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that the faculty and students gain from using the equipment he donated. “I was really impressed by the new equipment and I was glad that I was able to have a part in those improvements,” said Weber. “A lot has changed in the 40 years since I had been there, and the University has really made some leaps and bounds.” Gannon prides itself on maintaining state-of-the-art equipment and exceptional computer software and graphics in its Engineering labs. “New equipment is always needed because the labs are a crucial part of the learning process in Engineering,” Torab said. “The students attend lectures and then practice in the laboratory. They learn about the equipment that they will use in their profession.”

Students Reap Rewards

The students involved in the Engineering Program appreciated the improvements that state-of-the-art technology offered. Senior Electrical Engineering major Peter Kingsley shook his head in frustration as he remembered how slow and difficult the older computers were to use. “The programs on the older computers would take a lot longer and even freeze up sometimes, and they were only a few years old,” Kingsley said. In the middle of a project the computer would often freeze and force him to restart. The new computers allow students to get a lot more done in less time.

Meier is also specializing in Power and would like to add a minor in Mathematics by the time he graduates. He chose Gannon because of its reputation and relationship with surrounding companies such as General Electric. The internships, with companies such as GE, allow students to gain more experience in using the most current technology. Senior Engineering major Melanie Blauser recently received an internship with General Electric. “Gannon gave me the ability to get hired by giving me a strong background in the engineering field and offering me the technological experience I needed,” she said. Gannon’s faculty has long recognized the crucial role played by innovation and experimentation within their fields. Through research, practical experience, and innovation, faculty members renew and revitalize their own knowledge. Most of all, they excel at bringing their subjects to life for students through hands-on experience. They know that in order to remain a leading engineering institution, Gannon must not only keep up with the ‘wet-ware,’ knowledge and innovations within the field, but also the ‘hardware’—the equipment, computer software packages and other technology with which the students must be competent as they enter the workforce. Maggie M. Irvine, a junior English major from Greenville, Pennsylvania, is the Communications Department Intern. In addition to her work for Gannon magazine as Editorial Assistant, Irvine is co-editor for Arts and Leisure at The Gannon Knight.

“If you learn the technology while you are in college, you become more valuable in the workforce because there is less that they have to teach you,” said sophomore Electrical Engineering major Sonja Becker. “If you get hired, managers are not going to want to spend the time and money training you to use their computer software or other equipment. The knowledge and know-how can give you a step up on someone else.” “Using the standard computer programs has really helped me get a feel for what kinds of things I’ll be doing when I graduate,” said senior Electrical Engineering major Brandon Meier.

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Profile for Gannon University

Fall/Winter 2003  

Stay in touch and see the history of Gannon as it’s made! Gannon Magazine is published three times annually (Winter, Spring and Summer) by t...

Fall/Winter 2003  

Stay in touch and see the history of Gannon as it’s made! Gannon Magazine is published three times annually (Winter, Spring and Summer) by t...