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Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018

THE MONTHLY JOURNAL of THE

The resource for health, fitness, coaching, physical education, & recreation professionals.

Nutrition by Nancy Clark

Training Guidelines by Phil Alwitt

Business of Personal Training by Wendy Williamson

Across the Gamut by Wayne Westcott , Rita La Rosa Loud, Michelle Pearson, Samantha Vallier

Create a niche. KNOW. TRAIN. RETAIN.


FROM THE EDITOR “T

he great aim of education is not knowledge, but action.” Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) English philosopher, political theorist, and sociological theorist.

Education and experience give rise to knowledge. So then, what’s next? Thinking and truly understanding! The value of knowledge comes to fruition following understanding and realizing the intended meaning of an action stimulated by knowledge. Knowledge is awareness. Understanding is the “why” of “what.” In other words, the action makes perfect sense! This process: learning and experience  knowledge  thinking and understanding  action, repeated over and over, results in better and better performance and achievements. Enjoy reading another issue of the Gamut’s relevant, educational articles. And, do enjoy this Holiday Season! We wish you all the very best in 2018!

If you find an article in Health and Wellness Across the Gamut of Life! that you feel would be beneficial to a friend, family member or co-worker, all you have to do is forward this link, www.AAHF.info, to that person through email. We welcome your feedback about the contents of this journal and encourage you to submit topics that are of interest to: Pete@aahf.info We are committed to our mission of providing education and training for health, fitness, physical education and recreation professionals across the GAMUT of life! Have a question? Want more information on a specific topic? Ask the Experts

Be knowledgeable! Be successful!

Pete

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Pete Bazzel Editor-in-Chief 800.957.7348 Pete@AAHF.info www.AAHF.info

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE Updates from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

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Nutrition article by Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD

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Pressure Biofeedback: The Secret Tool for Core Strength and Stability Training Guidelines and Programs article by Phil Alwitt

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Customer Service and the Personal Trainer The Business of Personal Training article by Wendy A. Williamson, PhD, CPT

Differential Effects of our Exercise and Nutrition Program on Weight Loss Participants and Arthritis Patients

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Across the Gamut article by Wayne Westcott, PhD, CSCS, Rita La Rosa Loud, BS, CPT (AFAA), Michelle Pearson, M.S., and Samantha Vallier, A.S.

Ask the Experts 159

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References

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Health and Wellness Across the Gamut of LIFE! is published by the American Academy of Health and Fitness, LLC located in Springfield, Virginia 22153. Copyright 2017.

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


Updates from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics by Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD (Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics), who has a private practice in the Boston area (Newton) where she counsels both casual exercisers and competitive athletes and is author of Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook. Contact info

oxidant rich fruits and vegetables). Adaptation creates a change for the better in an athlete’s physiology.  Alcohol contributes to hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) by suppressing the release of glucose from the liver into the blood stream. If an athlete hasn’t eaten much food (as can easily happen after an event), alcohol in an empty stomach can easily lead to hypoglycemia (a lack of glucose for the brain) and a drunken stupor. The same happens when a person with diabetes has low blood glucose; he or she can get mistaken for being drunk when the brain just needs food.  In contrast to recreational marijuana, which is used with the intent to impair normal functioning, medical marijuana (MM) is used to relieve pain, reduce nausea and vomiting, and to overcome loss of appetite (as with cancer). If you have parents or friends who are new to using MM, caution them about using edibles. When MM is eaten, its pain relieving benefits are delayed for 30 to 120 minutes, as opposed to smoked MM, which offers immediate benefits. The problem with the delayed response with edibles is that a patient can easily overdose while waiting to feel an effect.  Meal timing affects circadian rhythms—as well as weight management. A study (Garaulet, 2013) with 420 subjects who ate an early lunch, or a later lunch, reports the early lunch eaters lost more weight, despite consuming the same number of calories and getting the same amount of sleep. Your best bet is to eat more food earlier in the day. As you have

Nutrition misinformation and food confusion surrounds today’s health-conscious athletes. To arm myself with knowledge to better educate my clients, I (along with 10,000 other registered dietitians) attended the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics annual convention to learn the latest food and nutrition updates. Here is some information that might help you on your health journey.  Stress fractures are a common sports injury. Among 42 Division-1 cross-country runners, 35% of the male and 41% of the female runners reported having had a stress fracture. Inadequate nutrition could have contributed to the problem. Their diets tended to be low in calories, calcium and/or vitamin D. If you are going to push your body to the limits, at least fuel it optimally!  If intestinal distress sidetracks you during exercise, try reducing your intake of apples, onion, garlic and broccoli—particularly for 2 to 3 days before a competitive event. These are just a few commonly eaten foods that are high in fermentable (gas-producing) carbohydrates; they might contribute to undesired pit stops. You could also meet with a sports dietitian to help you systematically discover triggering foods. The referral network at www.SCANdpg.org can help you find your local sports food expert.  Exercise increases harmful free radicals within muscles that can lead to oxidative damage and inflammation. Should athletes supplement with anti-oxidants to counter this? No. The better bet is to let the body adapt to these higher levels (and eat abundant anti-

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


NUTRITION iodine reduces the risk of goiter. Preservatives that have been generally regarded as safe help bread stay fresh for longer, reduce the growth of mold on cheese, and reduce the amount of food you waste. These ingredients can be beneficial for you and for the environment.  Sugar-sweetened beverages are the biggest source of dietary sugar in the US diet. Hence, research on sugar and health has focused on soft drinks. The question remains unanswered: Is sugar added to nourishing foods a health hazard? That is, is sugar added to spaghetti sauce (to make it less acidic) bad for you? What about the sugar added to bread (to help make the dough rise)? Is that a cause for concern? Doubtful. Yet, too many consumers freak out when a product lists sugar on the food label. Please note: sugar is just one of many nutrients listed on the label. Please look at the whole nutrient package. For example, chocolate milk has sugar (that refuels muscles) but it also offers protein (to repair muscles), sodium (to replace sweat loss), calcium and vitamin D to enhance bone health. Dietary guidelines say 10% of total calories can come from added sugar. That’s 200 to 300 calories a day for athletes. Do you really need to freak out about a little sugar that makes that spaghetti sauce taste better? I think you can find bigger things to worry about.

undoubtedly heard before: Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, dinner like a pauper.  We compromise our well-being every time we have a mismatch between the environment and our internal biological clock. (Think jet lag, shift work, sleep apnea, and watching latenight TV.) Every cell has a biological clock; all these cellular clocks need to be synchronized. If not, bodies become unhealthy. For example, shift workers experience more high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes than people who work 9:00 to 5:00. For athletes, jet lag means poorer performance. Sleep is restorative and helps synchronize cell biorhythms. If you have trouble sleeping well:  avoid caffeine at least 4 hours before bedtime and limit it to 2 mugs (400 mg. caffeine) a day.  turn off your computer screen/TV an hour before bed.  Consumers are self-defining “healthy food.” It needs to be organic, natural, non-GMO, free of dyes/additives/ colors, and have a “clean” label with no strange words. Will this trendy definition lead to unintended health consequences as food producers try to meet consumers’ demands? Likely yes. If you make your food decisions based on trends rather than science, you might want to take a step back and look at the whole picture. For example, enriched foods offer added nutrients that can make a label look “dirty” but the extra ingredients are good for your health. Added iron reduces your risk of becoming anemic; folic acid reduces the risk of birth defects;

Contact Nancy at www.nancyclarkrd.com.

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Pressure Biofeedback: The Secret Tool for Core Strength and Stability by Phil Alwitt, the founder and CEO of MyCore Health, Inc. and an expert in developing products to improve peoples’ health and quality of life—from robotic exoskeletons to the CoreCoach pressure biofeedback device. Contact info

Flex your bicep. Go ahead and flex it really hard. By flexing your bicep you just asked your brain to make the connection between the thought of flexing your bicep and activating the muscle. But not all our muscles are so easy to control. Consider the transverse abdominis (TVA) muscle for instance. It’s an incredibly important muscle for core stability. Without it you would not be able to stand erect and the downward pressures would be absorbed directly by your spine. Hiding behind the well-publicized 6-pack, a healthy and strong TVA is an absolutely critical muscle.

Pressure biofeedback device Pressure biofeedback was popularized by Professors Richardson and Jull in 1993 while in the Department of Physiotherapy at the University of Queensland, Australia. It was later incorporated by Paul Chek into the Check Institute programs. Many studies have since been published validating the efficacy of pressure biofeedback to evaluate, activate and strengthen the TVA.

Now flex your TVA. For most people this is more easily said than done. Unless you are already familiar with how to activate your TVA, you may have no idea how to start. If that’s the case, your brain has not yet made the connection between wanting to activate your TVA and actually doing it. And you can’t actively strengthen your TVA until you make the connection between your brain and the muscle.

Richardson and Jull discovered that when laying supine with knees bent and the air pillow under the lumbar spine, proper activation of the TVA was identified when a target was reached, as indicated on the gauge. When the TVA muscle is not active, the pressure will not increase appropriately. (A similar test is often performed when laying prone as well.)

So how do you start? Physical therapists discovered a solution over two decades ago that is now a valuable tool for fitness trainers too. It’s called pressure biofeedback. But before discussing pressure biofeedback, let’s define biofeedback.

Biofeedback uses an intermediary device to enable a conscious connection between the brain and a subsequent action. Some common biofeedback devices include electromyography (EMG) biofeedback to measure muscle tension as it changes to help relieve muscle spasms and electroencephalography (EEG) to measure brain wave activity to resolve headaches. A simple form of biofeedback is a common oral thermometer. It is difficult to know your exact temperature without a thermometer. Once you take your temperature, the reading on the thermometer enables you to take action such as taking medicine or not. The thermometer is a biofeedback device to guide you to make a conscious action.

By receiving the visual feedback from the gauge, the brain makes the connection between wanting to activate the muscle and actually activating it. It then becomes second nature. At that point the pressure biofeedback device is used to strengthen the TVA using progressively more difficult exercises. Watching the gauge and getting the visual feedback during these exercises enhances the efficacy of the exercise. The resulting increase in strength provides a great base for all fitness activities from weightlifting to running. It’s this base that makes pressure biofeedback an important tool for fitness trainers of all types.

Pressure biofeedback devices are very simple analog tools that consist of an air pillow and a sensitive pressure gauge similar to a blood pressure gauge. Pressure biofeedback merely uses a change in pressure as visually indicated on the gauge to identify and monitor TVA muscle activation, a body function otherwise difficult to target.

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TRAINING GUIDELINES AND PROGRAMS After the brain and the TVA muscle make the connection, continued use of the pressure biofeedback device is recommended. Even though the TVA muscle is active at this point, proper strengthening is enhanced by using the visual cues from the gauge to coach proper form. It is found that when the device is not used, most people quickly revert to using compensatory muscles.

I used to be very active; biking, windsurfing, skiing, running or ultimate Frisbee almost every day. That all changed when I was 31 and herniated my first disc. Fast forward 20 years. I am now 51 with three herniated discs, spondylosis and I’m two inches shorter due to disc degeneration. Needless to say, my active lifestyle took a big shift. I saw all kinds of Eastern and Western practitioners over the years. I stretched and worked my core every morning without fail. But my back still ached and I was beaten down with back spasms for 2-3 months every year.

Considering the importance of the TVA and the difficulty of consciously targeting the muscle, pressure biofeedback is an ideal tool. By using the gauge to coach proper TVA activation, clients will be able to workout with less chance of injury. Since pressure biofeedback devices are small and portable and require just a few minutes of use a day, they are ideal for clients to use at home in preparation for their training and more vigorous fitness routine.

Then, in 2015 I visited a physical therapist when in the midst of a back spasm. She introduced me to two things: first, she introduced me to my TVA, a muscle that after twenty years of visiting practitioners I knew little about. Then she pulled out a pressure biofeedback device. It turned out that my TVA was not active and I did not have good control of the muscle. My twenty years of plank and crunches and core exercises were not properly building my core. Within 10 minutes my brain connected with my TVA. I started to use the device daily. After a few days I felt sturdy and more upright. Soon I was mountain biking without taking ibuprofen. I got back into windsurfing. Just 6 months later I hiked Half Dome in Yosemite, a feat I would not have previously attempted for fear that my back would have gone out in the midst of the trek. But best of all, I have not had a single back spasm since I started—not one!

Low impact TVA strengthening exercise using pressure bio‐ feedback

Pressure biofeedback completely changed my life. Without it I would never have made the conscious connection between my brain and the transverse abdominis muscle. It enabled me to get back to the activities I love and, as I later learned, has done the same for thousands of other people too. And as an advocate of pressure biofeedback I have partnered with hundreds of fitness trainers, physical therapists and fellow weekend warriors to spread the word that the TVA is king of the core and pressure biofeedback is a key to a healthy TVA. Contact Phil at palwitt@corehealthbrands.com

More intense TVA/lower abdominal exercise by focusing on pressure biofeedback gauge Now that you know what pressure biofeedback is and a little bit about how it works, I’ll tell you a success story as a result of using pressure biofeedback. It happens to be mine.

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Customer Service and the Personal Trainer by Wendy A. Williamson, PhD, CPT (ACE and NASM), ACE Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist, Post Rehabilitation Specialist, nationally recognized as a leading educator, writer, author, and consultant. Contact info

Good-to-great customer service spurs on a successful personal trainer's career. Though not all of the success can be attributed to great customer service, a large portion can be attributed to the fitness professional’s interpersonal skills. Over 70% of Americans (2011) said they were willing to spend more money with companies they believe provide excellent customer service. However, many people believe customer service, regardless of the business, is a “lost art.” Two reasons for this include 1) customers feel poorly treated and 2) failure to problem solve in a timely manner. What makes up customer service in the personal training world? It is the act of addressing and satisfying the client’s expectations. Whether one-on-one personal training session, or a small group session (2-4 clients), great customer service is achievable by the attentive personal trainer/fitness professional. Interestingly, 80% agree that smaller companies place a greater emphasis on customer service than larger businesses. This is your client’s expectation. Whatever happened to the simple ideas of customer service such as greeting clients by saying “Good morning. How are you today?” or “What can I do for you?”, “Did you have a great weekend?”, “Did you feel good after our last appointment?”, “Do you have any questions regarding your last session?” The close interaction is extremely helpful in the fitness industry. Let’s dig deeper to find the skills that truly matter. Patience is clearly important and near the top of the list. When a client is frustrated or confused, patience is key. Clients would rather have a competent, patient, and safe professional than be rushed or experi-

ence a not-so-patient fitness professional during the personal training session. When a fitness professional is actively listening, he/she is focused and in-tune to what the client is saying. Positive body language illustrates the interaction and interest of the client. Often, it is helpful for the fitness professional to try and interpret the client’s comments for clarity and understanding. What a personal trainer may “hear,” unfortunately, may not be what the client is actually saying.

Ironically, 80% of companies believe they deliver “superior” customer service; yet only 8% of customers think these same companies deliver “superior” customer service. Perhaps, a company’s perception of customer service can be extremely distorted? Keep in mind that an average of 9 people talk about good experiences whereas 16 will talk about poor experiences. And, of note, 24% of American adults have posted comments or reviews online about the products or services they buy. Communication needs to be simple and clear between the fitness professional and the client. Being cautious and being sure the client understands what is being said is imperative, espe-

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THE BUSINESS OF PERSONAL TRAINING important to keep the client. Although, perhaps unusual, this does happen and initially not all personal trainers can adapt to this type of situation. Hopefully, with experience and time, interpreting the client’s frustration or irritation will be learned. Finally, another skill necessary for providing customer service is having the ability to “think on your feet” and problem solve during a session. This could involve the service or the science within the session. Regardless, if problem solving is successful, 70% of the time the client will return. In addition to the providing an exceptional training experience, customer service can be as simple as a phone call to see how the client may be doing, a birthday card, or checking in on a significant event. A personal trainer needs to recognize that they need to continue to provide the best experience for the client. Customer service is vital. Continuing to learn and growing professionally is also vital to the client experience. Magically, the blend of both will continue to stimulate an outstanding career.

cially when getting to know the client. Too often, the personal trainer initially expects too much understanding from the client and that can be dangerous and disappointing for the progression of the client’s goals. Can the personal trainer lose some professionalism and become too comfortable? Absolutely! There is a fine line between too casual and not maintaining professionalism. The session is about the client, not the personal trainer. Often during the session, the personal trainer communicates too much about his/her personal life, looks at the smart phone or drinks coffee. The session begins to lose focus and the client recognizes the decrease in session-value. Also of significant importance is imparting knowledge. Respect is only gained when the personal trainer provides knowledge and hears the feedback from the client. Rightly so, it is just as respectful when the personal trainer recognizes their lack of knowledge and refers to another personal trainer or refers to an appropriate medical professional. When a client seeks a fitness professional, they are hoping to gain some knowledge, understanding and direction regarding their fitness program. As a result, it is helpful that the personal trainer can provide positive interaction, encouragement and enhance the professional relationship. If not, the client may not return for another session or seek additional assistance. In fact, it takes 12 positive experiences to make up for one unresolved negative experience. Secondly, it costs 6-7 times more to acquire a new customer than to keep a current one. Likewise, there are times when no matter the interaction between the client and the personal trainer there seems that nothing can make the client happy. It is at this time; patience, encouragement, and listening, are all extremely

References Contact Wendy at: http://www.williamsonwc.com/

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DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF OUR EXERCISE AND NUTRITION PROGRAM ON WEIGHT LOSS PARTICIPANTS AND ARTHRITIS PATIENTS by Wayne Westchester, PhD, CSCS, Rita La Rosa Loud, BS, CPT (AFAA), Michelle Pearson, M.S., and Samantha Vallier, A.S. Wayne directs the Quincy College Fitness Research Programs. Rita is an author and Adjunct Professor at Quincy College.. Contact info

Approximately 70 percent of American adults are overweight or obese,6 even though almost the same percentage of men and women report that they are following reduced calorie diet plans.12 It would, therefore, appear that dieting alone is not an effective lifestyle intervention for attaining and maintaining a desirable body weight, let alone for achieving an ideal body composition. Following an extensive review of weight loss research studies, Mann and associates9 concluded that diet programs rarely lead to sustained improvement in body weight or health parameters and that very few dieters maintained their weight loss. The primary reason dieting results in only temporary reduction in body weight is that about 25 percent of the weight loss associated with typical diet programs is lean (muscle) weight.1 Muscle loss leads to resting metabolic rate reduction,16 which facilitates fat gain when normal eating patterns are resumed. Because most diet programs reduce caloric intake from all food groups, many dieters accelerate lean weight loss by consuming too little protein.8 On the other hand, several research studies show that resistance exercise can concurrently increase lean weight, increase resting metabolic rate, and decrease fat weight.2,7,10 Likewise, research reveals that higher daily protein intake can further enhance lean weight gain and fat weight loss.3,4,13,15 In a recent 6-month weight loss study our participants increased their lean weight by almost 4 pounds and decreased their fat weight by 14 pounds, for a 10-pound reduction in body weight and an 18-pound improvement in body composition.14 How did they achieve this beneficial result? The participants performed regular resistance exercise, consumed 2 daily meal-substitute protein-rich shakes, and ate between 1,200-

1,500 calories per day (women) or 1,500-1,800 calories per day (men). Even more impressive, the participants in our follow-up 6-month weight maintenance study sustained their weight loss while continuing to increase lean weight and decrease fat weight. Although these subjects no longer restricted their caloric intake, they continued to do regular resistance exercise and drink 1 daily meal-substitute protein-rich shake. Based on these findings, we decided to do a 3-month study with two groups of older adults who typically experience relatively high levels of muscle loss and fat gain, namely, obese/overweight individuals and arthritis patients. By 2020, approximately 60 million Americans will suffer from arthritis5, which is associated with and exacerbated by muscle loss and fat gain.11 We placed both groups of study subjects on the same strength training program (10 resistance machine exercises; 1 set; 8-12 repetitions; 2-3 days/week). We also encouraged all of the program participants to follow the higher-protein diet plan used in our previous studies. We ran these two minor studies concurrently: one for the older adults whose main objective was to lose weight (and improve body composition); one for the older adults whose main objective was to reduce arthritic symptoms (and improve body composition). The overweight participants were fine with our general dietary and exercise recommendations, and trained accordingly. The arthritic participants were much less inclined to change their dietary and physical activity patterns. They were especially cautious with the resistance exercise, using relatively light weights and progressing to slightly heavier loads very gradually. Undoubtedly, they were fearful of aggravating their arthritis and attempting to avoid flare-ups. We did not have

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ACROSS THE GAMUT a problem with this, and allowed them to train in a most conservative manner. As shown in Table 1, the obese/overweight subjects were successful in attaining their objectives of improved body weight and body composition. Similarly, as presented in Table 2, the arthritis patients’ experienced desirable reductions in general body pain and general body fatigue. We actually gained some valuable and practical information from this relatively small and simple study. First, we confirmed the results of two previous 3-month weight loss research studies,13,14 in which the subjects attained essentially the same improvement in percent fat (-2.6%; -2.9%; -3.0%), approximately the same amount of fat weight decrease (-7.0 lbs.; -7.1 lbs.; -7.6 lbs.), and similar amounts of lean weight increase (+0.8 lbs.; +1.7 lbs.; +1.1 lbs.) as in our present study. These relatively consistent program outcomes indicate that the combination of reasonable caloric restriction, higher protein intake, and basic resistance exercise is effective for reducing body weight and improving body composition with concurrent fat loss and muscle gain. Second, we discovered that older adults who have arthritic conditions may prefer to make smaller dietary modifications and to perform resistance exercise at more moderate effort levels. The fact that our older arthritic patients took a more cautious approach to these lifestyle changes is certainly understandable. In fact, their more gradual adoption of and adaptation to our recommended resistance exercise and nutrition program may have been a major factor in their improved general body pain and fatigue scores.

previous studies is highly effective for reducing body weight and improving body composition (with concurrent fat loss and muscle gain) in obese/overweight older adults; and (2) this resistance and nutrition program is beneficial for reducing general body pain and fatigue in older arthritic patients, while eliciting modest improvements in body weight and body composition. TABLE 1. Three-month changes in selected assessments for obese/overweight old adult participants in the exercise and nutrition program (N=10; Average age 69 years).

Body Weight

-6.5 lbs.

Percent Fat

-3.0 %

Fat Weight

-7.6 lbs.

Lean Weight

+1.1 lbs.

TABLE 2. Three-month changes in selected assessments for older adult arthritis patients in the exercise and nutrition program (N=6; average age 71 years).

Body Weight

-3.1 lbs.

Percent Fat

-1.1 %

Fat Weight

-2.8 lbs.

Lean Weight

-0.3 lbs.

General Body Pain

-2.2 points (5.2 to 3.0)

General Body Fatigue

-1.2 points (4.0 to 2.8) References

Conclusion We conclude that: (1) the resistance exercise and nutrition program incorporated in this and our

Contact Wayne at wwestcott@quincycollege.edu. Contact Rita at plloud@msn.com.

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Ask the Experts NAOMI AARONSON – MIND BODY Naomi Aaronson, MA OTR/L CHT CPI, is an occupational therapist, certified hand therapist, and mat Pilates instructor who believes in the power of exercise in recovery. Naomi’s articles have been featured in IDEA Fitness Journal, Occupational Therapy ADVANCE, and Women and Cancer maga‐ zines. She is the co‐author of the continuing education courses Return to Life: Breast Cancer Recov‐ ery Using Pilates, Breast Cancer Recovery: On Land and In Water, and The Breast Cancer Recovery Exercise Program. Naomi offers live courses through Integrated Rehabilitation and Fitness. recovercises@aol.com

www.recovercisesforwellness.com

PHIL ALWITT – CORE STRENGTH AND STABILITY Phil Alwitt is the founder and CEO of MyCore Health, Inc. and an expert in developing products to improve peoples' health and quality of life‐from robotic exoskeletons to the CoreCoach pressure biofeedback device. As an entrepreneur and product developer Phil works with the industry's lead‐ ing fitness and medical professionals to guide the success of the products he develops. Phil is the recipient of multiple patents, product design awards and, as an athlete with decades of chronic back pain, is the beneficiary of many of the products he develops. www.corehealthbrands.com

palwitt@corehealthbrands.com

PETE BAZZEL – EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Pete Bazzel, MS, CPT (ACE), is Partner and Editor‐in‐Chief for the American Academy of Health and Fitness (AAHF); served in the military, retiring as a Colonel; then led the Washington, D.C. regional growth of Town Sports International from 3 to 17 clubs. He co‐created SrFit™ and JrFit™, 19‐24 hour continuing education specialty certification courses focusing on mature adult and youth fitness respectively; and Move More, Eat Better ‐ YOU Matter!™, a lifestyle change course for the general public. He is a World Tae Kwon Do Federation Black Belt. Pete@AAHF.info

www.AAHF.info

MELISSA BAUMGARTNER – WELLNESS COUNSELING Melissa Baumgartner, CPT (ACE, ACSM, AFAA and WellCoach), is co‐owner of Midwest Fitness Con‐ sulting, LLC, a company in the St. Louis area that specializes in worksite health promotion; and cre‐ ator of LWC, a Lifestyle Wellness Coaching program. Melissa has worked in the health and fitness industry for 25 years, spending the last twelve as an educator, speaker and author. She has pre‐ sented to thousands of people spreading her message on happiness and well‐being. www.melissabaumgartner.com

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RANDALL BROAD – BUSINESS OF PERSONAL TRAINING Randall Broad is an entrepreneur, business founder, and the guiding force behind several enterprises. After working in the aerospace industry, he moved to Hollywood to embrace his dream of being an actor, making commercials and being a leading man stunt double. In 1990, he founded Opal Enterprises, a marketing services company. A cancer survivor, he now takes the stage professionally to share his lessons on living a work/life balanced existence. In the book he co-authored, It's an Extraordinary Life, he has chronicled his experiences and adventures for future generations to learn from and enjoy. www.itsanextraordinarylife.com

www.cancersurvivorsinspiration.com

BRADLEY J. CARDINAL – EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE Bradley J. Cardinal, Ph.D., is a Full Professor in Exercise and Sport Science at Oregon State University. In 2009 he received the university’s Elizabeth P. Ritchie Distinguished Professor award. He previously served on the faculties of Wayne State University (Detroit, MI) and Eastern Washington University (Cheney, WA). He is Fellow #475 of the National Academy of Kinesiology; a Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine; a Fellow in the North American Society of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport and Dance Professionals; and a Fellow in the Research Consortium of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance.

Brad.Cardinal@oregonstate.edu

http://health.oregonstate.edu/people/cardinal-bradley

JOHN PAUL CATANZARO – PERSONAL TRAINING John Paul Catanzaro, BSc Kin, CSEP-CEP is a Certified Exercise Physiologist with a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology and Health Science. He owns and operates a private facility in Richmond Hill, Ontario providing training and nutritional consulting. John Paul has authored two books, The Elite Trainer (2011) and Mass Explosion (2013), and has released two DVDs, Stretching for Strengthening (2003) and Warm-Up to Strength Training (2005), which have sold copies worldwide, been featured in several magazines, and have been endorsed by many leading experts. In 2013, John Paul released two new webinars, Strength Training Parameters and Program Design and Body Composition Strategies. www.CatanzaroGroup.com

SHARON CHAMBERLIN – PERSONAL TRAINING Sharon Chamberlin, BA, CPT (ACE), Fitness Nutrition Coach (NESTA), Lifestyle Fitness Coach (Spencer Institute), owns Catalyst 4 Fitness, a personal training company offering online fitness and nutrition coaching, boot camp classes, traditional fitness training, and fitness consulting. Her success with clients, both in the gym and online, is based on her pragmatic philosophy and realistic attitude.

www.catalyst4fitness.com

sharon@catalyst4fitness.com

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Ask the Experts MARCI CLARK – PILATES Marci Clark, MA, CPT, GFI, is an international fitness and wellness programming presenter with over 20 years experience in the fitness industry, specializing in Pilates exercise. She is the creator of the Foundational Pilates program and owner of Marci Clark Wellness Centers. Marci is widely published in the areas of Pilates, fitness programming and business and consults in the areas of group fitness, programming and business planning.

http://www.linkedin.com/in/marciclark

NANCY CLARK – NUTRITION Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD (Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics), counsels both casual and competitive athletes in her private practice at Healthworks, the premier fitness center in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. Her Sports Nutrition Guidebook and food guides for marathoners, new runners, and cyclists are available via www.nancyclarkrd.com. For a list of upcoming events/workshops, see www.sportsnutritionworkshop.com.

www.nancyclarkrd.com

www.sportsnutritionworkshop.com

CASEY CONRAD – GROWING YOUR PT BUSINESS Casey Conrad, BA, JD, President of Communication Consultants WBS, Inc., has been in the health and fitness industry for 26 years. In addition to authoring “Selling Fitness: The Complete Guide to Selling Health Club Memberships,” she has created and published over 25 other sales, marketing and man‐ agement training products for the industry. She has spoken in 19 countries, is a feature presenter at conventions and trade shows worldwide and writes monthly for numerous international maga‐ zines.

Casey@CaseyConrad.com

www.CaseyConrad.com

ERICA N. CONRAD – EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE Erica N. Conrad is a student majoring in Exercise and Sport Science at Oregon State University. She worked for a running store where she sold running shoes to customers and gained interest in both gait mechanics and barefoot running. Her goal for this paper is to inform people of the advantages and disadvantages of shod, barefoot, and minimalist running. Erica plans on enrolling in a Doctor of Physical Therapy program for a career working as a Physical Therapist and hopes this paper will help prevent future injuries or complications for people.

conrade@onid.orst.edu

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


CATHERINE CRAM – PRE- AND POSTNATAL FITNESS Catherine Cram, MS, is the owner of Comprehensive Fitness Consulting, LLC, a company that spe‐ cializes in providing pre‐ and postnatal fitness continuing education certifications and information to health and fitness professionals. Catherine is co‐author of the 2012‐revised edition of “Exercis‐ ing Through Your Pregnancy” with Dr. James Clapp. She is the author of “Fit Pregnancy for Dummies” (Wiley Publishing, 2004) and contributing author of “Women’s Health Care in Physical Therapy” (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009). She was appointed to serve as the International Childbirth Education Association Perinatal Fitness Subgroup Chair in 2013. ppfconsultingllc@gmail.com

prenatalandpostpartumfitnessconsulting.com

CAMMY DENNIS – YOUTH AND MATURE ADULT FITNESS PROGRAMMING Cammy Dennis, BS, CPT (ACE and AFAA), is Fitness Director for On Top of the World Communities Inc., a 55‐plus adult community and The Ranch Fitness Center and Spa. Her 20 years experience in the fitness industry includes group exercise instruction, personal training, lifestyle coaching and program management. Her specialty is curriculum development for youth and senior fitness. She co‐authored Kids In Motion and numerous articles on youth and senior fitness for Asiafit, SCW Fit‐ ness Education and ICAA. cammy_dennis@otowfl.com

BETHANY DIAMOND – WATER FITNESS Bethany Diamond, CPT (ACE, AFAA and NASM), is founder of Ovarian Cycle, Inc. and an Ironman tri‐ athlete. She is also a PowerBar R team elite athlete and a Scwhinn Cycling master trainer. Bethany has published articles for IDEA, has DVDs produced by Healthy Learning and is a contributor to the IDEA Water Fitness Committee. She has worked with fitness professionals, nationally and interna‐ tionally, sharing with them her philosophy of safe, effective exercise that is fun and results driven.

www.ovariancycle.org

www.bethanydiamond.com

ION DOAGA – PERSONAL TRAINING Ion Doaga is the creator of and a contributing author for Massage Dreams that features articles on alternative therapies, massage, aromatherapy, acupuncture, health and fitness, motivation and inspiration. He is Second Degree Black Belt in Karate Ion believes that exercising, healthy nutrition and alternative medicine is what the human body needs to heal itself and be strong. He is growing a community on his site massagedreams.com where he promotes a preventive care lifestyle. Ion lives in Chisinau, Moldova and speaks three languages: Romanian, Russian and English. http://massagedreams.com

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Ask the Experts SALLY EDWARDS – HEART RATE TRAINING Sally Edwards, MA, MBA, is a leading expert in business, exercise science and lifestyle living. She created the Heart Zones Training proprietary and branded training system. Sally is a best-selling author and sought after professional speaker with 23 books and 500 articles on health and fitness, including Heart Rate Monitor Guidebook and The Complete Book of Triathlons. She is a 16-time Ironman finisher, a member of the Triathlon Hall of Fame, and Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run winner. She is the founder and CEO of Heart Zones USA, the training, education, health club programming, and coaching company. www.theSallyEdwardsCompany.com www.HeartZonesCoaching.com

www.heartzones.com

JENNIFER GREEN – INCLUSIVE FITNESS Jennifer Green, BS in Health Fitness and Rehabilitative and Preventative Programs, MS in Clinical Exercise Physiology, is an Information Specialist at NCPAD in the Department of Disability and Human Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Jennifer creates and provides fact/ information sheets and videos focused on inclusion: adapting physical activity training and programs, making fitness centers more inclusive, etc. She is the author of the monthly NCPAD News column “The training corner,” written for fitness professionals who work with individuals with various disabilities and chronic conditions. green1jn@uic.edu

www.ncpad.org

TRACEY HARVEY – MATURE FITNESS Tracey Harvey, BS, SPINNING® Instructor, USTA Tennis player, has three decades of experience in the Health and Fitness Industry, currently specializing in managing wellness not illness in older adults; working with Independent Retirement Living Communities. Her background of packaging education with products for the commercial and consumer fitness markets is credited with introducing SPINNING around the globe. Tracey is also a published “Senior Living and Lifestyle” author and an International Council of Active Aging (ICAA) Presenter. http://www.gencarelifestyle.com/

tl.harvey@hotmail.com

SHERRI HORNER – MEET THE EXPERT Sherri Horner is a radio talk show host, fitness professional, motivational speaker and writer. She is a yoga teacher, and an AFAA certified personal trainer and group fitness instructor. She is trained in Tae Kwon Do and has received specialty training from Empower Training Systems, Yogafit and Silver Sneakers. Her column has been published in a Philadelphia Christian Bodybuilding Magazine and Delaware and New Jersey wellness magazines. She is the founder and president of Health Fitness Broadcast. Since 2004 her interviews with leading experts have resulted in a treasure chest of information. Sherri@HealthFitnessBroadcast.com

www.HealthFitnessBroadcast.com

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


KARSTEN JENSEN – STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING Karsten Jensen, MS Exercise Physiology, CPT (CPTN), is a high performance trainer and an educator with the Certified Professional Trainers Network. He has trained World Class and Olympic Athletes from 13 different sports since 1993, many winning European Championships and World Championships and Association of Tennis Professionals Tournaments. Karsten is an international speaker, author of several books (most recently The Flexible Periodization Method) and is an educator with the Certified Professional Trainers Network. He also shares “Insider Principles of World Class Strength and Conditioning Methods” through his web site. www.yestostrength.com

yestostrength@sympatico.ca

JENNY D JOHNSON – PERSONAL TRAINING Jenny D. Johnson, MS, CPT (NASM), began her higher education career at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro where she was a women’s volleyball NCAA Division I scholarship student athlete, earning a degree in Leisure Service Management. After a ten-year stent of career and family building, Jenny returned to California University of Pennsylvania to obtain her MS in Exercise Science and Health Promotion. She is currently completing a doctorate in education from Northcentral University. She is an Assistant Professor at American Public University System in the Sports and Health Sciences and Sport Management Department.

jennyjohnson.amu@gmail.com

TIM KEIGHTLEY – THE BUSINESS OF PERSONAL TRAINING Tim Keightley is V.P. of Fitness for Golds Gym International. He is also an international presenter and motivational speaker. Since teaching his first class in 1983, he has experienced life as an Officer in the British Royal Marines, a Professional Golfer, a ‘Stuntman’, a personal trainer to a Boxing World Heavy Weight Champion, built the largest personal training business in Europe and was V. P. of Fitness for Town Sports International. Tim believes that part of our secret to success is to learn how to have FUN in all that we do, build on our PASSION and show others how PROUD we are of what we can do for them.

tdkbusiness2000@yahoo.co.uk

PEGGY KRAUS – CARDIOPULMONARY REHABILITATION AND NUTRITION Peggy Kraus, MA, ACSM RCEP, NET, is a clinical exercise physiologist in cardiopulmonary rehab as well as a nutritional education trainer at Wellness Foundation where she teaches others about the benefits of following a plant-strong diet and committing to regular exercise. She is a frequent contributor to IDEA Fitness Journal and to Examiner.com and has been published in AFAA American Fitness and other health fitness magazines. She believes strongly that frailty and disease have become an acceptable part of life, but both are avoidable when you exercise and eat right. peggykraus@verizon.net www.peggykraus.com http://www.examiner.com/disease-prevention-in-national/peggy-kraus

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Ask the Experts TAMMY LEBOSS – BUSINESS OF PERSONAL TRAINING Tammy LeBoss, BA, CPT (NAFC), Pilates Coach, NAFC Nutrition Coach, Pilates Post‐Rehab and vari‐ ous yoga modalities certified, has been involved in the health and fitness industry for over 17 years. In 1997, Tammy gave her corporate job the boot and moved to San Diego where she struggled to make ends meet as a personal trainer. She has since learned about the many pitfalls of doing so and how to avoid them. She has served as head of the nutrition department for various health clubs and also helped build several successful health clubs from the ground up. Her publications have been featured by the National Association for Fitness Certification and Sports Nutrition Supplement Guide. http://thefitprofoodie.com

http://www.nafctrainer.com

tammyleboss456@gmail.com

SUSAN LEE – DIVERSITY AND EQUITY PROGRAMS Susan Lee, MPE, MA, CPT (CPTN), President of the Certified Professional Trainers Network (CPTN) works with leaders and partners to offer education, certification, leadership and advocacy for per‐ sonal trainers and fitness professionals. Concurrently, Susan develops co‐curricular diversity and equity programs for the Faculty of Physical Education and Health at the University of Toronto in Canada.

www.cptn.com

info@cptn.com

RITA LA ROSA LOUD – TRAINING GUIDELINES AND PROGRAMS Rita La Rosa Loud, B.S., CPT (AFAA) is an author and Adjunct Professor at Quincy College. She recently co‐authored with Wayne Westcott the book No More Cellulite. She self‐published the book‐ let W.O.W. Workout at Work; contributed a chapter in The Belly Melt Diet, a book from the editors of Prevention; developed the Nautilus At‐Machine Stretching Expressway Program; and has been recognized for her innovative stretching concept by Shape Magazine. She is a recipient of the dis‐ tinguished Honor Award and Outstanding Fitness Professional Award from the Mass. Assoc. of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance; plus the Nova 7 Award for exercise programming from Fitness Management magazine. plloud@msn.com

JENNIFER MANNING – INJURY PREVENTION Jennifer Manning, DPT, OCS, CPT (NSCA CSCS), was inspired to be a physical therapist after suffer‐ ing an ACL tear in high school. She is the creator of PrehabFitness.com, a website focused on injury prevention and exercise education. She has had the pleasure to work with people of all ages and tal‐ ents. Her latest clients include football players preparing for the NFL, a fighter in the UFC and Level 10 gymnasts in the United States and Canada. Jennifer is currently practicing physical therapy at Breakthrough Physical Therapy in Irvine California. www.PrehabFitness.com

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


GREG MAURER – BUSINESS, MARKETING, TECHNOLOGY AND PROGRAM INTEGRATION, AND PERSONAL TRAINING Greg Maurer, BS Exercise Physiology, CPT (ACE and NASM), is an Associate Partner with New Para‐ digm Partners health club consulting firm. Greg is also a fitness consultant for several emerging technologies in the fitness/wellness/medical industries, including bioDensity Strength Technology, Power Plate Whole Body Vibration and reACT – Rapid Eccentric Anaerobic Core Trainer, and Bul‐ garian Bag (IBBConline.com).

greg@maurer3.com

www.newparadigmpartners.com

JAMES MCPARTLAND – PURPOSEFUL EMPOWERMENT James McPartland, former President of Star Trac Fitness, Author, International Speaker, TV/Radio Host, and ‘Wellness Ambassador’ focused on developing the Human Potential within business. His present endeavor at The JMac Performance Group has allowed him to further play a leadership role in the health & fitness industry for now more than twenty years. Much of his current business advi‐ sory and speaking activity demonstrates a philosophy called Crosstraining for Life™, focusing on uncovering the potential that lies within a company by developing the potential of the people employed inside the business. info@jamesmcpartland.com www.jamesmcpartland.com http://www.jamesmcpartland.com/resources.php

CAROL MICHAELS - PERSONAL TRAINING Carol Michaels, MBA, CPT (ACSM, ACE), is the founder of Recovery Fitness®, a cancer exercise pro‐ gram. Her new book, Exercises for Cancer Survivors, is a fantastic resource for anyone undergoing cancer surgery or treatments. Carol also developed and produced two DVD’s called Recovery Fitness Cancer Exercise‐Simple Stretches and Recovery Fitness‐Strength Training. She owns and operates Carol Michaels Fitness and Recovery Fitness and is a consultant, author, speaker, Pilates instructor, and cancer exercise specialist. She is on the advisory board for several cancer organizations, and has appeared on health related television and radio programs. The American Council on Exercise recognized Carol as a Trainer to Watch in 2011 and Personal Fitness Professional honored her as the 2012 PFP Trainer of the Year. www.recoveryfitness.net www.carolmichaelsfitness.com

NICOLE NELSON - PERSONAL TRAINING Nicole Nelson, MS, LMT, holds a masters degree in Health Science from the University of North Flor‐ ida. In addition to being a licensed massage therapist, she is also certified as an Advanced Health and Fitness Specialist through ACE. She has a full time massage and training practice in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL and has contributed articles to IDEA Fitness Journal and Massage magazine.

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


Ask the Experts DORETTE NYSEWANDER – CORPORATE HEALTH, WELLNESS AND ANTI-AGE RESEARCH Dorette Nysewander, EdD, “DrD”, is Founder and President of D Group Consulting Services, Inc, a wellness education consulting company, facilitating initiatives worldwide. Committed to the health and well‐being of all, she has been recognized in Sutton's Who’s Who in Elite Healthcare, Jackson‐ ville Chamber 904 magazine as one of 75 Most Influential People In JAX Healthcare. Her articles have appeared in American Fitness, Jacksonville Business Journal, Liberation Wellness, several local pub‐ lications, national fitness organizations and corporate industries. Contact her: 904‐859‐1425. dorette@dgroupconsulting.com

www.dgroupconsulting.com

GARY L. PALMER – MATURE ADULT FITNESS Gary L. Palmer, BSEd, CPT (NCSF), a free lance writer and fitness enthusiast, served in the Navy during the Vietnam War, earned a football scholarship as a walk‐on at Ohio University, and went on to a successful 15‐year teaching and coaching career. He also spent 26 productive years in the busi‐ ness world before transitioning to a full time writer. His first published book, Chagrin Falls, is a memoir. The theme is overcoming adversity as an abandoned, impoverished foster child growing up in a small Midwest town during the 1940’s and 1950’s. His latest health and fitness writing focuses on the need to speed up, not slow down, exercise and physical activity, as we age. gpalmer1@neo.rr.com

http://www.garylpalmer.net/

LORI PATTERSON – BOOT CAMP Lori Patterson, BA, CPT (ACE, ACSM, AFAA and WellCoaches) is the CEO of VicteliB, LLC, and the creator of successful fee based programming to include Boot Camp Challenge®, Baby Boomer Boot Camp Challenge® and Kids Kamp Challenge. Lori served in the US Army as well as 28 years in the fitness industry. You can reach Lori at lori@victelib.com or the website at www.victelib.com.

www.victelib.com lori@bootcamp‐challenge.com

www.mwfitness.com www.bootcamp‐challenge.com

TAMMY J. PETERSEN – MATURE ADULT AND YOUTH HEALTH AND FITNESS Tammy Petersen, MSE, is the Founder and Managing Partner for the American Academy of Health and Fitness. She has written two books on adult fitness, SrFit™ and Functionally Fit™, and designed corresponding specialty certification training programs. She cocreated JrFit™, a specialty certification course focusing on youth strength training and nutrition and Move More, Eat Better— YOU Matter!™, a lifestyle change course. Her articles have appeared on PTontheNet; and in Club Business for Entrepreneurs, Personal Fitness Professional, Fitness Business Pro, American Fitness and OnSitefitness. Tammy@AAHF.info

www.AAHF.info

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


LORI PINE – MIND BODY Lori Pine, MA, CPT (ACE) is the Programs Director at In Motion Fitness in Chico, California. She is an APEX certified Nutritional Counselor and a member of Power Bar’s Team Elite. She holds certifi‐ cations and certificates in Youth Fitness, BOSU, TRX, Nordic Walking, Body Bar, Gliding, Kettlebell, GRAVITY, Drums Alive, and STRONG. Lori has 20+ years experience working with youth and adults in schools. She organizes events and charitable activities, including the “B.A.M.” fitness conference.

j916grif@aol.com

JOHN PLATERO – PERSONAL TRAINING John Platero, CPT, is a fitness educator who has consulted both nationally and internationally, most recently for the Royal family of Qatar. He is the Director of Education for the National Council for Certified Personal Trainers. He has obtained 35 personal training certifications, filmed over 30 fit‐ ness videos and infomercials has been published by most of the fitness magazines and is the author of “Yes You Can – Fitness After 40 – A New Beginning.” As an athlete, John was a champion body‐ builder who turned cyclist and has won 21 gold, two silver and two bronze medals in cycling in the Senior Olympics and the Master’s Pan American Games. www.johnplatero.com

JUSTIN PRICE - CORRECTIVE EXERCISE Justin Price, MA, CPT (ACE) is the creator of The BioMechanics Method® ‐ the world's fastest grow‐ ing corrective exercise education program for health and fitness professionals. He is an IDEA Inter‐ national Personal Trainer of the Year, subject matter expert on corrective exercise for the American Council on Exercise and BOSU, founding author of PTA Global, Director of Content and featured author on corrective exercise for PTontheNet and an education provider for TRX and the National Strength and Conditioning Association. info@thebiomechanicsmethod.com

www.thebiomechanicsmethod.com

KRISTEN PUHLMAN – NUTRITION Kristen Puhlman, RD, CPT (NASM and WITS), Spinning Certified (IFTA), is an Outpatient Diabetes Educator at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center; currently residing in Winston‐Salem, North Carolina. She has a BS in Nutrition and Food from Kent State University. She owns and oper‐ ates Obliques, LLC; a personal training business specializing in core training, weight management and individualized nutritional planning. She is also the on staff Dietitian for Aspire Fitness Studios. Her experience in the hospital setting is in clinical nutrition with a primary focus on weight man‐ agement and the psychology of weight loss.

kcj528@hotmail.com

kpuhlman@wfubmc.edu

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


Ask the Experts AMY RAUWORTH – INCLUSIVE FITNESS Amy Rauworth, MS, RCEP, is the Associate Director of Operations and Exercise Physiology Research at the Center on Health Promotion Research for Persons with Disabilities (CHP). CHP is located at the University of Illinois at Chicago in the Depa2rtment of Disability and Human Development. She is a Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist with ACSM. Amy conducts Inclusive Fitness training nationally on behalf of the National Center on Physical Activity and Disability and specializes in accessible fitness center design. www.ncpad.org

TIM ROCHFORD – SELF DEFENSE Tim Rochford, CPT (ACE, The Cooper Institute and NSCA), 6th degree Black Belt (Kajukenbo Karate), founder and owner of Empower Training Systems (a self defense/martial arts/kickboxing fitness instructor training & certification company), has authored numerous instructor training manuals, including (co‐author) the ACE Kickboxing Fitness Specialty Training manual and the Proactive Per‐ sonal Security Self Defense Instructor Training Program. He is an ACE and ISSA continuing education specialist. www.empower‐selfdefense.com

MARK ROOZEN – YOUTH STRENGTH AND SPORT CONDITIONING Mark Roozen, MEd, certified strength and conditioning coach (NSCA CSCS*D and CPT, and FNSCA), is Senior Content Editor for STACK Media which promotes safe training and sports enhancement and is Co‐Director of the Performance Education Association. He has been in the strength, condi‐ tioning and performance field for over 28 years. Mark has worked with teams from the high school to the professional levels as a strength coach; performed as director of a hospital owned fitness and training facility, as well as owned his own training center; and, has worked with over 30,000 youth in sport camps across the country. He has presented, written and consulted worldwide.

markroozen@clevelandbrowns.com

rozyroozen@gmail.com

TARA SAREEN - WELLNESS COACHING Tara Sareen, BS, is a Institute For Integrative Nutrition Certified Health Coach in the Greater Boston area and founder of iCrave Coaching. Through a unique, intensive 6‐month coaching partnership, Tara's clients lose weight, identify food sensitivities, discover ‘life after sugar’ and heal and reduce chronic conditions such as joint pain, skin irritations, headaches, fatigue, infections, anxiety and depression. tara@icravecoaching.com

www.icravecoaching.com

www.facebook.com/pages/iCrave‐Coaching/575414849205664

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


CODY SIPE – EXERCISE AND AGING Cody Sipe, PhD, ACSM Certified Clinical Exercise Specialist, ACSM Registered Clinical Exercise Phys‐ iologist, is an award‐winning industry leader in fitness for older adults with over 17 years of experi‐ ence. He serves on the editorial boards of IDEA and Active Aging Today and is an advisory member for Canadian Fitness Education Services, WholyFit, the National Posture Institute and the ICAA Visioning Board. Cody is a past recipient of the IDEA Program Director of the Year award. His blog www.codysipe.com provides innovative fitness and business information for professionals working with older adults.

www.codysipe.com

BRIAN SOUZA – EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY AND NUTRITION Brian Souza, BS, ACSM‐HFS, is the owner of Be Fit Personal Training, a company providing theoret‐ ically and evidence based exercise to a variety of populations. Brian has been in the personal train‐ ing industry for 10 years. He is will obtain a Master’s degree in Sport and Exercise Psychology from Springfield College in May 2011 and then will continue his education in a Doctoral level Sport and Exercise Psychology program. His research interests include exercise psychology, applied sports psychology, sports and exercise nutrition, positive psychology, and youth sport. He competes as a recreational triathlete. souzabr@onid.orst.edu

befittraining@comcast.net

MATTHEW B. SPANIER At the age of 18, Matthew B. Spanier was diagnosed with Type‐1 Diabetes Mellitus. Due to his very active lifestyle he has been able to control the disease very well. He will graduate in June, 2013 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise and Sport Science from Oregon State University. During his undergraduate studies he has interned and worked for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). After graduation Matt will continue his education at Ohio University, where he will be pur‐ suing a Master's degree in Clinical Exercise Physiology. mattspanier@hotmail.com

spanierm@onid.orst.edu

JIM STARSHAK – TAI CHI FOR HEALTH Jim Starshak, MS, NSCA‐CPT, IDEA Elite PFT is the Governing Board Chairman for the international Tai Chi for Health Institute, a Tai Chi for Health Master Trainer, an Exercise Science Adjunct Profes‐ sor, and founder of The Home Gym, Inc. After 18+ years in US Special Forces (“Green Beret”), Jim is a disabled veteran who promotes tai chi internationally for its functional fitness and health benefits. He certifies Arthritis Foundation Tai Chi instructors and provides continuing education for Health & Fitness Professionals, Athletic Trainers, Physical & Occupational Therapists, and Nurses. thehomegym@everestkc.net

www.thehomegym.net

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


Ask the Experts DENNIS SWEET Derrick Sweet is best known as a popular corporate keynote speaker and author of three highly cel‐ ebrated books: Healthy Wealthy and Wise, Get The Most Out Of Life, and You Don't Have to Die to Go to Heaven. He is the creator of the Hypnolinguistics Course: www.hypnolinguistics.com. Derrick is also the Chairman and Founder of the Certified Coaches Federation. Derrick created the coaching model that is the foundation of the Certified Coaches Federation's Certified Coach Practitioner Train‐ ing and Development Program. For more information on the Certified Coaches Federation please visit: www.certifiedcoachesfederation.com.

info@healthywealthyandwise.com

KELLY WARD – MATURE FITNESS Kelly Ward, MS in Therapeutic Aging, CPT (AFAA and SFA), author of “The Complete Guide to Fall Prevention: Everything You Need to Know to Remain Independent,” is a certified FallProof™ balance and mobility specialist who has been teaching fall prevention classes for six years and has worked with older adults for over 15 years. Kelly’s mission is to educate and facilitate the adaptation of a reduced fall risk lifestyle. She presents easily understandable evidence‐based research, applying this knowledge to daily life situations, and offers train‐the‐trainer programs. For more information on Kelly’s comprehensive fall prevention services or to order her book, see http://thefallprevention‐ lady.com. http://thefallpreventionlady.com

info@thefallpreventionlady.com

WAYNE L. WESTCOTT – STRENGTH TRAINING Wayne Westcott, PhD, CSCS, directs the Quincy College Fitness Research Programs. He has been a strength training consultant for the US Navy, ACE, the YMCA of the USA and Nautilus. He is an edito‐ rial advisor for numerous publications, including The Physician and Sportsmedicine, ACSM’s Health & Fitness Journal, Prevention, Shape, and OnSitefitness; and has authored 24 books on strength train‐ ing. He serves on the International Council on Active Aging Board of Advisors and ACSM’s New England Chapter. wwestcott@quincycollege.edu

WENDY A. WILLIAMSON - POST REHABILITATION SPECIALIST Wendy A. Williamson, PhD, ACE – CPT & CMES; NASM – CPT & CES; CFAS is nationally recognized as a leading educator, writer, and author. She has owned Williamson Wellness Center for over five years and has been in the fitness industry for over 20 years training, and speaking nationally, regionally and locally. She specializes in orthopedic conditions, neurological diseases, and serves as adjunct lecturer for Wichita State University with the Physician Assistant and Physical Therapy departments. Dr. Williamson also supervises exercise science interns from the Exercise Science Department. Her research focus has been with Parkinson Disease and Exercise. www.williamsonwc.com

wmsonwa@gmail.com

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


MICHAEL WOZNIAK Michael Wozniak BS, CPT, is the manager of the hospital-related fitness center at Harbor Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. He has 13 years experience in the fitness industry working with clients ranging from youth athletes to seniors and special populations. He has a Bachelors degree in Sport Psychology and is an ACE Certified Personal Trainer.

www.harborhospital.org/harborfitness

mike.wozniak@medstar.net

ROSE ZAHNN – YOGA Rose Zahnn, CPT (ACE), GFI (AFAA), E-RYT200 (Yoga Alliance), is the founder and owner of Healthy Habits Fitness-Yoga-Pilates Studios, creator of PilatesFit and the Learn to Be Lean Program, and is a Master Trainer for YogaFit International, Flirty Girl Fitness, and Balletone. A UCLA graduate and a fitness professional for over 20 years, Rose teaches at Healthy Habits in Sacramento, California; presents at conferences, leading teacher trainings and workshops; and is a continuing education provider for ACE and AFAA. Rose@HealthyHabitsStudio.com

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


References Customer Service and the Personal Trainer www.helpscout.net. 75 Customer Service Facts, Quotes, and Statistics, May 28, 20102 www.helpscout.net. 15 Customer Service skills that Every Employee Needs, June 20, 2016 Pernice, Mark. (2016) Revolutionizing Customer Service, Harvard Business Review, April 2016. Leggatt, Helen. (2017) Personal touch for customer service drives retention, loyalty, BizReport: Loyalty Market� ing: January 12, 2017.

Differential Effects of our Exercise and Nutrition Program on Weight Loss Participants and Arthritis Patients 1) Ballor D, Poehlman E. Exercise training enhances fat-free mass preservation during diet-induced weight loss: a meta analytic finding. Inter J Obes 1994; 18:35-40. 2) Campbell WW, Crim MC, Young VR, Evans WJ. Increased energy requirements and changes in body composition with resistance training in older adults. Am J Clin Nutr 1994; 60:167-175. 3) Campbell W, Trappe T, Jozsi A, et al. Dietary protein adequacy and lower body versus whole body resistive training in older humans. J Physiol 2002; 542:631-642. 4) Campbell W, Trappe T, Wolfe R, Evans W. The recommended dietary allowance for protein may not be adequate for older people to maintain skeletal muscle. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2001; 56:M373-M380. 5) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1999). National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/pdf/naap.pdf. 6) Flegal KM, Carroll MD, Ogden CL, Curtin LR. Prevalence and trends in obesity among US adults, 1999-2008. JAMA 2010; 303(3):235-241. 7) Hunter GR, Wetzstein CJ, Fields DA, et al. Resistance training increases total energy expenditure and freeliving physical activity in older adults. J Appl Physiol 2000; 89:977-984 8) Jakeman P. Protein supplementation at breakfast and lunch for 24-weeks beyond habitual intakes increases whole-body lean tissue mass in healthy older adults. J Nutri 2016; 146:65-69. 9) Mann T, Tomiyama J, Westling E, et al. Medicare's search for effective obesity treatments - diets are not the answer. Am Psych 2007; 62(3):220-233. 10) Pratley R, Nicklas B, Rubin M, et al. Strength training increases resting metabolic rate and norepinephrine levels in healthy 50-to-65 year-old men. J Appl Physiol 1994; 76:133-137. 11) Sharif S, Thomas JM, Donley DA, et al. Resistance exercise reduces skeletal muscle cachexia and improves muscle function in rheumatoid arthritis. Case Reports in Medicine, Article ID 205691, doi:10.115/2011/ 205691, 2011. 12) Serdula MK, Mokdad AH, Williamson DF, et al. Prevalence of attempting weight loss and strategies for controlling weight. JAMA 1999; 282(14):1353-1358. 13) Westcott W, Apovian C, Puhala K, et al. Nutrition programs enhance exercise effects on body composition and resting blood pressure. Phys Sportsmed 2013; 41(3):85-91. 14) Westcott W, Colligan A, Puhala K, et al. Exercise and nutrition effects on body composition and blood measures in overweight adults. J Exerc Physiol online 2017; 20(1):200-220.

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


15) Westcott W, Martin W, La Rosa Loud R, Stoddard S. Protein supplementation and body composition changes. Fitness Manage 2008; 24(5):50-53. 16) Wolfe I. The unappreciated role of muscle in health and disease. Am J Clin Nutr 2006; 84:475-482.

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GAMUT, Issue 59, Dec/Jan 2018


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Create a niche. KNOW. TRAIN. RETAIN.

Gamut Issue 59 Dec/Jan 2018  

Education and experience give rise to knowledge. So then, what’s next? Thinking and truly understanding! The value of knowledge comes to fru...

Gamut Issue 59 Dec/Jan 2018  

Education and experience give rise to knowledge. So then, what’s next? Thinking and truly understanding! The value of knowledge comes to fru...