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Issue 56, June/July 2017

THE MONTHLY JOURNAL of THE

The resource for health, fitness, coaching, physical education, & recreation professionals.

Mature Health and Fitness by Tammy Petersen

Nutrition by Nancy Clark

Training Guidelines by Wayne Westcott , Rita La Rosa Loud, Maya Gunther, Samantha Vallier & Scott Whitehead

Create a niche. KNOW. TRAIN. RETAIN.


FROM THE EDITOR “T he only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn and change.”

Carl Rogers American psychologist and among the founders of the humanistic approach (or client-centered approach) to psychology January 8, 1902 – February 4, 1987

A trainer does not motivate the client. What? The reality is that the client motivates herself or himself through study and experience. The client will not adhere to the best designed, most results oriented, time efficient program; regardless of how much the trainer attempts to “fire up” the client. Rather, the client will adhere to a program presented by the trainer only when the client internalizes the “facts” about the efficacy of the program and that the efforts placed into adhering to the program will very specifically address and achieve client established goals. This acceptance of the facts requires the trainer to skillfully facilitate the problem-solving process. What are the client’s concerns? What are the client’s goals (short term to long term)? What actions by both the trainer and the client will result in goal attainment? This month’s articles about aging and exercise, effective rep ranges for those 50 and older, and meal timing present relevant personal growth facts that have great potential for use by you and your clients in facilitating positive change.

If you find an article in Health and Wellness Across the Gamut of Life! that you feel would be beneficial to a friend, family member or co-worker, all you have to do is forward this link, www.AAHF.info, to that person through email. We welcome your feedback about the contents of this journal and encourage you to submit topics that are of interest to: Pete@aahf.info We are committed to our mission of providing education and training for health, fitness, physical education and recreation professionals across the GAMUT of life! Have a question? Want more information on a specific topic? Ask the Experts

Be knowledgeable! Be successful!

Pete Pete Bazzel Editor-in-Chief 800.957.7348 Pete@AAHF.info www.AAHF.info

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GAMUT, Issue 56, June/July 2017


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE 1

Aging and Exercise Mature Health and Fitness article by Tammy Petersen, MSE

3

Meal Timing: Does It Matter When You Eat? Nutrition article by Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD

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Repetition Ranges for People Past 50 Training Guidelines and Programs article by Wayne Westcott, PhD, CSCS, and Rita La Rosa Loud, BS, CPT

Ask the Experts 159

9 23

References

Health and Wellness Across the Gamut of LIFE! is published by the American Academy of Health and Fitness, LLC located in Springfield, Virginia 22153. Copyright 2017.

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GAMUT, Issue 56, June/July 2017


Aging and Exercise by Tammy Petersen, MSE, the Founder and Managing Partner for the American Academy of Health and Fitness (AAHF). She has written two books on adult fitness, SrFit™ and Functionally Fit™, and designed corresponding training programs. Contact info

There are certain changes in the body that occur universally with age. In this and the following six issues of The Gamut we will examine the changes for each organ system. This month we will look at the integumentary system.

Once adults pass the physical prime of their teens and 20’s, they lose an average of 10 ounces of lean body mass a year, and this is mostly in the form of muscle tissue. And, since few people actually lose 10 ounces of weight a year, instead, most gain about a pound a year, the loss of lean tissue is masked. Another way to look at this is the average person gains about 1 pound and 10 ounces of body fat per year. It is a process that is more insidious and crippling than osteoporosis but one few people notice until they realize it is getting difficult to climb the stairs or heft themselves off the sofa. Unchecked, the gradual loss of muscle strength is the primary reason elderly Americans have difficulty performing the tasks of daily living and ultimately lose their independence. This phenomenon, which we call sarcopenia, derived from Greek words for “vanishing flesh,” is NOT an inevitable consequence of aging. It is instead an inevitable consequence of disuse. Another important reason for older people to strength train is that evidence suggests that exercise may decrease the rate of bone loss associated with osteoporosis and reduce the likelihood of falls that result in hip fractures. A frightening statistic is that women ages 65–69 who break a hip are five times more likely to die within a year than women of the same age who don’t break a hip, according to a Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Falling is a serious public health concern among elderly people because of its frequency, the morbidity associated with falls, and the cost of the necessary healthcare. Approximately 28-35% of people aged of 65 and over fall each year increasing to 32-42% for those over 70 years of age. Unintentional injury, which most often results from a fall, ranks as the sixth

The surgeon General has issued a report warning people—including older adults—that physical inactivity is a major risk to their health. The aging of the American population has created a large group of older adults who are even more susceptible to the detrimental effects of physical inactivity than are younger people. This is not news to those of us in the fitness industry, but many of us are not prepared to deal with this growing segment of the population. So, first let's look at a few statistics. In the year 2000, roughly 35 million people (13 percent of the population) were age 65 or older. By 2030, the number is expected to double to 70 million. According to the Active Aging Partnership National Blueprint, 88% of these people have at least one chronic health condition that in many cases may be improved or managed with physical activity. They also report that 35%-50% of women age 70-80 have difficulty with general mobility tasks like walking a few blocks, climbing a flight of stairs or doing housework. Dr. Mark Williams, a professor at Creighton University of Medicine in Omaha, says this statistic reports a disproportionate amount of women, because although women make up about 60% of the elderly population (>65years), the female predominance increases exponentially after age 65, since women tend to live longer than men. According to data compiled by the Social Security Administration, women who reach age 65 have an additional life expectancy of 21.6 years, compared with 19.3 years for men of the same age.

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MATURE HEALTH & FITNESS associated with aging such as diabetes, colon cancer, heart disease, stroke, and others and reduce overall death and hospital rates. Balance exercises help to prevent falls and flexibility exercises help to keep the body limber by stretching muscles and tissues that hold the body’s structure in place. Flexibility may also play a part in preventing falls. Some types of exercise improve just one area of health or ability, but more often, an exercise has many different benefits. So, elderly adults should be encouraged to increase both the types and amounts of exercise and physical activity they do. For the older adult, the goals of exercise should be to minimize the effects of aging and chronic diseases; to reverse the effects of disuse; and to maximize psychological health. This is different than those of younger adults for whom exercise helps prevent disease and increase life expectancy. In summary, contrary to traditional thinking, regular exercise helps, not hurts,56 most older adults. Older people become sick or disabled more often from not exercising than from exercising. Almost all older adults, regardless of age or condition, can safely improve their health and independence through exercise and physical activity. There are few reasons to keep them from exercising, and “too old” and “too frail” are not among them!!

leading cause of death among people over 65 years of age. Muscle weakness has been identified as one of the biggest potentially modifiable risk factors for falling. In the late 80’s, early 90’s, studies began being done which proved that despite a decrease in muscle fibers and strength, muscle function can be maintained and or improved with training, even in the very old. A slight increase in muscle strength at any age can improve quality of life and stave off the frailty that used to be considered a normal part of getting old. While strength training is not the only type of exercise that is important for older adults, it should be easy to understand that the frailer a person becomes, the greater the importance of strength training. And sometimes, strength training and flexibility are the only types of exercise in which the elderly can engage until they gain enough muscle strength to allow them to work on their endurance or aerobic capacity and balance. Senior strength training expert Wayne Westcott, PhD, reports twelve health and fitness benefits that result from strength training by older adults. They are; avoid muscle loss, avoid metabolic rate reduction, increase muscle mass, increase metabolic rate, reduce body fat, increase bone mineral density, increase glucose metabolism, increase gastrointestinal transit, reduce resting blood pressure, improve blood lipids levels, reduce low back pain, and reduce arthritic pain. Although the benefits of strength training have been discussed exclusively to this point, older inactive adults also loose ground in three other areas that are important for staying healthy and independent. These are endurance, balance and flexibility. Endurance training can maintain and improve cardiovascular function and can reduce risk factors associated with chronic diseases

References Contact Tammy at Tammy@AAHF.info.

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Meal Timing: Does It Matter When You Eat? by Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD (Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics), who has a private practice in the Boston area (Newton) where she counsels both casual exercisers and competitive athletes and is author of Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook. Contact info

Meals and snacking patterns have changed over the past 40 years. You have undoubtedly noticed that many of us are eating fewer calories from meals and more calories from snacks. As a result, I get questions from both athletes and non-athletes alike about how to best fuel their bodies: Should I stop eating after 8:00 pm? Which is better: to eat 3 or 6 meals a day? Does it really matter if I skip breakfast? Because meals can be a central part of our social life—and busy training schedules can contribute to chaotic eating patterns— many athletes disregard the fact that food is more than just fuel. When (and what) you eat impacts your future health (and today’s performance). Food consumption affects the central clock in your brain. This clock controls circadian rhythms and impacts all aspects of metabolism, including how your organs function. Restricting daytime food and eating in chaotic patterns disrupts normal biological rhythms. The end result: erratic meal timing can impact the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), type-2 diabetes and obesity. This article offers food for thought from the American Heart Association’s Scientific Statement on Meal Timing and Frequency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention. (Circulation, Jan 30, 2017). The information is particularly important for athletes because training schedules can really upset standard meal times. Plus, most of us want to live a long and healthful life. Hence, we need to pay attention to meal timing—starting at an early age. Children and adolescents who skip meals have a higher risk of developing health issues (higher BMI, more belly fat, higher serum insulin and blood glucose). Not a good start for a long and healthy life. (Parents take note: Be responsible with family meals!)

Older athletes also want to stay healthy. In 2014, 14.5% of the US population was 65 years or older. Over the next 25 years, older Americans are expected to grow to 22% of the US population. We need to outlive the diseases of aging. That starts with fueling wisely on a regular schedule and enjoying regular exercise!

Breakfast: Is it really the most important meal of the day? If you define breakfast as eating 20% to 35% of your daily calories within two-hours of waking, about one-fourth of US adults do not eat breakfast. This drop in breakfast consumption over the past 40 years parallels the increase in obesity. Breakfast skippers tend to snack impulsively (think donuts, pastries, chips and other fatty foods). They end up with poorer quality diets and increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and overweight/obesity. Eating a wholesome breakfast starts the day with performance enhancing fuel at the right time for your body’s engine. If you exercise in the morning, fuel-up by having part of your breakfast before you workout and then enjoy the rest of the breakfast afterwards. This will help you get more out of your workouts, improve recovery—and click with natural circadian rhythms.

Meal Frequency: Is it better to eat 1, 3. 6, 9 or 12 times a day? In terms of weight, eating 2,000 calories divided into 1, 3, 6, 9, or 12 meals doesn’t change your body fatness. In a study where breakfast provided 54% of the day’s calories and dinner only 11% of calories—or the reverse, the subjects (women) had no differences in fat loss. Yet, in terms of cardiovascular health, the big breakfast led to signifi-

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NUTRITION cant reductions in metabolic risk factors and better blood glucose control. The bigger breakfast matched food intake to circadian rhythms that regulated metabolism. Athletes who skimp at breakfast commonly get too hungry and then devour way too may calories of ice cream and cookies. If they do this at night, when the body is poorly programmed to deal with an influx of sweets, they are paving their path to health issues. Hence, if you are eating a lot of calories at night, at least make them low in sugary foods, to match the reduced insulin response in the evening. This is particularly important for shift workers who eat at odd hours during the night and tend to have a higher rate of heart disease.

The best plan: Plan to eat intentionally. Failing to plan for meals can easily end up in missed meals, chaotic fueling patterns and impaired health, to say nothing of reduced performance. If you struggle with getting your food-act together, consult with a sports dietitian who will help you develop a winning food plan. Use the referral network at www.SCANdpg.org to find a local sports RD. Instead of holding off to have a big dinner, enjoy food when your body needs the fuel: when it is most active. If you worry you’ll eat just as much at night if you eat more during the day (and you’ll “get fat”), think again. Be mindful before you eat and ask yourself: Does my body actually need this fuel? Most active women and men can and should enjoy about 500 to 700 calories four times a day: breakfast, early lunch, second lunch, and dinner. To overcome the fear that this much food will make you fat, reframe your thoughts. You are simply moving calories in your pre- and/or post-dinner snacks into a substantial and wholesome second lunch (such as a peanut butter-honey sandwich, or apple, cheese & crackers.). The purpose of this second lunch is to curb your evening appetite, refuel your muscles from your workout earlier in the day (or fuel them for an after-work session) and align your food intake to your circadian rhythms. Give it a try?

Should you stop eating after 8:00 PM? There’s little question that late-night eating is associated with obesity. Research with 239 US adults who ate more than one-third of their calories in the evening had twice the risk of being obese. Among 60,000 Japanese adults, the combination of late-night eating plus skipping breakfast was associated with a greater risk of diabetes, heart disease and obesity. A study with 2,200 US middle-aged women reports each 10% increase in the number of calories eaten between 5:00 PM and midnight was associated with a 3% increase in C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation. Inflammation is associated with diabetes, CVD and obesity. Wise athletes make a habit of eating the majority of their calories earlier in the day, to curb evening eating.

Contact Nancy at www.nancyclarkrd.com.

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Repetition Ranges for People Past 50 by Wayne Westchester, PhD, CSCS, Rita La Rosa Loud, BS, CPT (AFAA), Maya Gunther, Samantha Vallier, and Scott Whitehead. Wayne directs the Quincy College Fitness Research Programs. Rita is an author and Adjunct Professor at Quincy College. Contact info

Over the past several years, we have conducted studies on the most effective repetition range for improving muscle strength in youth and adults. We recently completed a new study of low and high repetition training for increasing muscle strength and muscle mass in individuals over age 50. A primary purpose of this study was to identify the best repetition range for reversing the muscle loss experienced by aging adults. Research reveals that middle-aged men and women average a 6-pound per decade reduction in muscle mass unless they perform regular resistance exercise.1 Unfortunately, the rate of muscle loss approaches 10 pounds per decade after age 50.2,3 Although our previous research has demonstrated that adults of all ages can add muscle mass (approximately 1 pound per month),4 we wanted to determine if the rate of muscle development could be increased in older adults by performing fewer repetitions with heavier weight loads. Previous research has demonstrated similar muscle responses to medium and high repetition training in youth, middle-aged adults, and older adults. Westcott5 found no significant differences in strength gains between adult women who performed 10 repetitions or 20 repetitions per exercise set. Bemben et al.6 attained similar results with post-menopausal women who trained with 8 repetitions and 16 repetitions, and Kerr et al.7 achieved similar results in post-menopausal women who trained

with 8 repetitions and 20 repetitions. Both Westcott’s8 study with middle-aged women and Taaffe and associates’9 study with older women showed similar strength development when training with either 7 repetitions or 14 repetitions. Research with youth participants by Faigenbaum et al.10 demonstrated essentially equal strength development whether training with 6 to 10 repetitions or 15 to 20 repetitions. Two studies included low repetitions in their training comparisons. Chestnut and 11 Docherty trained young men with either 4 repetitions per set or 10 repetitions per set. Both training protocols resulted in equal increases in muscle strength and muscle mass. Behm et al.12 examined muscle activation in response to maximum effort strength training with 5 repetitions, 10 repetitions, and 20 repetitions. The young male subjects showed similar muscular response to all three repetition protocols. Several recent studies have attained similar results with low-repetition and high-repetition resistance training protocols. Mitchell and colleagues13 found no significant differences in muscle development among untrained young men who exercised with 30% or 80% of maximum resistance. A follow-up study by Morton et al.14 found no significant differences in muscle development among trained young men who exercised with 30-50% or 75-90% of maximum resistance. Jenkins and associates15 also attained similar increases in muscle mass with

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TRAINING GUIDELINES AND PROGRAMS young men who exercised with 30% or 80% of maximum resistance. A 2016 review of repetition ranges by Fisher et al.16 concluded that training with low loads and high repetitions produces similar muscle adaptations as training with high loads and low repetitions, as long as the exercise set is continued to momentary muscle failure. Another 2016 review of repetition ranges by Gonzalez17 reached a similar conclusion with respect to muscle mass, but suggested that higher-load, lower repetition training may be more effective for increasing muscle strength in experienced exercisers. Research indicates that muscles respond in a similar manner to a wide range of repetitions if the exercise set is continued to the point of muscle fatigue. However, none of the studies examined the effects of heavy resistance training (5 or fewer repetitions) with older adults. Because the aging process results in the selective loss of fast-twitch motor units, people over age 50 generally have a relatively low percentage of fast-twitch muscle fibers.18 This is a major reason that older adults experience reduced strength, speed, and power.19 We therefore decided to conduct a study to determine whether a high-load and low-repetition strength training protocol might be more effective than a low-load and high-repetition strength training protocol for enhancing muscle development in men and women over age 50.

Study Design We randomized 28 men and women over the age of 50 into two similar strength training groups. All of our study participants trained two days a week for a period of eight weeks. Each workout included the following 10 Nautilus machine exercises: (1) leg extension; (2) leg curl; (3) leg press; (4) chest press; (5) lat pulldown; (6) shoulder press; (7) seated row; (8) abdominal flexion; (9) low back extension; and (10) torso rotation. Group 1 performed each exercise for 1 set of 5 repetitions, and increased the weight load by approximately 5 percent whenever 6 repetitions were completed. Group 2 performed each exercise for 1 set of 15 repetitions, and increased the weight load by approximately 5 percent whenever 16 repetitions were completed. All of the training sessions were conducted under careful supervision in the Quincy College Fitness Research Center, and the workout results were recorded on specifically designed exercise forms. During the first and last week of the study, each participant was assessed for maximum muscle strength, body composition, and blood pressure. The initial data for the 16 Group 1 participants and the 12 Group 2 participants are presented in Table 1. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the baseline measurements. Results After 8 weeks of training Group 1 (5 reps) attained statistically significant improvements

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TRAINING GUIDELINES AND PROGRAMS in muscle strength, body composition, and blood pressure measurements. Group 2 (15 reps) achieved statistically significant improvements in muscle strength and body composition, but not in blood pressure measurements. The changes in muscle strength, body weight, percent fat, lean weight, and fat weight were statistically similar between both groups, but Group 1 experienced significantly greater change in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure than Group 2 (see Table 2). With respect to maximum lat pulldown performance, Group 1 and Group 2 experienced statistically similar strength increases (28.7 lbs. vs. 30.8 lbs.). Although body weight remained essentially the same, Group 1 and Group 2 experienced statistically similar improvements in percent body fat (1.5% vs 1.9%), muscle weight (3.0 lbs. vs 3.5 lbs.), and fat weight (-2.4 lbs. vs -5.7 lbs.). However, blood pressure responses were significantly different between the two training groups. Group 1 significantly reduced systolic blood pressure (-6.3 mmHg.) and diastolic blood pressure (-3.7 mmHg.), whereas Group 2 experienced non-significant increases in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure.

Conclusion Based on the findings from this study, adults over age 50 may be expected to attain similar improvements in muscle strength and muscle mass whether they train with 5 repetitions per exercise set or 15 repetitions per exercise set. Our results are consistent with those of our previous research and many other studies that found no significant differences between lower repetition vs higher repetition resistance training with respect to muscle development. Apparently, as long as older adults continue the strength training set to temporary muscle fatigue within the anaerobic energy system they should experience essentially the same level of muscle improvement. For reasons that remain unclear, Group 1 experienced more favorable blood pressure responses than Group 2. This may be an area for further study, as many older adults have hypertension. References Contact Wayne at wwestcott@quincycollege.edu. Contact Rita at plloud@msn.com.

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TRAINING GUIDELINES AND PROGRAMS Table 1. Initial assessment scores for Group 1 and Group 2 participants (N = 28) * Assessment Factor

Group 1 (n = 16)

Group 2 (n = 12)

Age Gender Lat Pull Down Strength Body Weight Percent Fat Lean Weight Fat Weight Systolic Blood Pressure Diastolic Blood Pressure

63.1 yrs. 12 F; 4 M 109.4 lbs. 167.4 lbs. 27.3% 121.1 lbs. 46.2 lbs. 125.9 mmHg. 77.7 mmHg.

68.2 yrs. 8 F; 4 M 111.3 lbs. 165.0 lbs. 25.6% 122.4 lbs. 44.9 lbs. 122.1 mmHg. 72.0 mmHg.

* Statistically significant difference between Group 1 and Group 2 (P < 0.05). Table 2.

Changes in muscle strength, body composition, and blood pressure measurements over 8 weeks of training for Group 1 and Group 2 participants (N = 28)

Assessment Factor

Group 1 (n = 16)

Group 2 (n = 12)

Lat Pull Down Strength Body Weight Percent Fat Lean Weight Fat Weight Systolic Blood Pressure Diastolic Blood Pressure

+ 28.7 lbs. + 0.7 lbs. - 1.5% + 3.0 lbs. - 2.4 lbs. - 6.3 mmHg. * - 3.7 mmHg. *

+ 30.8 lbs. + 0.2 lbs. - 1.9% + 3.5 lbs. - 5.7 lbs. + 2.2 mmHg. + 3.0 mmHg.

*Statistically significant difference between Group 1 and Group 2 (P < 0.05).

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Ask the Experts NAOMI AARONSON – MIND BODY Naomi Aaronson, MA OTR/L CHT CPI, is an occupational therapist, certified hand therapist, and mat Pilates instructor who believes in the power of exercise in recovery. Naomi’s articles have been featured in IDEA Fitness Journal, Occupational Therapy ADVANCE, and Women and Cancer magazines. She is the co-author of the continuing education courses Return to Life: Breast Cancer Recovery Using Pilates, Breast Cancer Recovery: On Land and In Water, and The Breast Cancer Recovery Exercise Program. Naomi offers live courses through Integrated Rehabilitation and Fitness. recovercises@aol.com

www.recovercisesforwellness.com

PETE AZAZEL – EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Pete Bazzel, MS, CPT (ACE), is Partner and Editor-in-Chief for the American Academy of Health and Fitness (AAHF); served in the military, retiring as a Colonel; then led the Washington, D.C. regional growth of Town Sports International from 3 to 17 clubs. He co-created SrFit™ and JrFit™, 19-24 hour continuing education specialty certification courses focusing on mature adult and youth fitness respectively; and Move More, Eat Better - YOU Matter!™, a lifestyle change course for the general public. He is a World Tae Kwon Do Federation Black Belt. Pete@AAHF.info

www.AAHF.info

MELISSA BAUMGARTNER – WELLNESS COUNSELING Melissa Baumgartner, CPT (ACE, ACSM, AFAA and WellCoach), is co-owner of Midwest Fitness Consulting, LLC, a company in the St. Louis area that specializes in worksite health promotion; and creator of LWC, a Lifestyle Wellness Coaching program. Melissa has worked in the health and fitness industry for 25 years, spending the last twelve as an educator, speaker and author. She has presented to thousands of people spreading her message on happiness and well-being. www.melissabaumgartner.com

RANDALL BROAD – BUSINESS OF PERSONAL TRAINING Randall Broad is an entrepreneur, business founder, and the guiding force behind several enterprises. After working in the aerospace industry, he moved to Hollywood to embrace his dream of being an actor, making commercials and being a leading man stunt double. In 1990, he founded Opal Enterprises, a marketing services company. A cancer survivor, he now takes the stage professionally to share his lessons on living a work/life balanced existence. In the book he co-authored, It's an Extraordinary Life, he has chronicled his experiences and adventures for future generations to learn from and enjoy. www.itsanextraordinarylife.com

www.cancersurvivorsinspiration.com

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BRADLEY J. CARDINAL – EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE Bradley J. Cardinal, Ph.D., is a Full Professor in Exercise and Sport Science at Oregon State University. In 2009 he received the university’s Elizabeth P. Ritchie Distinguished Professor award. He previously served on the faculties of Wayne State University (Detroit, MI) and Eastern Washington University (Cheney, WA). He is Fellow #475 of the National Academy of Kinesiology; a Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine; a Fellow in the North American Society of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport and Dance Professionals; and a Fellow in the Research Consortium of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance.

Brad.Cardinal@oregonstate.edu

http://health.oregonstate.edu/people/cardinal-bradley

JOHN PAUL CATANZARO – PERSONAL TRAINING John Paul Catanzaro, BSc Kin, CSEP-CEP is a Certified Exercise Physiologist with a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology and Health Science. He owns and operates a private facility in Richmond Hill, Ontario providing training and nutritional consulting. John Paul has authored two books, The Elite Trainer (2011) and Mass Explosion (2013), and has released two DVDs, Stretching for Strengthening (2003) and Warm-Up to Strength Training (2005), which have sold copies worldwide, been featured in several magazines, and have been endorsed by many leading experts. In 2013, John Paul released two new webinars, Strength Training Parameters and Program Design and Body Composition Strategies. www.CatanzaroGroup.com

SHARON CHAMBERLIN – PERSONAL TRAINING Sharon Chamberlin, BA, CPT (ACE), Fitness Nutrition Coach (NESTA), Lifestyle Fitness Coach (Spencer Institute), owns Catalyst 4 Fitness, a personal training company offering online fitness and nutrition coaching, boot camp classes, traditional fitness training, and fitness consulting. Her success with clients, both in the gym and online, is based on her pragmatic philosophy and realistic attitude.

www.catalyst4fitness.com

sharon@catalyst4fitness.com

MARCI CLARK – PILATES Marci Clark, MA, CPT, GFI, is an international fitness and wellness programming presenter with over 20 years experience in the fitness industry, specializing in Pilates exercise. She is the creator of the Foundational Pilates program and owner of Marci Clark Wellness Centers. Marci is widely published in the areas of Pilates, fitness programming and business and consults in the areas of group fitness, programming and business planning.

http://www.linkedin.com/in/marciclark

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Ask the Experts NANCY CLARK – NUTRITION Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD (Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics), counsels both casual and competitive athletes in her private practice at Healthworks, the premier fitness center in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. Her Sports Nutrition Guidebook and food guides for marathoners, new runners, and cyclists are available via www.nancyclarkrd.com. For a list of upcoming events/workshops, see www.sportsnutritionworkshop.com.

www.nancyclarkrd.com www.sportsnutritionworkshop.com http://community.active.com/blogs/NancyClarkRD

CASEY CONRAD – GROWING YOUR PT BUSINESS Casey Conrad, BA, JD, President of Communication Consultants WBS, Inc., has been in the health and fitness industry for 26 years. In addition to authoring “Selling Fitness: The Complete Guide to Selling Health Club Memberships,” she has created and published over 25 other sales, marketing and management training products for the industry. She has spoken in 19 countries, is a feature presenter at conventions and trade shows worldwide and writes monthly for numerous international magazines.

Casey@CaseyConrad.com

www.CaseyConrad.com

ERICA N. CONRAD – EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE Erica N. Conrad is a student majoring in Exercise and Sport Science at Oregon State University. She worked for a running store where she sold running shoes to customers and gained interest in both gait mechanics and barefoot running. Her goal for this paper is to inform people of the advantages and disadvantages of shod, barefoot, and minimalist running. Erica plans on enrolling in a Doctor of Physical Therapy program for a career working as a Physical Therapist and hopes this paper will help prevent future injuries or complications for people.

conrade@onid.orst.edu

CAMMY DENNIS – YOUTH AND MATURE ADULT FITNESS PROGRAMMING Cammy Dennis, BS, CPT (ACE and AFAA), is Fitness Director for On Top of the World Communities Inc., a 55-plus adult community and The Ranch Fitness Center and Spa. Her 20 years experience in the fitness industry includes group exercise instruction, personal training, lifestyle coaching and program management. Her specialty is curriculum development for youth and senior fitness. She co-authored Kids In Motion and numerous articles on youth and senior fitness for Asiafit, SCW Fitness Education and ICAA. cammy_dennis@otowfl.com

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BETHANY DIAMOND – WATER FITNESS Bethany Diamond, CPT (ACE, AFAA and NASM), is founder of Ovarian Cycle, Inc. and an Ironman triathlete. She is also a PowerBar R team elite athlete and a Scwhinn Cycling master trainer. Bethany has published articles for IDEA, has DVDs produced by Healthy Learning and is a contributor to the IDEA Water Fitness Committee. She has worked with fitness professionals, nationally and internationally, sharing with them her philosophy of safe, effective exercise that is fun and results driven. www.ovariancycle.org

www.bethanydiamond.com

ION DOAGA – PERSONAL TRAINING Ion Doaga is the creator of and a contributing author for Massage Dreams that features articles on alternative therapies, massage, aromatherapy, acupuncture, health and fitness, motivation and inspiration. He is Second Degree Black Belt in Karate Ion believes that exercising, healthy nutrition and alternative medicine is what the human body needs to heal itself and be strong. He is growing a community on his site massagedreams.com where he promotes a preventive care lifestyle. Ion lives in Chisinau, Moldova and speaks three languages: Romanian, Russian and English. http://massagedreams.com

SALLY EDWARDS – HEART RATE TRAINING Sally Edwards, MA, MBA, is a leading expert in business, exercise science and lifestyle living. She created the Heart Zones Training proprietary and branded training system. Sally is a best-selling author and sought after professional speaker with 23 books and 500 articles on health and fitness, including Heart Rate Monitor Guidebook and The Complete Book of Triathlons. She is a 16-time Ironman finisher, a member of the Triathlon Hall of Fame, and Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run winner. She is the founder and CEO of Heart Zones USA, the training, education, health club programming, and coaching company. www.theSallyEdwardsCompany.com www.HeartZonesCoaching.com

www.heartzones.com

JENNIFER GREEN – INCLUSIVE FITNESS Jennifer Green, BS in Health Fitness and Rehabilitative and Preventative Programs, MS in Clinical Exercise Physiology, is an Information Specialist at NCPAD in the Department of Disability and Human Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Jennifer creates and provides fact/ information sheets and videos focused on inclusion: adapting physical activity training and programs, making fitness centers more inclusive, etc. She is the author of the monthly NCPAD News column “The training corner,” written for fitness professionals who work with individuals with various disabilities and chronic conditions. green1jn@uic.edu

www.ncpad.org

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Ask the Experts TRACEY HARVEY – MATURE FITNESS Tracey Harvey, BS, SPINNING® Instructor, USTA Tennis player, has three decades of experience in the Health and Fitness Industry, currently specializing in managing wellness not illness in older adults; working with Independent Retirement Living Communities. Her background of packaging education with products for the commercial and consumer fitness markets is credited with introducing SPINNING around the globe. Tracey is also a published “Senior Living and Lifestyle” author and an International Council of Active Aging (ICAA) Presenter. http://www.gencarelifestyle.com/

tl.harvey@hotmail.com

SHERRI HORNER – MEET THE EXPERT Sherri Horner is a radio talk show host, fitness professional, motivational speaker and writer. She is a yoga teacher, and an AFAA certified personal trainer and group fitness instructor. She is trained in Tae Kwon Do and has received specialty training from Empower Training Systems, Yogafit and Silver Sneakers. Her column has been published in a Philadelphia Christian Bodybuilding Magazine and Delaware and New Jersey wellness magazines. She is the founder and president of Health Fitness Broadcast. Since 2004 her interviews with leading experts have resulted in a treasure chest of information. Sherri@HealthFitnessBroadcast.com

www.HealthFitnessBroadcast.com

KARSTEN JENSEN – STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING Karsten Jensen, MS Exercise Physiology, CPT (CPTN), is a high performance trainer and an educator with the Certified Professional Trainers Network. He has trained World Class and Olympic Athletes from 13 different sports since 1993, many winning European Championships and World Championships and Association of Tennis Professionals Tournaments. Karsten is an international speaker, author of several books (most recently The Flexible Periodization Method) and is an educator with the Certified Professional Trainers Network. He also shares “Insider Principles of World Class Strength and Conditioning Methods” through his web site. www.yestostrength.com

yestostrength@sympatico.ca

JENNY D JOHNSON – PERSONAL TRAINING Jenny D. Johnson, MS, CPT (NASM), began her higher education career at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro where she was a women’s volleyball NCAA Division I scholarship student athlete, earning a degree in Leisure Service Management. After a ten-year stent of career and family building, Jenny returned to California University of Pennsylvania to obtain her MS in Exercise Science and Health Promotion. She is currently completing a doctorate in education from Northcentral University. She is an Assistant Professor at American Public University System in the Sports and Health Sciences and Sport Management Department.

jennyjohnson.amu@gmail.com

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GAMUT, Issue 56, June/July 2017


TIM KEIGHTLEY – THE BUSINESS OF PERSONAL TRAINING Tim Keightley is V.P. of Fitness for Golds Gym International. He is also an international presenter and motivational speaker. Since teaching his first class in 1983, he has experienced life as an Officer in the British Royal Marines, a Professional Golfer, a ‘Stuntman’, a personal trainer to a Boxing World Heavy Weight Champion, built the largest personal training business in Europe and was V. P. of Fitness for Town Sports International. Tim believes that part of our secret to success is to learn how to have FUN in all that we do, build on our PASSION and show others how PROUD we are of what we can do for them.

tdkbusiness2000@yahoo.co.uk

PEGGY KRAUS – CARDIOPULMONARY REHABILITATION AND NUTRITION Peggy Kraus, MA, ACSM RCEP, NET, is a clinical exercise physiologist in cardiopulmonary rehab as well as a nutritional education trainer at Wellness Foundation where she teaches others about the benefits of following a plant-strong diet and committing to regular exercise. She is a frequent contributor to IDEA Fitness Journal and to Examiner.com and has been published in AFAA American Fitness and other health fitness magazines. She believes strongly that frailty and disease have become an acceptable part of life, but both are avoidable when you exercise and eat right. peggykraus@verizon.net www.peggykraus.com http://www.examiner.com/disease-prevention-in-national/peggy-kraus

TAMMY LEBOSS – BUSINESS OF PERSONAL TRAINING Tammy LeBoss, BA, CPT (NAFC), Pilates Coach, NAFC Nutrition Coach, Pilates Post-Rehab and various yoga modalities certified, has been involved in the health and fitness industry for over 17 years. In 1997, Tammy gave her corporate job the boot and moved to San Diego where she struggled to make ends meet as a personal trainer. She has since learned about the many pitfalls of doing so and how to avoid them. She has served as head of the nutrition department for various health clubs and also helped build several successful health clubs from the ground up. Her publications have been featured by the National Association for Fitness Certification and Sports Nutrition Supplement Guide. http://thefitprofoodie.com

http://www.nafctrainer.com

tammyleboss456@gmail.com

SUSAN LEE – DIVERSITY AND EQUITY PROGRAMS Susan Lee, MPE, MA, CPT (CPTN), President of the Certified Professional Trainers Network (CPTN) works with leaders and partners to offer education, certification, leadership and advocacy for personal trainers and fitness professionals. Concurrently, Susan develops co-curricular diversity and equity programs for the Faculty of Physical Education and Health at the University of Toronto in Canada.

www.cptn.com

info@cptn.com

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Ask the Experts RITA LA ROSA LOUD – TRAINING GUIDELINES AND PROGRAMS Rita La Rosa Loud, B.S., CPT (AFAA) is an author and Adjunct Professor at Quincy College. She recently co-authored with Wayne Westcott the book No More Cellulite. She self-published the booklet W.O.W. Workout at Work; contributed a chapter in The Belly Melt Diet, a book from the editors of Prevention; developed the Nautilus At-Machine Stretching Expressway Program; and has been recognized for her innovative stretching concept by Shape Magazine. She is a recipient of the distinguished Honor Award and Outstanding Fitness Professional Award from the Mass. Assoc. of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance; plus the Nova 7 Award for exercise programming from Fitness Management magazine. plloud@msn.com

JENNIFER MANNING – INJURY PREVENTION Jennifer Manning, DPT, OCS, CPT (NSCA CSCS), was inspired to be a physical therapist after suffering an ACL tear in high school. She is the creator of PrehabFitness.com, a website focused on injury prevention and exercise education. She has had the pleasure to work with people of all ages and talents. Her latest clients include football players preparing for the NFL, a fighter in the UFC and Level 10 gymnasts in the United States and Canada. Jennifer is currently practicing physical therapy at Breakthrough Physical Therapy in Irvine California. www.PrehabFitness.com

jenniferdpt@hotmail.com

GREG MAURER – BUSINESS, MARKETING, TECHNOLOGY AND PROGRAM INTEGRATION, AND PERSONAL TRAINING Greg Maurer, BS Exercise Physiology, CPT (ACE and NASM), is an Associate Partner with New Paradigm Partners health club consulting firm. Greg is also a fitness consultant for several emerging technologies in the fitness/wellness/medical industries, including bioDensity Strength Technology, Power Plate Whole Body Vibration and reACT – Rapid Eccentric Anaerobic Core Trainer, and Bulgarian Bag (IBBConline.com).

greg@maurer3.com

www.newparadigmpartners.com

JAMES MCPARTLAND – PURPOSEFUL EMPOWERMENT James McPartland, former President of Star Trac Fitness, Author, International Speaker, TV/Radio Host, and ‘Wellness Ambassador’ focused on developing the Human Potential within business. His present endeavor at The JMac Performance Group has allowed him to further play a leadership role in the health & fitness industry for now more than twenty years. Much of his current business advisory and speaking activity demonstrates a philosophy called Crosstraining for Life™, focusing on uncovering the potential that lies within a company by developing the potential of the people employed inside the business. info@jamesmcpartland.com www.jamesmcpartland.com http://www.jamesmcpartland.com/resources.php Back to Table of Contents

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CAROL MICHAELS - PERSONAL TRAINING Carol Michaels, MBA, CPT (ACSM, ACE), is the founder of Recovery Fitness®, a cancer exercise program. Her new book, Exercises for Cancer Survivors, is a fantastic resource for anyone undergoing cancer surgery or treatments. Carol also developed and produced two DVD’s called Recovery Fitness Cancer Exercise-Simple Stretches and Recovery Fitness-Strength Training. She owns and operates Carol Michaels Fitness and Recovery Fitness and is a consultant, author, speaker, Pilates instructor, and cancer exercise specialist. She is on the advisory board for several cancer organizations, and has appeared on health related television and radio programs. The American Council on Exercise recognized Carol as a Trainer to Watch in 2011 and Personal Fitness Professional honored her as the 2012 PFP Trainer of the Year. www.recoveryfitness.net

www.carolmichaelsfitness.com

NICOLE NELSON - PERSONAL TRAINING Nicole Nelson, MS, LMT, holds a masters degree in Health Science from the University of North Florida. In addition to being a licensed massage therapist, she is also certified as an Advanced Health and Fitness Specialist through ACE. She has a full time massage and training practice in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL and has contributed articles to IDEA Fitness Journal and Massage magazine.

nicolelnelson@att.net

DORETTE NYSEWANDER – CORPORATE HEALTH, WELLNESS AND ANTI-AGE RESEARCH Dorette Nysewander, EdD, “DrD”, is Founder and President of D Group Consulting Services, Inc, a wellness education consulting company, facilitating initiatives worldwide. Committed to the health and well-being of all, she has been recognized in Sutton's Who’s Who in Elite Healthcare, Jacksonville Chamber 904 magazine as one of 75 Most Influential People In JAX Healthcare. Her articles have appeared in American Fitness, Jacksonville Business Journal, Liberation Wellness, several local publications, national fitness organizations and corporate industries. Contact her: 904-859-1425. dorette@dgroupconsulting.com

www.dgroupconsulting.com

GARY L. PALMER – MATURE ADULT FITNESS Gary L. Palmer, BSEd, CPT (NCSF), a free lance writer and fitness enthusiast, served in the Navy during the Vietnam War, earned a football scholarship as a walk-on at Ohio University, and went on to a successful 15-year teaching and coaching career. He also spent 26 productive years in the business world before transitioning to a full time writer. His first published book, Chagrin Falls, is a memoir. The theme is overcoming adversity as an abandoned, impoverished foster child growing up in a small Midwest town during the 1940’s and 1950’s. His latest health and fitness writing focuses on the need to speed up, not slow down, exercise and physical activity, as we age. gpalmer1@neo.rr.com

http://www.garylpalmer.net/

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Ask the Experts LORI PATTERSON – BOOT CAMP Lori Patterson, BA, CPT (ACE, ACSM, AFAA and WellCoaches) is the CEO of VicteliB, LLC, and the creator of successful fee based programming to include Boot Camp Challenge®, Baby Boomer Boot Camp Challenge® and Kids Kamp Challenge. Lori served in the US Army as well as 28 years in the fitness industry. You can reach Lori at lori@victelib.com or the website at www.victelib.com.

www.victelib.com lori@bootcamp-challenge.com

www.mwfitness.com www.bootcamp-challenge.com

TAMMY J. PETERSEN – MATURE ADULT AND YOUTH HEALTH AND FITNESS Tammy Petersen, MSE, is the Founder and Managing Partner for the American Academy of Health and Fitness. She has written two books on adult fitness, SrFit™ and Functionally Fit™, and designed corresponding specialty certification training programs. She cocreated JrFit™, a specialty certification course focusing on youth strength training and nutrition and Move More, Eat Better— YOU Matter!™, a lifestyle change course. Her articles have appeared on PTontheNet; and in Club Business for Entrepreneurs, Personal Fitness Professional, Fitness Business Pro, American Fitness and OnSitefitness. Tammy@AAHF.info

www.AAHF.info

LORI PINE – MIND BODY Lori Pine, MA, CPT (ACE) is the Programs Director at In Motion Fitness in Chico, California. She is an APEX certified Nutritional Counselor and a member of Power Bar’s Team Elite. She holds certifications and certificates in Youth Fitness, BOSU, TRX, Nordic Walking, Body Bar, Gliding, Kettlebell, GRAVITY, Drums Alive, and STRONG. Lori has 20+ years experience working with youth and adults in schools. She organizes events and charitable activities, including the “B.A.M.” fitness conference.

j916grif@aol.com

JOHN PLATERO – PERSONAL TRAINING John Platero, CPT, is a fitness educator who has consulted both nationally and internationally, most recently for the Royal family of Qatar. He is the Director of Education for the National Council for Certified Personal Trainers. He has obtained 35 personal training certifications, filmed over 30 fitness videos and infomercials has been published by most of the fitness magazines and is the author of “Yes You Can – Fitness After 40 – A New Beginning.” As an athlete, John was a champion bodybuilder who turned cyclist and has won 21 gold, two silver and two bronze medals in cycling in the Senior Olympics and the Master’s Pan American Games. www.johnplatero.com

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JUSTIN PRICE - CORRECTIVE EXERCISE Justin Price, MA, CPT (ACE) is the creator of The BioMechanics Method® - the world's fastest growing corrective exercise education program for health and fitness professionals. He is an IDEA International Personal Trainer of the Year, subject matter expert on corrective exercise for the American Council on Exercise and BOSU, founding author of PTA Global, Director of Content and featured author on corrective exercise for PTontheNet and an education provider for TRX and the National Strength and Conditioning Association. info@thebiomechanicsmethod.com

www.thebiomechanicsmethod.com

KRISTEN PUHLMAN – NUTRITION Kristen Puhlman, RD, CPT (NASM and WITS), Spinning Certified (IFTA), is an Outpatient Diabetes Educator at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center; currently residing in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She has a BS in Nutrition and Food from Kent State University. She owns and operates Obliques, LLC; a personal training business specializing in core training, weight management and individualized nutritional planning. She is also the on staff Dietitian for Aspire Fitness Studios. Her experience in the hospital setting is in clinical nutrition with a primary focus on weight management and the psychology of weight loss.

kcj528@hotmail.com

kpuhlman@wfubmc.edu

AMY RAUWORTH – INCLUSIVE FITNESS Amy Rauworth, MS, RCEP, is the Associate Director of Operations and Exercise Physiology Research at the Center on Health Promotion Research for Persons with Disabilities (CHP). CHP is located at the University of Illinois at Chicago in the Depa2rtment of Disability and Human Development. She is a Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist with ACSM. Amy conducts Inclusive Fitness training nationally on behalf of the National Center on Physical Activity and Disability and specializes in accessible fitness center design. www.ncpad.org

TIM ROCHFORD – SELF DEFENSE Tim Rochford, CPT (ACE, The Cooper Institute and NSCA), 6th degree Black Belt (Kajukenbo Karate), founder and owner of Empower Training Systems (a self defense/martial arts/kickboxing fitness instructor training & certification company), has authored numerous instructor training manuals, including (co-author) the ACE Kickboxing Fitness Specialty Training manual and the Proactive Personal Security Self Defense Instructor Training Program. He is an ACE and ISSA continuing education specialist. www.empower-selfdefense.com

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Ask the Experts MARK ROOZEN – YOUTH STRENGTH AND SPORT CONDITIONING Mark Roozen, MEd, certified strength and conditioning coach (NSCA CSCS*D and CPT, and FNSCA), is Senior Content Editor for STACK Media which promotes safe training and sports enhancement and is Co-Director of the Performance Education Association. He has been in the strength, conditioning and performance field for over 28 years. Mark has worked with teams from the high school to the professional levels as a strength coach; performed as director of a hospital owned fitness and training facility, as well as owned his own training center; and, has worked with over 30,000 youth in sport camps across the country. He has presented, written and consulted worldwide.

markroozen@clevelandbrowns.com

rozyroozen@gmail.com

TARA SAREEN - WELLNESS COACHING Tara Sareen, BS, is a Institute For Integrative Nutrition Certified Health Coach in the Greater Boston area and founder of iCrave Coaching. Through a unique, intensive 6-month coaching partnership, Tara's clients lose weight, identify food sensitivities, discover ‘life after sugar’ and heal and reduce chronic conditions such as joint pain, skin irritations, headaches, fatigue, infections, anxiety and depression. tara@icravecoaching.com

www.icravecoaching.com

www.facebook.com/pages/iCrave-Coaching/575414849205664

CODY SIPE – EXERCISE AND AGING Cody Sipe, PhD, ACSM Certified Clinical Exercise Specialist, ACSM Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist, is an award-winning industry leader in fitness for older adults with over 17 years of experience. He serves on the editorial boards of IDEA and Active Aging Today and is an advisory member for Canadian Fitness Education Services, WholyFit, the National Posture Institute and the ICAA Visioning Board. Cody is a past recipient of the IDEA Program Director of the Year award. His blog www.codysipe.com provides innovative fitness and business information for professionals working with older adults.

www.codysipe.com

BRIAN SOUZA – EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY AND NUTRITION Brian Souza, BS, ACSM-HFS, is the owner of Be Fit Personal Training, a company providing theoretically and evidence based exercise to a variety of populations. Brian has been in the personal training industry for 10 years. He is will obtain a Master’s degree in Sport and Exercise Psychology from Springfield College in May 2011 and then will continue his education in a Doctoral level Sport and Exercise Psychology program. His research interests include exercise psychology, applied sports psychology, sports and exercise nutrition, positive psychology, and youth sport. He competes as a recreational triathlete. souzabr@onid.orst.edu

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MATTHEW B. SPANIER At the age of 18, Matthew B. Spanier was diagnosed with Type-1 Diabetes Mellitus. Due to his very active lifestyle he has been able to control the disease very well. He will graduate in June, 2013 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise and Sport Science from Oregon State University. During his undergraduate studies he has interned and worked for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). After graduation Matt will continue his education at Ohio University, where he will be pursuing a Master's degree in Clinical Exercise Physiology. mattspanier@hotmail.com

spanierm@onid.orst.edu

JIM STARSHAK – TAI CHI FOR HEALTH Jim Starshak, MS, NSCA-CPT, IDEA Elite PFT is the Governing Board Chairman for the international Tai Chi for Health Institute, a Tai Chi for Health Master Trainer, an Exercise Science Adjunct Professor, and founder of The Home Gym, Inc. After 18+ years in US Special Forces (“Green Beret”), Jim is a disabled veteran who promotes tai chi internationally for its functional fitness and health benefits. He certifies Arthritis Foundation Tai Chi instructors and provides continuing education for Health & Fitness Professionals, Athletic Trainers, Physical & Occupational Therapists, and Nurses. thehomegym@everestkc.net

www.thehomegym.net

DENNIS SWEET Derrick Sweet is best known as a popular corporate keynote speaker and author of three highly celebrated books: Healthy Wealthy and Wise, Get The Most Out Of Life, and You Don't Have to Die to Go to Heaven. He is the creator of the Hypnolinguistics Course: www.hypnolinguistics.com. Derrick is also the Chairman and Founder of the Certified Coaches Federation. Derrick created the coaching model that is the foundation of the Certified Coaches Federation's Certified Coach Practitioner Training and Development Program. For more information on the Certified Coaches Federation please visit: www.certifiedcoachesfederation.com.

info@healthywealthyandwise.com

KELLY WARD – MATURE FITNESS Kelly Ward, MS in Therapeutic Aging, CPT (AFAA and SFA), author of “The Complete Guide to Fall Prevention: Everything You Need to Know to Remain Independent,” is a certified FallProof™ balance and mobility specialist who has been teaching fall prevention classes for six years and has worked with older adults for over 15 years. Kelly’s mission is to educate and facilitate the adaptation of a reduced fall risk lifestyle. She presents easily understandable evidence-based research, applying this knowledge to daily life situations, and offers train-the-trainer programs. For more information on Kelly’s comprehensive fall prevention services or to order her book, see http://thefallpreventionlady.com. http://thefallpreventionlady.com

info@thefallpreventionlady.com

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Ask the Experts WAYNE L. WESTCOTT – STRENGTH TRAINING Wayne Westcott, PhD, CSCS, directs the Quincy College Fitness Research Programs. He has been a strength training consultant for the US Navy, ACE, the YMCA of the USA and Nautilus. He is an editorial advisor for numerous publications, including The Physician and Sportsmedicine, ACSM’s Health & Fitness Journal, Prevention, Shape, and OnSitefitness; and has authored 24 books on strength training. He serves on the International Council on Active Aging Board of Advisors and ACSM’s New England Chapter. wwestcott@quincycollege.edu

WENDY A. WILLIAMSON - POST REHABILITATION SPECIALIST Wendy A. Williamson, PhD, CPT (ACE and NASM), ACE Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist, Post Rehabilitation Specialist, is nationally recognized as a leading educator, writer, author, and consultant. She owns Williamson Fitness Consulting and is a frequent lecturer for national conventions and trade shows. In 2005 and 2006, the American Council on Exercise recognized Dr. Williamson as one of the leading personal trainers in the nation. Currently, Dr. Williamson is the Corporate Education Director for seven GENESIS Health Club locations and is a full time post-rehabilitation specialist in Wichita, Kansas. www.williamsonfitness.com

wmsonwa@aol.com

MICHAEL WOZNIAK Michael Wozniak BS, CPT, is the manager of the hospital-related fitness center at Harbor Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. He has 13 years experience in the fitness industry working with clients ranging from youth athletes to seniors and special populations. He has a Bachelors degree in Sport Psychology and is an ACE Certified Personal Trainer.

www.harborhospital.org/harborfitness

mike.wozniak@medstar.net

ROSE ZAHNN – YOGA Rose Zahnn, CPT (ACE), GFI (AFAA), E-RYT200 (Yoga Alliance), is the founder and owner of Healthy Habits Fitness-Yoga-Pilates Studios, creator of PilatesFit and the Learn to Be Lean Program, and is a Master Trainer for YogaFit International, Flirty Girl Fitness, and Balletone. A UCLA graduate and a fitness professional for over 20 years, Rose teaches at Healthy Habits in Sacramento, California; presents at conferences, leading teacher trainings and workshops; and is a continuing education provider for ACE and AFAA. Rose@HealthyHabitsStudio.com

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References Aging and Exercise 1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Web–based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) [online]. Accessed May 2017. 2) HCUPnet. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://hcupnet.ahrq.gov [online]. Accessed May 2017. 3) Hurley, B. Does strength training improve health status? Strength and Conditioning Journal, 16:7-13, 1994. 4) Judge, J.O., Kenny, A.M., Kraemer, W.J. Exercise in older adults. Conn Med. 67(8):461-464, 2003. 5) Nelson, M., Fiatarone, M., Morganti, C., Trice, I., Greenberg, R., & Evans, W. Effects of high intensity strength training on multiple risk factors for osteoporotic fractures. Journal of the American Medical Association, 272(24):1909-1914, 1994. 6) Petersen, T. SrFit: The Fitness Professionals’ Resource for Senior Fitness. Leavenworth, KS: American Academy of Health and Fitness. 2017. 7) Singh, M.A., Exercise comes of age: rationale and recommendations for a geriatric exercise prescription. J Gerontol Biol Sci Med Sci, 57(5) M262-M282, 2002. 8) Spirduso, W. Physical Dimensions of Aging. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. 1995.

Repetition Ranges for People Past 50 1) Flack, KD, KP, Davy, MAW, Huber, et al. Aging, resistance training, and diabetes prevention. Journal of Aging Research 2011:127315, 2011. 2) Marcell, TJ. Sarcopenia: causes, consequences, and preventions. Journal of Gerontology and Biological Science Medical Science 58:M911-6, 2003. 3) Nelson, ME, M, Fiatarone, C, Morganti, et. al. Effects of high-intensity strength training on multiple risk factors for osteoporotic fractures. JAMA 272:1909-14, 1994. 4) Westcott, WL, RA, Winett, JJ, Annessi, et al. Prescribing physical activity: applying the ACSM protocols for exercise type, intensity, and duration across training frequencies. Physician and Sportsmedicine 2:51-8, 2009. 5) Westcott, W. Effects of 10-repetition and 20-repetition resistance exercise on muscular strength and endurance. American Fitness Quarterly 10(1):25-27, 1991. 6) Bemben, D. et al. Musculoskeletal response to high and low intensity resistance training in early postmenopausal women. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 32(1):1949-1957, 2000. 7) Kerr, D. et al. Exercise effects on bone mass in postmenopausal women are site-specific and loaddependent. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (11) 2:218-225, 1996. 8) Westcott, W. A new look at repetition ranges. Fitness Management Y 18(7):36-37, 2002. Back to Table of Contents

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9) Taaffe, D. et al. Comparative effects of high and low intensity resistance training on thigh muscle strength, fiber area, and tissue composition in elderly women. Clinical Physiology 16(4):381-392, 1996. 10)Faigenbaum, A. et al. Early muscular fitness adaptations in children in response to two different resistance training regimens. Pediatric Exercise Science 17:237-248, 2005. 11)Chestnut, I. and D. Docherty. The effects of 4 and 10 repetition maximum weight training protocols on neuromuscular adaptations in untrained men. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 13:353-359, 1999. 12)Behm, D. et al. The effect of 5, 10, and 20 repetition maximums on the recovery of voluntary and evoked contractile properties. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 16(2):209-218, 2002. 13)Mitchell, CJ, TA, Churchward-Venne, DWD, West, et al. Resistance exercise load does not determine training-mediated hypertrophic gains in young men. Journal of Applied Physiology 113(1):71-77, 2012. 14)Morton, RW, SY, Okawa, CG, Wavell, et al. Neither load nor systemic hormones determine resistance training-mediated hypertrophy or strength gains in resistance-trained young men. Journal of Applied Physiology 121(1):129-138, 2016 15)Jenkins, NDM, TJ, Housh, SL, Buckner, et al. Neuromuscular adaptations after 2 and 4 weeks of 80% versus 30% 1 repetition maximum resistance training to failure. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 30(8):2174-2185, 2015. 16)Fisher, J, J, Steele, D, Smith. High- and low-load resistance training: Interpretation and practical application of current research findings. Sports Medicine DOI 10.1007/s40279-016-0602-1, 2016. 17)Gonzalez, AM. Acute anabolic response and muscular adaptation after hypertrophy-style and strength-style resistance exercise. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 30(10):29592964, 2016. 18)Larsson, L. Histochemical characteristics of human skeletal muscle during aging. Acta Physiological Scandinavia 117:469-471, 1983. 19)Baechle, TR, W, Westcott. Fitness Professionalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to Strength Training Older Adults, 2nd Edition. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2010.

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Create a niche. KNOW. TRAIN. RETAIN.

Gamut Issue 56 June/July 2017  

This month’s articles about aging and exercise, effective rep ranges for those 50 and older, and meal timing present relevant personal growt...

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