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PHIL 250: Comparative World Philosophy An introduction to the classics of world philosophy. Students will have a survey of some of the greatest contributions of bothWestern and Non-Western approaches to the major questions concerning issues like the good life, the self, theories of knowledge, reality versus appearance, and philosophical theology. Students will also compare and contrast the answers of thesemajor questions, using a unified standard of critical though and a unified goal of seeking insight into answers to thesemajor philosophical issues. This course fulfills the Philosophy II Series requirement. Prerequisite: LPHI 131 3 credits LPHI 255: Travel Course Philosophy of Place An overview of the philosophy of place which examines the topological and constructed development of environments. Philosophical categories of space, time, ontology, value theory, ethics and a sense of the global in relation to the local will be explored. Particular attention will be paid to the Catholic Social Teaching tradition’s emphasis on private property and the universal destination of goods. This is a GIFT course (Gannon Inspired Faculty Led Travel) and travel is required for completion of course. 3 credits History of Philosophy Cycle Attention should be paid to the fact that the history of philosophy is expounded systematically in a four semester cycle with one of the histories of philosophy being offered in each semester. PHIL 271: History of Ancient Philosophy A critical presentation of the rise of Western Philosophy in Greece in the seventh century before Christ and its development in the fourth century B.C. up to the third century of the Christian era. 3 credits PHIL 273: History of Medieval Philosophy A study of Augustine and the great synthesis of Thomas Aquinas, analyzed in the context of the philosophic-theological intellectual atmosphere of the thirteenth century. Non-Thomistic syntheses of Bacon, Bonaventure, and Duns Scotus are evaluated. Then the decline of scholasticism is studied with emphasis on Ockham, Suarez and the Electives. 3 credits PHIL 280: History of Modern Philosophy A critical presentation of philosophers and philosophical trends from the Italian Renaissance of the XV century to the early XIX century. 3 credits PHIL 286: History of Contemporary Philosophy A survey of some of the most important philosophical movements and thinkers of the latenineteenth and twentieth centuries, both in the Anglo-American and the Continental traditions. 3 credits PHIL 290: Philosophy & Law A discussion of the philosophical foundations of law and an investigation into the scope of legal philosophy. Questions such as: what is law? what is a legal system in a society? do the criteria for the existence of law include a moral element? how shall legal obligations be understood? will be discussed. In addition, the relationship between law and morality, and the common good must be reviewed. 3 credits PHIL 345: Philosophy of History Critical examination of the philosophers of history and their concern with the nature of history and the meaning of historical knowledge. 3 credits PHIL 350: Introduction to Metaphysics The nature of metaphysics as the study of being is examined in the philosophy of Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas. The study of essence and existence, potency and act, substance and accident, matter and form, is developed systematically. 3 credits PHIL 365: Modern Existentialism “Existentialism” refers to those modern philosophies concerned with the meaning of human existence, the experience of anxiety and absurdity, and the problem of personal responsibility.

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Gannon Undergraduate Catalog 2018-2019  

Gannon Undergraduate Catalog 2018-2019