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SPRING 2015

DESTINATION Where life blooms â„¢

an i n n ova t i o n story

GENESIS Page 38

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letter from the e d i t o r I’M PRETTY PSYCHED ABOUT THIS ISSUE. The themes for Destination:

Garden Spot Village have been following our mission, “To enrich the lives of older adults as an expression of Christ’s love,” and our values: Teamwork, Excellence, Service, Stewardship and, now, Innovation.

WATCH THE VIDEO!

Scan the above QR code to watch an exclusive video from the Editor. Once you’re there, feel free to peruse other great content on the Garden Spot Village channel.

“From absolutely nothing, an intentional series of creative events put things in motion that have sustained the galaxies, Earth, and humankind for ages.”

As we were discussing how to represent innovation on the cover, we kicked around “the usual suspects”—light bulbs, gears, out-of-the-box images—but for us, innovation has become much more than cliché. We wanted something different, unique… That led us to talk about the most amazing innovation story ever told: Genesis 1. From absolutely nothing, an intentional series of creative events put things in motion that have sustained the galaxies, Earth, and humankind for ages. We added innovation to our core values several years ago. We did it for two reasons: first, because others kept telling us we’re innovative and, second, because we believe innovation is critical to the future of Garden Spot Village and we don’t want to lose sight of it in the demands of the day-to-day. More recently, we included “Make Innovation Core” in our five-year strategic initiatives. We want to infuse it into every employee’s thinking. We want to make it an integral part of the fabric of the Garden Spot culture and our service offerings. That’s because consumer expectations are changing at an ever-increasing rate, and we believe it’s important to stay ahead of the curve. For example, many communities think of themselves as “senior communities” for old people. Not Garden Spot Village! We see ourselves as a place for people to live, engage, and explore new opportunities regardless of age. It’s why Baby Boomers find the lifestyle attractive. When planning this issue of Destination, we asked ourselves, “If innovation is our theme for this issue, can we do something innovative with it?” So we made it interactive by incorporating QR codes that you can scan with your smart phone or tablet, provided you have a scanning app on your mobile device. The codes link to short videos. We thought it might be kind of fun. So turn the pages, discover some cool stuff, check out the envisioned future, and decide for yourself how innovative you think Garden Spot Village might be. We recognize that making innovation core, at the employee level, is a pretty big goal. Where do you go to get the inspiration for something of that scale? It’s gotta be more than just lightbulbs… Come to think of it, the source of all inspiration is probably a good place to start. We find that Genesis is an amazing source of creative inspiration. Enthusiastically,

SCOTT MILLER Editor & Chief Marketing Officer 717.355.6000

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We welcome your feedback. Please write to us and let us know what you think about Destination Garden Spot Village. If you’ve had a chance to visit the Garden Spot Village campus, please tell us about it. We want to hear from you! E-MAIL:

CathieCush@comcast.net POST:

Scott Miller, Editor Destination: Garden Spot Village 433 South Kinzer Avenue New Holland, PA 17557 FACEBOOK:

Log in, search “Garden Spot Village” and join in the conversation. Or follow us on twitter @gsvcommunities.

table of c o n t e n t s departments

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TEAM SPOTLIGHT

10 INNOVATIVE MARKETING

Steve Muller, Chief Operating Officer

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SOCIALLY SPEAKING

Meet the Garden Spot Village Woodshop

18 CHARTING A COURSE FOR THE FUTURE

ONLINE: gardenspotvillage.org TELEPHONE: 717.355.6000

Please send address changes to our move-in coordinator Caren Creek at CCreek@gardenspotvillage.org Photography by Jeremy Hess Photography Issue No. 12 Published biannually

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WHAT’S AVAILABLE

Garden Spot Village Is Growing

14 MEET YOUR NEIGHBORS

Ed and Darlene Smith

16 COMMUNITY HIGHLIGHT

The Richmond House Bed & Breakfast

28 GIVING BACK

The Lancaster Best Kept Secrets Tour

54 CHEF’S DELIGHT Grilled Fish Tacos

with Mango Slaw

56 EVENTS CALENDAR

Engaging Things to See and Do

Getting to Know Garden Spot Village

Inside Our Strategic Process

24 NEXT GENERATION INNOVATION

Kids Running to Help Kids Walk

31 A BURNING DESIRE TO VOLUNTEER

A Resident is Recognized for 58 Years of Service

32 WHAT’S NEW ON MAINSTREET

Food like Never Before

36 A GREENHOUSE FOR GARDEN SPOT

Hydroponics Come to the Campus

38 5 FACETS OF INNOVATION

Destination Talks with GSV’s Most Innovative Professional Partners

44 CREATING PLACE

Warm Spaces that Invite People to Linger and Socialize Spring 2015

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Steve Muller: Bringing It All Together 4

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Steve Muller, chief operating officer at Garden Spot Village


eam

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team s po t l i g h t r

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ay e

It’s quicker to explain Steve Muller’s

“It’s so simple and yet, when you think about it, do it, it’s so profound,” he says. “That was intriguing to me. There’s real value in that.”

life enrichment, and wellness.

He’s excited by the many innovations he sees here, from the person-centered skilled nursing households to the transformation of “a standard traditional cafeteria into The Harvest Table, a classy restaurant setting with tremendous food,” to the way Garden Spot Village is landscaped in order to present a consistent palette even though the campus was developed in several phases. He’s excited that Refresh: Coffee, Gifts, Essentials serves the full line of Starbucks specialty drinks. “That’s a rarity,” he says. “You have to go to Lancaster or Ephrata to get to the next closest Starbucks.”

His job, he says, is to help them succeed. He sees himself as a quarterback, “bringing people together, because they’re making the play, not me. The departments are the experts. They make it happen.”

He encourages team members to continue to innovate by being open to the ideas they haven’t thought of yet. “Some days you’re going to be the one with the great ideas, and you need to share that.”

FOLLOWING A MULTI-FACETED PATH

WORKING FOR FUN

Raised in Quakertown, Muller studied civil engineering at Penn State, where he also played tenor sax and was in a doo-wop group called The Dreamers. After graduating, he worked in Pennsylvania, Houston, and Baton Rouge before landing in Lancaster in 1997. Although he likes numbers and the engineering thought process, he says, “I’ve always been more of a ‘people person.’” Prompted by his faith, he enrolled in Lancaster Bible College and earned a master’s degree in ministry with a leadership emphasis in 2005. He continued to work in engineering, construction, and consulting, including work with numerous non-profits. He also developed a strong network within the local business community.

When Muller’s not at Garden Spot Village, he enjoys camping and hiking with his wife and four children. Or you might find them at the Saturday market in Lititz. “We have a hobby business—a kettle corn business. We do it as a family,” he says. “We have job descriptions, and we try to keep metrics like watching waste and yield, how much popcorn gets bagged out of the raw ingredients.” The kids learn to make change and get a sense of who they are. “Our four-year-old is the crowd pleaser. She’s part of the crew,” he says. His younger son “gets to be the kettle tender because he doesn’t like to work the counter.”

role by what his responsibilities don’t include. “I don’t do human resources, finance, development, marketing or nursing,” says Muller, who joined the Garden Spot Village leadership team in December. As chief operating officer, he works with every other team in the organization: dining services, facilities services, housekeeping, campus services, Garden Spot Village at Home, on-campus adult day services, volunteer services,

“I’m always looking for connections and wondering how I can help people,” Muller says. He was attracted to Garden Spot Village because of its great reputation in the business community and for the opportunity to “keep all those balls in the air and help move the organization forward.” And he was drawn to the mission: To enrich the lives of older adults as an expression of Christ’s love.

“I’m always looking for connections and wondering how I can help people.”

“The kettle corn operation is fun,” he says, and “I think it’s valuable for everybody to work retail and food service.” It also gives the family a chance to “try something totally different that we can do together.” It’s about bridging the generations and being open to new ideas and experiences. Kind of like Garden Spot Village. Contact Steve Muller: smuller@gardenspotvillage.org or call 717.355.6052.

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socially s pe a k i n g

Meet the Garden Spot Village Woodshop Soon after John Dolan moved to Garden Spot Village two years ago, he found a home. His first week here, he discovered the Woodshop, paid his dues, and joined. It was like making 35 instant new good friends,” says Dolan, who will serve as the group’s chairman this year. “You can spend a couple hours down there and only get 15 minutes of work done, because you’re having so much fun with friends telling jokes and laughing.” Dolan spent most of his career as a dentist, but he had worked as a carpenter during some summers and did woodworking as a hobby for 10 years. Recent projects have included an acorn-shaped birdhouse for the Birdhouse Show & Silent Auction and a reproduction of a Shaker low-back chair with a rushed seat for the Fall Festival & Country Auction. Woodshop members generously contribute their time and talents to make those annual fundraisers successful. In fact, their handiwork is visible throughout Garden Spot Village. “Look at the oak work around the conservatory doors,” says Bill Ashley, who served as chairman last year. From the welcome center to the conference room table, display cases and shelving, to the signs around campus, the Woodshop members have had a hand in it. They spruce up items for the Share & Care Shop and repair items for residents. Every other year, they hold a cardboard boat regatta. “That’s a lot of fun. Some are absolutely 6

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extravagant,” Ashley says. “When the staff has Take Your Child to Work Day, we set up a project in the Woodshop, so the kids can build something like a birdhouse or a game. We do the same for the Grands & Kids Camp.” Woodshop members have also played a key role in mission projects in Honduras and Mennonite Disaster Service projects on and off the Garden Spot Village campus. THE BEST YEAR $35 CAN BUY

The Woodshop has about 75 dues-paying members, about half of whom are very active. It includes a small group of women who do outstanding decorative work. The annual $35 dues goes toward lumber, screws and nails, hardware, glue, sandpaper, and small hand-held electric tools that need to be replaced. The shop is fully stocked with top-of-the-line power tools and hand tools, much of it donated by members, as well as a supply of plywood and different hardwoods. Local lumberyards and cabinet shops often donate their remnants. “I’ve been to other communities that have shops, and ours is by far the most elaborate. We’re very fortunate,” says Dolan. “Over the last 15 years, we have developed almost a commercial-type shop. In the beginning it was kind of a home workshop,” says Bill George, who has been a member throughout. The Woodshop has expanded to fill three rooms, including one dedicated to painting and refinishing. Woodshop dues also include the combination to the lock, so members can work on projects when the spirit moves them—as long as they don’t run machinery on Sundays. “My wife used to say, ‘Why don’t you take a cot?’” says George, who spends a lot of time in the shop. “The Woodshop is what brought me here. The last thing the mover put on the van when I moved here was my workbench. I put it in the Woodshop.” George has enjoyed woodworking as a hobby since he was 14, and spent most of his life in the construction industry, working his way from carpenter to construction manager. But experience with wood is not a prerequisite for membership. “If you’re an experienced woodworker, we welcome you, and you’ll fit right in,” says George. “If you never have worked with wood, we welcome you the same way. The camaraderie here is wonderful, and we all help each other.”


L-R: Larry Knepper, John Dolan, and Bill George working together in the Garden Spot Village Woodshop.

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what’s avai l a b l e Roadways will lead to garages in the back of the houses.

Garden Spot Village Is Growing The phrase “small-town living” calls to mind many qualities that may seem lost in an era of sprawling subdivisions: comfortable closeness, vitality, people strolling on the sidewalks or sitting on the front porch with a warm “hello” for passers-by, a sense of camaraderie and the security that comes from knowing the people around you. If you’re looking for those qualities, you’re likely to find them in New Holland, as Garden Spot Village makes plans for a new neighborhood across Kinzer Avenue. “We’ve been exploring other community concepts ever since I arrived at Garden Spot Village 10 years ago,” says Scott Miller, chief marketing officer. “We’ve explored 55-plus communities and intergenerational options. We experimented with city living. We researched co-housing, which has some really interesting physical community design ideas. We looked at pocket neighborhoods, which are extremely popular on the west coast. We’ve been considering all these different models and options and drawing from their unique ideas and best practices to create something that is distinctively Garden Spot Village.” Plans call for individual houses with spacious, livable front porches that step out into individually landscaped front yards and onto sidewalks around a common green. 8

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“Rather than looking out your front door at cars, a cul-de-sac, and macadam, you’ll see common greens, community spaces, and people,” Miller says. Every detail of the design is intended to foster community and connection. “Entering from the porch through the front door, you’ll step into the living room and kitchen, where people tend to gather,” he says. “As you move through the house, the spaces become more private.” Houses will have secluded backyard patios with outdoor fireplaces that allow for “me” time or gathering with family.

“Rather than looking out your front door at... macadam, you’ll see common greens, community spaces, and people.”

The neighborhood will use land efficiently, but the houses are carefully designed to create a sense of spaciousness inside and out. Windows prudently positioned at different heights will maximize natural light while maintaining privacy. Interior design features will include built-ins and carefully crafted spaces. Floorplans will average 1,600 square feet with lofts for additional living space, two baths, and two-car garages. “It’s a perfect not-too-big, not-too-small footprint,” Miller says.

Some people have asked whether the homes will be part of Garden Spot Village. The answer is “Yes!” “After much thought and discussion, we’re viewing it like any small town in America. It’s one community with multiple neighborhoods,” says Miller. “We have a site plan and preliminary floor plans so we can prepare pricing. We’ll start out with about 25 houses.” To receive more information when the pricing, floor plans, and site plan are available, e-mail a request to info@sycamoresprings.net.


An artist’s rendering of the livable porches planned for the new houses.

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getting to know

Garden Spot Village

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innovative mar k e ti ng Below: Bob and Joanne Coleman, who participated in an immersive living experience at Graden Spot Village before moving from the Hudson River Valley.

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hen his mother received a copy of Destination magazine five years ago, Bob Coleman liked what he saw. A year and a half ago, he and his wife left their house in the Hudson River Valley and moved to Garden Spot Village—after taking their time and getting to know the community. “We always liked New Holland. We used to come down for the bed-and-breakfasts,” says Coleman. They had visited other communities in the area. They spent a night at Garden Spot Village and liked it, but weren’t sure if they could make a commitment. “It wasn’t enough time,” he says. So Coleman asked something a bit out of the ordinary. Could they pay a fee to visit periodically and stay for several days? Scott Miller, chief marketing officer at Garden Spot Village, discussed the proposal with other team members. They looked at it from various angles, including feasibility and fairness, and considered the circumstances of the long-distance move. Ultimately, says Miller, “We said, ‘yeah, we’ll do that.’” As an “occasional resident,” Coleman got to know Garden Spot Village and its surroundings very well. He loved the fact that he could walk or bike to restaurants, stores, and services. He loved the service he received when he visited the New Holland Police Department. “When they asked, ‘Can we help you?’ they meant it,” he says. “Those are the things that meant a lot to us.” The Colemans attended several Look & Learns. “Every time we learned something else and met new people,” he says. They asked questions of other residents. They brought friends to Garden Spot Village who moved in before they did. But they didn’t drag their heels too long. “Scott Miller said, ‘Come early if you want to get your money’s worth,’” says Coleman. They moved in after their son graduated. It is, he says, a good fit. Read More: gardenspotvillage.org/look-and-learn

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PICTURE YOURSELF 12

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EXPERIENCE GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE FOR YOURSELF. SCHEDULE YOUR FREE VISIT! INCLUDES: One night in our Hospitality Suite Breakfast in the Creamery Lunch or dinner, your choice

COME FOR THE LIFESTYLE— STAY FOR THE FRIENDS. WELCOME to Garden Spot Village...

Meet the people who live here

where life blooms™

Use all amenities

Thanks to its culture, landscape, and location, Lancaster County has become a haven for retired professionals, outdoor enthusiasts, and energetic adults of all ages who want a lifestyle full of social, cultural, recreational, educational, and spiritual opportunities. In the midst of this idyllic setting, Garden Spot Village has distinguished itself by providing world-class hospitality and resort-style amenities. Our faith-based heritage and commitment to service are the foundations of a truly welcoming community. Imagine life at its best.

GARDENSPOTVILLAGE.ORG 717.355.6000

Homes from $81,500 to mid $300s, $1,115 - $2,270 per month all inclusive.*

* Garden Spot Village, 433 S. Kinzer Avenue, New Holland, PA, 17557. 717.355.6000. A non-profit, fee-for-service community. Monthly fee includes repairs and maintenance of residence and furnished appliances, electric, heat, air conditioning, water, sewer, property taxes, garbage and trash disposal, lawn care, snow removal, security, use of common facilities, social, educational, cultural, and recreational events. The following are available for a fee: telephone service, cable tv, high speed internet, dining options, personal care, skilled nursing, memory support, adult day services, at home care services, housekeeping, laundry, and a hair and nail salon. Fees and services are subject to change. Minimum age requirement 62 for a single person or 62 and 55 for a couple.

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meet your n e igh bors

Ed & Darlene Smith: New Kids on the Block 14

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Even in cooler weather, you can smell the delicious aroma of steaks on the grill wafting from Ed and Darlene Smith’s patio. At ages 65 and 58, respectively, they weren’t looking for a ‘retirement community’ and since they moved in last August, they have embraced the Garden Spot Village lifestyle and have found so much more!


LIFESTYLE CHOICES

“We like cooking, gardening, growing flowers, serving others,” says Ed. “When you own a house, you have a lot of obligations. Here, we have everything we had without the worry of maintenance. We don’t worry about snow or bugs on bushes. All you have to do is plant and pick. It’s like a fairy tale.” The couple met in 1976 when they both worked for Shell Oil Company in Houston. They worked together for more than 30 years. During that time, they moved around the country, and were living in North Carolina when they retired. They decided to move north, closer to Ed’s family. They bought a house in Gap and joined a church in New Holland. Through the church, they started volunteering at Garden Spot Village. “We asked ourselves, ‘Why are we mowing grass and raking leaves when this is the perfect place to live?’” says Darlene. “When you volunteer at a place, you really get to know it. We asked a lot of questions and got to know the residents and staff. It is such a Christian community. We said, ‘This is where we want to be.’” Early last winter, the Smiths volunteered as hosts at a dinner for future residents. “A couple said, ‘It’s going to be five or six years before we move, because we’re still healthy,’” Ed says. “I said, ‘Don’t wait. Think of it as going to another town. Moving shouldn’t be a burden; it should be a fun thing you look forward to.’” “I think of it as a 55-plus-PLUS,” says Darlene. “We wanted to come here while we were young so we could take advantage of everything that’s here.” MAKING CLOSE CONNECTIONS

Originally, the Smiths were looking for a deluxe end cottage, but the wait was two to three years. Megan Farber, Marketing Associate at Garden Spot Village, suggested that they explore their options. “After thinking about it, we decided that a carriage house would be less downsizing,” Darlene says. With two bedrooms, a loft and three baths, their carriage house offers plenty of room for their children and grandchildren to visit. Ed and Darlene wanted more space than they would have in an apartment—but an apartment was just perfect for Ed’s father, Nolan, who recently moved into Gardens South. He had been living in Coatesville until he lost his wife. “Dad was lonely, so I said, ‘Why don’t you just move to Garden Spot Village?’” Ed says. In addition to helping Ed’s dad move, the couple has been busy since they arrived. They continue to be active volunteers. Darlene helps out in Refresh: Coffee, Gifts, Essentials, where she is on a committee to improve the grocery and over-the-counter pharmacy areas. She also helps with Mountain View bus trips and Caring Connections. She helps to prepare fresh vegetables for

the restaurants and reads to a woman in Mountain View. Ed escorts residents from the skilled nursing households to various activities and drives the Jolly Trolley. The couple joined the Community Church at Garden Spot Village and serve as greeters and escorts. “If I had more time, I’d do more volunteering,” Ed says. A bird lover, he also helps Scott Weaver, director of campus services, maintain the many bird feeders on the grounds and has signed up to work a garden plot this spring. Darlene would like to start a women’s bible study, and she joins in a cross-stitch group once a week. This season, she plans to plant more bulbs around the carriage house. “We love growing things. We had a 90- by 60-foot garden in North Carolina, so we signed up for a piece of ground here to grow a garden,” Ed says. Pickleball is also on his to-try list when he finds more free time.

“We don’t worry about snow or bugs on bushes. All you have to do is plant and pick.”

“We’re so active here,” says Darlene. “I think I have more friends here than I did at my house because there are so many more people around and more things to do.” Because of that, she says, “I think you become healthier.” LOOKING FORWARD TO THE FUTURE

The Smiths do a lot of their own cooking, but sometimes they like to take a break. “If you don’t want to cook, there are five fabulous restaurants at Garden Spot Village as well as two or three good restaurants in New Holland,” Ed says. “Anything you want is within a couple miles, and 80 percent of it is here at Garden Spot Village—a medical center, a church, a bank, hair salon….” They like the “new” Main Street—and the fact that Garden Spot Village is open to change. “If you don’t keep up-to-date, you won’t get new residents to come,” says Darlene. “I’m very excited. I can see us living here another 20 or 30 years, and it will be here. As long as they’re willing to innovate, Garden Spot Village will be here.” “What they’ve done at the Village Square shows that they’re constantly improving and changing with the times,” Ed says. He also mentions the regular Coffee & Conversation and Town Hall Meetings. “They want to know what you think. They listen to you. They recognize that they don’t live here—we do. They’re committed to improvement, whether it’s in the aesthetics or their services.” Spring 2015

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A warm welcome and historic charm awaits friends of Garden Spot Village. See coupon on page 69.

Tim and Dolores Walter

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community h i g h l i g h t

The Richmond House Bed & Breakfast For Dolores and Tim Walter, the stone and clapboard country cottage at 371 East Main Street in New Holland was a dream come true. “Over 20-some odd years, we always looked at houses with hopes of having a B&B,” says Dolores. The opportunity arose when The Richmond House became available in 2004, and the couple took the plunge. Built in 1933, this charming home features random-width wood floors, beamed ceilings, wrought iron hardware and other unique details. Although it was approved as a bed-and-breakfast, it had been a private home, so the Walters had work to do. They added bathrooms to each of the five upstairs guest bedrooms, installed central air conditioning and completely redid the landscaping and the gardens. At the time, the couple was living in the Lehigh Valley, and Tim was working as a corporate helicopter pilot. For the first five years, he commuted 70 miles from New Holland to Allentown. Today, both Dolores and Tim are full-time innkeepers, sharing the many duties that the job involves. She takes reservations, handles bookkeeping and cooks up a hearty breakfast; he maintains the house; they both plant flowers that splash the property with color in the spring and summer and attend to their guests. NEW HOLLAND HOSPITALITY

The Richmond House is popular with visitors who appreciate New Holland’s quiet charm and scenic rural views, as well as, its proximity to Lancaster County’s most popular attractions. “We have a large group of return guests,” says Tim. “We treat them like family or old friends—unless they want more privacy.”

“We like to make ourselves available to our guests, and they seem to respond positively to that,” says Dolores. Flexibility has been a key to their success. Although most reservations come in through the website, richmondhousebnb.com, they are prepared to lodge and feed the occasional traveler who shows up at the door. “You always have to be ready,” says Dolores. “You need to be available for guests’ needs, to work with them as a tour guide, to accommodate their dietary considerations.”

“You always have to be ready,” says Dolores. “You need to be available for guests’ needs, to work with them as a tour guide...”

The warmth of the Walters’ hospitality has made The Richmond House a favorite among those exploring New Holland as a vacation spot or as a potential place to live. Richmond House often hosts those visiting friends or family at Garden Spot Village, especially around the holidays, as well as, those who come to New Holland for the Garden Spot Village Marathon in the spring and the Pedal to Preserve cycling event each summer.

“We have met people from all over the world,” Dolores says. The Richmond House, she says, “is more than just a comfortable bed and a wonderful breakfast. It’s sitting at a table with conversation going every which way. Guests who have met here have made friends that continue long after they leave.” Read More: richmondhousebnb.com

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Charting a Course for The Future CHANGING CONSUMER EXPECTATIONS… Shifts in savings patterns and uncertainty about government benefit programs… Healthcare reform… New technologies… A new emphasis on living with purpose at every stage of life… These are some of the realities that shape the environment in which Garden Spot Village operates. “Although this can be a daunting list, it also represents incredible opportunity for an innovative, Christ-centered, mission-driven organization like Garden Spot Village,” says Steve Lindsey, chief executive officer.

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n many organizations, the board and senior management typically take a day or two every five years to sit down and lay out new goals. Very little about Garden Spot Village is “typical,” so it’s not surprising that the months-long strategic planning process it undertook has been dynamic, intentional, and inclusive of all stakeholders. The end result is a strategic blueprint that provides a solid foundation for the future in a changing world.

Exchange to develop a new plan to carry us into the future,” Lindsey says. It was different from previous strategic planning sessions in several significant ways. “The biggest difference was the level of involvement and input from various constituency groups. Significant time was spent with team members throughout the organization, as well as residents, management, board members, and others in order to better understand the variety of perspectives,” he says.

“Because this is a pivotal time in history, we took most of 2014 to work with Lois Dostalik and the team at E4

“Where innovation needs to take place is at the day-today level, and the people who can effectively do that are

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the people who are responsible for those day-to-day activities,” says Scott Miller, chief marketing officer. “Front-line team members are the ones who really know what new and innovative services, processes, techniques or experiences will enrich peoples’ lives.” “Another significant difference was the strategic level of the discussions that took place as we developed the plan. We were challenged to think well beyond the scope of the typical five-year plan in order to develop a blueprint for our future that is both challenging and exciting. It includes aspirational goals that will stretch us, as well as, very tangible success indicators that will keep us grounded as we move forward,” Lindsey says. A CREATIVE ROADMAP

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he strategic planning process was at once serious and lighthearted. Meetings took place in the E4 conference room, which has bright orange chalkboard walls. “The setting was very stimulating. The rooms inspired a sense of creativity and encouraged us to look at things differently,” Miller says. “We laughed—a lot. Lois poked and prodded us. She challenged us. There was deep and serious thinking going on, but it was fun, engaging, and invigorating.” “The thing that struck me about the whole process was that we started with all these thoughts and ideas, and the whole team collaborated to streamline it to get to the right strategic plan,” says Becky Weber, director of healthcare services at Garden Spot Village. “We placed a lot of emphasis on meeting with people at all levels of the organization and making sure they were engaged,” says Lora Gomboc, executive director at Maple Farm. “Everyone helped prioritize by going back and meeting with different groups, using their suggestions and ideas, and having them prioritize what was important to them.” That input helped narrow the focus. It also ensured that the plan was unique to Garden Spot Village. “The most exciting aspect of this plan is that it is not a boilerplate strategic plan,” Lindsey says. “It really does leverage the aspects of Garden Spot Village that have 20

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made it a unique and exciting community in a way that will allow us to successfully accomplish our mission for a whole new generation.” “The plan sustains us for the future and allows us to continue to honor and care for the generations we’re currently serving,” says Dale Beiler, chief financial officer, noting that Garden Spot Village residents currently range in age from late 50-something to 100-plus.

“We started with all these thoughts and ideas, and the whole team collaborated... to get to the right strategic plan.”

INNOVATION IS THE DESTINATION

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ver the course of several months, the myriad ideas were narrowed down to five strategic goals: to address socio-economic diversity, maintain a sustainable business model, make innovation core, establish a consultancy and leverage the Garden Spot Experience. “The five directions all feed off each other. The harmony is exciting,” Miller says. “It’s a very unique combination. At the same time, it’s very ‘Garden Spot Village.’” “At the 10,000-foot level, they’re all interrelated. You can’t do one without the other,” Beiler says. Including innovation as a strategic goal was no accident. “The world is changing rapidly, and the challenges that people face as they age are becoming much more complex. As a result of this, the old way of doing business will not satisfy needs or enrich lives in the years ahead,” Lindsey says. “People demand an approach to aging that is fresh, personal, and authentic. In order to


Innovation at Garden Spot Village isn’t confined to staff. The residents have created a train extravaganza packed with innovations.

meet that challenge, everyone associated with Garden Spot Village must be involved in a process of innovation that will help define new ways to ‘enrich the lives of older adults as an expression of Christ’s love.’ Having every team member thinking about these things every day, having this as a part of our culture, will be critical to our success going forward.” In this rapidly changing environment, Miller says, “We see innovation as risk mitigation, risk management, or risk aversion strategy as opposed to seeing innovation itself as a risk. We think that not being innovative is the risk.” “I feel very good about the direction we’re going,” says Beiler. “What came out at the end of the process is more than a plan, it’s a blueprint for the future of Garden Spot Village. It isn’t rigid and doesn’t limit the organization into one set direction, but enables us to move forward and carry out our mission with purpose and flexibility.”

“With Baby Boomers coming up as the potential market, we had to ask ourselves, ‘How are we going to be different and set ourselves apart?’ We are going to have to be innovative and involve everyone in the process,” says Bryan Groff, director of human resources. TRAVELING IN FAMILIAR TERRITORY

I

nnovation is a core value at Garden Spot Village, and it is already evident throughout the community, thanks to a committed group of people who work and live here and who are always looking for ways to be more effective, more creative and more efficient. “The evidence of this is in the outcomes,” Lindsey says. Women in Mountain View are helping a community in Bangladesh to create avenues for a more prosperous future. Residents and team members travel to Honduras to help build a church

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camp. The award-winning Grands & Kids summer camp program pairs residents with their grandchildren for a week of structured activities and a chance to deepen relationships between generations. Through collaboration with Mennonite Disaster Service, residents and team members have helped build houses for people across the country who have lost their homes to hurricanes and other natural disasters. The organization replaced traditional performance reviews with a coaching model that encourages creativity at all staff levels. The new Radar Screen process makes it easier for people who are ready to prepare and plan their move to Garden Spot Village. The recently-opened Harvest Table takes the dining experience to the next level. And the list goes on. For example, “Our skilled nursing households have become a learning journey destination for organizations around the world,” Lindsey says. The skilled nursing program continues to improve as team members find new ways to make the environment feel even more like home. “It’s little things, like having a Keurig machine so you can always have a hot cup of coffee or having family members bring decorations from home at the holidays,” says Gomboc. “We empower people to do things differently,” says Weber. “I don’t think anybody sits down and says, ‘Let’s think of an innovation.’ But they go through the day saying, ‘I could do this a different way and it would be better.’ If it felt right, we just did it. It usually works out well, because the staff has really good instincts.” The strategic plan builds on that. “We’re making innovation part of our DNA,” Gomboc says.

“We empower people to do things differently.”

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Building houses for people across the country.

ALL ROADS LEAD TO NEW IDEAS

M

aking innovation core is a strategic goal in and of itself—and it will take innovation to achieve the other strategic goals. Garden Spot Village is always exploring. From streamlining the hiring and sales processes to identifying new technologies that can support the health of team members and the independence of people who live here, Garden Spot Village is always looking for a better way. That means finding ways to serve adults as they age wherever they may choose to call home. It means developing a business model that protects current resources while enabling the organization to respond to growth opportunities. It means sharing our knowledge in the senior living field while generating revenue from our intellectual capital. And it means identifying the essential elements of “The Garden Spot Experience” so that we can continue to create that experience forever. Read More: e4exchange.com


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Tightening up the laces as the starting lineup approaches and the final leg of a big accomplishment.

kids

running to help kids walk THE NEXT

s

GENERATION OF

INNOVATORS

ome cultures in developing nations see a child born with clubfoot as cursed

and sometimes turn to witchcraft for a cure. Through an innovative partnership, these children are getting medical and spiritual support—and children in eastern Lancaster County are getting an opportunity to strengthen their own bodies and enrich their souls by giving to others.

Last year, Garden Spot Village and the Lancaster Family YMCA launched the first YMCA Kids Marathon in conjunction with the Garden Spot Village Marathon. Held the night before the adults’ marathon, the event gives young runners, ages 6 through 12, a chance to experience the excitement of a big race. Participants are encouraged to raise money for CURE International, a locally-based organization that delivers medical care to children with clubfoot, cleft palate, hydrocephalus, and other treatable conditions.

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! o g s ’ t le

TAKING AN IDEA AND RUNNING WITH IT

Lindsey first encountered the concept of a kids’ marathon while running in a marathon in Virginia Beach. He brought the concept back to Lancaster County, where, he says, “the YMCA had recently come to New Holland and was establishing their presence and role in our community. Their focus is on providing programs and services that enhance the spiritual, mental, and physical well-being of our community, so it seemed to be a perfect opportunity for us to join together to promote this new event.” The two organizations have “a lot of mutual mission crossover,” says Jeff Kenderdine, CEO of the Lancaster Family YMCA Association. For example, both encourage intergenerational activities. “What I like about the event is that it really takes some parent involvement and creates opportunities for families to do things together.” In the months leading up to the event, as the participants are logging their first 25 miles, adults must sign off on the entries, and “the whole family can start to adopt some healthier lifestyle behaviors, which is one of our core mission objectives,” says Kenderdine.

“Establishing regular running or exercise programs is important to help children develop healthy bodies. Developing a perspective that focuses on the importance of others’ well-being is critical to becoming an emotionally healthy adult,” says Steve Lindsey, chief executive officer at Garden Spot Village. “The focus of the CURE fundraising option is to help children realize the positive impact that they can have on the lives of those less fortunate.” CURE has hospitals and programs around the world, including Afghanistan, the Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Niger, the Philippines, Uganda, United Arab Emirates and Zambia. Since 1998, CURE’s network of charitable hospitals and surgical programs has seen more than 2.4 million outpatients, performed more than 167,000 surgeries and trained more than 7,200 medical professionals. Last year, approximately 150 young runners participated in the event and raised $3,665 for CURE’s Global Children’s Fund, which serves 29 countries. “CURE is about healing people physically and helping people spiritually,” says Brant Hansen, CURE storyteller. “CURE not only heals kids for today, but we also train doctors who are nationals in the countries we serve. They’re becoming wonderful doctors who can heal people for decades. Each of our hospitals is a teaching hospital, so we can multiply ourselves.”

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The evening of the Kids Marathon, participants run the final 1.2 miles on a traffic-free course on the Garden Spot Village campus. At the finish, they come down the same runners’ chute and see their time on the same clock as the runners in the big race. Each participant receives a shirt and each finisher receives a medal to commemorate the event. “Parents are able to run with their kids, if they wish, and there is a big crowd at the finish line cheering for each competitor,” Lindsey says. The moments are truly memorable. Kenderdine recalls a participant last year who had Down syndrome. “The broad appeal for anybody and everybody was evidenced by that child—seeing the joy as he crossed the finish line. His parents say he’s more confident,” thanks to the experience, Kenderdine says. “It’s a running event, but it’s not just a running event.” The event gives people who live at Garden Spot Village “lots of opportunities for an incredibly fun and inspiring evening,” Lindsey says. “Whether it is volunteering or cheering, we have an opportunity to experience the fun of hundreds of children completing an important milestone in their lives. Anytime you have a chance for people with lots of wisdom and life experience to share some time with children, it’s a win-win.” LOOKING DOWN THE ROAD

Event organizers hope to see even more kids participating in this year’s Kids Marathon. They continue to look at ways to improve the event and make the experience even more like an adult endurance race. The event may grow in other ways, too. “This year, we hope to encourage every Kids Marathon runner to send a get


well message to a child and let them know that they will be running for their healing from across the world,” says Lee Lawrence, CURE’s church engagement coordinator. The “Recent Patient Updates” page of the cure.org website lets site visitors post messages that can be printed out and given to recipients in CURE’s hospitals. “The Kids Marathon was a great way to raise awareness and motivate the runners to support a child with words of encouragement or fundraising. Every dollar raised goes straight to supporting CURE’s mission to ‘heal the sick and proclaim the Kingdom of God,’” Lawrence says. Some of the people at Garden Spot Village have talked about organizing a trip to CURE’s hospital in the Dominican Republic. Closer to home, registration fees for the Kids Marathon support YMCA programming. Participants have use of the Y as a training resource for up to five months, and families receive nutrition information. The Y promotes the event through its connections with local school districts, and Garden Spot Village provides the venue and the logistical support. Innovative collaborations like these are critical to meeting community needs today and in the future. “Part of the culture of Garden Spot Village is not to be insular, but to be outwardly focused,” Lindsey says. “The Kids Marathon is just one more example of the people of Garden Spot Village using elements of our culture— lifestyles of wellness, commitment to community, encouragement, volunteerism—to have a positive impact on the lives of people in our larger community and around the world in a fun and creative way.” Read More: gardenspotvillagemarathon.org lancasterymca.org cure.org

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Garden Spot Village Shares Its Secrets

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giving back Thousands of shoppers are expected to buy tickets for the Lancaster Best Kept Secrets Tour, which takes place April 9 through April 25. Garden Spot Village will break new ground by being the first community of its kind on the tour. “I’ve had several senior communities offer the tour as an outing for their residents, but I have never had one as a stop on the tour,” says Melissa Nordhoff, who launched the Best Kept Secrets Tours in 2008. Maybe that’s because Garden Spot Village doesn’t see itself as a ‘senior’ community. Stop by to visit and you’ll see why. As manager of Carson’s in the Cornfields, her mother’s antique store in New Holland, Nordhoff wanted a unique way to generate shopper traffic. “Secondly, I was searching for a way to raise funds for a favorite charity,” she says. “The Best Kept Secrets Tour was the perfect thing to accomplish both goals.” This year, $1 from each $9 ticket sold for the April tour will benefit the Samaritan Homeless Shelter in Ephrata. Garden Spot Village will also benefit from its participation. “The Best Kept Secrets Tour can bring as many as 400 to about 700 folks to a business who have never been there before,” says Linda Dodge, director of development for Garden Spot Village. When shoppers make purchases at the Share & Care Shop or Refresh: Coffee, Gifts, Essentials, proceeds benefit the Garden Spot Village Benevolent Fund, which assists residents who—for reasons beyond their control—have exhausted their financial resources. PERKS FOR PARTICIPANTS

The “ticket” for the tour is a coupon booklet with coupons from the three dozen or so stops on the tour. The booklet will include a coupon good for a free Grande Starbucks fresh-brewed coffee from the Refresh coffee bar. The first 2,000 shoppers who buy tickets will each receive a bag with goodies, including a coupon for a 15-percent discount on lunch at the Harvest Table. Tour ticket holders can enjoy some exclusive benefits. Garden Spot Village plans several special events during the tour period, including live piano music to enhance the shopping experience and hand massages to pamper shoppers. The wellness department will offer

Stretch Flow and Energize Express workshops with tips to help energize tour participants. The Harvest Table will offer cooking demos in the Village Square Indoor Park, and the Mountain View Vision & Design Team will demonstrate the art of tea bag folding, also known as miniature kaleidoscope origami. They are also developing a new lotion scent for the event and for Mother’s Day. The quilters will hold quilting bees and display their handiwork. “People need to have the Best Kept Secrets Tour ticket to take advantage of benefits like the hand massages and the cooking demos,” says Dodge. “Folks here for the marathon will be able to watch one of the quilting bees.” The Share & Care Shop and Refresh will offer expanded hours during the tour period. They will be open from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The Share & Care Shop will hold a “Yellow Sale,” with 50-percent off anything in the store that is yellow or has yellow on it. Proceeds from sales at the Share & Care Shop support the Garden Spot Village Benevolent Fund. “Shoppers who visit Garden Spot Village will have the opportunity to enter a drawing to win a hot air balloon ride for two, a handcrafted birdhouse and other items. Both Refresh and the Share & Care Shop will hold drawings for gift baskets,” says Dodge. “We are really excited to welcome many more visitors to Garden Spot Village—to our stores, coffee shop and dining venues,” says Deborah Fast, director of volunteer services. “Our volunteers are also excited about the opportunity, and look forward to taking part in hosting and interacting with hundreds of shoppers on the Best Kept Secrets Tour.” Learn More: You can purchase tickets for the April 2015 Lancaster County Best Kept Secrets Tour at Garden Spot Village before or during the tour. To reserve tickets for pick-up at Garden Spot Village, call 717.721.1750 or email Melissa@bestkeptsecretstour.com. To learn about other ways to support the Benevolent Fund, please contact Linda Dodge, CFRE, director of development, at 717.355.6215 or LDodge@gardenspotvillage.org. Read More: bestkeptsecretstour.com gardenspotvillage.org /charitable-giving

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Best Kept SecretsTour Lancaster C ounty

April 9 – 25, 2015

30

Plan Plan aa day day or or several several days days exploring exploring and and shopping shopping in in Lancaster Lancaster County County during during the the Best Best Kept Kept Secrets Secrets Tour. Tour.

Ticket Ticket Cost: Cost: $9.00 $9.00 per per person person

Tickets Tickets are are for for sale sale at at all all Best Best Kept Kept Secrets Secrets Tour Tour locations locations including including Garden Garden Spot Spot Village. Village.

Tickets Tickets are are for for sale sale at at the the Garden Garden Spot Spot Village Village Resident Resident Services Services Desk. Desk.

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(The (Thefirst first2,000 2,000shoppers shopperswho whopurchase purchasetickets tickets will willreceive receiveaabag bagwith withspecial specialopportunities.) opportunities.)


A Burning Desire to Volunteer

Below: Lloyd Groff receives an award for almost six decades of service with the Intercourse Fire Department.

FIRE DEPARTMENT HONORS DECADES OF SERVICE

w

hen Intercourse Fire Department held its annual awards banquet last December, it recognized Lloyd Groff for 58 years of service to the organization with its Volunteer Service Award.

Groff says he enjoyed every position he held with the fire department. He hopes that other volunteers would share his enthusiasm. “If they want to do it, they should put their heart into it and really do it right—not just because it’s a job,” he says.

Over the years, Groff has served as firefighter, assistant chief, fire police, and a member of the fire department’s board of directors. He was the organization’s president for 30 years.

“I just loved doing it and helping— doing something for other people.”

Groff, who has lived at Garden Spot Village since April 2000, joined the fire department at the invitation of another member and stuck with it for nearly six decades.

“I just loved doing it and helping—doing something for other people,” says Groff, who turns 94 in April. He faithfully provided traffic control as a firepoliceman for the marathon at a remote spot and is volunteering again this year. Spring 2015

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Opposite Page: Unique combinations of lighting, earth tones, and natural resources bring our Lancaster County heritage to life in new and exciting ways.

TAKE THE GOOGLE TOUR OF THE HARVEST TABLE

Scan the QR code.

What’s new on Main Street IN THE MIDST of last winter’s Resident Drop-In, Tom Wolfe looked above the festive crowd gathered in the Atrium and pointed out the exposed timbers overhead. “That post-andbeam construction is unique. It’s another example of the craftsmanship of the local people,” says Wolfe, who moved to Garden Spot Village from Honey Brook. In his previous position, he was involved in four major construction jobs and developed an appreciation for what is involved. “I never would have thought to put it in here,” he says of the heavy timbers. “In a barn there wouldn’t be anything artistic about it, but here it adds to the beauty of the space.”

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Words from a Woodworker One day CEO Steve Lindsey walked into the Garden Spot Village Woodshop with a picture torn from a magazine showing a piece of a wooden collage that would fit perfectly with the new décor at Refresh and asked, “Does anybody think they’d like to make something like this for us?” Bill George, a member of the Woodshop, stepped up to the plate. “I went into the storeroom and found an old beam of fir wood out of an old barn or something. I cut it up and re-sawed it into thinner boards about half an inch thick,” he says. He laid out a quilt-like pattern and stained the pieces lightly to achieve a variety of colors. “I laid the pieces at random, shifting them to get a pattern that had color scattered around all four sides.” Some other members of the Woodshop offered suggestions. Eventually, George glued the pieces to a backing sheet and put a walnut frame around the collage. It now hangs on the wall at Refresh: Coffee, Gifts, Essentials. George has enjoyed woodworking as a hobby since he was 14 years old. He also enjoyed a career in the construction industry, working his way up from carpenter to construction manager. His many projects included remodeling the Trump Plaza in Atlantic City and turning an old factory building in Philadelphia into condos for Historic Landmarks for Living. He looks at the recent renovations at Garden Spot Village with a professional’s eye. “I love it. I think it’s a beautiful job,” he says. “The builder should win an award for the design and construction.”

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The Atrium’s rustic golden oak and a palette that includes pumpkin and berry tones are part of a delicious new look at Garden Spot Village. In this pivotal entrance space, cozy conversation nooks replace the fountains. “The whole visual experience in Village Square I think is terrific,” says Dick Morris, who has lived at Garden Spot Village with his wife since 2001. A few steps away, just beyond a pair of stone pillars, the Village Park brings the outdoors in. Shutters on the inside windows help create the illusion of being outside the house, in a beautiful garden, relaxing under the pergola. On the night of the Resident Drop-In, dessert is served here, and the chocolate fountains are flowing. Nearby, the parlor has been transformed into a movie theater with cinema-style sconces and chandeliers that look like film canisters. Residents can relax in the ultraplush seats—with cup holders, of course—and enjoy the full surround-sound theater system. “We thought it was great before, but now it really looks like a resort,” says Jim McAbee, who moved to Garden Spot Village with his wife, Annie, in 2010. “It’s almost like being in a five-star hotel,” Annie says. “My daughter wants to put her name on the list.”

What’s brewing? Start down Main Street and you’ll encounter Refresh: Coffee, Gifts, Essentials, an all-new retail venue and coffee shop serving Starbucks coffees and other signature beverages, including cappuccinos, frappucinos, espressos, and lattes, as well as drip coffees, blended teas and lemonade drinks. Visitors can grab a pastry or breakfast sandwich in the morning or choose from a variety of sandwiches, wraps, salads, individual pizzas and other lunch items. In cooler weather, a gas fireplace adds to the warm ambience.


Refresh also offers a wide selection of convenience food items, and gifts, including jewelry, handbags, and other accessories.

and have my food cool off,” she says. She also likes the new color scheme. “I think the bright, bold colors make you feel happy.”

Farther down Main Street, a brickwork façade calls to mind Old Lancaster and lets you know that you’ve reached The Harvest Table, the new upscale, farmto-table casual eatery. Here, again, the décor is a nod to New Holland’s heritage as “the garden spot” of Lancaster County. A modernized interpretation of a classic wooden corn crib creates a room within a room in the middle of the restaurant. Dozens of dramatically lit canning jars full of fruits and vegetables add splashes of color.

“I eat lunch there every day,” says Bill George. “I particularly like the salad bar. It’s the nicest salad bar I’ve been in, with a wonderful selection of different vegetables. I think the food in general is better than it’s ever been.”

The Harvest Table features multiple dining destinations with rotating themes. Guests can choose from a wide variety of traditional American and ethnically inspired cuisines, with many made-to-order options.

“It makes me feel like I’m going out to dinner,” Dolores Malfucci says of the new dining venue. “It’s colorful, cheerful and offers a good array of foods.” A resident of Garden Spot Village since 2003, she recently hosted a party for 40 friends and family members in the Concord Room, across Main Street from The Harvest Table. “My family saw this place and said, ‘Wow, I’m never going to worry about Mom again!’ My daughter said, ‘It’s like you’re at the Hilton.’”

What’s cooking?

What’s new?

Mary Lois Beard has lived at Garden Spot Village since late 2013. She used to frequent the dining room or The Coop, but says, “I haven’t been to any of the other restaurants since The Harvest Table opened. It’s so attractive, and I like all the choices you have. If you don’t care for an item on the Chef’s Table, you can go to a different station and order something else. When you get a pizza or a Mexican or Asian dish, you have a choice of whatever you want in it. It seems to be a more health-conscious menu. They’re using more herbs and spices. I happen to like that.”

Feedback from residents has been overwhelmingly positive. Some people are curious about the concept.

Beard loves the infused waters that The Harvest Table keeps on tap. Flavored with citrus, strawberries, cucumber, and other fresh fruits, it is a refreshing—and healthier—alternative to soda. She also likes the ability to order and pay at the touch-screen kiosks. “I can order, pay right away, and I don’t have to wait in line

“It’s a learning experience as people get out of their comfort zone and start to enjoy it,” says Tom Rogers, district manager at Sodexo, who is happy to work with Garden Spot Village to bring The Harvest Table to fruition. “It’s what we look for—a great partnership. We want to move ahead, take things into the future, get ready for the next generation to move in.” As demographics change, the future is likely to bring more portability, more non-traditional foods, more options to meet the needs and tastes of a wide range of individuals—and more of the innovations people have come to expect at Garden Spot Village. “We’re a part of the Garden Spot Village family and they are part of ours,” he says. “It is a great privilege to make their meals for them.” Spring 2015

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TA K I N G L O C A L F O O D T O T H E N E X T L E V E L

a greenhouse for Garden Spot

HOW DO YOU SERVE FARM-TO TABLE FRESHNESS ALL YEAR ROUND? If you’re Garden Spot Village, you take steps to make fresh, locally grown food available regardless of the season. A high-tech greenhouse planned for the west campus will grow produce year-round, support sustainability, and potentially create jobs.

“The idea originated after we heard so many comments about the tomatoes in the salad bar in the middle of winter,” says Steve Lindsey, chief executive officer at Garden Spot Village. “We have such wonderful produce from local farms that our kitchens use through the summer months. We thought that the idea of having freshly grown, hyper-local produce throughout the year would fit well with the culture and values of Garden Spot Village. “Garden Spot Village has always had a culture of growing and placing a premium on landscaping plants and trees,” says Scott Weaver, director of campus services. “We’ve always grown many of our own shade trees. A greenhouse that would grow vegetables and possibly annual flowers felt like a natural extension of that.” Producing food on campus eliminates the use of fossil fuels for production or transportation. Additionally, the produce can be grown without pesticides or preservatives. The greenhouse would use highly efficient aquaponic technology, which requires no soil. Instead, produce is grown on towers, through which water circulates. The towers turn in order to allow plants

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access to sunlight, water and nutrients. A carefully controlled environment will make it possible to grow fresh produce all year, regardless of weather conditions. “Freshly harvested fruits and veggies bring intense flavors, crisp textures, and plentiful nutrients— qualities that decline in many types of produce after harvest,” Lindsey says. “It doesn’t get any more local than if we harvest in the morning and eat it at lunchtime,” says Weaver.

LEARN MORE

Many residents have expressed an interest in volunteering in the greenhouse, and the project could create jobs for the community as well.

HYDROPONICS

ABOUT

Scan the QR code.

“The greenhouse creates a win-win for the people of Garden Spot Village and for our local community,” says Lindsey. “We are able to get the benefits of great food throughout the year while providing employment to local people who are living with disabilities that make it difficult for them to find gainful employment.” READ MORE: aeroponicsgrowing.com

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5

facets of INNOVATION What’s new? At Garden Spot Village, it’s always something. That’s because innovation is one of the six core values at the heart of Garden Spot Village—today and in the future. Making innovation core, as a strategic initiative, encourages all stakeholders to come up with new ideas and solutions focused on finding ways to allow people to live in a way that is meaningful for them. Creative ideas come from team members, residents, and people from the community. Here, we talk to professional partners, who are innovators in their own right, about innovation at Garden Spot Village.

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1

GREGG SCOTT // aia  “I have always believed that it’s important to show a new look periodically. Predictability can lead to failure.” — T. Boone Pickens

The dramatic new look at Garden Spot Village began with a casual conversation at a professional conference and grew from there. “One of the first things I said was, ‘Your name is Garden Spot Village. It’s the perfect name for your ZIP code, in the garden spot of the county and the state,’” Gregg Scott, AIA, said to Steve Lindsey, Chief Executive Officer of Garden Spot Village, at a LeadingAge conference about two years ago. Scott, a partner in RLPS Architects, Lancaster, noted that nothing about the community’s interior design spoke to “garden spot” or anything agrarian or representative of the unique geographic region where the community is located. “I said, ‘Why don’t we try to brand it to be more in focus with what you are all about?’” This fall, Garden Spot Village unveiled a spectacular renovation, highlighted by an earthy color palette, exposed beams and brickwork, a combination of direct and indirect lighting and other elements that are at once contemporary and yet clearly inspired by the area’s rural heritage. “It’s a reference to our region which is very unique,” Scott says of the heavy timbers and mortise-and-tenon construction in the Atrium. “That’s about as Lancaster County as it gets.” The organic country theme continues down Main Street at The Harvest Table, a casual eatery where canning jars full of local bounty provide color against a backdrop of honey-colored horizontal wooden slats, which create an intimate room-within-a-room. “It’s a contemporary expression of a traditional corn crib,” Scott says. “The lighting is a lot of fun, too. We used a combination of direct and indirect light, multiple sources of light. There’s a variety of finishes and color; there’s energy.” For an architecture firm, working with forward-thinking clients like Garden Spot Village is refreshing. “They had a vision and together we worked to make it a reality,” Scott says. “The team was clearly on board with wanting to do something different. They were tuned in to creating an experience that would get everyone excited to be there.” Around the time the renovations were completed, Scott attended another LeadingAge conference. “The Harvest Table was the talk of the conference,” he says. “A lot of Lancaster County retirement communities came to the grand opening in November to see what Garden Spot Village is doing.”

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A decade ago, Garden Spot Village began making what has become a successful transition to a person-centered model of care for residents who needed skilled nursing services. Two years ago, Garden Spot Village approached North Group Consultants and asked, “Can we do that with our people?” “The annual performance appraisal system was not, in Steve Lindsey’s terms, ‘life giving,’” says Daryl Leisey, partner and senior consultant with North Group. Garden Spot Village wanted to implement something completely different—an organizationwide coaching model similar to what some corporations offer their executives and management team. “For an organization the size of Garden Spot Village to say, ‘We want to do something different here’ shows a tremendous amount of innovation on the team’s part,” he says. The leadership team at Garden Spot Village recognized that there had to be a better way. They made a dramatic change, not for the sake of the dramatic, but because “it got to the core of who they are as an organization,” Leisey says. Instead of meeting once a year with a supervisor, team members now meet regularly with a trained coach to discuss goals and ideas for improvement. This opens the door to innovation throughout the organization because it recognizes that no one person has all the answers. “Everybody in the organization is challenged to participate in his or her own growth and development,” says Leisey. “This can drive more efficiencies, effectiveness, and innovation and ultimately lead to the betterment of the organization in very practical ways. It drives more ideas and better ideas, because it is invested and directly impacted by this approach.” The coaching model supports the LEAN continuous improvement process at Garden Spot Village. Improvement efforts extend to the coaching model itself, which continues to evolve. “Even as they introduced the coaching model, they recognized that it would have to be modified,” Leisey says. “There’s enough wisdom to say, ‘We’re going to continue to learn and grow in this process and we’ll continue to make adaptations to make it better.’” Since Garden Spot Village implemented the coaching model, Leisey has accompanied Steve Lindsey and Scott Miller to present this concept at several industry conferences across the country. “You could clearly tell there was a buzz in the broader industry about what Garden Spot Village is doing,” he says.

2 DARYL LEISEY //

north group

 “The most effective way to cope with change is to help create it.” — LW Lynett

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3

DEBORAH BRANDT //

moxie house

 “Christians are supposed not merely to endure change, nor even to profit by it, but to cause it.” — Harry Emerson Fosdick, DD

A few years ago, Garden Spot Village was looking for a new logo. What it found was a partner in creativity—and creating community. “We were very excited to start working with Garden Spot Village. We hadn’t done any work in the 50+ industry, so it was interesting to come to the project with a fresh eye and a totally outside perspective,” says Deborah Brandt, founder and owner of Moxie House, a Lancaster graphic design and marketing studio, and creator and editor of Fig®, an innovative communications package that showcases businesses in distinctive small cities. Published in six locations, including Lancaster, Fig® is a direct mail showcase that provides a variety of communications channels to promote small businesses. Scott Miller, chief marketing officer, searched out Moxie House “because he wanted an innovative, small, nimble team that was able to be as creative as possible.” A Lancaster County native, Brandt returned to Lancaster after spending seven years in New York City, where she designed packages for the fragrance and cosmetic industry. She saw a need for a vehicle that would give local entrepreneurs access to a communications package at an affordable cost. Promoting these vibrant businesses has helped build the perception of Fig® cities as destinations for the day, the evening, or the weekend. For Brandt, creativity is key. “It goes back to the reason I started Fig®. If we don’t support fledgling ideas, we end up with a homogenized society. Creativity is the key to changing perceptions, to changing your situation in life, the key to moving society forward,” she says. “If you’re not doing something different, you’re not moving forward.” From her perspective, Garden Spot Village is always moving forward. “They are in a state of constant renewal and improvement. They’re always asking, ‘How can we do it better?’ They’re very in tune with the needs of the population they serve, and they are always looking forward to what the next generation will need or want,” Brandt says. For the Moxie House team, partnering with Garden Spot Village is a positive experience on several levels. “I’m always impressed that no matter what they’re doing, no matter what innovative new idea they have, it always focuses around the resident experience and the culture of the organization,” Brandt says. “I think it’s important to Garden Spot Village that they communicate the sense of the place. They don’t want to do things the way everybody else is doing things.” From a marketing perspective, that means a range of things, from avoiding stereotypes to using only original photography. “They never just take the easy way. They are very intentional in making sure their message is authentic.”

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4

DICK STAUFFER //

rgs associates

“God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can and the wisdom to know the difference.” — Reinhold Niebuhr

When the Weaver family first envisioned a continuing care community to serve the New Holland area, they asked Dick Stauffer to help develop a master plan. Today it is so much more and the organization Stauffer founded, RGS Associates, continues to provide Garden Spot Village with landscape architecture, civil engineering and land planning services. “The founders of Garden Spot Village had a long-term vision to create a cohesive mix of land uses and accommodate varying income levels. They are held in high regard by their peers for the kinds of things they’ve implemented over the years,” says Mark Hackenburg, a principal with RGS. “They continue to be leaders in the foresight of everything from operations to new types of care facilities. In their zest to lead, Garden Spot Village has set the groundwork for others to follow.” Garden Spot Village was among the first in the region to offer the household model of skilled care. Today, they continue to break new ground and find new ways to serve empty nesters and other older adults while maximizing their opportunities. “Garden Spot Village recognizes the fact that aging in place can be and is a dignified way for people to spend their latter years. Folks want to remain in their homes longer.” Hackenburg says. Garden Spot Village and RGS are exploring the development of “pocket neighborhoods,” a concept introduced in the Pacific Northwest but relatively new to the East Coast.Pocket neighborhoods cluster a small group of homes around open green space, moving the living spaces—such as kitchens and living rooms—to the front of the homes overlooking walkways and a central community green. “Big porches are a key design element, as are other outdoor spaces to gather and entertain,” Hackenburg says. Such intentional communities are designed around social interaction. In pocket neighborhoods, he adds, “People come together and want to support their neighbors. Many may even come from the same church. They know each other and look forward to coming together and living in community.” Through RGS, Hackenburg has worked with Garden Spot Village for more than 18 years. “Their projects are always some of the most exciting we’ve got going. They are just fun to work with,” he says. “Garden Spot Village is always looking to differentiate themselves. They push our design team to challenge new ways of thinking, to find new opportunities and to achieve new outcomes. They are always looking for a better way of living and ways to create interaction among people. They understand that happier people are healthier people. Garden Spot Village is focusing on health and wellness. As a design professional, I find these challenges really intriguing.”

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A Designer Considers An Innovative Client There is always a measure of risk associated with innovation. The challenge is to maintain a new vision while managing the risk. No one on the Garden Spot Village team is going to blindly spend the kind of dollars these projects demand without first doing their homework, testing the financial feasibility. The danger is that we tend to believe that the best outcomes are often described as something that has been done before. Breaking this pattern requires true leadership. The desire to do better is and should be a strong motivator. Somewhere along the way, someone in leadership has to ask, “Why is this?” and “What if…?” As designers, that is the kind of challenge that drives us to explore. In our very first meeting we asked the development team about Garden Spot’s mission and value statements. To my surprise, no one had to run and look this up. They just recited them to us. The mission statement sticks clearest in my mind: To enrich the lives of older adults as an expression of Christ’s love. What better purpose is there to serve as a foundation for change? In that sense, this has been a true partnership: Fulfill the mission. — David P. McGill, AIA, senior designer and vice president, SFCS, Inc.


At Garden Spot Village, innovations often begin with a simple question: “Are we fulfilling our mission?” Sometimes the answer sparks groundbreaking change, as it has in the case of the skilled nursing households. A decade ago, Steve Lindsey saw residents gathered around nursing stations. Ostensibly, they were watching television—but the set wasn’t always on. It struck him that Garden Spot Village could provide a more enriching environment for people who required healthcare services. Thus began the transformation of the skilled nursing households.

5 DAVE MCGILL // sfcs  “The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.” — Socrates

READ MORE

“It takes leadership and vision to say, ‘The TV’s not even on, so we’re going to take a building we just built and redo it.’ It wasn’t a financial decision, because it involved a lot of construction. It takes courage to say, ‘This is not what our mission says we’re supposed to be doing’ and do something different,” says Dave McGill, vice president and senior designer at SFCS, an architecture, engineering and interior design firm from Roanoke, Virginia. “I’ll work for people like that all day.” SFCS redesigned the legacy floorplan so it would support a more personcentered approach and, in the process, incorporated many innovative ideas. “We created a team room instead of the nursing station and created open space with more outside views. We decentralized dining and put a dining area in each of the households,” just like home, McGill says. They incorporated many other innovative ideas designed to enable team members to work more efficiently, “so once you get to the room, you spend time with the resident, not running around looking for something.” They did that by creating cubbies for linen carts close to the rooms, so clean sheets and towels are always close at hand instead of in a centralized storage room. Similarly, a discrete piece of casework in each room holds glove boxes and medication packets, saving time and steps so team members can focus on spending time with household residents. However, Garden Spot Village is so much more than simply exceptional healthcare. It’s a place where people live with purpose and opportunity, regardless of their age. Many people want to move in young and age in place— but in smaller homes that are affordable and easy to maintain. Innovative architectural designs for their new houses—stair railings that double as bookshelves, corner fireplaces, varied ceiling heights, and natural lighting— enable a lot of living room in a smaller space. It’s like a Baby Boomer dream house. Small homes clustered together in pocket neighborhoods “provide an enhanced level of social connectedness and reinforce a sense of community,” McGill says. These architectural “widgets,” combined with “gadgets” ranging from safety pendants to smart phones, make it possible to offer services for the 50-plus population while still providing a high degree of autonomy. “Could your cell phone take your pulse or do a diabetes check? We’re so close with so much of this technology,” he says. And he wouldn’t be surprised to see it at Garden Spot Village. “They are a solid organization that is on the cutting edge of innovation, and they’re not afraid to explore things if they are for the benefit of residents and staff.”

moxiehouse.com northgroupconsultants.com rgsassociates.com rlps.com sfcs.com/Home.aspx

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The distinctive board and batten siding framed with handcrafted heavy timber construction reflects the strength and traditions of Lancaster County architecture while the bold colors and visual textures reinforce Garden Spot Village’s commitment to vision and leadership.

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Place

creating

A strong dose of character with splashes of warmth invites people to linger, socialize, & get to know each other. A front porch appeal where community happens! TEXT BY STEVE LINDSEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEREMY HESS CAPTIONS BY GREGORY J. SCOTT

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Above, from left: Mortised and tenon post and beam construction feels right at home at Garden Spot Village. The timbers were precisely cut and carefully assembled by local craftsmen. The existing skylight and clerestory windows were retained for their important role in bathing the atrium with natural light.

reat spaces are where celebrations are held, social interaction takes place, friends run into each other, and relationships develop. They are the “front porches” of our community—where we interact with those we know, as well as those we haven’t yet met. When the spaces work well, they serve as a stage on which “community” happens. As we set out to redesign two key areas at Garden Spot Village last year, our goal was to create great spaces. That meant we first needed to recognize that the existing spaces didn’t necessarily show the best aspect of life at Garden Spot Village: that we are a place where genuine community exists; people know, and are

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known by, their neighbors and deep friendships flourish. The existing spaces were aesthetically pleasing, but they didn’t foster the interactions and relationships that have become a hallmark of Garden Spot Village. So we set out, not simply to develop a beautiful design, but to create a “place.” When we first met with the team from RLPS Architects, we outlined some specific goals: to create spaces that encourage community, reflect our GSV culture, as well as our Lancaster County heritage, and is authentic to our community. If your goal is to create a place, a nice design will not be enough. To make an under-performing space into a vital “place,” you have to do more than just add nice furniture, beautiful decorative elements and


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attractive wall coverings; you have to think about places for private conversation, and consider how circulation patterns will allow people to navigate the space while also creating opportunities for connection. Perhaps most importantly, you have to integrate some elements that provide for a natural connection between people, and prompt strangers to talk to other strangers as if they knew each other. The goal was to create a place that has both a strong sense of community and a comfortable image, as well as a setting, activities, and uses that collectively add up to something more than the sum of its often simple parts. This is easy to say, but difficult to accomplish. In the Village Square, we worked to accomplish this by creating a number of elements that contribute to community life. Central to this is Refresh! Coffee, Gifts, and Essentials. It is a place to shop, grab a bite to eat, or get something from the full range of Starbucks offerings. More importantly, it is a place to meet friends, run into neighbors, or have chance encounters with someone you haven’t yet met. All around are lots of comfortable seating areas, computers, a fireplace, and plenty of tables; great spaces to read a book, surf the internet, play a game, or

Left: “We proudly serve Starbucks� greets every visitor entering Garden Spot Village. The Refresh coffee bar exudes hospitality and encourages conversation. Above: Casual seating and a warm hearth complete the inviting first impression experience at the main entrance.

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Steve Lindsey (left), CEO, Garden Spot Village and Gregory J. Scott, AIA (right), Partner, RLPS Architects

sip a latte until an opportunity arises for a great conversation. It also serves as somewhere convenient to hang out until the movie begins in the new theater, or the party gets under way in the Village Park. The Harvest Table design began with a fascination for the beauty of home canning and a desire 50

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to showcase our “farm-to-fork” efforts of recent years. I’ve always been intrigued with the care and artistry that went into canned goods that were entered into fairs, and felt that this could be the central theme for the artwork in the new restaurant. Again, Gregg Scott and the RLPS team took this idea and turned it into a stunning display


that captures your eye and stimulates your appetite! But beautiful surroundings are not enough when planning a restaurant—you have to create a space that delivers a delicious meal as well! The focus in this effort was to re-create the way meals were prepared at Garden Spot Village. We wanted

to showcase those wonderful ingredients that come from local Lancaster County farms by preparing each meal fresh when ordered, creating options for healthy meals for people who are increasingly focused on lifestyles of wellness, and by the opportunity to experience the multi-sensory drama of a chef creating a masterpiece in

Above: Patrons can enjoy a seat by the fire or a delicious meal in the ‘room within the room’ surrounded by well stocked shelves of farm fresh preserves. Recessed LED lighting creates a delightful ambiance throughout all the venues.

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front of you. By working closely with RLPS and Scopos, a restaurant design firm, we were able to design an incredible space for all of this to happen. Placing this new space in the hands of an extremely talented executive chef has resulted in an experience that stimulates the senses and satisfies the palate. Through this renovation project, we were able to transform our spaces into a truly great place—one that embodies the subtle elegance that typifies our sense of style, represents our culture as well as our heritage, and promotes relationships and community‌a place that is uniquely Garden Spot Village.

Black and white hand painted brick feels right at home in a community steeped in history and traditions.

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Below, from left: Organic shapes and forms for seating, ceilings, counters, and decorative lighting echo Garden Spots’ agrarian roots. Canning jars filled with fruits and vegetables are lit with energy efficient LED rope lighting. The fifteen foot long Harvest Table invites spontaneous friendships and casual conversation.


Acoustic clouds temper the noise, but not the excitement inspired by the pizza oven, rotisserie, chef’s station, and fresh salad selections.

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chef’s d e l i g h t

Grilled Fish Tacos with Mango Slaw The new Harvest Table restaurant at Garden Spot Village invites guests to tantalize their palates with a variety of new and exciting taste sensations—like these flavorful fish tacos. Mindful recipes like these balance nutrition with enticing flavors to create an indulgent way to enjoy healthy eating. Mild tilapia is the perfect foil for sweet mango, tangy lime, and a zesty cilantro mayonnaise—and fresh cabbage and red onion add a crispy crunch. Mangos are a good source of Vitamins A and C, as well as 25 different kinds of carotenoids, to keep the immune system healthy and strong.

(SERVES SIX)

FOR THE CILANTRO

FOR THE TACOS

MAYONNAISE

15 oz. tilapia filets

1

/3 c. low-calorie mayonnaise

Vegetable oil spray

through (about 2 to 3 minutes per side, or until internal temperature reaches 145°F for 15 seconds).

½ tsp. cilantro leaves, chopped

1

the mayonnaise and the half teaspoon of chopped cilantro in a bowl and mix well. refrigerate until ready to use.

6 6-in. flour tortillas

combine

/8 tsp. black pepper, ground

/3 c. red onion, julienned

1

/4 c. mango, peeled and diced

3

/4 c. cilantro, chopped

1

FOR THE SLAW

3/4 c. cabbage, shredded 1/3 c. lime juice In another bowl, toss the shredded cabbage with the lime juice. refrigerate until ready to use.

the tilapia filets into six portions, approximately 2 to 2.5 ounces each. spray the strips with vegetable oil and sprinkle with pepper. On a grill or grill pan, sear the fish until it is marked on both sides and cooked cut

To warm the tortillas, heat a dry skillet over medium heat. Place the tortillas, one at a time, on the warm skill and heat each side for about 30 seconds. In the middle of each tortilla, place 1 tablespoon cabbage slaw, 1 piece of grilled tilapia, 1/2 tablespoon of onions, 1 tablespoon of mango and 1 teaspoon of cilantro. drizzle 1/2 tablespoon of the mayonnaise over the filling. fold the tortilla and enjoy! Recipe courtesy of Sodexo.

MICHAEL PEZZILLO: EXECUTIVE CHEF, GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE

Chef Pezzillo was awarded the Culinary Gold Medal for Academic Excellence in 1995 from the Academy of Culinary Arts, a wonderful start to a twenty year culinary career that is bursting with flavors, artistic expression, and mouth-watering originality. With cooking as his passion, he’s keen on menu preparation and is always looking for ways to delight his guests. From the Devon Seafood Grill in Rittenhouse Square, to executive chef at Vanguard, to his own establishment, Café Mosaic, he has a wide range of outstanding culinary experiences. 54

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Tilapia and fresh produce come together for an unforgettable combination of flavors.

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events cale ndar

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Things To See & Do

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March

An intergenerational sharing and learning experience. For residents, staff and their children.

21

SATURDAY EVENING CONCERT

Celebrate the luck of the Irish with a performance by the Hooley School of Irish Dance. For residents and the public.

24

STAFF VARIETY SHOW

BUSINESS EXPO

Local businesses offer free samples, education seminars, and more. For residents and future residents. SATURDAY EVENING CONCERT

The 2014-2015 concert series concludes with a performance by the Lancaster Bible College Chamber Singers. For residents and the public.

21

LOOK & LEARN

(See March 25 description.)

23

TAKE YOUR CHILD TO WORK DAY

May 1

SHRED IT DAY

Enjoy an afternoon of light entertainment as Garden Spot Village team members perform. For residents and staff.

Dispose of documents and papers safely and securely. For residents and the public.

25

6–7

LOOK & LEARN

2

MOVIES WITH A MESSAGE

Enjoy a Dove family-approved film with a faith-based theme. For residents and the public. DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE

A luncheon to learn more about life at Garden Spot Village. Visit GSVLookandLearn.org to findout more and register. Seating is limited. For the public 55+.

Compelling two-day program addresses roadway risks and defensive driving techniques to keep drivers safe on the road. For residents and the public.

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Spend a day in Manhattan with a visit to the 9/11 Memorial at the World Trade Center site. For residents.

LET’S TRAVEL

Learn about the world’s most fascinating destinations without packing a suitcase when travelers share their stories. For residents.

April 4

MOVIES WITH A MESSAGE

HEALTH TALK

Find out what you need to know about staying well from an Ephrata Community Health physician. For residents and the public.

10

16

YMCA KID’S MARATHON

NEW YORK CITY & 9/11 MEMORIAL

LADIES ELEGANT TEA

Enjoy high tea and each other’s company. For residents and guests.

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Enjoy a Dove family-approved film with a faith-based theme. For residents and the public.

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PRIMARY ELECTION

Garden Spot Village serves as the Earl Township polling location. For residents and the public.

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CELEBRATION OF AGE

Honor those who have joined the 90-plus Birthday Club. For residents.

28 LOOK & LEARN (See March 25 description.)

For the public.

June

11

6

MARATHON AND HALF-MARATHON

For the public.

9-25

LANCASTER BEST-KEPT SECRETS TOUR

Shopping discounts, demonstrations, and special events show off restaurants, retail stores, and more at Garden Spot Village and other area venues. For ticketholders.

13, 20, 27

AMISH EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE

Learn more about the Amish through this educational series organized by Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society. For residents and the public. 56

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PEDAL TO PRESERVE

Annual bicycle event to benefit the Lancaster Farmlands Trust begins and ends on campus. For residents, guests and the public.

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EXPLORE FREDERICK COUNTY

Experience vintage shopping, Civil War history, and more on this day trip to Maryland with Elite Coach. For residents.

15, 22 & 29

MEET THE CONGREGATIONS


Popular speaker series provides a chance to get to know the history, beliefs, and customs of local churches and congregations. For residents and the public.

ethnic restaurant to sample one of the world’s cuisines. For residents.

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Enjoy delicious food and delightful entertainment at this covered-dish outing. For residents.

Monthly Life Enrichment for Seniors programs feature informative presentations by business owners, public figures, and residents. For residents.

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OVERLY’S GROVE PARK PICNIC

GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE YARD SALE

6

LEFS SPEAKER SERIES

WINDOWS 8

Annual community-wide sale offers bargains on household items, crafts, books and more. For residents, guests, and the public.

Learn the ins and outs of this operating system and become a more efficient computer user. For residents.

22–26

Join us for dinner and an outdoor show at The Gretna Timbers in scenic Mount Gretna. For residents.

GRANDS & KIDS CAMP

Award-winning intergenerational program offers a host of favorite activities to bring back memories and create new ones. For residents and grandchildren.

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ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT

Popular golf outing benefits the Garden Spot Village Benevolent Fund, which supports residents who need financial assistance. For residents, guests, and the public.

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LOOK & LEARN

(See March 25 description.)

July 8

ICE CREAM CARNIVAL

A delicious event provides a sweet time to socialize. For residents, their families, and future residents.

10

RAYSTOWN LAKE CRUISE

Take in the scenery on this 8,300-acre lake in Huntingdon County—and keep an eye open for eagles. For residents.

13, 20, & 27

MEET THE CONGREGATIONS

Popular speaker series provides a chance to get to know the history, beliefs, and customs of local churches and congregations. For residents and the public.

16 & 17

SERVANT STAGE COMPANY

12 13

September 1

3

8–9

(See March 25 description.)

DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE

Compelling two-day program addresses roadway risks and defensive driving techniques to keep drivers safe on the road. For residents and the public.

9

FLORAL CREATIONS

Learn how to put together eye-catching flower arrangements in this popular workshop. For residents.

14

LOOK & LEARN

LEFS SPEAKER SERIES

Monthly Life Enrichment for Seniors programs feature informative presentations by business owners, public figures, and residents. For residents.

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HEALTH TALK

Find out what you need to know about staying well from an Ephrata Community Health physician. For residents and the public.

13

LONGWOOD GARDENS

VOLUNTEER PICNIC

Garden Spot Village gives back to those who give so much of themselves in service to others. For residents and volunteers.

Enjoy an exceptional theatrical and musical experience that will inspire, uplift, and entertain. For residents and the public. Tour formal gardens, conservatories, and fountains and take in a musical theater performance by the Brandywiners. For residents.

TIMBERS DINNER THEATRE

SEPTEMBERFEST

A polka party with music, food, and polka dancing. For residents. A DAY AT CAPE MAY

Enjoy the beach, birdwatching, shopping, and more in this quaint seashore town known for its beautiful Victorian homes. For residents.

22

LOOK & LEARN

(See March 25 description.)

August 4

HEALTH TALK

Find out what you need to know about staying well from an Ephrata Community Health physician. For residents and the public.

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DINE AROUND THE WORLD

Schedule is subject to change. For current listings, visit gardenspotvillage.org/events or contact Resident Services at 717.355.6000.

Expand your gastronomic horizons with a trip to a local Spring 2015

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Healing the Sick and Proclaiming the Kingdom of God

cure.org

Supported by the Garden Spot Village/YMCA Kids Marathon

Helping you sell your Home, your Treasures and making the Move Easy. Pete Shaub

Realtor®/Auctioneer/Mover 717-468-2520 pete@lifetransitionserv.com www.lifetransitionserv.com

Visit our office inside Garden Spot Village

Garden Spot VillaGe office 433 S. Kinzer Ave I 717.355.6055 I fultonbank.com Fulton Bank, N.A. Member FDIC. Member of the Fulton Financial Family.

FIG IS PROUD TO SUPPORT THE PASSION FOR INNOVATION AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE.

* New Name… Same Trusted Company

®

THE MAGAZINE. THE WEB. THE SOCIAL MEDIA. Creative communication for a thriving local community. [figlancaster.com]

* Free Shuttle Service in the New Holland Area * Courtesy Vehicles

501A East Main Street New Holland, PA 17557 717.354.8505 www.KeystoneMotors.net Owned & Operated by:

@figlancaster

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* Wide Variety of Pre-Owned Vehicles for Sale * Full Service Center All Makes and Model Cars, Vans, Trucks & SUVs


PERSONAL CARE SUITES

PERSONAL CARE SUITES AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE ARE INVITING AND UNIQUE—AND SO ARE THE RESIDENTS!

Live with

Mountain View Personal Care and Laurel View Memory Support offer a world of amenities, but what sets us apart is our specially trained staff who form family-like bonds with each individual. Residents also develop close friendships with others in a true community environment. Plus, all the amenities of Garden Spot Village are available for everyone! Call 717.355.6272 to learn more and schedule a visit!

ADULT DAY SERVICES

ADULT DAY SERVICES AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE PROVIDES A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITY

Adult Day Services provides a secure, protective environment for older adults who need supervision and assistance during the day. Plus the amenities of Garden Spot Village offer unique opportunities for activity and engagement. Call 717.355.6226 to learn more or schedule a one-day no-charge trial

THE AREA’S FINEST HOME CARE SERVICES ARE AVAILABLE TO EVERYONE

Garden Spot Village at Home provides personalized in-home services to help people live with purpose and significance at all stages of life. We’ll help with the activities of daily living like getting up, dressed, and ready for the day; running errands and much more, so you can do the things that are meaningful to you! Call 717.355.6031 to learn more or visit GardenSpotVillageAtHome.org A service of Garden Spot Village Lancaster County, PA

433 SOUTH KINZER AVENUE NEW HOLLAND, PA 17557

717.355.6000 GARDENSPOTVILLAGE.ORG

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... r u o at s u h t i w n 2nd Annual u r e Com Lancaster Family YMCA

Kids Marathon

April 10, 2015 for Ages 6–12 Garden Spot Village and the Lancaster Family YMCA are teaming up to promote healthy lifestyle choices for Lancaster County Youth! Encourage your kids or grandkids to participate in our second Kids Marathon! After they register the kids complete 25 miles at their own pace during the time between when they register and April 10, 2015. Friday evening at 6:00 the kids run the final 1.2 miles (parents can run with them) on the campus of Garden Spot Village beginning and ending at the same Start and Finish line that the elite marathon runners will use the following day. The kids get to experience the thrill of coming down the finisher’s chute, seeing the time clock and getting a finisher’s medal as they cross the marathon finish line.

Registration & details at GardenSpotVillageMarathon.org. 60

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Janie Hutton never stops moving. Since moving to GSV, if she’s not running the marathon, she’s helping organize it, leading teams to Honduras, or traveling the world with her husband, Paul. It’s impossible to catch her standing still. JOIN US FOR THE 2015 GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE MARATHON April 11, 2015 | Registration now open! gardenspotvillagemarathon.org


FROM OUR FAMILY TO YOURS

John Backof, D.D.S., Melissa Della Croce, D.M.D., & Staff

JOHN S. BACKOF, D.D.S. MELISSA DELLA CROCE, D.M.D. Proudly serving Garden Spot Village

We value your trust in us, and strive to provide you with excellent care & service! 119 WEST MAIN STREET | NEW HOLLAND, PA 17557 | 717.354.6471 | BACKOFDENTAL.COM

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Bucket

Travel to Eur List ope X Sky Div e X Fly Fir st Class (at le ast once) X Go F ly Fishing in A laska See the World Perspective - from a Whole New A Hot Air Ba lloon Ride I have to call today & schedule!!! X

a short drive to the Team’s Bird In Hand Launch site Or Experience lifting off from the Garden Spot Village Front Lawn! Discount Hot Air Balloon Ride tickets available at the Resident Service Desk.

US Hot Air Balloon Team 800-763-5987 www.ushotairballoonteam.com

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Compassionately serving our local community. We are a locally owned and operated funeral home C. STANLEY

cremation options, and advance funeral planning.

ECKENROTH HOME

Visit our two other locations:

BECK FUNERAL HOME, INC.

FOR FUNERALS

BECK FUNERAL HOME , INC . 315 EAST MAIN STREET NEW HOLLAND, PA 717.354.2227 BECKFUNERAL.COM Sven E. Miller, Supervisor

C . STANLEY ECKENROTH HOME FOR FUNERALS 209 EAST MAIN STREET TERRE HILL, PA 717.445.5122 Loren E. Bender, Supervisor Branch Location of Groff-High-Eckenroth Funeral Home, Inc.

145 WEST MAIN STREET, NEW HOLLAND, PA

717.354.0444

GROFFECKENROTH.COM

R. FRED GROFF, III, SUPERVISOR

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Family-Owned and Operated for 45 years HEARING AIDS • BATTERIES CLEANING, SERVICING, & REPAIR FREE Video-Otoscope Examination FREE Professional Hearing Evaluation & Fitting

“I began coming to Beltone in Lancaster in 1996. They gave me a wonderful examination and my hearing aids are great! I could hear the birds again! It was a whole new world. Since then, they have become like family. They are always willing to help no matter what. If I need something, they fit me into their schedule. The service is fantastic. I can’t say enough about them.” Nancy from Millersville

Beltone Promise™

Visit us at Garden Spot Village 2nd THURSDAY of every month 9:30-12 Noon

1560 Lititz Pike Lancaster, PA 17601 (717) 397-4927 http://beltonelancaster.com

16 GRAYBILL RD | LEOLA, PA 17540 5 MILES WEST OF GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE; OFF ROUTE 23 717.656.2181 | WWW.HFCI.US

MAKING

TRY OUR LIFT OR POWER RECLINERS

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life EASIER

OPTIONAL EXTRA FIRM SEAT CUSHIONS & SPRING SYSTEM


Since 1986 we have We are firm believers that trust is the paramount quality of a meaningful and long lasting relationship. With decades of collective experience, we have the expertise to offer you sound advice.

WE CAN HELP

New clients receive a 20% discount on Personal Income Tax Return for the upcoming filing season. For more details, visit our website. Call to schedule an appointment today 610-869-8284

Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Tax services are not affiliated with or endorsed by LPL Financial.

PRO T E C T YO U R L OV E D ON E S W I T H

PROPE R PL A N N I N G Free Seminar - Lunch Included MARCH 30 NOON - 1:30PM Concord Room, Garden Spot Village

AVOIDING THE COMMON PITFALLS IN YOUR ESTATE PLAN WHILE CARRYING OUT YOUR LEGACY.

Brought to you by JEFFREY GOSS and DANA PANAGOPOULOS

Do I need a Trust? ∙ Do I have a Durable Power of Attorney that protects me? ∙ How do I avoid taxes now and when I die? ∙ Do I have the proper healthcare directives? ∙ Do you know when your loved one is competent to sign legal documents or is being unduly influenced? rsvp if you are able to attend to

Emily Forrey at 945-5745 or emilyf@bcgl-law.com. 480 New Holland Ave, STE 6205, Lancaster, PA 17602 - BCGL-LAW.COM

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Inspired by the everyday family cooking that we grew up with, you'll feel at home while savoring a great meal in our casual and relaxed dining room. Experience our attentive service, and a friendly atmosphere; come see what makes us one of the most popular restaurants in town.

Breakfast Lunch Dinner Daily Specials

10% senior discount

(every day)

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New Holland Family Restaurant

624 West Main Street, New Holland PA | 717.355.2600 newhollandfamily.com | Monday–Saturday, 6 am–8 pm Spring 2015


RICHMOND HOUSE Bed & Breakfast

Where Country Charm and Hospitality Await You 371 East Main Street New Holland, Pa 17557 Dolores & Tim Walter, Innkeepers Will Garden Spot Village be your next home? Stay with us while you explore New Holland.

15% OFF

our regular rates to family and friends of Garden Spot Village residents.

717.355.0450 or 866.279.7599 www.richmondhousebnb.com richmondhousebnb@comcast.net

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Petal Perfect Flowers Flowers • Plants • Gift Baskets

Yoder’s Country Market offers many conveniences all under one roof! We offer a Full-Service Grocery Store, Pharmacy, Dry-Cleaning, One Hour Photo Lab, H2O to Go, Gift Shop & Petal Perfect Flower Shop.

- Store Hours -

Monday-Friday: 8am-5:30pm Saturday: 8am-4pm | Closed Sundays

LOCATED IN YODER’S MALL 12 South Tower Road | New Holland, PA 17557

717.354.2430

- Store Hours -

petalperfectflowers.com

Monday-Saturday: 7am-9pm, Sunday 8am-5pm Join Us At Yoder’s Restauant & Buffet For

Sunday Brunch 10am-2pm Restaurant Hours:

Monday-Saturday: 6am-8pm, Sunday 10am-2pm

WE DELIVER LOCALLY

14 South Tower Road | New Holland, PA 17557 yoderscountrymarket.com

717.354.4748

Artful Window Dressing.

★COMPLETE AUCTION SERVICES SINCE 1986★

We’ve got you covered!

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Luminette® Privacy Sheers provide great design and variable light control, with UV, temperature and sound insulation... and much more.

20% discount on all Window Treatments!

Schedule your personal appointment with Jackie or Debbie

• • • •

All Types of Real Estate Antiques Personal Property Estates

• • • •

Business Liquidations Inventory Reductions Farm Sales Appraisals

www.barevilleflooring.com • 717-661-6522 ★SUPERIOR SERVICE AT COMPETITIVE RATES★

www.barrdavis.com

FLOORING & TILE . KITCHENS & DESIGN . WINDOW TREATMENTS . RENOVATIONS

295 East Main St. Leola, PA • M-W-F: 9am-5pm • Tu-Th: 9am-8pm • Sat: 9am-3pm; Closed Sunday

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(717)442-9221 or (610)384-8433


3.5” x 5” | Maximum Font Size: 36 pt www.edwardjones.com

sier

Low interest rates getting you down? Let’s talk. Allen Wessel

Financial Advisor .

201 East Main St New Holland, PA 17557 717-354-4879

ree.

001 Member SIPC

Food • Fuel • Friendly Service Open 24 HouRS Mon-Sat

BEST WISHES from

ndywine Financial Management (BFM) delivers personal and prehensive financial services in the areas of money nagement, financial planning, estate planning and taxes. For e than 20 years they have helped clients achieve their ncial goals by taking the initiative to develop, implement and nitor their financial plans. In addition, BFM specializes in the ysis of the many financial options offered by retirement munities. They help older adults make the tough choices ociated with transition and they help them understand what can afford. Through independent research, custom portfolio agement, tax planning, and regular reviews, BFM adds the 168 Toddy Drive • East Earl PA • 17519 e needed for clients to make financial decisions.

717-354-9486 www.trailsideexpress.com

State Senator

RYAN AUMENT www.SenatorAument.com 301 East Main Street Lititz, PA 17543 (717) 627-0036 PAID FOR BY AUMENT FOR SENATE

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Theraflex Massage

NEW & USED SCOOTERS AND POWER WHEELCHAIRS Walkers, Ramps and Lifts

A Unique Approach to Physical, Emotional and Therapeutic Health

Ruth Carey-Hench, LPN, LMT Massages for Garden Spot Village residents & employees, on Wednesdays in Gardens South Clinic Room 1. $40 per hour. By appointment only. Sessions are paid at time of service. 143A East Main Street, New Holland, PA theraflexmassage.com | 717.615.3126 72

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CALL 610.286.9840

VISIT OUR REPAIR SHOP AT GSV Lower Level of Gardens South, next to the Health Office. Every other Tuesday. 1 pm-3 pm. Call for an appointment.

STOP BY OUR SHOWROOM FOR A LARGE SELECTION 107 Maxwell Hill Road, Morgantown PA 610.286.9840 or 800.942.1181 ucangomobility.com


ELANCO

Social Services Network PROVIDING HOPE AND ASSISTANCE FOR ALL WHO SEEK IT WITHIN THE ELANCO COMMUNITY.

AS PEOPLE OF FAITH, we strive to meet the humanitarian needs around us by providing a coordinated endeavor so that all of the available church, business, civic and educational resources will be made known and accessible to those in need, assisting in both the short and long term. WE ARE WORKING to prevent hunger, help underprivileged children, and promote strong values and community bonds. JOIN OUR MISSION: Contact us at 717.354.ESSN or email ElancoSSN@hotmail.com

give the gift of

CONFIDENCE

where all are welcome The Community Church at Garden Spot Village weekly services

Sundays, 10 am

You’re Invited to at GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE

March 25, April 21, May 28, June 23, July 29, September 22 Join our resident tour guides for lunch and learn firsthand about the welcoming way of life at Garden Spot Village. Visit GSVLookandLearn.org to find out more and to register. Seating is limited. For the public 55+. Help us achieve our mission of inspiring girls to be joyful, healthy and confident. Give to Girls on the Run at

www.gotrlancaster.org

GSVLookAndLearn.org 717.355.6500

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GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE WIN A HOT AIR

BALLOON RIDE YOU HAVE 2 WAYS 2 WIN

A RIDE FOR 2 1 2

Like the Garden Spot Village page on Facebook Online at: GardenSpotVillage.org/Hot-Air-Balloon-Drawing

The Garden Spot Village Hot Air Balloon drawing will take place the end of March 2015. Winners will be contacted after the drawing.

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THE NEW HOLLAND

Worth it ADVANTAGE

Worth

BIG COUNTRY SELECTION with 17 acres

Worth

LOW COUNTRY OVERHEAD with straightforward pricing

theTime theDrive

Worth

the Experience

8 MANUFACTURERS TO CHOOSE FROM

EXPRESS SERVICE WORRY-FREE FINANCING

SATISFACTION

Guaranteed

FRIENDLY STAFF NO HASSLE, NO HAGGLE

CONVENIENCE | Pickup & delivery has never been easier. When your vehicle is in need of service, we can pick it up, service it, and bring it back to you!

New Holland AUTO GROUP

Where a little country means a lot of savings! Route 23, New Holland, PA • 1-800-642-8605

Always online at

NewHollandAuto.com Spring 2015

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NON-PROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID LANCASTER, PA PERMIT NO. 472

433 SOUTH KINZER AVENUE NEW HOLLAND, PA 17557

so lid, re sponsi ble LEGAL ADVICE

A general practice law firm devoted to Wills, Trusts, Powers of Attorneys, Estate Administration & Elder Law Real Estate, Bankruptcy, Business Law & Family Law 131 West Main Street, New Holland 717.354.7700

480 New Holland Avenue, Lancaster 717.299.6500

3561 West Newport Road, Intercourse 717.768.7711 We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for relief under the bankruptcy code. KLINGANDFANNING.COM

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Profile for Garden Spot Village

Destination Garden Spot Village - Spring/Summer 2015  

Destination Garden Spot Village - Spring/Summer 2015