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In-class mock crime scene investigations will be conducted resulting in scientific findings. These findings will be thoroughly discussed and the student will have an opportunity to present his/her findings in 'court'. Prerequisite: CFRO 210 or (CRJS 310 and CHEM 170) 3 credits CRJS 363: Digital Evidence/Computer Crime This course is designed to introduce the student to what investigators do to collect, preserve, and authenticate digital evidence. How the legal admissibility of digital evidence can be assured and how digital evidence can be used to reconstruct crimes and generate leads. This course is important to train criminal justice students, police, lawyers, programmers or System administrators, and forensic scientists involved in the investigation or prosecution of Computer-related crimes. The course will provide step-by-step instructions for dealing with an assortment of evidentiary problems and will also illustrate how these details fit within the broader contexts of forensic science, crime, and society in general. The difficult balancing act between a secure computing environment and individual privacy will also be evaluated. Prerequisites: CIS 170, 171, 172, 173 or CIS 150 3 credits CRJS 364: Investigation Internet Crime The objective of this course is to teach students about technical aspects of the Internet and how the Internet can be used as an investigative tool. As detailed in the syllabus, this is a demanding technical course, requiring participants to submit weekly assignments to demonstrate their understanding of the materials. Participants who are not already familiar with Internet crime should take the Introduction to Internet Crime course (CRFO 345). Topics covered include advanced Internet searching, locating the origin of e-mail messages, tracking criminals who operate on chat networks, investigating computer fraud and intrusions, and dealing with personal computers as an extension of the crime scene. Articles and case examples are used to give a sense of current crimes and law enforcement efforts on the Internet. The course ends with a final investigative assignment those ties together many of the lessons and techniques taught throughout the course. 3 credits CRJS 365: Principles of Forensic (Kinesic) Interview and Interrogation Kinesic interview and interrogation is viewed as a multiphase behavioral analysis system used to conduct more effective and efficient interpersonal communications. The foundation of the techniques used in this course is to conduct more effective and efficient interpersonal communications. This technique rests on the observation of common everyday behavior of human beings and their diverse communication abilities.The course will explore principles of basic kinesics in terms of speech and body language, and also the same behaviors exhibited in written statements. It is suggested that speech and body language behaviors can give insight into the individual's personality type, indicating the "psychological fingerprint" of the person. By combining the information received through diagnosis of verbal and nonverbal behavior with this psychological fingerprint, an interviewer can conduct an interview and interrogation that is specifically tailored for the subject. Prerequisites: CRJS 202, CRJS 310 3 credits CRJS 366: Biological Evidence This course focuses on the biology and technology behind serology and a DNA analysis method used today and provides a thorough introduction to students who are less familiar with biological evidence and DNA. This comprehensive course provides an overview of conventional Forensic Serology and DNA Profiling and the role of this section of the crime laboratory as part of the criminal justice system. Evidence collection and preservation, acquisition of known standards for comparison purposes, chain of custody issues and crime scene reconstruction techniques will be discussed. Safety issues regarding biological hazards will also be reviewed. This course concludes with reviews of the DNA testing performed in high-profile cases such as the O.J. Simpson trial, the President Clinton-Monica Lewinsky affair, identifying the remains of Russia's Romanov family and the Tomb of the Unknown

Gannon University Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014  
Gannon University Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014  
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