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RADIOLOGIC SCIENCES 439

RADIOLOGIC SCIENCES ASSOCIATE DEGREE CYNTHIA L. LIOTTA, MS, RT(R), (CT), Program Director FACULTY: Ronald G. Cuzzola, Suzanne Sturdivant. Practitioners in radiologic sciences are highly skilled professionals qualified by education to provide radiographic images of the human body to aid in the diagnosis of disease or injury. This requires development of cognitive abilities, technological skill, effective communication and interpersonal qualities that will assist the individual in this process. The Radiologic Sciences Program, fully accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, is 24 months in length. The first year is primarily didactic, with emphasis on required academic courses and introductory courses in radiologic sciences, including a clinical rotation. The professional component, which is 15 months in length, combines extensive clinical rotations with professional coursework. Clinical competency is verified through faculty assessment of student's skill level in actual performance of radiologic examinations. Students enrolled in the program must maintain a grade point average of 2.5. All Radiologic Sciences courses (RADS) and all Anatomy and Physiology courses (BIO) must be completed with a C or better to continue to the next sequenced professional course. The Associate Degree fulfills all the eligibility requirements for the national certification exam administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Radiology provides many opportunities for professional growth. The associate degree provides a foundation for continued education and certification in computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, radiation therapy, education and management. Prospective students should be aware that in order to successfully complete this program they will be required to perform certain physical functions in course work and/or clinical education. The following standards describe the physical abilities necessary to complete the program. Physical Standards (See Minimum Physical Requirements - Student Handbook:) 1. Help in lifting and/or transferring patients who may be comatose, paralyzed, or otherwise incapacitated. 2. Lift, move and push heavy equipment. Must be able to extend arms overhead (6’ from floor) and forward. 3. To insure patient safety, hear faint sounds from a distance of 15 feet, as control panels and exposure switches are located in rooms or paneled areas separate from the x-ray table on which patients are placed. 4. Hear verbal directions/requests from physicians, patients, etc; faint audible signals such as low sounding buzzers and bells to determine and recognize malfunctioning equipment. 5. See requisitions/computer screens for medical information pertaining to radiographic exams, proper equipment manipulation, proper positioning and image evaluation of exams. 6. Communicate orally and in writing instruction and directions to patients and with health care personnel. Obtain health history and other pertinent data from patients. 7. Manual dexterity, good motor skills, eye-hand coordination skills and sensory function to perform skills such as filling a syringe, putting on sterile gloves, assisting with sterile procedures, manipulating equipment, etc. )

Undergraduate Catalog 2012-2013  

Undergraduate Catalog 2012-2013

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