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by examining the connections between various regions, including circulations of people, goods, and ideologies. 3 credits HIST 304: Introduction to Museum Studies This course intends to survey the field of museum studies and introduce the student to the world of museums/historical societies and to various facets of exhibit research, design, and implementation. There will be a “hands-on” component as well as a theoretical underpinning to museum best practices. The course will cover methods adopted by curators and educators in the care and preservation of artifacts, and issues currently debated in the field. Topics include: collection, acquisition, cataloguing, and inventorying. There will be a class project in museum exhibit design, utilizing archaeological resources in the Archaeology Museum Gallery at Gannon. 3 credits HIST 307: History Through Arabic Literature Literature is a key cultural element throughout Arabic history, from pre-Islamic poetry slams to brilliant court poets to jailed dissidents “then and now.” This course aims to give a general survey of literary works written in Arabic from the 6th century until the present and their links to historical developments vital to understanding Arabic and Middle Eastern/North African history. It adopts a chronological format appropriate to such a historical survey, examining from the outset the important role of the Qur’an in the literary heritage and the poetic milieu into which it emerged. We will explore the earliest prose tradition, popular literature such as the Arabian Nights, and the renaissance (nahda) in the 19th century as well as the emergence of a modern tradition of Arabic literature, with special attention to the novel. The course is literaryhistorical, using a sequencing that avoids tying literary trends strictly to external events, while yet investigating the myriad political, religious and social influences upon literature. 3 credits HIST 310: The Renaissance and Reformation The development of humanism and the great intellectual, artistic and cultural achievements of the Renaissance in Italy and subsequently in northern Europe. The religious, social, political and economic factors underlying the division of Christianity, the great Protestant reformers, their life and work. Prerequisite: LHST 111 3 credits HIST 311: The Global Sixties This course will examine the1960s as a global phenomenon. Through thematic sections centered on events in the Soviet Union, China, France, West Germany, Algeria, Japan, Palestine, America, and Mexico, students will learn world history through the prism of a tumultuous era. Our primary goal is in fact to evaluate the topic of the course: “the 60s.” Is there something, or some set of characteristics, that coherently links these events together (other than the fact that they occur in the same decade)? Are there shared problems, or approaches, that link the various political and cultural phenomena? 3 credits HIST 312: The Baroque and Enlightenment Era: Europe 1648-1780 The major features of European cultural and political history from the Peace of Westphalia to the beginning of the French Revolution. Prerequisite: LHST 111 3 credits HIST 313: Enlightenment and Revolution This course will explore relationship between the social and intellectual history of the Enlightenment with the political revolutions of the late eighteenth century. Prerequisite: LHST 111 3 credits HIST 315: Modern Egypt This course explores the history of modern Egypt, from the 1919 Revolution against British occupation to the 1952 Revolution against the monarchy through the 2011 and 2013 Revolutions, with special attention to people—with widely varying experiences—as architects of that country. We will encounter Egyptian history through autobiography, film, political and digital history, literature, and even graffiti. 3 credits

Profile for Gannon University

Gannon Undergraduate Catalog 2018-2019  

Gannon Undergraduate Catalog 2018-2019