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justice teaching serve as the basis for students’ leadership development as reflected both in this course and in the co-requisite Theology or Philosophy III course. 1 credit Liberal Studies/ARCH 201: Archaeology and History of the Ancient Near East This course will offer a basic survey of the archaeological culture and history of the ancient Near East, including the Biblical Lands of Israel and Transjordan and contemporary societies in neighboring Mesopotamia and Egypt. The purpose of this particular course is specifically to introduce the student to a broad sweep of civilizations, peoples, and ancient life ways, dating primarily to the Bronze and Iron Ages (4th - 1st millennia BCE roughly). 3 credits Liberal Studies/ARCH 302: Becoming Human–Becoming the World This course intends to study culture continuity and change by concentrating on the most important turning points and developments in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas, covering the time span from Human Origins to the edge of the Renaissance. The orientation is global, the themes integrative, the overall goal being to show interconnections in the development of civilization(s), along with divergence across cultural and societal boundaries. The course stresses the archaeological and textual evidence. Some of the over-arching themes that express both culture and cultural diversity in antiquity include: becoming human, first states, nomadic movements, empires, and universal religions. 3 credits Liberal Studies/BCOR 111: Principles of Microeconomics This course focuses on an understanding of basic economics from a microeconomic standpoint. The specific topics explored will be scarcity, supply and demand, cost-production decision making, the operation of the firm in the product market under varying assumptions of competition, monopolistic competition, monopoly, oligopoly and the operation of the firm in the factor market. Prerequisite: High School Algebra 3 credits Liberal Studies/BCOR 112: Principles of Macroeconomics This course seeks to develop an understanding of macroeconomic issues and theory and their application to current problem areas such as unemployment, economic growth and inflation. Additionally, the role of money, financial institutions, and the effectiveness of economic policy regarding control of the macroeconomy are explored. Prerequisite: High School Algebra 3 credits Liberal Studies/BIOL 103: Environmental Issues This course is a study of our environment and some of the interactions between humans and their surroundings. The course analyzes through an interdisciplinary approach how humans and their social institutions interact with physical and biological systems of the environment. The course surveys the most urgent environmental health problems facing humanity today. 3 credits Liberal Studies/BIOL 383: Tropical Marine Biology This course is open to all students regardless of major and fulfills the Liberal Studies Core Science requirement. The course is offered over spring break in the Bahamas, where students investigate ecological systems such as coral reefs, mangroves, beaches, tidal pools, and inland habitats. 3 credits Liberal Studies/CHEM 166: Issues in Science and Technology Designed to present the principles of science, particularly chemistry, to enable one to better understand the world. It is also designed to not only improve the student's ability to understand current problems, but also provide the basis for understanding future developments in the area of science and technology as they relate to the environment. 3 credits Liberal Studies/ECON 285: Project Economics This course develops the techniques necessary for understanding economic price theory, the time-value of money, and the basic issues surrounding organizational architecture. These include issues surrounding supply and demand, cost-production, decision making and market models. In particular, the course focuses on the application of these economic theories

Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015  
Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015  
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