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offenders, and victims. Theoretical perspectives on gender inequality will be explored by reviewing the strengths and the limitations of traditional Social Theories. Marxism, Rational choice theories, Psychoanalysis, Ethnomethodology, and Expectation states theory will be some of the theories reviewed. This is a CRJS upper level elective and an accepted course in the Women’s Studies minor. 3 credits CRJS 341: Basic Firearms and Law Enforcement Application This course trains students in basic firearm techniques, proper shooting principles and proficiency in handling some types of handguns, shotguns and rifles. Students learn handgun safety, care and cleaning techniques. Students also acquire an understanding of general laws regarding firearms. Students become familiar with the physical components of shotguns and rifles. They will be able to successfully draw on weapons nomenclature to identify each type of gun and will develop the ability to handle firearms effectively and safely in various settings. In addition, each student will acquire proper loading, unloading and shooting techniques associated with general marksmanship, law enforcement, and long gun shooting through a combination of lectures, classroom dry fire drills and live fire exercises at the firearms range. The course also uses videos and photos of actual gunshot wounds to familiarize students with the capabilities of various firearms. Availability for course is restricted to upper level criminal justice majors and others only by permission of the Director of the Criminal Justice Program. 3 credits CRJS 350: Criminal Justice Ethics An introduction into the application of ethical theories relevant to the practice of the criminal justice system. The course is designed to focus upon and emphasize the most significant moral issues faced by criminal justice professionals today. The student will be required to conduct a detailed examination of these issues and to apply the various ethical theories, codes, and canons to arrive at a moral decision. CRJS majors/minors. Upper level. Prerequisite: CRJS 240 3 credits, Fall CRJS 360: Criminal Justice Statistics Statistics are used (and misused) in the criminal justice system on a regular basis. This course is designed to familiarize students how data is collected and analyzed in the criminal justice field so that students are comfortable with performing the quantitative tasks that will be required of them as practitioners in the criminal justice system. This course is open to all majors/minors. No specific prerequisite is required, but an understanding of basic mathematical functions is expected. 3 credits CRJS 361: Crime Scene Forensic Techniques This course is designed to help you collect and process physical evidence correctly, analyze it thoroughly, and understand its relevance in a criminal case. There is a strong focus on a systematic approach that uses proven, reliable methods for field applications in the investigation of criminal cases and evidence collection. Traditional and new technologies will be discussed in the framework of actual cases. This is an essential hands-on course for everyone involved with physical evidence, from the first responding officers, to crime scene processors, laboratory technicians, investigators, and attorneys trying a criminal case. The students will be exposed to the newest chemical and instrumental techniques, and covers new areas such as forensic analysis of computers and advanced shooting scene reconstruction methods. Prerequisite: CRJS 202, 310 3 credits CRJS 362: Expert Witnessing This course incorporates the court's concern with reliability, relevance, and the admissibility of expert testimony along with the proper court room demeanor. It will also define the avenues of attack used by opposing attorneys regarding expert qualifications and examine the significance of the expert's use of sophisticated technologies to present demonstrative evidence in the courtroom. The student will explore the increased importance of deposition testimony by experts in the light of the recent trend to mediate and settle cases, rather than go

Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015  
Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015  
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