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ENTREPRENEURSHIP 95

ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM KURT E. HERSCH, M.B.A., Program Director ENTREPRENEURSHIP MAJOR Gannon University believes that people can change the world one great idea at a time. Whether you are interested in starting your own business or nonprofit organization, joining a family business, working for a small or mid-size company or becoming a change agent within a larger corporation, Gannon’s entrepreneurship program is right for you. As an entrepreneurship major, you will develop an understanding of how to create value by recognizing attractive opportunities and identifying the unique resources needed to exploit them. Being a successful entrepreneur requires that you not only have a complete understanding of all the individual business functions such as accounting, marketing and management, but more importantly how they all need to work together to create a successful venture. You will learn not only how to understand your customers needs, but also how to fulfill them. You will learn not only how to create budgets, forecasts and financial statements, but also how to interpret them. And finally in your senior year, you will apply all the knowledge you’ve accumulated to create a comprehensive business plan around a business or nonprofit idea that you think will change the world. It will be an experience you will never forget as you spend the entire semester preparing for one event, the presentation of your business plan to a panel of established business executives who will determine your one and only grade for the course. Once you graduate from Gannon’s entrepreneurship program, you will be ready to enter into one of the fastest growing and most dynamic environments that exist in business. According to the United States Small Business Administration, small businesses represent 99.7% of all employers and they provide 60-80% of net new jobs annually. Entrepreneurship is more than a major. It’s a way of thinking. It’s a way of life.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: ENTR 310: Organizational Innovation This course examines how individuals and organizations innovate. This is accomplished by studying organizations of all sizes, from garage start-ups to global corporations, to see what can be learned about the creative process of innovation specifically around idea generation, evaluation and implementation. By the end of the semester, students will have identified and evaluated several product, service and non-profit ideas of their own. Prerequisite: BCOR 241 3 credits ENTR 330: Entrepreneurial Finance Entrepreneurial finance focuses on the issues confronting start-up ventures, and the early stages of company development. A startup venture does not have the same credibility as a well established publicly traded corporation and therefore must raise capital differently. We will address key questions relevant to these companies: how much money can and should be raised; when should it be raised and from whom; what is a reasonable valuation of the company; and how funding should be structured. In this course, these companies will be examined at all phases of their life cycles, from initial idea generation to the ultimate harvesting of the venture. We will investigate various forms of harvesting, for example, initial public offerings (IPO’s) or acquisitions and discuss the structural and legal issues of various forms of harvest. Prerequisite: BCOR 201 3 credits ENTR 410: New Venture Creation This course is for those considering going starting a business for themselves. Topics include

Undergraduate Catalog 2012-2013  

Undergraduate Catalog 2012-2013

Undergraduate Catalog 2012-2013  

Undergraduate Catalog 2012-2013

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