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individual, and organizational forces. The course will examine theoretical propositions about the police in light of current research literature and analyze the three major functions of policing in the United States: law enforcement, service provision, and the maintenance of order. The legal parameters of policing and police administration are reviewed in relation to contemporary issues that pose substantial challenges to police officers and administrators and finally probes contemporary concerns and future challenges such as the critical issues of deadly force, AIDS, affirmative action, and police deviance. The student will also explore the contemporary police industry including public and private agencies at the federal, state and municipal levels. 3 credits, Spring CRJS 205: Principles of Private Security and Loss Prevention An introduction to principles of private security and loss prevention, including the history and role of private security; threat assessment and security survey; and principles of physical security, including personnel security and functional area security systems. This course will also focus on the legal aspects of private security, touching on civil and criminal liabilities. 3 credits CRJS 210: Criminalistics I: Introduction to Investigative Forensics An introduction to Forensic Science course that introduces the non-scientific student as well as the science based student to the field of forensic science through an exploration of its applications to criminal investigations, with clear explanations of the techniques, abilities, and limitations of the modern crime laboratory. Forensic science is the application of science to those criminal and civil laws that are enforced by agencies in a criminal justice system. This course will familiarize the student with the most current technologies in forensic analysis that private, police and law enforcement professionally rely on to approach criminal perpetrators and to link them through trace evidence to crime scenes. You will also be introduced to the various forensic sciences that make up a typical full service crime laboratory and the role it plays as part of the criminal justice system. This course will also provide students with insight into the issues surrounding physical evidence; introduce students to basic concepts and encourage their exploration of latest websites. Actual cases enable students to see the role of forensic science in criminal investigations and highlight the integral part forensic science plays in modern criminal investigations. 3 credits CRJS 212: Intro to Forensic Psychology Forensic Psychology is generally defined as the application of the science and profession of psychology to issues relating to law and the legal system. This course is intended to provide an overview of the various applications of psychology to forensic settings. This course focuses on the production and application of psychological knowledge and research findings for the civil and criminal justice systems. The student will explore criminal profiling, crime scene investigations, and serial murders. Based on this applications approach, the course also investigates police psychology, legal psychology, psychology of crimes and delinquency, “victimology� and victim services, psychological assessments, mental disorders, and correctional psychology. Prerequisite: CRJS 110 and PSYC 111 3 credits CRJS 230: Juvenile Delinquency and Adolescent Development This course examines delinquency in American society, the history of delinquency and major theoretical concepts that have been utilized to explain criminal behavior and juvenile delinquency with suggestions for the future. Ethnographic research methods will be utilized to identify behaviors and place qualitative meaning to the observed behaviors. 3 credits CRJS 240: Criminological Theory This course is designed to provide an overview of the scientific study of crime as a social phenomenon of criminal behavior. Criminological theory will be addressed from a sociological perspective and issues related to the measurement and extent of crime. The major schools of thought will be discussed utilizing the founders of each school and supplementing their premises with supporting criminology research. 3 credits, Spring

Profile for Gannon University

Gannon Undergraduate Catalog 2018-2019  

Gannon Undergraduate Catalog 2018-2019