan groups in my regions, doing product development work with them, monitoring fair trade practices and planning purchases,” she says. She also helped plan product collections for Ten Thousand Villages stores and its e-commerce site. Eventually, she moved into marketing and became creative director. 14

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MAKING CONNECTIONS

Today, Fast manages and promotes Garden Spot Village’s volunteer programs, including the Gift Shop and the Share and Care thrift shop and special events. “It’s a fun way to bring together my retail and marketing background as well as the volunteer aspect. Like Ten Thousand Villages, these stores are mission driven, raising money for the Garden Spot Village Benevolent Fund,” she says. Perhaps the strongest manifestation of that connection is the Mountain View Vision and Design Group, a team of residents in the personal care community who are developing folded paper designs to inspire Ten Thousand Villages artisans. The team meets periodically to share product ideas with Melissa Hand, who holds Fast’s previous position as buyer. Ultimately, the program benefits women in Bangladesh who earn money by making stationery and other paper products.

CLOSER TO HOME

Fast loves coming to work and seeing the smiling faces of Villagers walking down the hallway. “This is a guaranteed part of every morning. That, along with the wonderful aromas coming from The Creamery, is a great way to start the day,” she says. These days, Fast spends most of her time in Akron with her husband, Menno Wiebe, whom she met while they were studying theology in college. They have two children. Her daughter, born in Kenya, is now a sophomore in college, and her son is a student at Ephrata High School. Fast still loves to travel, especially to northern Ontario. Her all-time favorite vacation was camping in Maine’s Acadia National Park, and her favorite country to visit was Turkey, with its fascinating history, gorgeous beaches, incredible food and unique culture. At home, she enjoys cooking, baking, entertaining and playing Settlers of Catan and other strategy and board games. She’s also involved with church and school activities as—you guessed it—a volunteer. CONTACT DEBORAH

dfast@gardenspotvillage.org or call 717-355-6204.

Fast loves coming to work and seeing the smiling faces of Villagers walking down the hallway.


DEBORAH FAST, DIRECTOR OF VOLUNTEER SERVICES

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calendar eve nt s

TO SEE & DO

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GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE & LANCASTER FAMILY YMCA KIDS MARATHON Kids run the last 1.2 miles of their 26.2-mile program on the campus of Garden Spot Village and finish down the marathon chute. For more information, visit www.gardenspotvillagemarathon.org/kids.php. For children ages 6–12.

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GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE MARATHON USA Track & Field-certified 26.2-mile marathon and half-marathon for runners and walkers. Visit www.gardenspotvillagemarathon.org for more information. For residents, guests and the public.

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MEET THE CANDIDATES Get to know the local candidates for office at this community forum. For residents and the public.

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BUSINESS EXPO Local businesses offer free samples, education seminars and more. For residents and future residents.

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LOOK & LEARN A luncheon to learn more about life at Garden Spot Village. Visit www.GSVLookandLearn.org to find out more and register. Seating is limited. For the public 55+.

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SATURDAY EVENING CONCERT The Clarions clarinet quartet plays favorites from light classics to pops and everything in between. For residents and the public.

MAY 02

SHRED IT DAY Dispose of documents and papers safely and securely. For residents and the public. GSV MARATHON

APRIL 01

HEALTH TALK Learn the latest news about staying well from an Ephrata Community Health physician. For residents and the public.

03

LANCASTER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Listen and learn when we travel to the Fulton Opera House to hear the Lancaster Symphony rehearse, with an informal question-and-answer session with the maestro and a guest artist. For residents.

08

VISIT THE PENTAGON Tour the Pentagon and take in its colorful displays and historic photographs of significant moments in military history on this bus trip to Washington, D.C. For residents.

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HEALTH TALK Find out what you should know about staying well from an Ephrata Community Health physician. For residents and the public.

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BLACK ROCK RETREAT Experience a Native American educational opportunity through a Lunch & Learn at this Christian retreat center. For residents.

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VILLAGE VOICES CONCERT Relax and enjoy a musical performance by a vocally talented group of men and women from Garden Spot Village. For residents.

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LADIES ELEGANT TEA Enjoy high tea and each other’s company. For residents and guests.

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PRIMARY ELECTION Garden Spot Village serves as the Earl Township polling location. For residents and the public.


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SIGHT & SOUND THEATRE Marvel at the story of Moses at this Christian theater experience. For residents.

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LOOK & LEARN A luncheon to learn more about life at Garden Spot Village. Visit www.GSVLookandLearn.org to find out more and register. Seating is limited. For the public 55+.

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CELEBRATION OF AGE Honor those who have joined the 90-plus Birthday Club. For residents.

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READING PHILLIES We’ll take you out to the ballgame to see the Fightin’ Phils take on the Trenton Thunder at Reading. For residents.

JUNE

more and register. Seating is limited. For the public 55+.

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LANCASTER BARNSTORMERS Join us for an afternoon of baseball when the Barnstormers play the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs at Lancaster. For residents.

JULY 01

HEALTH TALK Learn the latest news about staying well from an Ephrata Community Health physician. For residents and the public.

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ICE CREAM CARNIVAL A delicious event provides a sweet time to socialize. For residents, their families and future residents.

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HEALTH TALK Learn to stay well with the latest health information from an Ephrata Community Health physician. For residents and the public.

MEET THE CONGREGATIONS Popular speaker series provides a chance to get to know the history, beliefs and customs of local churches and congregations. Meets Monday evenings through August 25. For residents and the public.

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PEDAL TO PRESERVE Annual bicycle event to benefit the Lancaster Farmlands Trust begins and ends on campus. For residents, guests and the public. PEDDLER’S VILLAGE Bus excursion to a scenic Bucks County, Pa. shopping destination. For residents.

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OVERLY’S GROVE PARK PICNIC Enjoy delicious food and delightful entertainment at this covered-dish outing. For residents.

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GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE YARD SALE Annual community-wide sale offers bargains on household items, crafts, books and more. For residents, guests and the public.

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LOOK & LEARN A luncheon to learn more about life at Garden Spot Village. Visit www.GSVLookandLearn.org to find out more and register. Seating is limited. For the public 55+. LONGWOOD GARDENS Tour formal gardens, conservatories and fountains and take in a musical theater performance by the Brandywiners. For residents.

AUGUST 05

HEALTH TALK Find out what you need to know about staying well from an Ephrata Community Health physician. For residents and the public.

GRANDS & KIDS CAMP Award-winning intergenerational program offers a host of favorite activities to bring back memories and create new ones. For residents and grandchildren.

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16TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT Popular golf outing benefits the Garden Spot Village Benevolent Fund, which supports residents who need financial assistance. For residents, guests and the public.

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“LES MISERABLES” Join us when the Fulton Theatre presents this classic hit musical based on Victor Hugo’s story of lives and loves in 19th-century France. For residents.

TIMBERS DINNER THEATRE

Join us for dinner and an outdoor show at The Gretna Timbers in scenic Mount Gretna. For residents. VOLUNTEER PICNIC

Garden Spot Village gives back to those who give so much of themselves in service to others. For residents and volunteers. Schedule is subject to change. For current listings, visit www.gardenspotvillage.org/events or contact Resident Services at 717.355.6000.

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LOOK & LEARN A luncheon to learn more about life at Garden Spot Village. Visit www.GSVLookandLearn.org to find out

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simple skills and smiles

The Roots of Service at garden spot village

“I KNOW ONE THING: THE ONLY ONES AMONG YOU WHO WILL BE REALLY HAPPY ARE THOSE WHO HAVE SOUGHT AND FOUND HOW TO SERVE.”

—A LBERT SCHWEITZER, IN A SPEECH TO STUDENTS ON “THE MEANING OF IDEALS IN LIFE”, DEC. 3, 1935

I

f service is the secret to happiness, Garden Spot Villagers must be ecstatic. Some work patches of fertile soil and share their vegetable harvest with their neighbors. Others husk corn, slice peaches and hull strawberries so the whole community can enjoy the bounty of Lancaster County. Still others reach out to develop intentional relationships with individuals who are going through difficult times. Some mentor teens through local youth ministries or gather warm gloves and hats for students in need. Others help build or rebuild houses for families that have experienced natural disasters. “The acts of service that happen at Garden Spot Village are both large and small—and too numerous to begin to describe,” says Steve Lindsey, CEO. They range from public service at various levels to lending a hand in the laundry, from serving at a church camp in Honduras to writing a note of encouragement. 18

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“The value of service manifests itself in countless ways, but it all starts with a value for people, for community and for relationships— and that,” he says, “is what makes the culture at Garden Spot Village very special.”

“The acts of service that happen at Garden Spot Village are both large and small— and too numerous to begin to describe.”


CULTIVATING VALUES INTO ACTION

The culture of service at Garden Spot Village didn’t happen by accident. It sprang from the desire of the community and was nurtured intentionally. When Lindsey joined the leadership team in October 2001, the campus had just undergone a major expansion with some unexpected costs. In order to address any concerns, the team worked on ways to increase transparency and accountability, making sure that they were responding to residents’ needs. The theme of service came up at meetings with both staff and residents. “It seemed to tap into a deep-seated value that was held by many of our residents and emerged as a hallmark value of our community,” Lindsey says. When the community refined its mission statement and values in 2002, “service” was listed along with teamwork, excellence, stewardship and integrity as one of the core values that provide a framework for how the organization functions. Later, the team added “innovation.” Everything derives from a simple mission statement: “to enrich the lives of older adults as an expression of Christ’s love.” “Simply put, our goal is to create a sense of community where people can live lives that have meaning, purpose and value—a community where we show love to one another in practical ways as an extension of who we are and what we believe,” says Lindsey.

achieve. That’s not the case at Garden Spot Village, where most residents and team members value genuine and meaningful relationships. As a result, service happens spontaneously. “Service is just doing good things for other people,” Lindsey says. “It’s a value that can be easily learned, an attitude that can be adopted and a skill that can be honed by anyone. It has to do with putting our own ego, our own attitudes and our own issues aside and being vigilant for opportunities to do good for someone else. The fascinating part of this is that when we do that, good things happen for ourselves as well.” That observation—that doing good for others supports happiness—gives a deeper, richer meaning to the saying “service with a smile” at Garden Spot Village.

STEVE LINDSEY, CEO, WITH RESIDENTS SHIRLEY FULTON AND JOAN HAZELTON, WHO VOLUNTEER TO FOLD THE VILLAGE’S LINENS.

As Villagers continued to talk about service, he says, “residents began using their gifts and talents to benefit others on campus in new and unique ways. They began reaching out into the community, serving in the local schools, churches and non-profit organizations. Eventually this grew to the point that residents were making a difference in the lives of people they had never met, who lived in other parts of the country or around the world. This all grows out of a common desire to serve others in the name of Christ, to share God’s love in very practical ways with other people.” SIMPLY SHARING A GIFT

Management consultants have written volumes on service and hospitality. Some imply that “the gift of hospitality” is a rare thing—or one that’s difficult to

THE LEADERSHIP TEAM SERVES AT THE STAFF PICNIC, MAKING THE WHOLE TEAM CLOSER AND STRONGER.

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serving seniors

around the world “To enrich the lives of older adults as an expression of Christ’s love.” —Garden Spot Village mission statement

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True

to its mission, Garden Spot Village enriches the lives of those older adults who call its New Holland campus “home.” The organization also benefits many elders whom it will never meet—perhaps many more who haven’t even begun to think about aging—by sharing its knowledge and insights into person-centered care. From hosting educational visits for peer groups to helping shape policy, Garden Spot Village makes contributions to the senior services industry that have a positive impact on eldercare across the country and around the world. Garden Spot Village started a successful transition to the innovative personcentered household model of skilled care in 2005. In the years since, hundreds of peer organizations have visited the campus’s skilled care households to learn how to make that transition. Last year, visitors included representatives from several retirement communities. In anticipation of building a Skilled Care facility with eight households, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) sent its nursing home administrator to Garden Spot Village. She spent three days in the households, learning about culture change and person-centered care from team members and residents. OPENING DOORS TO CULTURE CHANGE

“More and more organizations across the country are moving to the household model. It is quickly becoming the standard for new construction, and many organizations are looking for ways to renovate their institutional nursing homes into the household model,” says Steve Lindsey, CEO at Garden Spot Village. The potential pitfall is that some may see the household model as merely a cosmetic change. In reality, making the household model work requires a culture change. If the organization continues to operate in an institutional manner, without becoming person-centered, the resulting disconnect can lead to problems. Garden Spot Village helps peer organizations understand the culture change that is necessary by inviting them to see the households in action. The visitors usually meet with members of the leadership team and then tour the households, with lots of opportunities to get answers to their questions. Most groups spend half a day or so. “We have encouraged guests to have a meal in the household, so that they get to see the household in operation and interact with the elders in the household at that time,” Lindsey says. Ideally, visitors can spend some time with their counterparts in similar job roles—for example, nurses can talk with nurses in the household, nursing assistants meet with other nursing assistants, and dietary staff can talk with a homemaker.

Garden Spot Village makes contributions to the senior services industry that have a positive impact on eldercare across the country and around the world.

“We are really open and honest in our sharing,” says Becky Weber, Nursing Home Administrator at Garden Spot Village. Team members talk freely with visitors about the challenges they faced, what they learned and what they would do differently—and the fact that they are still on the journey. They share contact information so visitors can continue the dialogue. SHARING INSIGHTS AND SHAPING STANDARDS

Garden Spot Village has hosted tours for Continuing Care Retirement Communities and nursing homes from across the United States and from several other countries, including Canada, Mexico, Great Britain, Ireland, China, Iceland, the Netherlands and Argentina. They learn about Garden Spot Village from architects, consultants or professional associations such as Action Pact, the Pennsylvania Culture Change Coalition or the

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Pioneer Network. They learn through word-of-mouth referrals from others who have visited Garden Spot Village, or they have heard Lindsey, Weber or other team members speak at state, regional or national conferences and have wanted to learn more.

“The participation of individuals with such a wide range of expertise helps make the document one that truly reflects a variety of clinical, administrative, engineering and design concerns and that is indeed based on interdisciplinary consensus.”

In addition to speaking and hosting tours, Garden Spot Village team members serve the industry in other ways. When the Facility Guidelines Institute (FGI) began the process of updating its guidelines for design and construction of healthcare facilities and nursing homes, LeadingAge— an association of not-for-profit senior services—asked Lindsey to serve as their representative. As such, he joined a multidisciplinary team of more than 200 experts from the federal, state and private sectors to develop the updated standards for 2014. “The participation of individuals with such a wide range of expertise helps make the document one that truly reflects a variety of clinical, administrative, engineering and design concerns and that is indeed based on interdisciplinary consensus,” Lindsey says. “I was fortunate to work on a subcommittee of very dedicated professionals who believe in the value of the household model and worked collaboratively to ensure it was held up as the new standard. Having operational experience in the household model was extremely beneficial as we developed the code language for the guidelines.” With this year’s edition of the Guidelines for Design and Construction, FGI will publish two standards— one for hospitals and outpatient facilities and one for residential healthcare and related support facilities. The FGI website notes that the rise of person-centered care drove the decision for a separate document because “the philosophical approach to residential care is 22

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fundamentally different.” The consensus is developed through a public process that includes three meetings of the full committee over a two-year period. FGI released the 2014 guidelines for publication early this year, and soon the committee will begin working on updates for 2018. As the industry moves forward with developing and refining services for the growing population of people ages 62 and better, the Garden Spot Village team remains ready to serve in whatever capacity they can to help enrich the lives of older adults. READ MORE

www.gardenspotvillage.org/healthcare/skilled-nursinghouseholds www.fgiguidelines.org www.leadingagepa.org

GARDEN SPOT’S INNOVATIVE AND PERSONCENTRIC CARE CONTRIBUTES TO THE DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF THE INDUSTRY WORLD-WIDE.


HAVE YOU SEEN THE ONEBEDROOM APARTMENTS AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE? Garden Spot Village is shattering the retirement community stereotypes with its unique and appealing lifestyle. Whereas the average move-in age for most retirement communities is 80plus, Baby Boomers are moving to Garden Spot Village in their late 50s and early 60s. Single men and women find the one-bedroom and studio apartments especially attractive. “It’s the perfect space

433 SOUTH KINZER AVENUE

for my lifestyle,” says Barbara Hoekstra, featured here in the living room of her one-bedroom apartment. If a “pick up and go” lifestyle appeals to you, whether it’s working, traveling or going out with friends, you can have it all at Garden Spot Village. There’s limited availability but a one-bedroom or studio apartment just might be yours before this summer. Discover all that Garden Spot Village has to offer! Call Megan Farber at 717.355.6290 today.

NEW HOLLAND, PA 17557 717.355.6000 Spring 2014 destination 23 GARDENSPOTVILLAGE.ORG


HOSPITALITY STARTS AT

HOME FOR MORE THAN 20 YEARS, BECKY WEBER AND HER HUSBAND HAVE GONE TO THE SAME VACATION SPOT.

“We go for the beautiful surroundings, the beach and the temperatures, but we go back because we are treated like family,” says Weber, Nursing Home Administrator at Garden Spot Village. “The first thing the staff says to us when we get there is ‘welcome home.’”

BECKY WEBER WITH RESIDENT ELEANOR CURLL. THE HOUSEHOLD MODEL IS JUST LIKE HOME.

That’s the feeling that Weber and her team strive to achieve for the people who live in the Skilled Care households at Garden Spot Village and Maple Farm. After all, it is home. PUTTING THE PERSON FIRST

Growing up, Weber sometimes worked in her family’s flower shop, where the emphasis was on taking care of the customer. When Garden Spot Village transitioned to the person-centered household model of skilled care, Weber and her team shifted away from an institutional model of care toward one that is driven by meeting residents’ needs and preferences. For example, medication schedules are now individualized, based on when the resident wakes up instead of on when the shift changes. Breakfast is made-toorder. Residents have “rights to the refrigerator” around the clock, and they can have parties and gatherings for friends and families.

to imagine—except that it’s just like home. Prospective residents and their families ask a lot of “can we” questions. “After we keep saying ‘yes,’ they stop asking and just start doing,” Weber says. A Garden Spot Village resident recently spent some time in a rehab hospital, which wouldn’t allow him to see his dog unless they went outside. That wouldn’t have been the case in the households.

The goal is to do whatever it takes to make people feel at home.

“Residents can move our furniture out of their rooms and move theirs in,” Weber says. “One thing we do is incorporate residents’ furniture and belongings throughout the household. It really helps people to feel that this space is truly their home.” The goal is to do whatever it takes to make people feel at home. For folks who have only ever observed the institutional model, the household model can be hard 24

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“It’s hard for me to believe that there is a good reason for not allowing a dog or a cat to come visit,” Weber says. “A half-hour visit with the dog would have been more therapeutic than a day of therapy. We have really tried to banish the word ‘no’ from our vocabulary.” ALL IN THE FAMILY

Throughout Garden Spot Village, hospitality comes from the heart, from relationships. In the households, team members are consistently assigned to the same households and spend quality time with residents and their families. They do projects together. Team members are even encouraged to bring their own family members to visit. Team members


and residents get together to decide how to celebrate birthdays and holidays and to talk about other issues that affect the household. As a result of all this, team members get to know residents—and their preferences—very well. The challenge then becomes to continue to offer choices and not rely on the routine.

“We have really tried to banish the word ‘no’ from our vocabulary.” For example, it can be tempting “to start making someone their poached eggs before they even get seated in the dining room, because that is what they order every day,” Weber says. She once educated a homemaker who

was removing the skin before she served her chicken, because skinless chicken is healthier. “Granted, I know that it is healthier, but it is not our choice to make for someone else,” Weber says. Each individual can enjoy the meal the way he or she prefers. It seems, then, that the secret to hospitality in the households starts with caring and a strong sense of connection, a dose of humility, a recognition of each person’s uniqueness and a commitment to meet each person’s needs, even as they change day by day. To make a home, the team members do more than provide care, cook meals or clean rooms. They share their lives with the people who live in the households at Garden Spot Village. READ MORE

www.gardenspotvillage.org/healthcare /skilled-nursing-households www.paculturechangecoalition.org www.leadingagepa.org

ALL AREAS OF GSV HEALTHCARE & ADULT DAY SERVICES ARE PERSONCENTERED.

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PICTURE YOURSELF 26

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EXPERIENCE GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE FOR YOURSELF. SCHEDULE YOUR FREE VISIT! INCLUDES: One night in our Hospitality Suite Breakfast in the Creamery Lunch or dinner, your choice

COME FOR THE LIFESTYLE— STAY FOR THE FRIENDS. WELCOME to Garden Spot Village...

Meet the people who live here

where life blooms™

Use all amenities

Thanks to its culture, landscape, and location, Lancaster County has become a haven for retired professionals, outdoor enthusiasts, and energetic adults of all ages who want a lifestyle full of social, cultural, recreational, educational, and spiritual opportunities. In the midst of this idyllic setting, Garden Spot Village has distinguished itself by providing world-class hospitality and resort-style amenities. Our faith-based heritage and commitment to service are the foundations of a truly welcoming community. Imagine life at its best.

GARDENSPOTVILLAGE.ORG 717.355.6000

Homes from $80,900 to mid $300s, $1,070 - $2,200 per month all inclusive.*

* Garden Spot Village, 433 S. Kinzer Avenue, New Holland, PA, 17557. 717.355.6000. A non-profit, fee-for-service community. Monthly fee includes repairs and maintenance of residence and furnished appliances, electric, heat, air conditioning, water, sewer, property taxes, garbage and trash disposal, lawn care, snow removal, security, use of common facilities, social, educational, cultural, and recreational events. The following are available for a fee: telephone service, cable tv, high speed internet, dining options, personal care, skilled nursing, memory support, adult day services, at home care services, housekeeping, laundry, and a hair and nail salon. Fees and services are subject to change. Minimum age requirement 62 for a single person or 62 and 55 for a couple.


VOLUNTEERS (AND FUTURE RESIDENTS) DARLENE AND ED SMITH IN THE VILLAGE STORE.

VOLUNTEERS

make the village a

SPECIAL PLACE

J

esus’ message that “it is more blessed to give than to receive” has fallen on fertile soil at Garden Spot Village. Volunteerism thrives. Neighbors willingly offer their time and talents to make a great community truly exceptional. “Volunteers add greatly to the richness of life at Garden Spot Village,” says Deborah Fast, Director of Volunteer Services. “I feel that volunteering is a way for residents to help make this community the kind of place in which they want to live: active, caring and reaching out beyond themselves.”

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From operating the Jolly Trolley and delivering the mail to reaching out to neighbors in need of friendship and support, volunteers enhance many, if not most, of the programs and services available at Garden Spot Village. “Some initiatives that are entirely staffed by volunteers include the Village Store, the Share & Care Shop, the Jolly Trolley and internal mail delivery,” says Fast. “The Garden Spot Village Marathon, the Fall Festival & Country Auction and the annual Business Expo could not happen without the participation of volunteers.”

stations along the course, hand out Mylar blankets to warm finishers as they cross the line and much more. The Fall Festival—and, ultimately, the Benevolent Fund—benefits from their support on the day of the event and behind the scenes.

Hundreds of volunteers help make the marathon happen. They park cars, register runners, staff water

Those activities are just a few of the more than 80 different types of volunteer opportunities to be found

“Volunteers contribute many hours to the preparation and set-up, as well as creating the quilts, wood items and many other pieces sold at the auction,” Fast says. OPPORTUNITIES AROUND EVERY CORNER


at Garden Spot Village. They are as diverse as sorting books in the library to bringing a pet to visit a Skilled Care household, from knitting for the prayer shawl ministry to helping out in the Welcome Center or leading tours on Look & Learn days to decorating the campus for Christmas. “Volunteers serve in virtually every area of Garden Spot Village. Many of the volunteer roles are a significant support to residents and also to staff,” says Fast. “As I meet with each new volunteer, we talk about what is of most interest and what would be a good match for them. Our goal is to do whatever we can to provide volunteer opportunities that suit their interests, availability and capacity.” Fast and two team members coordinate approximately 600 volunteers. About 500 are Villagers, and another 100 come from the surrounding community. “About half of all residents volunteer in some way,” says Fast. Volunteers gave more than 54,450 hours of time last year. Some of the opportunities arise from within the departments. For example, Dining Services requested volunteers to help anyone who might need assistance with carrying a tray to a table. Other ideas come from the residents themselves.

DEBORAH FAST AND HER TEAM MATCH VOLUNTEERS WITH THEIR INTERESTS.

“Volunteers serve in virtually every area of Garden Spot Village. Many of the volunteer roles are a significant support to residents and also to staff.” – DEBORAH FAST

“One couple who has a background with English as a Second Language came up with the idea of starting an ESL class open to Garden Spot Village staff and the local community,” Fast says. The class is now held weekly at Garden Spot Village. Many of the opportunities occur on a regular schedule; others, like the marathon, don’t require an ongoing commitment. Volunteers can also serve as “substitutes” when a regular volunteer calls off, so the program offers tremendous flexibility. For resident volunteers, there is no minimum time commitment. Volunteer opportunities

are advertised in the weekly news, the monthly Garden Variety newsletter and on the Volunteer Services bulletin board. SERVICE NEAR AND FAR

Without ever pressuring anyone, Garden Spot Village has created an environment where individuals can draw on their experience to serve others—or to learn new skills. In addition to a wide range of volunteer opportunities on campus, Garden Spot Village supports unique service opportunities, including mission trips to Honduras and participation in Mennonite Disaster Service projects. “Out-of-the-box” thinking—like organizing a Boston Marathon qualifier that brings thousands of people to campus—“has given many volunteers a whole new range of experience and enthusiasm,” Fast says.

The Making a Difference Committee, organized by the Life Enrichment Department, provides another outlet for those interested in service. In addition, the Community Church at Garden Spot Village, which includes Villagers and people from the surrounding neighborhoods, reaches out in service beyond the campus boundaries. In Mountain View Personal Care, a group of crafters has evolved into the Mountain View Vision & Design Team, which is volunteering with Ten Thousand Villages, the global fair trade retailer, to create designs for a group of artisans in Bangladesh. As a result, the women in Bangladesh can earn money to feed their families and the women in Spring 2014

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Mountain View can expand their horizons.

Christmas cards and other notes, and Volunteer Services and the leadership team make a point of thanking them in Village publications and at public events.

One of the women involved with the Vision & Design Team stopped in Fast’s office in January to share her concern about election-related violence in Bangladesh.

In truth, though, most volunteers don’t do it for the recognition. They do it for the inner satisfaction, for the opportunity to stay busy, to get out of the house, to make a difference. Fast tells of one volunteer who answered an ad for a volunteer position that put her in constant contact with others. The experience has given this normally reserved individual a chance to know people she might not have interacted with otherwise, and now she looks forward to seeing them every week. When asked why she volunteered for a job that was out of her comfort zone, she said, “I get up and pray to God to show me where there’s a need, and I respond.”

“I was so gratified to hear this,” Fast says. “I doubt she would have had any reason to pay attention to news from Bangladesh prior to her involvement with Ten Thousand Villages and the Bangladesh artisans. It’s a really wonderful outcome of all of this.”

That’s the spirit that moves people to serve at Garden Spot Village.

ON RIGHT: THE JOLLY TROLLEY IS OPERATED BY VOLUNTEERS

“I get up and pray to God to show me where there’s a need, and I respond.”

VOLUNTEERS ARE VALUED

Garden Spot Village is grateful for its volunteers. The community says “thank you” by holding an annual Volunteer Appreciation breakfast at Yoder’s each April and a Volunteer Picnic in August. It recently instituted “People’s Choice” awards, asking volunteers to nominate “Best Product Tester” at the Village Store, “Best Whistle Blower” in the Train Room, “Most Entertaining Driver” on the Jolly Trolley and many more. “It’s a fun and engaging way to involve everyone, and to provide recognition opportunity even for those who might not be able to serve a large number of hours,” Fast says. In addition, Volunteer Services organizes periodic small gatherings throughout the year to enable volunteers to socialize and share information. Volunteers receive 30

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LLOYD GROFF AND FRANK LIPPOLIS. BELOW: PERRY BUSCH VOLUNTEERS AT THE VILLAGE STORE.


“VOLUNTEERS ADD GREATLY TO THE RICHNESS OF LIFE AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE” Spring 2014

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Destination:

GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER SERVES REGIONAL TOURISM BOARD

how many times have you fallen so in love with a vacation destination that you wanted to move there? That happens more and more when folks visit Lancaster County, which ranks with Florida and Arizona as a major retirement ‘mecca’. In fact, about 55 percent of the people who choose to live at Garden Spot Village move here from out of the area. So perhaps it’s not surprising that Garden Spot Village serves the community at large by promoting regional tourism. ENCOURAGING VACATIONERS TO FEEL AT HOME

As Chief Marketing Officer at Garden Spot Village, Scott Miller extols the resort-like lifestyle available to those who choose to make a home in this exceptional community. With its rural landscape and easy access to Philadelphia, Baltimore and other urban centers, the Lancaster County location is part of the draw. As part of the job, Miller often finds himself plugging the attractions and amenities of Lancaster County. Garden Spot Village joined the Pennsylvania Dutch Convention & Visitors Bureau several years ago. When the call went out for board members, Miller expressed an interest. “I had been looking for boards to serve and thought this might be interesting and worthwhile for Garden Spot Village,” he says. After all, the Village and the tourism bureau share some similar goals. “We’re interested in people traveling to Lancaster County and we want to create enticing environments for people from out of the area.”

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For the past four years, Miller has served on the board of directors. The nomination requires signatures from 15 bureau members. As a member of the retirement industry, relatively new to the Convention & Visitors Bureau, Miller initially wondered if he had enough contacts in the tourism industry to obtain the necessary signatures. Then he realized that Garden Spot Village had already forged many connections with the area’s hospitality businesses, including The Inn at Leola Village and other bed-and-breakfasts and motels that offered lodging packages during the Garden Spot Village Marathon, which draws participants from across the United States and beyond. He got the signatures and has been on board ever since. “I’ve learned a lot about the tourism trade, which has been helpful in thinking about how Garden Spot Village SCOTT MILLER HAS SERVED ON THE TOURISM BUREAU’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR THE PAST FOUR YEARS.


can reach people who are traveling,” he says. Garden Spot Village is visible in the bureau’s map and visitors’ guide, website, brochures and at the visitors’ center. “It’s given me the opportunity to explore resources and opportunities that I wouldn’t have discovered any other way.”

the secrets of service from the perspective of a luxury hotel. Miller brings those lessons back to Garden Spot Village—where every day can feel like a dream vacation. READ MORE

www.padutchcountry.com/index.asp

Garden Spot Village—where every day can feel like a dream vacation.

LEARNING AND PROVIDING LEADERSHIP

Miller attends meetings for the board and the executive committee, as well as networking events. When the organization needed to hire a new president in 2012, he was asked to chair the search committee. “We found a fantastic president, Kathleen Frankford,” he says. Frankford has worked with American Music Theater, Hershey Entertainment & Resorts Company, Cumberland Valley Visitors Bureau and the Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts. In 2014 Miller begins his tenure as chairman, extending the depths of his service and broadening his horizons at the same time. Among the many new tasks in his new role is the opportunity to address the audience at the 700-member organization’s annual meeting. One of the initiatives on the group’s program for this year is formation of an advocacy team to meet with legislators in issues that impact tourism. In addition to his service to the Convention & Visitors Bureau, Miller is just completing a term with the Marketing and PR Society of Senior Housing and Service Professionals, where he was responsible for membership. He also supported a program featuring Dennis Snow, a former Walt Disney World manager and author of Lessons From the Mouse, which focuses on excellence in customer service. The year before, the group hosted representatives from the Ritz Carlton, learning

EVENTS LIKE PEDAL TO PRESERVE AND THE GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE MARATHON ATTRACT THOUSANDS OF VISITORS.

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Good NEIGHBORS Garden Spot Village serves the community through strong local partnerships

F

rom a cup of coffee at the café to a Saturday evening concert, from Sunday church services to an indoor swimming p ­ ool, you can find virtually any amenity or convenience you could want without ever setting foot beyond the boundaries of Garden Spot Village’s impeccably manicured 104-acre campus. The same is true for service opportunities. Yet the Village doesn’t exist in a vacuum. Strong local partnerships benefit Villagers as well as organizations and individuals in New Holland and beyond. “Over time, a warm relationship has developed between Garden Spot Village and the New Holland and Eastern Lancaster County community,” says Rep. Gordon Denlinger, who has represented the people of Pennsylvania’s 99th Legislative District—including New Holland—since 2003. “The depth to which the relationship has grown is a testimony to the goodwill of all of the individuals on both sides of the equation.” DRIVING BENEFITS TO THE COMMUNITY

“New Holland is blessed to have Garden Spot Village here as a part of our community,” says Geoff Class, President of New Holland Auto Group. Class and Garden Spot Village founder Dale Weaver served together on the board of the New Holland Recreation Center, which once met at Garden Spot Village. “I became impressed with how well it was run, how clean and neat it always was and with the caliber of the employees,” Class says. When his mother needed skilled care, he moved her from Philadelphia to Garden Spot Village. “They were very attentive to her needs, and somebody was always there with a cheerful attitude.” Today, when new residents move to Garden Spot Village, they receive a packet of “perks” that includes coupons for a free state inspection, free oil change, a rewards card and other benefits from New Holland Auto Group. It’s Class’s way of acknowledging not just the quality care his mother received, but also the benefits that Garden Spot Village has brought to local businesses like his. “New Holland is a small town. A retirement community is the best industry that could have moved in. There’s no smoke and no dirt. It’s like a housing development, but the school doesn’t have to get bigger, and the town doesn’t have to hire extra police,” Class says. “It’s a total plus for the area.”

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“A warm relationship has developed between Garden Spot Village and the New Holland and Eastern Lancaster County community.” LEARNING FOR LIFE

Although the school didn’t have to grow, the ELANCO School District and Garden Spot Village enjoy a mutually beneficial relationship, with many connections great and small. For example, the Making A Difference Committee collects items such as backpacks and warm winter accessories for students in need. Villagers volunteer to tutor students who need academic support. Others participate in a unique living history program, bringing students a first-


“Our students benefit from this practical, hard-core knowledge sharing,” says Robert Hollister, District Superintendent. What’s more, the support comes at no cost to the district—a great value in a time when school budgets statewide are stretched tight.

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED

hand perspective on events ranging from World War II and Vietnam to racial segregation in the 1950s and ‘60s and the assassination of John F. Kennedy. One Villager is a coach for the baseball team.

MARK WENGER

BOB HOLLISTER

GEOFF CLASS

GORDON DENLINGER

In his capacity as Superintendent, Hollister is involved with Cross Connection Ministries and the Elanco Social Services Network, both of which also benefit from ties with Garden Spot Village and its residents. “Those two organizations benefit our kids as well, so Garden Spot Village is contributing again,” he says. In addition, he notes that Garden Spot Village contributes significant tax revenue, which supports the school system. The Villagers’ service to the schools “gives the students a fuller and enriched understanding of what community should be—and is,” says Hollister. “The students look at the older generation differently because of these interactions.” Going forward, Hollister envisions more ties between the school district and Garden Spot Village. A career day is one possibility. “As we develop new programs, we expect to reach out more to Garden Spot Village for expertise,” Hollister says. “They do bring in a broader world perspective to this local community.”

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED

“Another huge way that Garden Spot Village supports us is through our special education program,” says Hollister. Students in the program serve as interns in the Village. “The kids really benefit, and I assume the residents get a lot out of seeing special needs kids become meaningfully employed.”

LEADING THE WAY

Students aren’t the only ones who benefit from Villagers’ knowledge and experience. “With backgrounds in business, non-profit organizations, government entities and a wide range of other life experiences, Villagers provide a ready resource when I need to reach out and ask questions,” says Rep. Denlinger, who is now running for State Senate. “I can call or contact them and get insight as I consider policy decisions that need to be made at the state level.”

“As we develop new programs, we expect to reach out more to Garden Spot Village for expertise.”

Denlinger is a familiar face at Garden Spot Village. His mother has lived here 16 years, and his mother-in-law has lived here for 10 years. He’s in the Village virtually every week in one capacity or another. He has made many friends here and has seen the value of service in action, as residents give their time to make the Eastern Lancaster Community richer and more vibrant.

“You’ll find Garden Spot Village residents plugged into most, if not all, of the Spring 2014

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churches and charitable organizations in the ELANCO area. Some are connected to local government and some have assisted me with state-level government issues,” Denlinger says. “The value of community is that we all contribute when and where we can. The residents at Garden Spot Village have a bit more time and a wealth of life experience to give back to this local community—and they do so in a very unselfish manner, in so many ways I can’t begin to name them all.” One of the ways that Denlinger gives back is by presenting awards at the Garden Spot Village Marathon. A runner himself, he is happy to join residents and community volunteers in supporting the marathon.

“The residents at Garden Spot Village have a bit more time and a wealth of life experience to give back to this local community—and they do so in a very unselfish manner, in so many ways I can’t begin to name them all.”

“The Marathon has gained national prominence as a first-tier running event. It’s well managed, and it’s one of the most scenic runs in America,” says the Lancaster County native. “As I’m giving awards, I’m always amazed at how many go to runners from other parts of the world. That indicates the standing of the Garden Spot Village Marathon in the global running community. Garden Spot Village residents are the reason that the race has become so successful.”

provide stimulating learning and discussion around important topics. One of the most popular programs was last year’s “The Middle East: Land of Promise, Land of Strife.” Taught by Elias George, a Palestinian by birth, and David Miron, who was born Jewish, the thought-provoking program drew participants from throughout the community. This spring, “Faith in the Crucible of Conflict,” taught by Ken Sensenig, of Mennonite Central Committee East Coast (MCC), will focus on MCC work around the world.

“What we do at Garden Spot Village is very different from the classes we offer at Eastern Mennonite University. For us it’s a community service as well,” says Wenger. By collaborating and extending its hospitality, Garden Spot Village serves partners such as EMU, enhances their ability to serve and, ultimately enriches the community at large. READ MORE

newhollandauto.com SERVING THE SPIRIT

elanco.org

Continuing education is another means of enriching the community. Garden Spot Village partners with institutions of higher learning to offer a variety of enrichment courses on the Garden Spot Village campus. Since 2009 Eastern Mennonite University at Lancaster (EMU) has offered six-session educational programs in the spring and fall. Topics have included “The Case for Christian Pacifism and Peacebuilding”, “World Religions” and “Discipleship: Following Christ Here and Around the World.”

gordondenlinger.com/index.html

The partnership between EMU and Garden Spot Village grew out of a relationship between Rev. Dr. Mark Wenger, Director of Pastoral Studies at EMU, and Chet Yoder, Director of Pastoral Services at Garden Spot Village. Yoder suggested that they collaborate on educational opportunities exploring Anabaptist themes. “The process grew from there. Chet drew in two local Mennonite congregations, Weaverland and Bowman’s Hill,” says Wenger. The first course, taught by John A. Lapp, examined 20th-century American evangelicalism. The programs give the organizers an opportunity to

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emu.edu/lancaster/

GORDON DENLINGER WITH JOHN WALLACE


Janie Hutton never stops moving. Since moving to GSV, if she’s not running the marathon, she’s helping organize it, leading teams to Honduras, or traveling the world with her husband, Paul. It’s impossible to catch her standing still. JOIN US FOR THE 2014 GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE MARATHON April 12, 2014 | Registration now open! gardenspotvillagemarathon.org

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7 Ways to Make a Better World

Garden Spot Village has a clearly focused mission: To enrich the lives of older adults as an expression of Christ’s love. One of the many ways the community carries out that mission is by creating an environment in which Villagers can live with purpose. Many residents and team members choose to do this by serving others, enriching their lives and making the world a better place in many, many ways.

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1.

MAKE A DIFFERENCE: Inspired by the book Changing the Face of Hunger by former U.S. Congressman Tony Hall, the Garden Spot Village Making-A-Difference committee looks for ways to make a positive impact far beyond campus boundaries. Since the group started in 2009, it has collected items of warm winter clothing, backpacks and school supplies for students in need; assembled and distributed lunches through the New Holland Summer Lunch program; and collected personal care items for the Teen Challenge Christmas Bag Project, which helps young men struggling with addiction. Group members also gathered more than a ton of glossy magazines to support the Ronald McDonald House recycling project, stocked shelves at the New Holland Food Bank, collected baby clothing and supplies for the Susquehanna Pregnancy Center, and served lunch at Water Street Ministries.

“The Making-A-Difference opportunities strike at the heart and make us aware of the needs right around us,” said Colleen Musselman, Director of Life Enrichment. Musselman read Hall’s book in 2008 and was moved to make a difference. She formed a planning committee with a team of residents who identify projects to pursue.

2.

CARE AND CONNECT: Since 2004, dozens of Villagers have volunteered to take part in Caring Connections, providing emotional and spiritual support for individuals who are facing difficult challenges, such as the loss of a loved one or a serious illness. Hundreds of residents have benefitted from their intentional visits.

3.

BUILD SOMETHING: From New Holland, Villagers have reached out to Long Island, the Gulf Coast and even Honduras to help out with building projects. Through the Mennonite Disaster Service (MDS) Partnership Home Program (PHP), residents, staff, and other Eastern Lancaster County community members have joined together to build houses for Gulf Coast families left homeless by hurricanes or tornadoes. They build the wall panels in the parking lot at Garden Spot Village, then truck them to the Gulf, where teams of volunteers complete the homes over a period of two or three months. After Superstorm Sandy, many Villagers got in a van each week throughout the summer and rode to Far Rockaway, N.Y., to help repair a storm-damaged home. And for several summers, groups from Garden Spot Village have traveled to Honduras, with Missions Door, to help build a church camp in the mountains outside Tegucigalpa.

The number and length of visits depends on what the recipient needs. Some volunteers spend an hour or two a week, others more. Volunteers have visited residents in Laurel View memory support, knitted with women in Mountain View Personal Care, and read to residents with visual challenges. "Sometimes it's bringing the word of God to them, sometimes it's just listening and letting them know someone cares," says Carol Wendel, the dynamic resident volunteer who coordinates the program and matches volunteers with residents who have requested visits. Caring Connections volunteers receive training—and get the satisfaction that comes from knowing that they are brightening someone’s day.

VOLUNTEERS TRAVEL TO WHERE THEY’RE NEEDED, HELPING REBUILD AREAS HURT BY DISASTERS.

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4.

SHARE AND SHOP: Several dozen volunteers operate the Share and Care Shop on the lower level of the Village Square. Established in 2002, the Share and Care Shop had raised more than $313,000 as of the end of 2013 to benefit the Garden Spot Village Benevolent Fund. The shop carries housewares, dishes and serveware, decorative items and furniture donated by Villagers and members of the surrounding community. The volunteers restore the items for resale and staff the shop.

“It’s a win-win recycling project that provides a source of affordable household items and raises funds for a worthy cause,” says Deborah Fast, Director of Volunteer Services.

5.

MAKE IT SPECIAL: Special events at Garden Spot Village—the Garden Spot Village Marathon, the Fall Festival & Country Auction, Pedal to Preserve and so many others—could not be the successes that they are without the generous support and service of all the Villagers who help make them happen. For example, hundreds of residents, staff and members of the surrounding community volunteer for the Garden Spot Village Marathon. They serve on planning committees, register runners, park thousands of cars, staff water stations along the route, hand out blankets and medals to the finishers and more. Community organizations—fire, police and emergency response teams—also make a major contribution toward a fun, safe event that runs smoothly.

6.

BRIDGE THE GENERATIONS: One of the highlights of this year’s Garden Spot Village Marathon is the first annual Lancaster Family YMCA Kids Marathon to promote healthy lifestyles for kids ages 6 to 12. This year, the YMCA and Garden Spot Village are partnering with Cure.org to encourage young participants to reach out and support children around the world who can’t walk. The event is just one of many intergenerational initiatives that give Villagers an opportunity to bridge the so-called “generation gap.” Residents also volunteer to mentor young people through Cross Connection Ministries, tutor at area schools and participate in living history programs at Garden Spot High School. They make the Fall Festival & Country Auction kid-friendly, with face painting, radio-controlled airplanes and other fun activities and, at Christmastime, they open the doors to the Train Room to share a magical world with children of all ages.

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BILL ASHLEY, GSV RESIDENT

The Kids Marathon is just one of many intergenerational initiatives that give Villagers an opportunity to bridge the so-called “generation gap.”


7.

GIVE GENEROUSLY: For residents of Garden Spot Village, chores like lawn care, snow shoveling and home maintenance are taken care of. With a variety of dining venues, meal preparation and cleanup are optional. That leaves plenty of time for those who want to take advantage of shortterm or long-term volunteer opportunities. Even with plenty of time, however, some prefer to make a difference in a different way. They donate to food, clothing and fund drives organized by the Making A Difference Committee, The Community Church and others. They donate items to the library or the Share and Care Shop, or they give to the Garden Spot Village Benevolent Fund in many ways.

These are just a few of the many ways that the people at Garden Spot Village are helping to make a better world. Now that

VOLUNTEERS MAKE SPECIAL EVENTS AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE—LIKE PEDAL TO PRESERVE— A SUCCESS.

you know some of the opportunities, how will you make an impact?

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Reaching Out Touching Lives Building Community SOMETIMES,

what seem like small things— things we might take for granted—make the biggest impact. A smile… A game of chess… A shared meal… Someone to listen… Through their selfless service, the people of Garden Spot Village help Cross Connection Ministries, ELANCO Social Services Network (ESSN), churches and other organizations enrich the lives of others. It is part of the culture at Garden Spot Village and a way of life throughout Lancaster County. “This community is blessed with people who really do care,” says Don Ware, one of several Garden Spot Village residents who volunteers in the community. “I’m excited about working with Cross Connection and ESSN. The leaders that these two organizations put in place are special people.” “It comes from a heart of love and wanting to serve a great God,” says Sharon Smeltz, a medical technician and

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resident attendant in the Mountain View Personal Care community who volunteers at Cross Connection. “I think the Christian atmosphere at Garden Spot Village promotes service. When you see other people doing things, it encourages you,” says Duane Tice, a resident and community volunteer who gives his time in response to Jesus’ love. “He loves me and wants me to love and serve those He loves.” REACHING FOR RELATIONSHIPS

Tice has volunteered with Cross Connection for two years. He mentors a young man, now 15, whose grandmother wanted him to have a positive male influence in his life. Over the past two years, Tice and his mentee visited Penn’s Cave, Cabela’s, the Kutztown Fair and the Threshermen’s Reunion, an agriculture museum in nearby Kinzers. They’ve gone to movies and played games.


“It is important for people of all ages to come together to see a healthier and more well-rounded community. Volunteers from Garden Spot Village are a vital and essential piece of our ministry.” “Sometimes we just go out to eat and talk a little bit,” says Tice. “I think I’ve been successful in getting him to read more. I’ve steered him towards books with a good message.” Don Ware is also mentoring a teenager, a 13-year-old, through Cross Connection. “I really enjoy being with him. He’s a pretty sharp kid. He can beat me in chess,” Ware says. Ware tries to expose his mentee to new things and give him someone to talk to. “Hopefully you make a positive difference in people’s lives, especially when you see so much potential.” Ware learned about Cross Connection when he and his wife, Ruthann, attended a fundraiser at Shady Maple. He grew up in Southwest Philadelphia and knew the dangers of hanging out on the streets. Impressed by the organization and what it was doing for the ministry and for the community, Ware decided to get involved. He also helps with Cross Connection Junior, an afterschool program for third- to fifth-graders at the Cross Connection Youth Center. Ware sets out food and cleans up; other volunteers are available to play games, help kids with their homework, do crafts or read a story. “We just give them the space to interact with us, letting them voice what they want to voice,” says Sharon Smeltz, who volunteers at the Youth Center with Cross Connection Junior and with older teens. She and her

husband have also housed troubled teenagers. Often, the volunteers are role models just by being present. “You don’t have to be somebody special,” Smeltz says. “You just have to be.” MANY WAYS AND MANY ‘WHYS’

“It is important for people of all ages to come together to see a healthier and more well-rounded community,” says Meredith Dahl, Executive Director at Cross Connection Ministries in New Holland. “Volunteers from Garden Spot Village are a vital and essential piece of our ministry. They are able to build relationships with people in the community and make an impact for eternity. Without their help in our programs, we would not be able to grow or successfully see students and families be supported.” Cross Connection is just one of the worthy organizations that is getting help from Villagers. Ware has also spent time developing database applications to help ESSN track its contacts and clients, and he serves on a committee that is trying to understand how ESSN can best help those in need of housing. It all feels like the right thing to do. “To get kids off the street and give them a place to go, to help people with their needs, to help the community… it answers the call of Christ,” Ware says. Smeltz feels grateful to be a part of what goes on at Cross Connection. “Through these experiences, you get blessed and you bless somebody else—and you’re growing.” For Tice, it’s a matter of paying it forward. When he and his wife, Sharry, were first married, the next-door neighbors often helped them out. “When I asked him, ‘How do I repay you?’ he said, ‘You don’t. You do it for somebody else,’” Tice says. Tice does bookkeeping for ESSN and mentors an adult with medical and cognitive challenges. He made several trips to Far Rockaway, N.Y., to help rebuild a house damaged by Hurricane Sandy, and he has even traveled to Honduras to help build a church camp. On campus, he volunteers with Caring Connections. “There’s a feeling of satisfaction, but that’s not why you do it,” he says. “You hope to make a difference in somebody’s life just by pointing in the right direction. God can intervene miraculously, but mostly He works through people.” God is clearly working through the people at Garden Spot Village. READ MORE

newhollandcross.org elancossn.org

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FROM OUR FAMILY TO YOURS

John Backof, D.D.S., Melissa Della Croce, D.M.D., & Staff

JOHN S. BACKOF, D.D.S. MELISSA DELLA CROCE, D.M.D. Proudly serving Garden Spot Village We value your trust in us, and strive to provide you with excellent care & service! 44 WEST destination 2014 | NEW HOLLAND, PA 17557 | 717.354.6471 | BACKOFDENTAL.COM 119 MAINSpring STREET


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“I began coming to Beltone in Lancaster in 1996. They gave me a wonderful examination and my hearing aids are great! I could hear the birds again! It was a whole new world. Since then, they have become like family. They are always willing to help no matter what. If I need something, they fit me into their schedule. The service is fantastic. I can’t say enough about them.” Nancy from Millersville

Visit us at Garden Spot Village 2nd THURSDAY of every month 9:30-12 Noon

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Breathe easy. Conestoga Pulmonary & Sleep Medicine is at Garden Spot Village.

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Let our family move the Center for Health at Garden your family with the Spot Village in New Holland. expertise of Dr. Scott Silverstein is available The Perfect Plan™ s to see patients suffering from relocation services. asthma, COPD, sleep disorders & other pulmonary conditions.

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Heart Specialists of Lancaster County is now at Garden Spot Village. Our friendly health care team of Frank Corbally, D.O. and Susan Hite, CRNP is now seeing patients at the Center for Health at Garden Spot Village.

New patients are always welcome! Please call us at 71 7-354-6676 Brandywine Financial Management (BFM) delivers personal and to schedule your appointment. comprehensive financial services in the areas of money

management, financial planning, estate planning and taxes. For more than 20 years they have helped clients achieve their financial goals by taking the initiative to develop, implement and monitor their financial plans. In addition, BFM specializes in the analysis of the many financial options offered by retirement communities. They help older adults make the tough choices associated with transition and they help them understand what they can afford. Through independent research, custom portfolio 168 Toddy Drive • East Earl PA • 17519 Center for Health at Garden Spot Village management, tax planning, and regular reviews, BFM adds the www.trailsideexpress.com 435 S. Kinzer Rd., New Holland • www.hslcares.com value needed for clients to make financial decisions.

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where all are

welcome The Community Church at Garden Spot Village weekly services

Sundays, 10 am

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LOOK & L E A R N

ELANCO

Social Services Network PROVIDING HOPE AND ASSISTANCE FOR ALL WHO SEEK IT WITHIN THE ELANCO COMMUNITY.

AS PEOPLE OF FAITH, we strive to meet the humanitarian needs around us by providing a coordinated endeavor so that all of the available church, business, civic and educational resources will be made known and accessible to those in need, assisting in both the short and long term. WE ARE WORKING to prevent hunger, help underpriveleged children, and promote strong values and community bonds. JOIN OUR MISSION: Contact us at 717.354.ESSN or email ElancoSSN@hotmail.com

give the gift of

CON FID E NCE

April 22, May 22, June 26, & July 22 Join our resident tour guides for lunch and learn firsthand about the welcoming way of life at Garden Spot Village.Visit GSVLookandLearn.org to find out more and to register. Seating is limited. For the public 55+. GSVLookAndLearn.org 717.355.6500

Help us achieve our mission of inspiring girls to be joyful, healthy and confident. Give to Girls on the Run at http://gotrlancaster.org/sponsorship.

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The Expert Care You Deserve in Your Own Backyard.

Visit our office inside Garden Spot Village

At Internal Medicine Specialists of Lancaster County, we are ready to help you take control of your health. Our providers will care for you in the office or nursing home settings. We now also offer in-home medical visits to established patients who have difficulty getting to the doctor’s office.

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New Patients Welcome! Our New Holland office is conveniently located in the Center for Health at

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destination SpringSpring 2013 54 destination

2014

Destination Garden Spot Village - Spring/Summer 2014  
Destination Garden Spot Village - Spring/Summer 2014