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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

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Necessary Verdicts

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cers — Michael Hunter, Robert Barrios and Ignatius Hills — pleaded guilty and cooperated with federal prosecutors. Lehrmann and Hunter’s cooperation earned them three-year and eight-year prison terms, respectively — a deal that must sound good now to the five cops who were convicted Aug. 5. According to Letten, sentencing guidelines indicate that Bowen, Gisevius and Villavaso face a minimum of 35 years each in prison, while Faulcon, who was convicted of shooting Madison to death, faces 60 years behind bars. Sgt. Arthur “Archie” Kaufman, who was not on the bridge, was convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, lying to the feds and falsifying evidence; he faces up to 120 years, according to Letten. All but Kaufman are being held without bond until sentencing.

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Some people still think the cops were railroaded, a position that requires stubbornly turning a blind eye to the facts.

Defense attorneys had pleaded a “stress defense,” saying the tension and trauma in Katrina’s aftermath affected the cops’ judgment and behavior. Those were indeed stressful days, but the vast majority of New Orleans police officers did not kill unarmed civilians and then conspire to hide the truth immediately after the fact. Letten aptly summed up the government’s response to the so-called “Katrina defense” after the verdicts came down, telling reporters, “Who can we count on when our society is threatened? If we can’t depend on them, who can we depend on?” Indeed. Cleaning up NOPD is not going to be easy, or quick, or tidy, just as the process that led to the Aug. 5 verdicts was neither easy, nor quick, nor tidy. In the end, however, the jury’s “guilty on all counts” decision was resounding. And necessary — for the Madison and Brissette families as well as for all New Orleanians.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

hen jurors in what became known as the Danziger Trial returned their guilty verdicts Aug. 5, many New Orleanians described the outcome as “closure.” Not quite. Recently retired NOPD Sgt. Gerard Dugue, who coauthored the official police report on the Danziger Bridge shootings in the tumultuous days after Hurricane Katrina, is scheduled to be tried next month in connection with the cover-up. Likewise, the sentencing of former NOPD Lt. Michael Lohman, who pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice and has since cooperated with federal investigators, was once again postponed last week — also until next month. This saga is far from over. For the families of James Brissette and Ronald Madison, two unarmed civilians who were shot by NOPD officers as they attempted to walk to a grocery store in search of food and water, there can be no real closure, just the sense that justice, however delayed, has been served — to a point. Sgt. Kenneth Bowen, officer Robert Faulcon, Sgt. Robert Gisevius and officer Anthony Villavaso — who were all on the bridge that day — were found guilty of every federal charge brought against them. However, the jury did not find their actions constituted “murder.” Lance Madison, the brother of Ronald Madison, told reporters outside the courtroom, “We’re thankful for closure.” But Brissette’s mother, Sherrel Johnson, saw it differently. “I want the word ‘murder’ behind their name, attached to their name,” she said. “I’m not satisfied with this, and I’m not going to be satisfied with this.” For lawyers, the jury’s decision not to classify the killings as murder is a technical one; jurors found that the killer cops lacked the “specific intent” required under the law to classify a homicide as a murder. For the defendants, it means they won’t face automatic life sentences — though all of them face virtual life sentences behind bars. For the victims’ families and the community at large, the verdict has caused many to rethink their definition of justice. Amazingly, some people still think the cops were railroaded, a position that requires stubbornly turning a blind eye to the facts. In February 2010, Lohman pleaded guilty. U.S. Attorney Jim Letten said Lohman created false reports and witness statements and then lied to federal agents. Less than a month later, former NOPD officer Jeffrey Lehrmann pleaded guilty to misprision (concealment) of a felony. After Lehrmann’s plea, U.S. District Judge Lance Africk said, “I have neither imagined or heard of more despicable conduct by law enforcement officers.” Eventually three other former NOPD offi-

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“They’re acting like Beavis and Butt-Head.” — State Treasurer John Kennedy to Baton Rouge TV station NBC 33, describing his feelings toward the U.S. Congress.

‘WORST OF THE WORST’

New Orleans Police Chief Ronal Serpas is so pleased with the department’s Friday morning COMSTAT crime-statistic review meetings that he’s making them a twice-a-week affair. However, the new Tuesday COMSTAT meetings, unlike the Friday meetings, are cops-only affairs. “Because of highly sensitive information that will be disclosed, these Tuesday COMSTAT meetings will not be open to the public,” the NOPD said in a press release. The “Crime Intelligence Briefings” will highlight what the chief calls “the worst of the worst” criminals in the city, as well as the progress made by NOPD officers in apprehending them. The new COMSTAT meetings will be led by Deputy Chief Kirk Bouyelas. The first meeting is Aug. 16. — Kevin Allman

TULANE LEADS LOCALS ON FORBES ‘TOP COLLEGES’ LIST

#OVERKILL?

BY ALE X WOODWARD

ow can you not vote for the Protecting Children from Internet Pornographers Act of 2011? A “no” vote would strike a resounding, humiliating blow to your chances of re-election. Or would it?

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The bipartisan measure’s broad sweep is a potential kiddie porn-ring killer. But its other casualties include all Internet users, whose IP addresses (your computer’s unique web browsing number) will be logged by Internet service providers (ISP) for up to 18 months. The resolution, authored by Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., passed 19-10 in the House judiciary committee in July. The bill amends Section 2703 of title 18 of the U.S. Code to say, “A provider of an electronic communication service or remote computing service shall retain for a period of at least 18 months the temporarily assigned network addresses the service assigns to each account.” The people targeted aren’t necessarily sex offenders or suspected child predators. The rules apply to all

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Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

Who’s most to blame for the partisan gridlock in Washington?

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BoUQuets Irvin Mayfield,

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

the Grammy Award-winning trumpeter, has announced “Love Sessions,” a series of fundraising concerts to be held at his Jazz Playhouse in the Royal Sonesta Hotel and the newly opened Irvin Mayfield’s I Club in the JW Marriott. Twelve Louisiana organizations, including Unity of Greater New Orleans and the LSUHSC Department of Psychiatry, will be the beneficiaries of 11 nights of concerts held in the two clubs.

Benjamin Franklin High School students

received a perfect score and a Gold Medal Scholastic Crown award for this year’s edition of Riverbend Review, the student literary arts magazine. It was the 15th gold medal for the magazine, which was edited this year by students Rikia Ancar, Carly Peddie, Haley Robinson and Naomi Slack. The award is presented annually by the Columbia Scholastic Press Association.

Blue Bayou and Dixie Landin’

amusement parks in Baton Rouge were fined $25,295 in civil penalties after the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division in Baton Rouge found the parks had employed 49 children under the age of 16 for more than eight hours a day, in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The FLSA states children under 16 may not work more than three hours on a school day or eight hours on a nonschool day.

Emelda Blanco and Gerard Blanco,

mother and son NOPD officers, left the force after pleading guilty to charges related to their attack on a bouncer at a Treme nightclub. Emelda pleaded guilty to one count each of aggravated assault and simple battery; Gerard pleaded guilty to simple battery as well as domestic abuse battery in a separate incident. Each could be sentenced to six months in jail.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

A CONGRESSIONAL BILL WOULD FORCE INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDERS TO RETAIN YOUR INTERNET HISTORY FOR UP TO 18 MONTHS AND TURN IT OVER TO THE FEDS AT A MOMENT’S NOTICE — ALL IN THE NAME OF PROTECTING CHILDREN FROM ONLINE PREDATORS. AND LOUISIANA LEGISLATORS ARE ON THE FENCE ABOUT IT.

Tulane led all Louisiana colleges and universities on the annual list of “top 650 colleges” ranked by Forbes magazine. The Uptown campus came in at No. 190 on the list, which was led overall for the second year in a row by Williams College, a small liberal-arts institution in western Massachusetts. Princeton came in second. So what’s the second-best undergraduate institution in Louisiana?

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A rewrITe exPAnded The dATA retention to include addresses, credit card numbers, email addresses and other sensitive personal information submitted online (including pornography). Smith said in a statement, “Investigators need the assistance of Internet Service Providers to identify users and distributers of online child pornography. This bill requires ISPs to retain subscriber records, similar to records retained by telephone companies, to aid law enforcement officials in their fight against child sexual exploitation. … when investigators develop leads that might result in saving a child or apprehending a pedophile, their efforts should not be frustrated because vital records were destroyed simply because there was no requirement to retain them. every piece of prematurely discarded information could be the footprint of a child predator. This bill ensures that the online footprints of predators are not erased.” In the statement, wasserman Schultz added, “This bill will ensure that officers of the law have the information they need to identify and apprehend those who abuse and violate children.” Many ISPs already retain certain user information specifically for authorities under Section 2703, which requires “disclosure of customer communications of records.” Opponents of the latest resolution say it oversteps all sorts of privacy boundaries. “You lose any measure of privacy in the interest of monitoring the activities of a very small number of people,” says Marjorie esman, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Louisiana, which opposes the legislation. “The idea the government should be able to snoop on what everyone does, that’s sort of a classic ‘killing a flea with a sledgehammer.’” where dO LOCAL LegISLATOrS STAnd? Louisiana’s very recent history of child pornography suggests any crackdown measures would get a hearty thumbs up. Following last year’s bust of the “dreamboard” child pornography ring (with ties to Lafayette and Shreveport), and the subsequent arrests and prosecutions of 72 of its members, U.S. Attorney general eric holder told reporters this month that the ring was “the pre-eminent online community for the promotion of child sexual exploitation.” The bust was the largest ever in the U.S. On Aug. 10, former department of environmental Quality scientist

Michael drury pled guilty to child pornography charges stemming from a 2009 bust in which authorities found dozens of images on two laptop computers and three storage drives from drury’s home. In his 2009 State of the State address, gov. Bobby Jindal said he’d support any legislation to increase penalties against child predators. In his book Leadership and Crisis, Jindal wrote, “The Internet has become the hub of predators, particularly sexual predators who prey on women and children. In Louisiana, we are doing everything we can to make these people miserable. Make no mistake, we are not just trying to stop those who would attack and abuse our young. no, that’s far too modest a goal. we mean to do them harm and end their despicable crimes.” The governor also suggests chemical castration for repeat offenders. “The American public is ready for a crushing crackdown on these criminals,” Jindal wrote. robert Sawicki, press secretary for U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, says the senator is reviewing the proposed legislation while it is pending before a committee (on which Landrieu doesn’t serve). Louisiana Congressman Cedric richmond of new Orleans also is reviewing the bill. Aketa Simmons, richmond’s communications director, says the congressman “supports efforts to stamp out child pornography.” Gambit’s requests for comments from Sen. david Vitter and rep. John Fleming, both republicans, were not answered by press time. In an era of praise for “small government” legislation, some of its biggest defenders are throwing their support behind the bill. rep. Steve Chabot, r-Ohio, ran as an “outspoken defender of individual privacy rights,” according to his website. he’s one of the bill’s co-sponsors. The legislation also has the support of the national Center for Missing and exploited Children, the national Center for Victims of Crime, the national Sheriff’s Association, the Major County Sheriff’s Association, the International Union of Police Associations and the Fraternal Order of Police. The MeASUre IS TOO BrOAd TO PASS the smell test in the house — it’ll likely be rewritten to limit the scope of snooping allowed, according to Kimberly Mason, a University of new Orleans College of education and human development professor who specializes in Internet security and child protection issues. “I understand the reasoning behind wanting to implement this bill — trying to protect kids from pedophiles,” she

says. “however, the downfall of this bill is the privacy issue that generalizes to everyone — meaning whomever my Internet provider may be, they are going to be required for the next 18 months to maintain all my information. My IP address, my name, my address where I live, bank account information, personal information associated with that account — and keeping all that information without my permission to keep kids safe.” Mason also fears ISPs may be forced to invest in larger databases and monitoring systems to filter that information — the proposed legislation adds a safety amendment, ensuring the 18 months’ worth of data is protected (“stored securely to protect customer privacy and prevent against breaches of the records”). “where is that money going to be passed along? Typically, the consumer,” she says. “You’re going to have to store a year-and-a-half of information that is going to be encrypted in order for others not to have access.” The logging of IP addresses creates a digital footprint of website traffic. By zeroing in on certain addresses, authorities can trail users frequenting (or uploading to) child porn websites. Some “anonymizer” proxy tools attempt to conceal IP identities for “secure” web browsing. Mason says child predators, like those arrested following the dreamboard bust, employ networks of dummy addresses and aliases to avoid suspicion. “who’s to say, through this bill, the same thing isn’t going to happen?” she says. “They could easily mask who they are. “where does the law protect citizens from having their information being ascertained without my permission, when there really is no probable cause to get my information?” Mason says. “That’s the biggest downfall in looking at consumer and privacy issues in just technology in general.” Authorities and ISPs have tried in the past to gain control over user information — with little success. In 2006, department of Justice officials met with Comcast, AOL and other companies to convince them to retain at least two years’ worth of user data. The deal didn’t work out. “Certainly there are people who have used the Internet for Internet-based crimes, and it could be appropriate to impose restrictions on those people,” esman says. “But to presume guilt on the part of every person in this country is not the appropriate way to solve a problem.”

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    According  to  the  Forbes  list,  it’s  Centenary  College,  a  private  college  in  Shreveport,  which  was  ranked  No.  284  nationally.  Next  was  Dillard  at  No.  380,  followed by LSU at 442 and Loyola at 447.  Louisiana  Tech  in  Ruston  also  made  the  top 500, coming in at No. 494.     Other  Louisiana  universities  on  the  list  were  the  University  of  LouisianaLafayette  at  No.  577,  the  University  of  New Orleans at No. 618 and Southeastern  Louisiana University at 624.     According to Forbes’ website, the rankings focus “on the things that matter the  most  to  students:  quality  of  teaching,  great career prospects, graduation rates  and low levels of debt. Unlike other lists,  we  pointedly  ignore  ephemeral  measures  such  as  school  ‘reputation’  and  ill-conceived metrics that reward wasteful  spending.  We  try  and  evaluate  the  college  purchase  as  a  consumer  would:   Is it worth spending as much as a quarter of a million dollars for this degree?”  — Clancy DuBos

Secretary of State race HeatS Up, trimS Down

    The  race  for  secretary  of  state  didn’t  take  long  to  heat  up  last  week,  just  as  the  field  of  candidates  also  got  smaller.  As  expected,  House  Speaker  Jim Tucker,  R-Terrytown,  announced  he  will  run  against  interim  Secretary  of  State  Tom Schedler, R-St. Tammany.      Schedler  assumed  the  office  last  December  when  Jay Dardenne  won  the  lieutenant  governor’s  job.  Schedler  was  Dardenne’s  first  assistant  and  has  since  announced  his  intention  of  running  for  the job. Schedler previously served in the  state Senate.     As  soon  as  Tucker  announced  for  the  post, Schedler fired off the first of what  promises to be many volleys, swiping at  Tucker  for  supporting  the  controversial  2008  legislative  pay  raise.  “This  latest  move  by  Representative  Tucker  will  be  his  plan  for  getting  the  pay  raise  he  always wanted,” Schedler said in a press  release.  “As  the  architect  of  the  legislative  pay  raise  fiasco,  Speaker  Tucker  tried to double his salary. Thankfully, the  people  of  Louisiana  and  Gov.  (Bobby)  Jindal saw it differently.”     Tucker  called  the  pay  raise  a  “red  herring”  and  noted  that  he  promised  to  donate his raise to charity had it become  law.  Jindal  vetoed  the  measure.  Tucker  added that lawmakers made a “mistake”  in 2008 when they made the raise effective  immediately  rather  than  in  the  following  term  —  which  a  constitutional  amendment now requires.     Meanwhile,  another  GOP  candidate  for  that  office  has  announced  he’s  getting out of politics — for now. State Rep.  Walker Hines, R-New Orleans, previously  announced  his  candidacy  for  secretary 

of state, but last week he said he will not  seek any public office this fall.      “At  some  point  in  the  future,  I  plan  on  returning  to  public  service  to  offer  myself  to  Louisiana  voters  as  a  major  office candidate,” Hines said in an email,  later  adding,  “I  look  forward  to  the  day  when I am again able to serve the people  of our State.”     So  far,  the  secretary  of  state’s  race  is  an  all-GOP  affair,  but  that  could  change  soon.  Democrat  Caroline Fayard,  a  New  Orleans attorney who ran a credible race  for lieutenant governor last year, is widely  considered  a  likely  entry.  If  she  runs,  she  is expected to be the top spender, based  on her family’s wealth and the dough she  dropped in the lieutenant governor’s race  last  year.  Though  she  has  yet  to  declare,  on  Aug.  11  Fayard  released  her  own  poll  that  claimed  “a  true  toss-up”  in  a  hypothetical contest against “Tucker (or similar  candidate),”  though  the  poll  carried  no  date or attribution.     Also considered a potential candidate is  Natural Resources Secretary Scott Angelle,  a  top  adviser  to  Gov.  Bobby  Jindal  and  a  recent GOP convert. Angelle would be the  only  non-New  Orleans  area  candidate  in  the race if he runs, but he reportedly is having second thoughts about the campaign.     Qualifying for all state and local offices  on the Oct. 22 ballot is Sept. 6-8. — DuBos

Safe at Home plate

    State  restaurant  safety  inspections,  which haven’t been online for public view  in six years, became a lot easier to obtain  Aug.  8,  when  the  Louisiana  Department  of  Health  and  Hospitals  (DHH)  launched  EatSafe.la.gov,  the  department’s  new  searchable  database  of  public  health  records.  At  a  Baton  Rouge  press  conference, DHH Secretary Bruce D. Greenstein  said  the  site  has  two  goals:  food  safety  and holding “restaurants and other retail  food  establishments  accountable.  It’s  to  keep DHH accountable” as well, he added.     Website users can enter a parish, town,  ZIP  code  or  name  of  a  restaurant  and  get  the  state  sanitarians’  most  recent  reports.  “We  have  sanitarians  who  work  in  every  parish,  every  day  around  the  state,” Greenstein said. The site lists some  32,000  licensed  food  dispensaries,  from  restaurants,  bars  and  markets  to  “a  service  station  that’s  serving  boudin  balls  and  fried  chicken,  or  sno-ball  stands,”  Greenstein  said.  The  site  also  highlights  other food safety-related news, including  recalls,  announcements  and  tips  on  safe  preparation of school lunches.     While  other  states  assign  restaurants  letter grades that must be posted onsite,  the  Louisiana  database  is  purely  “pass/ fail,”  Greenstein  said,  adding,  “Our  track  record in the state is very good.”     A  previous  website,  launched  in  2005,  was  discontinued  because  “it  wasn’t 

really built with the right database,” Greenstein said. “This [information] has always been public record, but hasn’t always been easy for the public to acquire.” — Allman

NightMARE, PARt ii

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

Last week, the Jefferson Parish Council named Dr. Allison Barca the parish’s equine veterinarian for cruelty investigations pending on the West Bank. Barca, a veterinarian of 20 years who runs Barca & Associates veterinary clinic Uptown, provides health care to horses in cruelty and neglect cases handled by the Jefferson Parish Animal Shelter. The parish has taken on dozens of horse cruelty cases on the West Bank since July 2010, when outgoing cruelty investigator Kim Staton led investigations into West Bank stables, barns and other places where horses are kept (see Gambit’s cover story, “NightMARE,” Aug. 2). Earlier this year, Parish President John Young and the council asked the animal shelter and code enforcement staff to conduct barn sweeps. This year’s sweeps on the West Bank inspected more than a dozen barns and yielded several code violations (unsanitary conditions, lack of shelter). One January sweep resulted in the closure of a rental stable in poor condition, according to Young’s Chief Administrative Officer Loren Marino. Staton has worked with the parish since 2009 on a contract basis through the ASPCA and acted as consultant for sanitation and disease prevention issues. Last year she helped the parish animal shelter begin its horse investigations, which led to the seizure of a dozen horses and two foals. She finishes her contract this week. Of six horses recently placed under parish care, five have been adopted; the sixth died of colic. Meryll Bergeron, who already owns two rescued horses, adopted one of the animals, an Arabian mare. Bergeron thanked Young and Council Chairman Chris Roberts for their roles in the barn sweeps. The council also agreed to conduct monthly code enforcement sweeps (beyond West Bank barns), specifically as a response to blighted and neglected property complaints. But how to handle frequent violators who won’t bow to code? Parish Attorney Deborah Foshee said the recent jump in bankruptcies and foreclosures has increased the parish’s blight problem, and District 4 Councilman Louis Congemi said some property owners “taunt” the parish by avoiding court hearings. The parish will announce “general” sweep locations, but won’t get too specific. — Alex Woodward

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occurred,” according to the EAB’s website. But a recent court ruling in Baton Rouge threw into dispute which body — the ethics board or the EAB — has the power to enforce campaign finance fines that have gone unpaid. The Baton Rouge Advocate reported recently that the EAB declined more than a dozen hearings for campaign finance cases, citing a lack of jurisdiction. The EAB, according to the report, believes that unless a fine is appealed, it’s not EAB’s problem. According to Allen, the ethics board soon will seek a declaratory judgment in district court in Baton Rouge hoping to settle the matter. “Where we are right now is, if there’s not payment, who’s conducting the initial hearings to obtain those judgments?” she says. “That’s what will be pursued, to get that question answered.” In the meantime, collecting fines for campaign finance violations in Louisiana has come to a screeching halt. Even the board’s 2006 deal giving the attorney general’s office a 25 percent cut on collections is yielding mixed results. For example, Al Donovan Jr. of River Ridge, a Democrat and one-time executive counsel to former Gov. Edwin Edwards, has

yet to pay a dime on the $42,000 in fines he owes for several late filings in connection with a 2003 race for secretary of state. The same holds for Shreveport attorney JoAnn Gines, who accrued more than $23,000 in fines for a failed district judgeship bid in 1994. Former Orleans Parish School Board member Jimmy Fahrenholtz, who racked up $45,440 in fines for failing to file or for filing late in races in 2000 and 2004, has entered into a payment plan with the board to resolve his debt. To date, according to the board’s website, Fahrenholtz has paid about $15,500, leaving him with a nearly $30,000 balance. In 2008, Fahrenholtz was disqualified from running against then-incumbent Congressman Bill Jefferson because he failed to indicate on his qualifying papers he had an outstanding debt with the ethics board. Fahrenholtz challenged the disqualification, but ultimately remained off the ballot. According to Gannett’s recent analysis, in the five years since the AG’s office has served as a collection agency for ethics fines, nearly 130 cases involving more than $520,000 in fines have been processed. Almost half that amount — about

$242,000 — has been collected, and 49 of the 130 cases have been paid in full. Most individuals on the ethics board’s list of outstanding fines are losing candidates. Some of them face fines that exceed the amount they spent on their failed campaigns. Short of some tough measures — and a resolution to the squabble between the board and the EAB — many who owe fines no doubt see little value in shelling out big bucks for their brief but vain twirls in the political arena. It’s a different story for those currently in office, however, and for those who plan to seek elective office. For them, the ethics board has a new tool at its disposal. Earlier this summer, Jindal signed into law a bill that requires candidates to have paid their ethics fines in full before they can qualify to run for office. Previously, a candidate could enter into a payment plan with the board and then qualify. But, as Allen told a House committee, many who owed fines simply entered into a payment plan in order to qualify — and then walked away after losing the election. Shreveport demographer Elliott Stonecipher, a loud and frequent critic of the governor’s “gold standard,” calls

it a “deliberate wrecking of ethics law enforcement” and a “gimmick” designed to burnish Jindal’s image during “the thenunderway hustle for the Republican Party’s 2008 presidential campaign ticket.” Stonecipher often pens detailed emails criticizing Jindal’s plan. Recently, he wrote: “Notably, several of the ‘legislative leaders’ on board to eviscerate ethics enforcement had serious ethics violation cases against them which were under investigation at that time, but any public mention of that fact was illegal under state law. Literally, these ‘leaders’ were writing and passing laws which would specifically protect them when their cases reached any such point of need. “All of the worst predictions have now come to pass. Our ethics administration has, effectively, ceased functioning. Louisiana is now in a far worse position to police ethics laws than at any time since their 1960s origin. Such is Jindal’s legacy, whether he rushes off to some new job tomorrow, or hangs around for another term as governor.” Walter Pierce is the managing editor of the Independent Weekly in Lafayette, where a version of this story first appeared.

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clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Pay Raise Showdown hree years ago, Louisiana voters were hopping mad at state legislators who voted to more than double their annual pay. Some voters organized recall petitions. Bloggers and radio talk shows pressured Gov. Bobby Jindal into vetoing the bill, and many vowed never to forgive those who voted for the immediate pay hike. As recently as last April, a statewide survey by Southern Media and Opinion Research (SMOR) found more than 86 percent of voters saying they would be “less likely” to vote to re-elect lawmakers who voted for the raise. Such sentiments suggest that anyone who voted for the raise is a sitting duck. Yet, surprisingly, all is quiet on most fronts with less than four weeks to go before qualifying. In one local contest, however, the pay raise will be the dominant issue. House District 94, which now includes all of Lakeview and much of Metairie’s lakefront area, has two Republican incumbents facing off in what promises to be a bloody fight. One of them voted for the

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raise and the other voted against it. The lines between them could not be more clearly drawn. Rep. John LaBruzzo of Metairie, whose district was carved up and moved to another parish, is running against fellow Rep. Nick Lorusso of Lakeview. LaBruzzo voted for the pay hike in 2008 — and signed an affidavit saying he would accept the raise once the hated Stelly tax was repealed. Lorusso voted against the raise and signed a declaration refusing to accept it. Soon after the controversial raise passed, some of LaBruzzo’s constituents announced a recall drive against him. That sent him running for cover. After being one of the most vocal supporters of the raise, he penned a letter to Jindal begging him to veto it. “It has become obvious to me that we, the Legislature, grossly misjudged the issue of legislative pay during this past session,” LaBruzzo wrote. No doubt LaBruzzo, who peppered Lakeview with signs soon after new district lines were drawn, will want to take voters’ minds off the pay raise by drawing other distinctions between himself and

what’s the issue?” On other fronts as well, LaBruzzo has stirred controversy. He filed several bills to drug test welfare recipients, and his proposal to pay poor women $1,000 to get sterilized made him a pariah even among his conservaLorusso, who already has tive Jefferson Parish Rep. John LaBruzzo of slammed him for his pay colleagues. Metairie (left), who voted for raise vote. “I ran for the The pay raise will the 2008 legislative pay raise, job knowing what the be an issue in many faces Rep. Nick Lorusso of pay was,” Lorusso says. Lakeview, who voted against legislative races, “Mr. LaBruzzo won’t be the raise, in House District 94. but nowhere else able to hide from his vote Both are Republicans. will voters choose — or his affidavit.” between two incumLaBruzzo responds that bents who voted differently on it. the pay raise is a non-issue. “Yes, I voted for “Three years later, voters were still irrithe pay raise. But the way it went down tated with this particular vote,” says SMOR — getting it immediately — I was the first pollster Bernie Pinsonat of Baton Rouge. official in the House and the loudest voice “Legislators who face a well-financed chalasking the governor to repeal it. And a few lenger will absolutely have to defend their days later he did. We didn’t get the raise, so vote to increase their pay.”

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Center of the Action here’s always something fun or interesting going on at the New Orleans Jewish Community Center (JCC) (5342 St. Charles Ave., 897-0143; GoldringWoldenberg Jewish Community Center, 3747 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 887-5158; www.nojcc.org), whether you’re interested in cooking classes for youngsters or activities for senior citizens with Alzheimer’s disease. Activities and classes, as well as membership, are open to everyone, regardless of religion. “We truly are trying to be a community center,” says J.J. Korman, marketing director at the Uptown JCC. “We are a Jewish community center, so we value Jewish culture, Jewish traditions and Jewish thought, and we try to bring some of that information into our programming. But we are part of New Orleans and we want to be there for our entire community, whether they are Jewish or not. We want everyone to be comfortable and valued here.” The Uptown center’s three main areas of focus are its nursery school, summer camp and state-of-theart Goldring Fitness Center. The 5,600-square-foot fitness center offers a weight room, cardiovascular workout space, top-of-the-line exercise equipment, an indoor cycling studio, outdoor pool, racquetball court, batting cage, gym, personal training studio and group workout room. Members can choose from 50 exercise classes a month, including Zumba, spinning, kickboxing, Pilates and more. The Kohlmann Health Spa offers massages, waxing, manicures and pedicures, a steam room, sauna and Jacuzzi.

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There are swimming pools (open from May through September) at both the Uptown and Metairie locations, and the Metairie JCC’s fitness center has a range of offerings for men and women (check the website for details). This summer, the New Orleans JCC is holding driver education classes for teenagers, as well as A personal trainer helps a woman an Alzheimer’s care and correctly lift weights at the support program. Goldring Fitness Center. A variety of classes PHOTO COURTESY JCC aimed at different age groups are offered, covering subjects including exercise, movies, music, cooking, ballroom dancing, the art of massage, ballet and more. Some programs — those planned for Jewish holidays and celebrations — are designed to introduce Jewish traditions to people of other religions, she says. Ultimately, Korman says, the goal of exposing non-Jews to Judaism and vice versa is to help the different groups focus on their commonalities instead of their differences. “We are a Jewish community center, but the majority of our members are not Jewish,” Korman says. “We try to serve all the different ages and interests in our community.”

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Rentals Real Estate Rentals Real Estate Jobs Jobs ServicesServices Autos Mind, Body, Spirit Autos Mind, Body, Spirit EventsEvents SpecialsSpecials & More & More classadv@gambitweekly.com 504-483-3100 www.bestofneworleans.com classadv@gambitweekly.com 504-483-3100 www.bestofneworleans.com

The public is invited to a grand opening celebration at MYPHONEMD (6601 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 33, Metairie, 454-0901; www.myphonemd. net) from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 18. The event at the smart device repair center includes contests, giveaways and an appearance by DJ Speedy from B97 FM. Louisiana-based myPhoneMD provides repairs for iPhone, iPad, Android and other smart devices. GULF COAST BANK (Citywide, 581-4561; www. gulfbank.com/aaauctionsinaugust.asp) is holding its fourth annual Auctions in August Fundraiser to benefit 200 charities, groups and schools. The silent auction closes at 4 p.m. Aug. 31, and bids can be submitted at local bank branches, online or by phone. Items for auction range from oil changes to Sandra Bullock’s 1963 white Corvette Stingray, which benefits Warren Easton High School. The bank’s goal is to raise $100,000. Visit the website for details and to view auction items. SANKOFA weekly farmers market will open at its new location at Holy Angels Complex (3500 St. Claude Ave.; www.sankofafarmersmarket.org) on Aug. 27. The market will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sankofa will stage a grand opening celebration Sept. 10, featuring fresh produce for sale, live music by funk band Yojimbo, health screenings, cooking demonstrations, children’s activities and more.

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PERFECT FIT SHOES has moved its store from Metairie to 5525 Magazine St. (456-5993; www.perfectfitshoes.net) in the middle of a bustling area of fashion, beauty and other stores. Virginia B. Davis, a physical therapist who specializes in foot and ankle rehabilitation, opened Perfect Fit Shoes in 2006 to provide comfortable, fashion-forward footwear by a range of designers.

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Setting aside [Drew] Brees’ unquestioned talent as a signal caller, what’s truly remarkable is how his stature has grown off the field.

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Drew Brees is still one of the Best, if not the best, quarterbacks in the league. By now we’re used to the Saints possessing a franchise quarterback on whom fans can count to be reliably good-to-spectacular from week to week. Sure, last season saw Brees regress slightly with poor performances against the lowly Cleveland Browns and Arizona Cardinals, but the Saints quarterback continued to be one of the game’s most accurate passers and game managers. Setting aside Brees’ unquestioned talent as a signal caller, what’s truly remarkable is how his stature has grown off the field. Brees was one of the lead plaintiffs in the players’ lawsuit against the NFL during the labor dispute, becoming a target of scorn by NFL owners and retired players who felt Brees and current players weren’t looking out for their pensions. But instead of becoming a pariah, Brees’ likely increased his stature with his team and throughout the league. The Saints had one of the most widely attended player-only practices — led by Brees — and when rumors emerged that Brees was holding up a deal for his own self-interest, he swatted them down almost immediately. It’s no surprise that when Brees hinted at a political career last year, fans wondered if he’d be New Orleans’ first mayor-for-life. page 26

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the SaintS SigneD olin kreutz. The Saints’ signing of Kreutz may have been the savviest move by general manager Mickey Loomis during free agency. Not only did he shore up a hole that appeared when Jonathan Goodwin left for the San Francisco 49ers, it also gives the Saints a veteran Pro Bowl center to show the ropes to secondyear backup Matt Tennant. While losing Goodwin could have threatened the line’s dynamic and chemistry, Kreutz will be a more than adequate replacement. Kreutz, who turned down bigger offers from other teams so he could play for New Orleans, said he has the best job in the NFL because he considers Jahri Evans and Carl Nicks the best guards in the league. This is an offensive line that has given up fewer than 50 sacks in the past two seasons and likely will ensure Brees will continue to be a leader in completion percentages, passing yards and touchdowns.

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Darren SproleS iS a lot like reggie BuSh, only cheaper. The signing of Sproles may have been the most exciting move the Saints made this offseason, if only for the fact he’s replacing an overpaid Reggie Bush while maintaining comparable stats. Sproles, though, is not as exceptional a kick returner as many would have fans believe. Last year, he was in the middle of the pack for NFL kickoff returns, and his combined four career touchdowns on punts and kickoffs doesn’t jump off the stats sheet. Saints coach Sean Payton, however, covets Sproles’ “exceptional acceleration” and knows Sproles’ true value is his ability to line up at running back and wide receiver, as well as on special teams. Sproles averaged 5.6 yards per carry last season as a utility back for the San Diego Chargers and has wowed teammates in training camp. Because he can change the pace of a game and keep opposing teams’ defenses on their heels — while costing the Saints about $2 million less than Bush — he’s sure to become a fan favorite. By the way, the Saints also drafted a Heisman Trophy-winning running back, just for good measure. When the Saints scored the steal

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of this year’s draft by landing Mark Ingram with the 28th overall pick, Bush responded with a tweet saying “It’s been fun New Orleans.” Even Bush, also a Heisman winner, understood that in NFL backfields, there’s usually room for just one Heisman Trophy winner. At the same time, the Saints are now spoiled for choice in their running game with Ingram, Sproles, incumbent Pierre Thomas and last year’s breakout star Chris Ivory all competing for touches. For a running game that has long been something of a liability — not a surprise when about 60 percent of Payton’s play calls are passes — this is a welcome change. Ingram is an excellent pass-catcher and at 215 pounds, he has a natural ability to break tackles — an ability he showcased to much fanfare when he pulverized Roman Harper on a touchdown run last week in camp. When healthy, Thomas is one of the most consistent backs in the league (he’s averaged close to 5 yards per carry his whole career). And while Ingram has his share of critics, you can bet the former University of Alabama standout will be eager to prove that the 27 teams that passed on him during the draft made a terrible mistake. page 28

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>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 43 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

FILM

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A former member of Wynton Marsalis’ septet and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, alto saxophonist Wess “Warm Daddy” Anderson blends traditional jazz, some bebop and swinging sounds in a blues-inflected style that has drawn flattering comparisons to Cannonball Adderley. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. & 10 p.m. Thursday. Snug Harbor, 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com

48 Hour Film Project 4 P.M., 6:30 P.M. & 9 P.M. SATURDAY (DIFFERENT FILMS IN EACH SHOWCASE), AUG. 20 NOCCA, LUPIN HALL, 2800 CHARTRES ST.; WWW.48HOURFILM. COM/NEWORLEANS TICKETS $10

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THE RAP GAME

Dawn Spatz’s 2010 film “Pygmy Park” was a mockumentary about a country club in crisis.

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THE LOVE SESSIONS

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In the first half of the Love Sessions, trumpeters Irvin Mayfield (pictured) and Kermit Ruffins duel it out in concerts benefiting different groups each night, including the New Orleans Public Library Foundation (Friday), Dress for Success (Saturday) and others. The second installment continues at Irvin Mayfield’s I Club with the Roy Hargrove Band (Aug. 26-29). Tickets $22. 7:30 p.m. Fri.-Thu. Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, Royal Sonesta, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2299; www.sonesta.com

THE APPLESEED CAST

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The Appleseed Cast are emo heroes who don’t make emo music, which must feel something like going to AA meetings for a habit you kicked years ago. Middle States (Graveface), the Lawrence, Kan., quartet’s heady March EP, continues the trend of elongated structures, rhythmic complexity and heightened drama that started with 2001’s Low Level Owl suite. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Monday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

eams competing in the 48 Hour Film Project can’t do any creative work before the event begins. They can scout locations, collect licensed music and organize their process. Some teams have prepared by making a short practice film, but the crucial element is picked out of a hat just before the clock starts running: genre. “We wanted to do horror,” says Dawn Spatz, whose film Pygmy Park won three awards in New Orleans’ 2010 competition. “We pulled mockumentary. That had never been on our minds.” The 2011 festival began Friday Aug. 12, when nearly 40 teams drew genres from options like sci-fi, superhero, dark comedy, romance and detective/cop film. Competition organizers also provide a character, a line of dialogue and a prop that all teams must incorporate, regardless of genre. Teams then have 48 hours to write a script, shoot and edit a seven-minute film. All completed films will be screened Saturday at NOCCA’s Lupin Hall. Award-winners will be announced the following week. Now 10 years old, the festival has more than 90 participating cities worldwide. Winners from each American city are screened at Filmapalooza, which will be at Taos, N.M., in March 2012 for 2011 films. The top finalists from around the world are then screened at the Cannes International Film Festival. The competition is open to everyone from amateurs to professionals. Last year’s global winner, The Girl is Mime was shot

in London and starred Martin Freeman from the British version of The Office. There are very few constraints beyond the time limit, and last year one team shot its video with an iPhone. New Orleans participants have included student teams from UNO’s graduate and undergraduate film studies programs, film professionals on location in Louisiana, amateurs and teams that travel to compete in 48-hour festivals in different cities. Most teams try to write a five- to six-page script on Friday night, use Saturday to shoot and then edit the film on Sunday, all on little or no sleep once the competition begins. Spatz’s 2010 team of a dozen UNO students secured permission to shoot at Belle Terre Country Club and improvised some shoots as they sped around on golf carts looking in sandtraps for footprints of pygmies that supposedly inhabited the course. Jason Waggenspack and his team, Trophy Whores, shot some of their award-winning Trust Bob on a studio green screen. A fan of the Red Dress Run, which was happening the weekend of the competition, he incorporated it into a film in which some bumbling criminals take a hostile CEO hostage and put up with her abuse. Waggenspack is a professional and his Neutral Ground Films produces commercials, TV spots and documentaries. Reed Daigle is another film industry professional who competed last year. His team drew horror as a genre, and the repeated effects of a frantic run up spiral stairs in Crazy Stairs showed the polished camerawork that helped it win best film honors. He’s not competing this year, because he’s working on the set of G.I. Joe 2. But he has some advice for participants. “Be prepared,” he says. “Get to know your team and the actors. And edit as you shoot.”

18

Within writing classes disguised as music classes, Michael Patrick Welch’s public school hip-hop seminars accidentally captured some of the most hilarious — and dextrous — New Orleans raps of recent years. This inversion, a music class masquerading as karaoke, puts the adults on the mic to demonstrate Welch’s teaching methods, with the winner awarded a free bar tab. Hilarity is ensured; dexterity, less so. Free admission. 10 p.m. Thursday. Mimi’s in the Marigny, 2601 Royal St., 872-9868

41

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

MUSIC

PAGE 43 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Dave Easley, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 YUKI IZAKAYA — Sombras Brilhantes, 8

Wednesday 17 12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Micah Mckee’s Songwriters Showcase, 8; Royal Rounders, 10 THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Gravity A, 11

BMC — David Mahoney Quartet, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Jason Marsalis, 7:30

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Nervous Duane, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — NOLA County, 9

D.B.A. — Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Oscar & the Blues Cats, Big Daddy’s Juke Joint Jam, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

HI-HO LOUNGE — Midnight Snax, DJ Beesknees, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hope Toun, Gravy Flavored Kisses, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Kristin Diable & Mia Borders, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 6

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — John Royen, 12 OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Brandon Foret, 9

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Joe Krown, 8:30 RUSTY NAIL — Jenn Howard, 7:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — J.D. & the Jammers, 7 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, noon THREE MUSES — Schatzy, 7 VICTORY — Sombras Brilhantes, 7:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Thursday 18 12 BAR — Life Without Elvis, Johnny Dilks, Roarsharks, 9

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Washboard Rodeo, Country Fried, 10:30 BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings Quartet, 7

BANKS STREET BAR — Kenny Triche, 8; Dave Jordan, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Pocket Aces Brass Band, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30

THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; Cat’s Pajamas Funk Allstars, 9

BOMBAY CLUB — Dr. Bones & the Hep Cats, 7:30

LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Hillbilly Hotel, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Andrea Gomez, 6; Lil’ & Big Band, 9:30

BMC — Ramblin’ Letters, 6; The Soulabilly Swamp Boogie Band, 9:30

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 8

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Sweet Jones, 7; Dr. Funk, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Some Like it Hot!, 8

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

D.B.A. — Happy Talk Band, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Los Tres Amigos, 9:30

• 3-6pm DAiLY •

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

haPPY hoUr

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

HI-HO LOUNGE — Second Line Brass Band, Stooges Brass Band, 10

Bring a

SAINT

THE HOOKAH — SamiYam & Teebs, 9

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Amanda Shaw, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; James Andrews, 8 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

$1.50 PBr PintS $2 gaMe rentalS $3 iMPortS

sandwichES & cheese PLATTERS from

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LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE PHARE — Quintin Gerard W. CD release, 7

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Meta the Man, The Riffs, Motherlode (upstairs), 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Peter Novelli Band, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9:30

5004 prytania street uptown | new orleans 504.899.4737 mon-thurs | 11am-6pm fri-sat | 11am-8pm • sun | 11am-4pm www.stjamescheese.com

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Nattie, 8; Frans Schumann, 9; Fifth Nation, 10

VOTED

Live Music Nightly -No Cover

Zagat Rated

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Sandy Hinderlie, 5 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

TARPON JOE’S BAR AND GRILL — Minus Linus, 9:30

TUES 8/16

GREG SCHATZ & FRIENDS 8PM

WED 8/17

CHIP WILSON

9PM

THUR 8/18 BETH PATTERSON

9PM

FRI 8/19

DANNY BURNS FOOT & FRIENDS

5PM 9PM

SAT 8/20

PAUL TOBIN RITES OF PASSAGE

5PM 9PM

SUN 8/21

DANNY BURNS

8PM

MON 8/22

KIM CARSON

8PM

THREE MUSES — Luke WinslowKing, 7:30 VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 PAGE 48

WEDNESDAYS • 8pm

8 Ball toUrneY THURSDAYS • 9pm-miDNighT St

ladieS 1 drink free

dj kodiak

free!

EVERY SUNDAY • 8pm-2Am

karaoke

30 BeerS on taP

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Geno Delafose, 8:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Wess Anderson Quartet, 8 & 10

fooSBall toUrneY

SATURDAY • 8/20 • 10pm

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 8

SIBERIA — Midnight Ghost Train, Wildfires, Brother Dege, 10

Ping Pong &

Yeah YoU right

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30

ROYAL PALM — Philip Melancon Jr., 6:30

TUESDAYS • 8pm

FRiDAY • 8/19 • 9pm

OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Tornado Brass Band feat. Darryl Adams, 8

game rentals • PBr Pints jaMeSon ShotS

& free jello ShotS

OAK — St. Louis Slim, 9

PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Thursdays at Twilight feat. John Autin, 6

2 MondaYS

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S H a M r O C K Pa r T Y. C O M

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Salvadore Liberto, 9; Sam Cammarata, 10

47

A True MID-CITY

NEIGHBORHOOD

MUSIC BAR

TUE

16 WASHINGTON

9PM

WED

AUG

9PM

THU

AUG WALTER FREE BLTS “WOLFMAN”

AUG

17 U.S. NEROS

18 POCKET ACES BRASS BAND 9PM

SAT

FRI

ADAM CROCHET 19 & I TELL YOU WHAT AUG BE COOL PRODUCTIONS 20 AUG

HIP HOP EMCEES

9PM 10PM

542 S. JEFF DAVIS PKWY

MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 47 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

MON 8/15

Papa Mali

TUE 8/16

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 8/17

Hillbilly Hotel

THU The Trio featuring 8/18 Johnny V & Special Guests

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

FRI 8/19

48

SAT 8/20

101 Runners w/Monk Boudreaux

preview

Friday 19 BANKS STREET BAR — Egg Yolk Jubilee, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8 BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Time Machine, 9

BAYOU PARK BAR — Adam Crochet, 9 BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Zena Moses & Rue Fiya (upstairs), 9; Gravy, 10

BMC — El DeOrazio & Friends, 3; Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Mark Pentone & Smoky Greenwell Trio, 9; Dana Abbott Band, 10; Free Spirits Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

Showcasing Local Music

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

BOMBAY CLUB — Matt Lelimer, 6

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Good Children, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Hooch Riders, 4; Louisiana Hellbenders, 7; Vidrines, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Voodoo Blues Krewe Solo/Duo Challenge, 7

COLUMBIA STREET, DOWNTOWN COVINGTON — Meghan Swartz, 6; Jonno Frishberg & T-Fair, 7 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Pine Leaf Boys, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Joe Krown Trio, 10

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

Hands On Last September, on the day after his third album was released, Adam Arcuragi shared with Paste magazine a personal wish that has nothing and everything to do with his music: The troubadour, a Georgia native and Philadelphia transplant, had applied for a handyman position in his adopted third home, New York. “I’m really hoping (it) comes through,” Arcuragi said. “I like working with my hands and by myself, and that would afford me the opportunity to do both.” Recorded at a colleague’s home studio during a two-week sojourn in the Empire State, the affable, hardscrabble I Am Become Joy (High Two) provides him with a handful of high points, if not a moment of solitude. As many as a dozen contributors (from Philly friends The War on Drugs and B.C. Camplight among others) liven the LP with a chorus of horns, steel guitars, handclaps and church-saved backup vocals, turning Arcuragi’s lonely soul spirituals into a Sunday choir singalong. The front-loaded side A finds him self-baptizing in Okkervil River’s swooning rock (“Math”) and caught up in Richard Buckner’s swollen country undertow (“She Comes to Me”). Well-crafted and off-the-cuff, it’s both a spontaneous and workmanlike effort, measured twice and cut once. John Shark America opens. Tickets $7. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

AUG

19

Adam Arcuragi & the Lupine Choral Society 10 p.m. Friday Howlin’ Wolf Den, 901 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlin-wolf.com

GREEN ROOM — Dash Rip Rock, 10

NOBD Reunion

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter 8/21 & 3/13 Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

tropical isle® HOME OF THE Hand Grenade® -Sold Only At-

435, 600, 610, 721, 727 Bourbon St.

New Orleans’ Most Powerful Drink! Live Entertainment Nightly

THE HANGAR — Consortium of Genius feat. Haus of Vigilante, Sick Like Sinatra, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — Chop Tops, Strickers, Rockets, Bills, Unnaturals, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Adam Arcuragi & the Lupine Choral Society, John Shark America, 10

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Irvin Mayfield & Kermit Ruffins, 7:30 JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Joe Krown, 7 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Bad Beth & Beyond, 7

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Kristina Morales, 7; Ashton Hines & the Big Easy Brawlers, Eric Gordon & the Lazy Boys, 10

MANDEVILLE TRAILHEAD — Sgt. Pepper’s Beatles Tribute Band, 6:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — 101 Runners, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Alex Bosworth, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30; Mumbles, 12:30 a.m. NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Damn Hippies, 7; Gallivan Burwell, 9; Gina Forsyth, 10; Iain Micah Weigert, 11

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Fritz Barrau, 2 OAK — Cristina Perez, 6; Billy Iuso, 10 OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — The Soulabilly Swamp Boogie Band, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Dax Riggs, 10

PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Coldshot, 9:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Bucktown Allstars, 9:30

SHAMROCK BAR — Yeah You Right, 9 SIBERIA — Hooten Hallers, Howl, Howdies, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Victor Goines Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 STUDIO A AT THE STEAK KNIFE — Jessie McBride & the Next Generation, 7 THREE MUSES — Congo Bo & Trumpet Mike, 7; Glen David Andrews, 10

TIPITINA’S — Lost Bayou Ramblers, N’awlins Johnnys, 10

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 20 12 BAR — Righteous Budda, 11

ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m.

BANKS STREET BAR — Green Genes, Solid Fuzz, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8 BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Dr. Funk, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR — Be Cool Productions Hip Hop Emcees, 10

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Brass-A-Holics, 10; Soul Project (upstairs), 10

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Cha Wa Mardi Gras Indians, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Luther Kent, 9:30 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Joe Krown, 8

CARROLLTON STATION — Credo Blues Society feat. Chuck Credo & Brint Anderson, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Stephanie Nilles, 7; Rotten Cores, 10; My Wooden Leg, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Malcolm Holcombe, 9

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Little Red & Big Bad, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 10

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

GREEN ROOM — Five Star Fiasco, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — Redraw Black feat. Simon Lott & Brad Walker, Thomas & the People, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — Eric Johnson, 8 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Kyle Turley CD release feat. Dash Rip Rock, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF NORTHSHORE — Gorilla Productions Battle of the Bands, 5 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Purpetrator, 10

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Los Hombres Calientes feat. Irvin Mayfield & Bill Summers, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Irvin Mayfield & Kermit Ruffins, 7:30 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9 KINGPIN — Clockwork Elvis, 10

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Earphunk, 3; Shamarr Allen, 4

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Courtyard Kings, 7; Chapter: SOUL, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — NOBD, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kristina Morales, 4; Kipori “Baby Wolf” Woods, 7:30; The Soulabilly Swamp Boogie Band, 11 MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Mike Dill, 7; Clint Kaufmann, 8; Mr. Steve, 9; Olive Juice, 10 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Sheri Lynn Colby Trio, 12 OAK — Mia Borders, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1;

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Johnny J & the Hitmen, 9:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Gregg Stafford’s Jazz Hounds, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Super Chargers, 10 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. T’Canaille, 2; Boogie Men, 9:30 SATURN BAR — Pony Killer, Dummy Dumpster, 10

SIBERIA — F, Pallbearers, Die Rotzz, Split Lips, Indian Givers, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Nola Nova, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 THREE MUSES — Kid Merv, 7; Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TIPITINA’S — Stockholm Syndrome, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 TOOLOULA’S — Papa P, 10

VAUGHAN’S — Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana benefit feat. Treme Brass Band, New Birth Brass Band, Hot 8 Brass Band, 7 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 21 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Julie Odell, Gabriel Miller Phillips, Marvin & the Cloud Wall, 10

BANKS STREET BAR — Smashing Blonde, 9

BLUE NILE — John Dobry Band, 7:30; Mainline, 10 BMC — The Soulabilly Swamp Boogie Band, 1; Alex Bosworth, 7; Andy J. Forest, 10

BOMBAY CLUB — Matt Lelimer, 6 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Captain “Chiggy Chiggy” Charles, 7

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.

CAFE RANI — Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m.

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Wooden Wings, 9

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Dave Jordan, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Adverse, Innerlign, Rus, Mr. Cool Bad Guy, 9

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Mardi Gras Indian practice, Skulls & Bones, 6

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.; Matisyahu, Trevor Hall, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Irvin Mayfield & Kermit Ruffins, 7:30 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Ched Reeves, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m. MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON — Dave Easley, 5; Alex Pena, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Pfister Sisters, 11 a.m.; Ricardo Crespo, 4:30; Javier Olondo & Asheson, 8

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Sunday Swing feat. Swingaroux, 2

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Richard Scott, 2 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1

OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-A-Holics, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street All-Stars feat. Lars Edegran, 8

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 11:30 a.m.

REDEMPTION RESTAURANT — Big Daddy O, 3:30

RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m.; Catherine Anderson, 2 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Rock Ride ‘N’ Rescue feat. Bruce “Sunpie” Barnes, 6 SIBERIA — Midnight Chainsaw, Rok Boms and others, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ven Pa Ca, 8 & 10

SPECKLED T’S — Chicken on the Bone, 6 SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales, 6; Pat Casey, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Mary Flynn Thomas & Prohibition Blues, 10 a.m. THREE MUSES — Zazou City, 7

TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6

Monday 22 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 9 BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Blues Jam, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL

AUG 19

NO COVER

10PM HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

MON: FREE POOL 6-10pm

WED: Blues Jam Night 8-11pm THURS: Steak Night 6pm-till

FRI: Ladies Night- FREE Drinks SAT: Karaoke 10pm

SUN: Happy Hour ALL DAY

CHICKIE WAH WAH — The Vincedent at Chickie’s, 6; Mark Growden, 8:30

D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Sugar Shawn, 9:30 DRAGON’S DEN — The Shiz, 10 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

GREEN ROOM — Peripheral, 7; Todd Lemoine, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — Bluegrass Pickin’ Party, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Irvin Mayfield & Kermit Ruffins, 7:30

SUN

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6

WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 9PM 8/17

THE MAISON — Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT — Courtyard Kings, 7 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Salvadore Liberto, 8; Jon Hebert, 10 OLD POINT BAR — The Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7

ONE EYED JACKS — Appleseed Cast, 10

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Mark Braud, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7

SIBERIA — Natural Child, Liquor Store, King Louie’s Missing Monuments, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville, 8 & 10

8/14

THU 8/18

SOUL TRACK MIND 9PM

LIFE WITHOUT ELVIS JOHNNY DILKS & ROARSHARKS 9PM BROWN IMPROV

FRI COMEDY 8:30PM

8/19

DJ DIAGNOSOS 10:30PM

SAT RIGHTEOUS BUDDHA 11PM 8/20

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classical/ concerts DUTCH ALLEY — Near French

Market, on North Peters Street — Sun: Summer Twilight Romance Series presents Harmoniemusik, 7

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 16 > 2011

ATCHAFALAYA — Sam & Boone, 11 a.m.

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hilarious.”

cole abaius/film school reJects

FILM

“every single minute of this movie is

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING 30 MINUTES OR LESS (R) — Jesse Eisenberg, Danny McBride and Aziz Ansari star in the comedy about a pizza delivery guy who gets caught up in the plans of two wannabe criminals. AMC Palace 10,

AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 ANOTHER EARTH (PG-13) — After the discovery of a

duplicate Earth, the lives of a young woman in MIT’s astrophysics program and a brilliant composer intersect . Canal Place

BEATS, RHYMES & LIFE: THE TRAVELS OF A TRIBE CALLED QUEST (R) — The documen-

tary chronicles the influential hip-hop collective’s 2008 reunion tour. AMC Palace 20

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

BEGINNERS (R) — A new relationship causes Oliver (Ewan McGregor) to remember his recently deceased father (Christopher Plummer) who, after 44 years of marriage, came out of the closet. Chalmette Movies

50

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH MEDIA RIGHTS CAPITAL A RED HOUR PRODUCTION “30 MINUTES OR LESS” JESSE EISENBERG NICK SWARDSON MICHAEL PEÑA DANNY McBRIDE AZIZ ANSARI EXECUTIVE WITH FRED WARD PRODUCERS MONICA LEVINSON BRIAN LEVY PRODUCED BY STUART CORNFELD BEN STILLER JEREMY KRAMER SCREENPLAY STORY BY MICHAEL DILIBERTI BY MICHAEL DILIBERTI & MATTHEW SULLIVAN DIRECTED BY RUBEN FLEISCHER check local listings for theaters and showtimes

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13) — Chris

Evans stars in the origin story of the Marvel Comics hero. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE CHANGE-UP (R) — Best

friends Ryan Reynolds and Jason Bateman are envious of each other’s opposite lifestyles, and after a drunken night out they somehow swap bodies. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

COWBOYS AND ALIENS (PG-13) — A desolate city in 1873 is

attacked by marauders from space. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE (PG13) — A recently divorced

Lasting Achievements

German artist Anselm Kiefer took over a closed silk factory in Barjac, France, both to create art and construct a massive complex to house and display it. It must be a fascinating place to visit. Kiefer creates huge canvases and sculptures, and some of his works occupy their own specially constructed buildings. He also tunneled under some structures to create his own catacombs, which are meant to be explored as part of his opus. Reportedly, it’s a very theatrical experience to tour his array of art and architecture, and it makes sense why filmmaker Sophie Fiennes set out to make the documentary Over Your Cities Grass Will Grow. It succeeds in tempting a viewer to consider a pilgrimage to the site, but as a film it feels too long. Kiefer and his assistants are diligent laborers who work with massive canvases and sculptures using heavy construction equipment including industrial cranes. They build square concrete huts they then stack in towers. They melt metals into liquids and cast them over piles of dirt to create sculptures with organically rendered surfaces. For art materials, they shatter large panes of glass and dinner plates with a robust energy for both destruction and construction. The best part of the film is a long interview in which a journalist talks to Kiefer about his ideas. Kiefer reveals a remarkably broad view of time and space, imagining his works stretching from the minuscule to the infinite, like single-cell organisms evolving over millions of years, or comparing boulders he places in his work to meteors hurtling though the vastness of the universe. He is fascinated by the lead plates on the top of the cathedral in Cologne, Germany, which over time have become heavier at the bottom, suggesting their solid form is a matter of temporal illusion. The reporter is very familiar with Kiefer’s work and ideas and not everything is explained to the camera, but it’s an illuminating conversation nonetheless. The rest of the film is mostly silent. The opening scenes slowly pan over Kiefer’s buildings, tunnels and work, and it is more than 17 minutes before a human being appears or a word is spoken. Fiennes’ approach makes sense as an effort to capture the entirety of the compound at Barjac, but at times, it also is like watching paint dry. One can admire her attempt to do justice to Kiefer’s work, but she could have been similarly successful in an hour. The film needs more of Kiefer’s voice, but even with its spare approach, it’s a intriguing look at the artist at work. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

AUG

19 25 THRU

Over Your Cities Grass Will Grow 5:30 p.m. Friday - Thursday Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

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BASED ON THE #1 INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER

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“an epic must-see romance!” – Harper’s bazaar

One Day Twenty years. Two people...

Anne Hathaway/Jim Sturgess

in tHeatres eVerYWHere FriDaY, auGust 19tH cHeck local listinGs For tHeatre locations anD sHoWtimes special engagements nO passes Or discOunt cOupOns accepted

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TUESDAY 8/16 4.7292x5.33” ALL.ODY.0816.GW.PDF

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FS

40-something (Steve Carrell) gets back into the dating game with the help of a young Lothario in the romantic comedy. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

review

DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX FINAL DESTINATION 5 (R) — Survivors of a bridge col-

lapse learn there’s no way to evade death in the latest installment of the horror franchise. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS (PG13) — Two friends enter into

a relationship that is solely about sex, but soon complications arise. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 GLEE: THE 3-D CONCERT MOVIE (NR) — The film fea-

tures 3-D footage from the sold-out tour of the hit TV series. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) — The Harry Potter

series culminates in an epic showdown with Lord Voldemort. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 THE HELP (PG-13) — In the

film adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s hit novel, an aspiring journalist shakes up her conservative Southern town when she interviews the black maids of the city’s upper class. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — The film tells the

story of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX

HORRIBLE BOSSES (PG-13) — A

group of friends devise a convoluted plan to get rid of their intolerable bosses. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG) —

In the Woody Allen film, a screenwriter and aspiring novelist (Owen Wilson) finds himself travelling back in time to the Jazz Age while touring Paris at night. AMC

Jumping to Conclusions

Writer/director Matthew Chapman would like to have the audience on the edge of its seat throughout The Ledge. Gavin (Charlie Hunnam) ascends to a rooftop in the opening minutes, but it’s pretty clear once police officer Hollis (Terrence Howard) shows up you’re going to hear the whole story before Gavin even peeks at the street below. Gavin works as a hotel manager and shares an apartment with a roommate who is gay. New neighbors Joe (Patrick Wilson) and Shana (Liv Tyler) move into their building and invite them to dinner. Joe is an overbearing evangelical Christian and, presuming his guests are a gay couple, he asks to say grace and launches into a judgmental prayer for their eternal souls and salvation. It’s not long before Gavin senses the loneliness Shana feels in her marriage, and he gets the perfect opportunity to reach out to her when she coincidentally starts working at the hotel he manages. The ample supply of empty beds is a great convenience. Back up on the rooftop, we learn Hollis also is having a crisis in his life, and the two plots both unfurl in flashback as it is slowly revealed why Gavin is prepared to end his life. Hunnam, Howard and Tyler all turn in decent performances, but unfortunately for Wilson, he has to play a monster. A wolf in sheep’s clothing, he has shed various vices and addictions and filled the void with a dogmatic embrace of Christianity. His marriage is hollow because he’s not so much in love with Shana as dedicated to the notion of saving her soul. Her life hasn’t been easy either, and it’s no wonder she finds Gavin more compassionate. Chapman’s film features an extended battle between Joe and Gavin as respective advocates for faith and secularism. The filmmaker has dubbed Gavin the first openly atheist lead in a major film, and he has promoted the film to take the faith debate public. Many of the arguments are encapsulated well and some are hindered by the limitations of Joe’s narrow and rigid views. Occasionally the two characters’ give and take helps to advance the plot, particularly when Joe’s attempts to demonstrate the purity of his faith shows how blind he is to Shana’s needs. At times, however, that debate becomes the tail that wags the dog, and ultimately the plot has a forced sense of conflict before anyone betrays their own creed. — Will Coviello

AUG

21

THRU

23

The Ledge 7:30 p.m. Sunday-Tuesday Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992; www.chalmettemovies.com

PAGE 54

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of the saga, Captain Jack Sparrow’s (Johnny Depp) past comes back to haunt him when he encounters Angelica (Penélope Cruz), a pirate he once loved. Entergy IMAX

RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) — The origin

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story of the cult classic takes place in modern-day San Francisco, where a geneticist’s engineering begets intelligent apes. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE SMURFS (PG) — After getting chased out of their village, CGI Smurfs end up in New York and must find a way back home. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13) — A

mysterious event from the past threatens to bring war to Earth in the third installment of Michael Bay’s giant robot series. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX ZOOKEEPER (PG-13) — Zoo animals break their silence to help their kind caretaker (Kevin James) get a girlfriend. Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY CONAN THE BARBARIAN (R) — The warrior embarks on a

journey across the continent of Hyboria to avenge the murder of his father.

FRIGHT NIGHT (R) — A high

school senior seeks to kill the next-door neighbor he suspects is a vampire in the horror-comedy.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com

DAYLIGHT (NR) — David

Barker’s taut thriller finds

a couple — which includes a pregnant wife — at the hands of a conniving gang of kidnappers. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net DEFEND THE GULF — The Gulf Restoration Network screens its collection of short films focused on the BP oil disaster and its longterm effects. The screening is followed by a discussion and also features food and cocktails. Free admission. 7 p.m. Thursday, Green Project, 2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www. thegreenproject.org EL BULLI: COOKING IN PROGRESS (NR) — Gereon

Wetzel’s documentary takes a look at Ferran Adria’s Michelin 3-star restaurant in Spain, known for its avant-garde cuisine and use of molecular gastronomy. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net THE EXPERIMENT (NR) — Ben

Lemoine’s film explores the charter school movement by documenting five children as they navigate the shifting educational landscape of the New Orleans public school system after Hurricane Katrina. The screening also includes a hors d’oeuvres and cocktail reception. Reservations are required. Visit www.theexperimentfilm.com/sneakpreview for details. 6 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. screening. Thursday, New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org

IF A TREE FALLS: A STORY OF THE EARTH LIBERATION FRONT — The documentary traces

the rise and fall of the Earth Liberation Front — a group the FBI called America’s “number one domestic terrorism threat” — and raises questions about the definition of terrorism. Tickets $6.50 New Orleans Film Society members, $8.50 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992

admission. 7 p.m. Thursday, New Orleans Food & Farm Network, 4840 Banks St., 8642009; www.noffn.org OVER YOUR CITIES GRASS WILL GROW (NR) — Sophie

Fiennes’ film documents German artist Anselm Kiefer’s elaborate installations at a derelict silk factory in the south of France. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 5:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, then nightly through Aug. 25, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net THE TREE (NR) — Charlotte

Gainsbourg stars in Julie Bertuccelli’s mystical drama about a woman and her family struggling after the death of her husband. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, then nightly through Aug. 25, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (PG) — In Mel Brooks’ comedy,

Gene Wilder plays a young neurosurgeon who inherits the castle of his grandfather, Dr. Frankenstein. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012

Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

NEW ORLEANS FOOD & FARM NETWORK SUMMER MOVIE SERIES — The center screens

Food, Inc. for its series of food-related films that are followed by discussions. Free

Scan for movie times.

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Todd White, ongoing. GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery

artists, ongoing.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “Bending the Curve,” acrylic on panel by Michael Kessler, through Sept. 25. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com — “Summer Showcase,” works

by 16 gallery artists, through Sept. 17.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery. com — “What Lies Beneath,” painting and mixed media by Josh Reames and Deb Sokolow; “Under the Influence,” an installation by Stephen Collier; both through Sept. 4. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com —

“Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing.

GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed

HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

neric Arts Solutions; “Closer to Nothingness,” work by Stephen Collier, through Aug. 27.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — Paintings by Billy

Solitario, through Sept. 24.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — Venetian glass

mosaics by Randy Sanders; “Capture the Moment,” clocks made from vintage and collectible vinyl albums by Judy Di George; oil paintings by Sean Friloux; all through September.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown glass works

MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, Mondays-Fridays.

JACK GALLERY. 900 Royal St., 588-1777 — Paintings,

lithographs and other works by Tom Everhart, Gordon Parks, Al Hirschfeld, Stanley Mouse, Anja, Patrick McDonnell and other artists, ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg. com — “From Dreams Come ...”

paintings by Oscar Quesada, through August.

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Perchance to

by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “Drawing the Line,” a juried exhibition featuring Hannah Chalew, Alyssa Dennis, Hayley Gaberlavage and others, through Aug. 27.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “Anarcadia,” works by Ge-

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show

Dream,” box assemblages by Audra Kohout, through August.

review

tries, ice-carving by Dawson, chocolate sculpture by Cloud Candi and 3-D designs by The Bikery, through September.

featuring works from guild members, ongoing.

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — Acrylic and oil on linen by Matthew Abbott, through Sept. 24. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 —

“Fascinate Me: A Culinary & Sculptural Extravaganza,” culinary sculpture by Jean-Luc Albin of Maurice’s French Pas-

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Dreaming Inside the Box

Many art aficionados, including those at the leading fantastic art website, www.phantasmaphile.com, compare Audra Kohout’s box assemblages to those of the great surrealist Joseph Cornell, while noting that hers are “more personal” or even “emotional.” I would add “visceral” and “protean” as well. Kohout seems to be a shapeshifter in the guise of a middleclass Mid-City mom, and her boxes, like the phone booth in Doctor Who, are vehicles for her travels to other worlds. Where Cornell was like a detached, eccentric bird man obsessed with ballerinas and symbolic objects in perfect equipoise, Kohout meanders between the sweet and the sardonic like a mythic Earth mother who knows that without the darkness there is no light and, try as we may, the two can never be sundered but only balanced. In other words, this is some pretty weird but elegant and eloquent stuff. In accordance with Carl Jung, her “other worlds” reflect inner worlds, and many of her doll-like figures hang from strings like puppets who assumed a wayward life of their own. In Titania, a fairy princess with long, shapely legs stands on a pedestal holding a big wand over a fallen male puppet. Is she trying to revive him, or did she smite him with it? Zeitgeist (pictured) features a pair of mythic nymphs; one rides a unicycle on a rail, the other has fallen or jumped off. Standing on her head, her doll legs are spread wide to reveal her genitals. Are they flirting or engaged in kabuki combat? Kohout’s flair for transmogrification is epitomized by Under the Linden Tree, where a pair of pixie dolls are performing an arcane ritual. Originally the title of a medieval German poem about a trysting place, Unter den Linden became the name of a Berlin boulevard lined with statues of generals in a startling example of how something originally identified with love eventually became associated with war. Kohout gives playfully eloquent form to humanity’s most complicated and ironic impulses. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU AUG

31

PERCHANCE TO DREAM: BOX ASSEMBLAGES BY AUDRA KOHOUT

Heriard-Cimino Gallery, 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Priscilla Busch, Natalie Nich-

ols, Andrew Jackson Pollack, Barbara Roberds and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 5259988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by

Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown glass

works, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

Phipps, ongoing.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — Paintings by

Eric Abrecht, through August.

STAPLE GOODS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — “Mining the Edges,” drawings by Aaron Collier, through Sept. 4.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Artists Who Wish They Were Dead II,” a group exhibition curated by Dan Tague, through Sept. 3. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 9437446; www.venusiangardens. com — “Luminous Sculpture,”

works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — “Southern Pop

Surrealism,” works by Charles Bennett, Jeff Bertrand, Dustin Dirt and Brandt Hardin, through Tuesday.

CALL FOR ARTISTS COMMUNITY VISIONS UNLIMITED. Artists are invited to

submit designs for a public art project in Lakeview involving painted utility boxes. Visit www.cvunola.org for details. Submissions deadline is Sept. 1. DESCOURS. Architects, design-

ers and artists are invited to submit proposals for the free public architecture and art presentation hosted Dec. 2-11. Visit www.descours.us or www.aianeworleans.org for details. Submission deadline is Friday.

MONUMENTAL. Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.press-street.com —

Antenna seeks proposals for imaginative reinterpretations of 19th- and early 20th-century New Orleans monuments for a

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

ART

57

The kids are back in school. Break out the good stuff!

ART

LISTINGS

show in February 2012. Submissions deadline is Nov. 15, and there is a $15 entry fee. Email courtney@ courtneyegan.net for details.

SPARE SPACES 5707 Magazine St. · 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

Now Serving ICY Hot Chocolate

ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — “Youth,” sculpture by

Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing. BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 246-6992; www.campbellscoffee.com — Mul-

OCHSNER MEDICAL CENTER ART WALK. 1315 Jefferson Hwy., 8423900; www.ochsner.org — Acrylic

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www.dosjefescigarbar.com — Works by Mario Ortiz, ongoing.

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel and Blues,”

SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 9474477 — Mixed-media paintings

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

58

ongoing.

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel.com —

Paintings by YA/YA senior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA youth artists, ongoing. JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www. marriott.com — Works by Charlene

Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas

by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

EAST BANK REGIONAL LIBRARY. 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — “The Louisiana Film Poster,”

INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 6247903 — Paintings by Annie Strack,

*NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 08/28/11

and mixed-media paintings by Jax Frey, through August.

ROYAL BLEND CAFE. 621 Royal St., 523-2716 — Black-and-white photographs by Jocelyn Marquis, through September.

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing.

(reg. $132)

Oil landscapes of the Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollantiques. com — Works by Sandra Horstman

HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www.hazelnutneworleans.com — Photography by Roy Barloga, ongoing.

89

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www. neutralground.org — Works by NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 943-0010 —

an exhibit of 14 movie posters for films made in or about Louisiana, through Sunday.

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330)

NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobia-nola. com — Works by Tanner, ongoing.

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by Andrew

Roberts, ongoing.

*

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www.myspace. com/mojoco — Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing.

local artists, ongoing.

timedia works by Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

$

Unconventional Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — “The

LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 454-1144 — Fused-glass works by Paulette Lizano, ongoing. MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book of Kells,

Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing.

by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing. ST. JOE LOFTS ARTISTS COMMUNITY. 923 Constance St., 982-5638; www.stjoelofts.com — “Night in

White,” a group show featuring resident artists, ongoing.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com — Wa-

tercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing.

THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses. com — Portraits by Zack Smith,

ongoing.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent exhibits

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “The Center Cannot Hold,” paintings and drawings by Brooke Pickett; “Drip: The Music of Water in New Orleans,” sound installation by John Kleinschmidt and Andy Sternad; “Patterns and Prototypes: Early Paintings by Tina Girouard and Robert Gordy,” curated by Dan Cameron; all through Sept. 25. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gacc-nola. com — Museum exhibits depict

the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Magic

Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “Before

During After,” photographs illustrating the impact of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, through Sept. 25. “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items, ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc. org — The Supreme Court of Lou-

isiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias.org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org — “Absinthe

of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana ItalianAmerican Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing.

“Dancing String Bean,” paintings and drawings by Eugene Martin; “A Gumbo of Colors: Works by New Orleans Quilt Artists”; both through Aug. 27. “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” 18thand 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection, through Oct. 29. “Restore the Oaks: Art Under the Overpass in Treme,” paintings by artists of the murals under the 1-10 overpass, through Oct. 29.

BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org — Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com —

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — Zen

paintings from the museum’s permanent collection, through Sunday. “Thalassa,” a 20-foot-tall suspended sculpture by Swoon, through Sept. 25. “The Elegant Image,” figural bronzes from the Indian Subcontinent from the collection of Siddharth K. Bhansali, through Oct. 23.

NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits about 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “A

Technological Terrarium,” mechanical, kinetic, electronic and biological sculpture, through Sept. 12. “Self-Taught, Outsider and Visionary Art from the Collection of Alexa Kleinbard & Jim Roche”; “Spotlight on Mississippi,” paintings, drawings and sculpture by Mississippi artists; “Mississippi Photographs: 1860s-Present,” through Sept. 18. “Mississippi Mud: The Potters of Mississippi”; “Looking to Learn,” works by New Orleans Center for Creative Arts visual art students, through September. “Whispering Pines,” photographs by Birtney Imes, through Oct. 16.

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state.la.us/site/ mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through March. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Acadian

to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing. TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www.africanamericanheritagemuseum.com — The museum

exhibits works that preserve and tell the history of AfricanAmerican ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November.

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER ART. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The NOLA Project performs Yasmina Reza’s comedy about friends evaluating an outrageously priced painting one of them has purchased. Visit www.noma.eventbrite.com for reservations. Tickets $8 NOMA members and university students, $16 general admission. 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday, through Aug. 28. AIN’T DAT SUPER! Boomtown Casino, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — John “Spud” McConnell, Becky Allen and other local favorites appear in the play about brothers who take all credit for the success of the New Orleans Saints. Visit www.aintdatsuper.com for details. Tickets $25. Tailgating with free food and drinks begins two hours prior to the show. 8 p.m. Thursday-Friday and 5 p.m. Saturday. THE GLASS MENDACITY. Deutsches Haus, 1023 Ridgewood St., 522-8014; www.deutscheshaus.org — John “Spud” McConnell, Becky Allen, Mo Brennan McConnell and others star in the staged reading of the Tennessee Williams parody. Tickets $15. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday. THE GRADUATE. Actor’s Theatre of

HUGGING THE SHOULDER. Shadow-

box Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — A man kidnaps his war veteran brother to wean him off his deadly drug habit in Jerrod Bogard’s play performed by the Crescent Theatre Collective. Call 298-8676 or visit www.noctc.org for reservations. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday. LA SIRENA. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — Samantha Hubbs’ rock musical follows an opera singer who becomes acquainted with a world-famous plastic surgeon and his demented “creations.” Tickets $15, $10 service industry night (Monday). 8 p.m. Thursday-Monday through Aug. 28. THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE.

Slidell Little Theatre, 2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 641-0324; www. slidelllittletheatre.org — The musical follows a naive small-town girl who moves to New York amid the Roaring Twenties to find a new

life for herself. Tickets $19 general admission, $14 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 11.

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

Best Fajitas in Town!

THE WONDER BREAD YEARS.

Fuhrmann Auditorium, 317 N. Jefferson St., Covington, 892-2624 — Former Seinfeld writer Pat Hazell’s one-man show is a tribute to Baby Boomer-era America. Tickets $20. 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15 Come Have Lunch With Me!

COUNTRY FLAME

BURLESQUE & CABARET

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta. com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

BUSTOUT BURLESQUE. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com — The burlesque troupe performs with special guests Stormy Gayle and Madame MacKay. Tickets $22 (plus fees). 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Friday.

FAMILY STAGE DARWIN THE DINOSAUR. Contempo-

rary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 5283800; www.cacno.org — Corbian Visual Arts and Dance’s production uses glow-in-the-dark puppets to tell the story of a scientist and his creation. Tickets $18 general admission, $15 CAC members, $10 children 10 and under. 7 p.m. Friday-Sunday and 2 p.m. Saturday.

AUDITIONS CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

STAGE EVENTS RED, WHITE, & BLUE APOCALYPSE HOEDOWN. Sweet Mama Pagan’s,

2636 Lepage St. — The Cripple Creek Theatre Company’s “Armageddonstyle hoedown” fundraiser for an upcoming production features live music, raffles, games, food and more. Email harris@cripplecreekplayers.org for details. Admission $20. 7 p.m. Saturday.

CALL FOR THEATER RUBY PRIZE. Southern Rep will

award a $10,000 prize, a 10-day writer’s retreat, development workshops and readings at Southern Rep New Play Bacchanal to a female playwright of color. Visit www.southernrep.com for details. Submission deadline is Sept. 15.

COMEDY COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Free admission. 10 p.m. Friday.

CRESCENT CITY COMEDY EXPLOSION.

UNO Lakefront Arena, 6801 Franklin Ave., 280-7171; www.arena.uno.edu — Stand-up comedians Earthquake, J. Anthony Brown, Nephew Tommy and Adele Givens perform. Tickets $43-$73 (plus fees). 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS/ GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show with vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors is followed by the improvised comedy program. Admission $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www. therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC. La

Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar

and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. LIVE IN THE DEN: WILD BILL DYKES’ PREMATURE EVACUATION COMEDY TOUR. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den),

828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — Wild Bill Dykes, Fayard Lindsey, Andi Coll and

Stormy Gayle returns to headline Bustout Burlesque’s Friday night shows (8 p.m. & 10:30 p.m.) at the House of Blues (225 Decatur St., 3104999; www.hob.com). She joins dancers Perle Noire, Praline Dupree, Mina Mechante, Madam MacKay and singer Jenna Se Qua, emcee/magician Nathan Kepner and the Bustout Burlesque Jazz Band. Tickets $31 (includes fees). others perform. Tickets $10. 9 p.m. Wedndesday. MAKE ’EM LAUGH!: LYNN WIN ROBERTS. Stage Door Canteen at

The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www. stagedoorcanteen.org — Roberts does impersonations of comedians such as Bob Hope, Red Skelton, Jack Benny, Jimmy Durante and W.C. Fields. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www. nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday.

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PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

SAM DEMARIS. Boomtown Casino,

4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedian performs. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

41 FRENCH MARKET PLACE 299-9225 { A r oun d t h e bl o c k f r o m Ma r g a r i tav i l l e } www.s t e r l i ng s i lv i a .c o m

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SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

SNACK TIME WITH THE ANVIL COMPANY. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The improv and sketch comedy troupe performs. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton

Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

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Monday - Saturday 9am-6pm [504] 733-0901 • w w w.emmettsmeats.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — In the play adapted from the 1967 film, a recent college graduate dealing with anxiety about his future is seduced by the much-older wife of his father’s business partner. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 27.

STAGE

59

LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Alex Woodward listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 16 TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 18 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during its weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

PAWS & CLAWS. Fairview-

Riverside State Park, 119 Fairview Drive, Madisonville — The interactive program designed for preschoolers teaches children about animals commonly found in the park with a focus on characteristics that enable survival. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Saturday 20

CECILIA DARTEZ . Le Jouet, 1700

Airline Drive, Metairie, 8370533; www.lejouet.com — The author of the Jenny Giraffe series reads from her books and leads a second line through the store. 1 p.m. KIDS CRAFTING NATURE . Bayou

Segnette State Park, 7777 Westbank Expwy., Westwego — Children of all ages are invited to join the park staff in learning a new nature topic each month, and participants get to create and take home a craft based on the topic. 10 a.m.

OGDEN FAMILY FAIR . Ogden

Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — The museum’s take on a Southern country fair features arts and crafts, games and perfor-

mances by New Orleans Suzuki Forum, Calliope Puppets, the Preservation Hall Jr. Brass Band and more. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

preview

RADIO WORKSHOP. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Children ages 8 to 12 learn to make radio sound effects, listen to old-time radio shows and famous WWII-era radio broadcasts, and then create an original radio story. Preregistration is required. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 or email lauren.handley@nationalww2museum.org for details. 10 to 11:30 a.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 16 CASA NEW ORLEANS VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION . CASA New

Orleans, 1340 Poydras St., Suite 2120, 522-1962; www.casaneworleans.org — The organization hosts an orientation for those interested in volunteering as court-appointed special advocates. Call 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans. org for details. 6:30 p.m.

COMMUNITY PROJECT PARTNERSHIP WORKSHOP.

Junior League New Orleans, 4319 Carondelet St., 891-5845; www.jlno.org — The Junior League of New Orleans hosts workshop for nonprofits interested in partnering with the organization. Visit www.jlno. org for details. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. TULANE UNIVERSITY SQUARE, 200 Broadway St. —

The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE. Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 S. I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www. dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m. FEASTING FOR FREEDOM. New Orleans restaurants donate a portion of their revenue on this day to the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Louisiana. Visit www.laaclu. org for the list of participating restaurants. STAGE DOOR IDOL: FINALS.

Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org — Contestants perform World War II-era hits for a

StrippedDown Sound PHOTO BY ROBIN WALKER

The Noisician Coalition is known for at least two unique features: electronic music generated by instruments mounted with modified bullhorns and its red-andblack bohemian biker-gang/clown-posse look. The Noisicians will shed their signature garb at the Underpants Party and Fundraiser. The pants-optional event will raise money to build new instruments, repair old ones and promote battery recycling. Coalition members typically build their own instruments. Ashley Shabankereh plays a “Shabonkahonk,” a euphonium topped with a megaphone. “This is free-form music,” she says. “I’m happy to have a change from a classical form of music.” Members use everything from bullhorns and assorted electronic parts to trash cans, bottles and hubcaps. One member created “The Pacified Amplifier” — actually an amplified pacifier — for a baby girl. The fundraiser features performances by the Noisician Coalition, Kali, Natasha Fiore, Matt Thomas (The Human Blockhead) and ActionActionReaction. There is a “Pants Off Dance Off,” a silent auction and a raffle for prizes which include three-course meals cooked in the winner’s home, a cocktail party for 15 hosted by a professional mixologist, photographs and kung fu classes. Admission is $5 and includes your first raffle ticket. — Lora Ghawally

AUG

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Noisician Coalition Underpants Party 10:30 p.m. Friday AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 2185778; www.theallways.com

panel of celebrity judges in the singing competition. Call 5281944 ext. 267 for details. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. WEDNESDAY 17 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GREAT DECISIONS: REBUILDING HAITI . Latter Memorial Library,

5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The World Affairs Council of New Orleans’ discussion series features Laila Hlass, staff attorney at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law’s immigration clinic. Call 280-5591 or director@wacno.

org for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

LGBT YOUNG ADULT PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT

Community Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www. lgbtccno.org — The group supports 18- to 24-year-olds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. 7 p.m. LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon. NONPAC MEETING . Seventh

District Station, 10555 Lake Forest Blvd. — The New Orleans Neighborhood Policing Anti-Crime Council holds its monthly meeting. 7 p.m.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

WOMEN & WINE ON WEDNESDAYS. Santa Fe Tapas,

1327 St. Charles Ave., 504-3049915 — The women’s networking and social event features wine specials. Visit www.womenwinewednesday.com for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. YOUTH IMPACT CONFERENCE . Little Zion Baptist Church, 4821 Earhart Blvd., 371-5520 — The conference for youth, parents and educators includes activities and guest speakers meant to help motivate young people to overcome challenges. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday-Friday.

Thursday 18 50 HAIRCUTS IN 50 STATES IN 50 DAYS TOUR . Kenneth’s Studio

for Hair, 2100 St. Charles Ave., 528-8585; www.kennethsstudio.com — Hairstylist Patrick Lomantini provides haircuts for a minimum donation of $20 to raise money for the LA/SPCA. Appointments are encouraged. 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP. St. Tammany Hospital’s

Parenting Center, 1505 N. Florida St. Suite B, Covington, (985) 898-4435; www.stph. org — A certified lactation consultant answers questions related to breastfeeding in the monthly group. Noon to 1 p.m. CELEBRATE RECOVERY. Victory

Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The group addresses addictions and other emotional issues through a spiritual perspective. Call 7335005 for details. 6:30 p.m.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

EPILEPSY & SEIZURE EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT GROUP.

East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The Epilepsy Foundation of Louisiana holds a monthly support group for adults who have or are impacted by epilepsy or seizure disorders. The group meets in the Foundation Board Room. Call (800) 960-0587 or email kelly@epilepsylouisiana. org for details. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. LIFE HURTS, GOD HEALS. Victory Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The support group focuses on teens and young adults with addictions, hang ups and emotional pain. Call 733-5005 for details. 7 p.m. THE RAP GAME . Mimi’s in the Marigny, 2601 Royal St., 8729868; www.myspace.com/ mimisinthemarigny — Michael Patrick Welch, Gambit contributor and teacher of a class where students learn to create and record original songs, and MC Intelligence host a class/competition for non professional adult rappers. Call 756-2147 for details. 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. RED HAT SOCIETY CONVENTION . Hilton New Orleans Riverside, 2 Poydras St., 561-0500; www. hilton.com — The national women’s social organization hosts its annual convention featuring live entertainment, a parade, a “pajama breakfast” and an expo hall with vendors selling fascinators, hats and other accessories. Email Emily@ redhatsociety.com or visit www.redhatsociety.com for details. Thursday-Saturday. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. A TOAST TO LITERACY WINE & FOOD TASTING . Vom Fass, 5725

Magazine St., 302-1455; www. vomfassusa.com — The store selling vinegars, oils, select wines, spirits and liqueurs hosts an event to benefit the Literacy Alliance of Greater New Orleans. Call 864-7012 or email literacygno@gmail.com for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Friday 19 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — The weekly

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

ALICE IN WONDERLAND TEA . Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-1922; www. windsorcourthotel.com — The hotel hosts traditional tea services with an Alice in Wonderland theme. Children are encouraged to dress as their favorite characters. Reservations are recommended. Call 596-4773 or visit www. grillroomneworleans.com/lesalon for details. 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

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EVENTS

LISTINGS

support group meets at 6:15 p.m. Fridays. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details. FRIENDS OF THE SLIDELL LIBRARY USED BOOK SALE. St. Tammany

Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The sale features a variety of magazines and paperback, hardcover and children’s books. Email fsl70458@yahoo.com for details. Members-only sale 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, general admission 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, North

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays.

NOISICIAN COALITION UNDERPANTS PARTY & FUNDRAISER . AllWays Lounge,

2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — The eccentric marching band that promotes hearing protection hosts a fundraiser with raffles, silent auctions, DJs, performances and more. Wearing only underwear is encouraged but not required. Email noisiciancoalition@gmail. com for details. Admission $5. 10:30 p.m.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

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CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. DINERRAL SHAVERS EDUCATIONAL FUND BACK TO SCHOOL EXTRAVAGANZA .

Treme Community Center, 900 N. Villere St. — The Hot 8 Brass Band, Free Agents Brass Band, To Be Continued Brass Band and others perform at the event that features free school supplies for New Orleans students, food, health screenings and more. Call 235-2084 for details. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. EAGLE WATCH. Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m. ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING .

Christ Church Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

EXPLORE THE SHORE .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville,

(888) 677-3668 — The group explores the lakefront to discover the biodiversity of plant and animal life found there. 1 p.m. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rainor-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. GUIDED CANOE TOUR. Bayou Segnette State Park, 7777 Westbank Expwy., Westwego — The park staff leads a guided canoe trip around the park’s waterways to learn about its history and ecology. 10 a.m. KNOT TYING . Bogue Chitto

Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The park ranger instructs participants on several varieties of knots and their uses. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

MADISONVILLE ART MARKET. Madisonville Art Market, Tchefuncte River Front at Water St., Madisonville, (985) 871-4918; www.artformadisonville.org — The monthly market features fine art from local artists including painting, mixed media, photography, jewelry, wood carving, sculpture, stained glass and more. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. NEW ORLEANS SECULAR HUMANIST ASSOCIATION BANQUET. Smilie’s Restaurant,

5725 Jefferson Hwy., Harahan, 733-3000; www.smiliesrestaurant.com — The banquet celebrates the organization’s 12th anniversary and features keynote speaker Annie Laurie Gaylor, co-president of Freedom From Religion Foundation and editor of Freethought Today. Call 282-5459 for details. Admission $40 members, $45 nonmembers. 7 p.m.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www. sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock Barn,

409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases freshly caught seafood items, local

produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 355-4442 or visit www.visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. TREME UNDER THE BRIDGE MARKET. North Claiborne

Expressway, between Ursulines Avenue and Gov. Nicholls Street — The new monthly market highlights local artwork and features live music from local bands, high schools and choirs; community services like health and legal aid; and educational services and exhibits. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Sunday 21 ABITA ARTISTS. 9th Street

Gallery, 71377 St. Mary St., Abita Springs — Local artists hold a monthly meeting. Call Lana at 898-3071 for details. 3 p.m.

DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE .

New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www. lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

JAPAN CLUB OF NEW ORLEANS BON ODORI. Lakeside Shopping

Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-8000 — The organization hosts the traditional Japanese dance festival to raise awareness for relief efforts in the country. Call 393-7887 or visit www. japanclubofneworleans.org for details. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SUNDAY SWING WITH SWINGAROUX . National World

War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — Professional swing dancers provide coaching for dancers of all levels while local musicians play World War II-era hits. Call 528-1944 ext. 359 for details. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. dance lessons, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. live music. Free admission.

Monday 22 TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www. notoast234.freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

SPORTS

NEW ORLEANS ZEPHYRS. Zephyr

Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www.zephyrsbaseball. com — The Zephyrs play the Colorado Springs Sky Sox. 7 p.m. Tuesday-Friday.

RENAISSANCE MIXED MARTIAL ARTS.

Harrah’s Casino (Harrah’s Theatre), 1 Canal St., 533-6600; www.harrahsneworleans.com — The more than 10 fights in the event feature a mixture of martial arts techniques. 8 p.m. Friday.

RED BULL KING OF THE ROCK BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT. A.L.

Davis Playground, 2600 Lasalle St. — Sixty-four one-on-one basketball players compete in the tournament for a chance to play in the finals on Alcatraz. Visit www.redbullusa.com/ kingoftherock for details. 2 p.m. Sunday.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

ACT STUDENT VIDEO CONTEST. High

school juniors and seniors are invited to make videos creatively expressing their reasons for taking the ACT college entrance exam for a chance to win scholarships to the colleges of their choice. Visit www. actstudent.org/videocontest for details. Submissions deadline is Sept. 11.

CAREGIVER STRESS MANAGEMENT CRUISE GIVEAWAY. Home Instead

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP GRANTS.

The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation awards grants to local arts and educational programs. Visit www.jazzandheritage.org for details. Application deadline is Sept. 6.

GREATER NEW ORLEANS FOUNDATION IMPACT GRANT. The

organization awards grants to nonprofit organizations in the arts and culture, education, health and human services, and youth development categories. Visit www.gnof. org for details. Application deadline is Aug. 26.

PROJECT HOMECOMING . The faith-

based nonprofit seeks homes to rebuild that suffered damage of 50 percent or more from Hurricane Katrina. Call 942-0444, ext. 244 for details.

VERIZON FOUNDATION LITERACY GRANTS. The foundation awards

nonprofits $50,000 in grants to support literacy programs. Visit www. verizonfoundation.org for details. Application deadline is Sept. 1.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River

BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth seeks

volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION . The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The

volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email nkennebrew@handsonneworleans.com or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details.

HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS. Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 8328111 for details. LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org.

LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS. Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.lowernine. org or email lauren@lowernine.org for details. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 888-5880 for details. OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS.

Operation REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to provide recreation and education opportunities for innercity youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www.operationreach.org. PITOT HOUSE . Volunteers are

needed on Saturdays in August and September to help spruce up the historic home’s parterre garden before the fall season. Call 482-0312 or email info@louisianalandmarks. org for details.

PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS. New

Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMSOutreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts,

academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach.org or call 654-1060 for information. SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING.

The STAIR program holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www. stairnola.org for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION . The Teen

Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middleand upper-school New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

VOLUNTEERS CAN LEAD PROGRAM .

899-7323 — The group discusses Katheryn Stockett’s The Help. 10:30 a.m. Saturday. PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 5867432; www.themckennamuseum. com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturday. PHILIP R. RATCLIFFE. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and discusses Mississippi John Hurt: His Life, His Times, His Blues. Singer/songwriter Joe Barbara also performs at the event. 6 p.m. Thursday. POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. THE SARATOGA COLLECTION . Ogden

The program allows residents to assist the New Orleans Police Department at its district stations. Email vocal@nola.gov for details.

Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — Contributors sign the publication published by the University of New Orleans and curated by Terrence Sanders. 6 p.m. Thursday.

WORDS

SOCRATES CAFE . St. Tammany Parish

BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes & Noble

Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. CARL D. MALMGREN. Old Metairie

Library, 2350 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-4353 — The author signs Paris Metro. 7 p.m. Wednesday. COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday. DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at the

Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE . Latter

Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twiceweekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

GREAT BOOKS DISCUSSION GROUP.

East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The group discusses William Faulkner’s Light in August. 7 p.m.

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP. Barnes &

Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple

Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. OCTAVIA BOOKS BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St.,

Library, Folsom Branch, 82393 Railroad Ave., Folsom, (985) 7969728 — The philosophical group holds a monthly discussion. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. SOUTHERN COOKBOOK SIGNING .

Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — Writers including April Miller and Jean LeFleur sign their cookbooks. 2 p.m. Saturday.

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SOUTHERN LOUISIANA CHAPTER OF ROMANCE WRITERS OF AMERICA .

East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Author Erica Spindler discusses “Five Must Have Elements For A Killer Thriller.” Visit www.solawriters.org for details. 10 a.m. Saturday.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. TOM PIAZZA . Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs Devil Sent the Rain: Music and Writing in Desperate America. 6 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola. org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail.com for details. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

Senior Care awards a free five-day cruise to a family caregiver. Those interested in nominating someone should submit a brief story explaining why the individual deserves to win. Call 455-4911 or visit www. homeinstead.com/339 for details. Submission deadline is Aug. 31.

Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information.

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B

WHERE

7638 Maple St., 304-1526 WHEN

Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sun. HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

RESERVATIONS

Not accepted

WHAT WORKS

Breakfast pastries, chocolaty snacks, sandwiches WHAT DOESN'T

Coffee service is weak, sandwiches are few CHECK, PLEASE

A neighborhood bakery worth crossing town to visit

CHILD’S PLAY

Julia Child inspired countless American home cooks and restaurant chefs. One of them is Susan Spicer, and this week she honors the birthday of the late chef and food television pioneer with a special dinner series at her restaurant Bayona (430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com). Each night this week, through Saturday, Aug. 20, Spicer serves a threecourse meal based on Child’s recipes. The prix fixe dinners are $45 and reservations are recommended.

five 5 IN

Five Places for African Cuisines

BENNACHIN RESTAURANT 1212 ROYAL ST., 522-1230

The cafe’s West African fare includes many spicy dishes and meatless choices.

CAFE ABYSSINIA

3511 MAGAZINE ST., 894-6238 www.cafeabyssinia.com

Maple Street Patisserie bakes an array of European breads and pastries. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

A MAPLE STREET BAKERY RISES TO THE OCCASION.

3030 SEVERN AVE., METAIRIE, 888-2209

when she tasted it. They teamed up to start Maple Street Patisserie in 2010. You don’t need any deep-seated taste memories to appreciate their patisserie’s work. Take the bear claw, which has scant resemblance to the doughy sugar bomb more typically sold by the name. This one is not just about flavor but texture and form, too. Bite in and your teeth sink easily through layers of pastry, reaching an airy hollow lined with raspberry. Along the way, you get the crunch of sugar grains and warm, toasted almond slivers. This is pastry that works with your mouth rather than just filling it. Cichowski’s breads have been turning up in restaurants around town, and at lunchtime at Maple Street Patisserie they’re the building blocks for sandwiches. This is a rather small part of the business here, and though the simple chalkboard menu has just four options, you can mix things up by choosing your bread. I prefer the prosciutto sandwich on airy, crusty ciabatta, which soaks up a layer of bright, tangy pesto and holds in soft, plump wads of fresh mozzarella. Dense, chewy baguettes are my choice for a French-style sandwich of thin-sliced ham and thick planks of Brie. Pastry can get highly personal, too. Just watch the guy trying to choose from a platter of ostensibly identical blueberry muffins, like a kid picking his goldfish from the aquarium’s multitudes. For people attached to their baked goods, Maple Street Patisserie proves a great place to go fish.

JAMILA’S MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE 7808 MAPLE ST., 866-4366

This cozy Tunisian cafe serves couscous, tajine, merguez sausage and more.

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE

845 N. CARROLLTON AVE., 250-1054 www.medcafenola.com

Moroccan dishes like harira make guest appearances among Middle Eastern standards.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2010 Postales del Fin del Mundo Malbec

PATAGONIA, ARGENTINA / $11-$13 RETAIL Patagonia, 500 miles below Argentina’s renowned Mendoza wine region, is gaining recognition for its European-style wines. This 100 percent Malbec bottling offers aromas of black and red fruit and hints of vanilla, earth and spice. On the palate, taste ripe plum and currants, black tea and rounded tannins culminating in a smooth finish. Decant an hour before serving, and drink with rare beef, pork, lamb, poultry, pizza and firm cheeses. Buy it at: The Wine Seller, Dorignac’s and The Wine Market in Slidell. Drink it at: Eiffel Society, Bistro Daisy, Santa Fe, Byblos and Royal Palm. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

BY IAN MCNULTY

P

CASABLANCA RESTAURANT

Try traditional Moroccan dishes prepared in a kosher kitchen.

Upper Crust astries and bread evidently have a power beyond mere calories. At least that’s the impression I got while hanging around Maple Street Patisserie. Under some evocative, aromatic influence, customers often start gushing to the counter help about amber braids of challah bread from their youth, the mystifyingly light croissants from their Paris honeymoon or the cake they sampled on vacation in Greece and are desperate to find somewhere back home. Sometimes the trigger is what they find in the case or baskets at this Uptown bakery, where an impressively diverse range of European-style pastries is always offered. At other times, people implore the baker to sate some craving with a special order. They’ve come to the right place. The maestro here is master baker Ziggy Cichowski, a native of Poland whose multi-ethnic prowess in the baking arts owes something to Cold War geopolitics. Growing up in the then-communist country, he was allowed to work in Russia, Germany, France and elsewhere as a baker’s apprentice. Had he lived in a more open society, he says now, he might have elected to stay longer, perhaps permanently, in one these countries. But he was always required to return home to Poland, where he’d again apply to travel and work somewhere else. Over time, these trips amounted to a journeyman’s tour of European baking traditions. Later, his family emigrated to the U.S., and eventually he made it to New Orleans. He was bringing samples of his pastries to potential clients when he met Patricia Ann Donohue, a chef and New Jersey native who knew baking talent

Share platters of Ethiopian stews, scooped up with injera bread.

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>

<<<< <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN

BARBECUE

FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Harahan, 287-4581; 7457 St. Charles Ave., 266-2921; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pit-cooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. Reservations accepted. St. Charles Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Hickory Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $$

ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N.

68

Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133

S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jeffer-

son Hwy., Jefferson, 832-0830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers, alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. Thrusday’s steak night special features a filet mignon, butter-garlic potatoes, salad, grilled French bread and a soft drink for $15. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks

St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq. com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat. Cash only. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Grilled Brewhouse ribs are served with house-made barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with red pepper aioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

tions. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ECO CAFE & BISTRO — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — Eco Cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. There are fresh squeezed juices, and Friday and Saturday evenings feature tapas dining. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. The cochon de lait panini includes slow-braised pork, baked ham, pickles, Swiss, ancho-honey slaw, honey mustard and chili mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL —

4905 Canal St., 488-7357; www. beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickoryamoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reserva-

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 5811112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes —

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

SWEET

VICTORY

3 locations: 819 W. Esplanade Ave, Kenner 6233 S. Claiborne Ave, Uptown 800 Metairie Rd, Metairie

w w w. t h e k u p c a k e f a c t o r y. c o m

(504)464-8884

and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $ VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St.,

361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Cause-

Frank and Maria Pyburn and Phillip way Approach., Manand Josie DiCristina serve Creole and deville, (985) 626-4476; Italian dishes at DiCristina’s (810 N. 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Columbia St., Covington, 985-875Hammond, (985) 3450160; www.dicristinas.com). 6789; www.tryyuen.com PHOTO By CHERyL GERBER — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho purees, various chocolates and sauce, and Cantonese-style stirnuts and more. There also are fried alligator and mushrooms fresh fruit parfaits and green in oyster sauce. Reservations actea smoothies. No reservations. cepted for large parties. Lunch Lunch and dinner daily. Credit and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ cards. $

COFFEE/ DESSERT

CONTEMPORARY

ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metai-

rie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4648884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 2673328; www.thekupcakefactory. com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

PINTS & POBOYS

Choose a 3-inch Poboy & a Pint of Beer • $8

GAME TIME

GOURMET YOUR HQ FOR

Every Night • 7-10pm

GAMETIME EATS

Choices include: Fried Green Tomato & Remoulade, Overstuffed Shrimp, Root Beer & Glazed Ham & Cheese, Pattons Hot Sausage, Certified Angus Roast Beef, or French Fry, Roast Beef & Cheddar Poboy

“HABANERO HOTTIES” HOT WINGS, GOURMET SLIDERS & MORE! DELIVERY AVAILABLE THROUGH NOLAFOOD DELIVERY

Come Try Our Weekly Throwback Cocktail!

DRINK SPECIALS ON PRO SUNDAYS

plus tax

EXTENDED HOURS!

Mon-Sat 11am-10pm

3454 Magazine St. NOLA 504-899-3374

DINE IN OR CARRY OUT.

TUESDAY - FRIDAY 11 AM - 9 PM SATURDAY - SUNDAY 8 AM - 5 PM WEEKEND BRUNCH SPECIALS A L L D AY S AT U R D AY & S U N D AY 3100 MAGAZINE ST. (CORNER OF MAGAZINE & 8TH)

504-373-6579 WWW.GOTTGOURMETCAFE.COM

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

− mon-sat • 7am-9pm − serving full menu til 8pm − sunday • 7am-3pm − kitchen closes at 2:30pm 5606 Canal Blvd. • 504-483-7001 • www.lakeviewBrew.Com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Gott Gourmet Cafe uses the freshest ingredients available for our homemade dressings, sauces & meats to make all of our signature recipes daily.

69

OUT2EAT ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713

THRIFT CIT Y USA

serving new orleans'

favorites

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

Po-Boys, Pizzas & Plates

70

including Seafood Muffulettas, Italian Meatballs, Veal Marsala, Mirliton Casserole, Fettucine Alfredo, Grilled Chicken or Grilled Shrimp Salad, Gumbo and more.

THURSDAY AUGUST 18TH SALE STORE HOURS 7AM - 9PM nOw Open sundays 11AM-6PM

1 / 2 OFF ON ALL C LOTHI & SHOES NG

Now accepting donations on behalf of AMVETS

3939 Veterans • 885-3416 (between Cleary Ave & Clearview) Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

601

NEW LOCATION TERRY PKWY · GRETNA

Green Parrot Nursery 201 Nashville Av • New Orleans, LA • (504) 894-1100

15% off with ad Monday-Saturday: 9am-4:30pm Sunday: 11am-4pm www.greenparrotnursery.com

St. Louis St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168;

www.therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 888-2010; www.kosher-

cajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

Red Gravy (125 Camp St., 561-8844; www.redgravycafe.com) serves Italian dishes and sandwiches.

PhOTO BY ChERYL GERBER

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 El-

meer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. The Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia

St., 895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stoneground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch

Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge

Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE —

923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

Shanghai grilled Shrimp or ChiCken Salad — Grilled shrimp or chicken with romaine lettuce, cucumber, tomato, edamame and honey roasted pecans in chef’s sesame vinaigrette dressing. Served with sesame wheat noodles.......... with ChiCken $9.95 · with Shrimp $10.95 Beef Chow fen noodle — Marinated beef with fen noodle and Chinese vegetables................................................................................................................................$9.50 aSparaguS Sautéed with ChiCken — In brown or garlic sauce... $10.95 fried Bean Curd in teriyaki SauCe — Teriyaki sauce with black mushrooms, peas and carrots.............................................................................................................$8.95 Stuffed ChineSe eggplant — Chinese eggplant stuffed with pork and shrimp with chef’s special sauce.................................................................................................... $10.95

Out2EAt vations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

3605 South Carrollton ave · reServationS / take-out 482-3935 · www.fivehappineSS.Com mon-thurS 11am-10pm · fri & Sat 11am-11pm · Sun 11am-10pm

Happy Birthday, Julia! This iconic woman, who taught us how to cook French, was Celebrated at Bayona in 1992. Julia Child inspired dishes prepared by our Celebrated woman in the kitchen, Chef Susan Spicer.

EVENINGS, AUGUST 15-20 3 COURSE MENU $45

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave.,

265-8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD

72

BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636

Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iber-

ville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-

A U T H E N T I C J A PA N E S E C U I S I N E

H I Su n

Now Serving FRESH

3 -Th u 1 301 S 1:0 . 0a m -10:3

TORO

and SEA URCHIN

1 Carro llton • 488-188m-11:00pm 0pm · 0p Fri 11:00am 0 -11:00pm · Sat 4:

SUSHI BAR

FREE DELIVERY www . M IKIMOTOS U S

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

4 3 0 R U E D aU ph inE • 5 0 4 .5 2 5 .4 4 5 5 • www.bay ona.c om

0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of poboys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is

tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8835513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.

italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and din-

ner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-

7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy. com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $ TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 5208530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ page74

CLASSIFIEDS PET ADOPTIONS

AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

‘09 CHEVY AVEO

ALLEY CAT

‘10 CHEVROLET HHR

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

‘10 FORD FOCUS SES

Caffe

$11,995 504-368-5640

‘10 PONTIAC VIBE

Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

1970 CHEVY CHEVELLE Big Block SS. Red with white stripes. Price $5700. Use email for pictures. cher74me@msn.com Call 337-366-8243.

IMPORTED AUTOS ‘05 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT $7,500 504-812-5975

08 HONDA S-2000 LOW MILES $24,995 504-368-5640

‘10 HYUNDAI SONATA $16,995 504-368-5640

‘11 TOYOTA CAMRY LE

Power seat. Several to choose from $16,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES AWD $16,995 Call 504-368-5640

$22,995 Call 504-368-5640

VANS

Rentals &

Employment

NOLA

MARKETPLACE

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

MASSAGE BY JAMIE

SW/DT or Gen Relaxation. Safe, priv & quiet location. Awesome work. $60/hr & $95/1.5hr. 8am-9pm. 504-2311774. LA#509

Message Extraordinaire

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

MERCHANDISE APPLIANCES 18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Almond Color. $35. Call 943-7699.

ART/POSTERS VINTAGE N.O. JAZZFEST POSTERS

‘09 VW ROUTAN

Dating back to 1980, Still in protective tubes, Will sell as collection or by year. 704-681-4914.

WANTED TO PURCHASE

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

$16,995 504-368-5640

CASH FOR CARS

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE

Advertise in

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

1

Relax Today

hour/ $50

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

MERCHANDISE WANTED WANTED: WAR SOUVENIERS

German, Japanese, U.S. Helmets, Daggers, Swords, Flags, Guns, Civil War. ALL MEMORABILIA. Call 985-722-7051

PETS

Hours: 10am-7:30pm Mon - Sat

Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

Alicia LA Lic# 520

16 yrs exp. Non-Sexual call

504-317-4142

CHATTY CAT

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

Itty Bitty Inky

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

Kit Kit

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

Lola

SWEET, loving bl/white pit needs loving & caring home Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

LOST/FOUND PETS REWARD- LOST

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

Hands on Instruction in Jewelry Arts $530 for 11 wks Choice of 4 sessions Starting Sept. 18th Sun. 10a-2p, M or T 6-10p, F 11a-3p Payment Plans. Credit accpt. 2712 Royal St. 427-8010 nolametalsmithing.com

LEGAL NOTICES

DID YOU WORK AT SOUTHERN SCRAP? Did you work on ship scrapping operations of any kind for or at Southern Scrap between 1960 and 1998? In specific, we are looking for any former employees who can assist us in identifying employees and/or describe operations and working conditions associated with asbestos, insulation tear out and disposal of the materials. Please call Jeri Enright at the ARDOIN LAW FIRM, 504-305-2375 OR 503-237-5569 to discuss this matter.

Minnie

white & tan tabby, princess. very vocal & likes to play. contact Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

MISHKA

Beautiful long hair Russian Blue mix 5 yr old sweetie ,spayed vacs ,504 462-1968

Princess Leila

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Sandy-yellow lab

3 yrs/F, sweet, great w/ kds & othr pets perfect family pet contact Tracitbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Toto-Lab Mix

90 min. avail • Swedish & Deep Tissue

5 min from Elmwood

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

NOLA Metalsmithing Enroll Now for Fall 2011

deserves loving home w/ lots of love. no kids other pets ok obeys commands. watch dog contact Tracitbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971 HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com ANNOUNCEMENTS

ADOPTIONS WANT TO ADOPT

Adopting your newborn would be my life’s greatest joy. Will give a child a life of security and endless love. A great family, education, and wonderful home awaits. Expenses paid. Please call Ria at 1-888-851-4935. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

ANNOUNCEMENTS AAAA** Donation.

Donate Your Car, Boat or Real Estate. IRS Tax Deductible. Free Pick-Up/Tow. Any Model/Condition. Help Under Privileged Children Outreach Center 1-800-419-7474

SERVICES

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

AIR COND/HEATING MERYNS Heating & A/C Service

Residential Service All Makes & Models Service - Installation- Repairs Free Estimates on Replacements & New Installations 504-701-3605 - jcollins51@cox.net

ELECTRICAL TRINITY ELECTRIC

If you’ve had a major renovation, added major appliances, your home is 10+ yrs old or you are buying/selling a home, call today. $69.95 HOME INSPECTION. (504) 305-1222

HANDYMAN HARRY’S HOUSE HELPERS * Small Jobs *Repairs *Carpentry *Painting *Install AND MORE! Insured & Priced-Right Harry’s Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown * 504-896-1500 Metairie * 504-896-1550

INSULATION AUDUBON SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

Save up to 50% on ac/heat bills; live in a more comfortable home; Improve sound control, reduce your carbon footprint. Roland (Rusty) Cutrer Jr, Owner 504-432-7359 www.audubonsprayfoam.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

Real Estate

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

‘09 SUBARU FORESTER

‘09 VW TIGUAN

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

Elijah

$11,995 504-368-5640

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m.

Adorable m 3/m old Bobtail kitten Very sweet and playful ,tested vacs neutered 504 462-1968

$11,995 504-368-5640

Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

DOMESTIC AUTOS

Purrfect 8 wk old adorable & sweet kitten smokey grey ,vacs and will be spayed . rescue 504 462 -1968

$9,995 504-368-5640

CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in

Alexa

77

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe FRENCH QUARTER

RIVER RIDGE 9012 Rosecrest Lane Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

Call (504) 915-3220

Reduced! Asking $169,000

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $228K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. 374.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE METAIRIE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

3817 N. Arnoult Road

KENNER 16 BISTINEAU CT Woodlake South

4 BR, 3 BA, lg bonus rm. Master suite with firepl, jacuzzi, separate shower & 4 closets. French doors in Master & den lead to extra lg patio. $200,000. Pat Arnold, Latter & Blum, 504-9153184. parnold@latterblum.com To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100 1323 Esplanade A&D $165k-$185k

4505 LAPLACE ST. $179,900

MOTIVATED SELLERS! 2/3 Very spac w/lg greatrm & open kit. Each BR has own bath + 3rd bath w/shwr in laun rm. Conv. loc off W. Esplanade by East Jeff Hosp. http://www.papiliostour. com/archives/2773. Delery Comarda Realtors, 504875-355

Metairie Office’s Top Producer in 2010. Under contract: 800 Rue Burgundy, 711 Ridgewood, 1113 Athania, 3213 39th St., 532 Metairie Lawn, 3217 41st. St., 337 Edinburg, 124 Duplessis St. Call Carol to buy or sell your home today! 512-5487

OLD METAIRIE 1249 PAPWORTH - $399,500

4BD/4BA Fabulous for entertaining! Renov’t kit., Mstr down, M-I-L suite dnstrs. Add’l 18’x17.5’ room - could be Media, office, etc. Loads of storage! Huge w/i closets. Encl. porch off upstairs bdrm. Much more! Call Sandy Ward, ReMax, 504-259-2616

812 Esplanade #2 $189k

1809 BURGUNDY $238K This condo has lots of pizzaz. Lights! Camera! Located on Action! Zoom the ground in for a close level. One up look at this bed one bath beauty. This French Quarter condo with house has the qualities, origibrick paver floors. Separate nality and style of something but efficient kitchen. Lots spectacular, but needs facelift. of windows overlooking the Shotgun style with 12’ ceil, orig patio allow lots of light to pine flrs, transom wndws and stream in. Use of laundry and frpl mantle in every room. Trad pool across the courtyard. flr plan: kitch, BA & laundry at You’ve gotta see it. Open to rear. Back deck/brick patio w best offer! bedding along edges.

Samara D. Poché

504.949.5400

504.319.6226 sam@fqr.com frenchquarterrealty.com

RENTALS 439 Burgundy #2 • 1BD/1BA $1,000 / $1,000 Grnd flr apt w tons of space. lots of storage. central AC. common w/d. common ctyd. 519 Iberville #2 • 1BD/1BA $1,300 / $1,400 2nd flr w a pvt balc over str. renov w stainless appl, hdwd flrs, exposed brick. pt w/d 1233 Esplanade #16 • 2BD/1BA $950/ $1050 2 story apt w/ liv and kitch dwnstrs, BD/BA up. common w/d. Pool. 1 assigned garage parking space included! 528 St Louis #202 •1BD/1BA $1,450 / $1,550 2nd story apt in the heart of the FQ. Private 2nd floor balcony over the street. Hardwood floors. galley kitchen. common w/d. Elevator.

200 BEVERLY DR.

4/4.5 Spacious foyer, lg liv rm, den, gourmet kit, bkfst rm, 1 BR w/ full ba down, master & 2 add’l br w/full baths on 2nd flr. Hdwd flrs, firepl. $825K. Karen Prieur, RE/MAX, 504-250-8000. www.karenprieur.com

NEED HELP? Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

242 MULBERRY

345 E. LIVINGSTON PL

332 PAPWORTH AVE $175,000

837 OLD METAIRIE PL

Beaut home on premier st. 4/3 + 3 half ba. Massive limestone firepl. Formal liv & din. Gourmet kit, fam rm. Large salt water heated pool. $1,650,000. Karen Prieur, RE/MAX, 504-250-8000. www.karenprieur.com

Needs just a little TLC! Front porch w/ swing. LR has wd frs. 2 ind. BR, DR w/ closet coudbe 3rd BR. sun poch in rear has w/d hkkups. Big kit w/island. Lg yd w/rear yard access. Unfin. garage in rear. http://www.papiliostour.com/ archives/2809. Delery Comarda Realtors, 504-875-3555

Exquisite 3-story, new irrigation & lighting sytms, lovely pool. Spanish cedar shutters. Lg master suite & bath. Elevator. Ofc has coffee bar. $1,130,000. Janet Favrot, Coldwell Banker TEC REALTORS. 504-615-0813 3 BR, 3 BA Twnhme, travertine flrs, renovated kit w/ granite, spacious floorplan. Quiet neighborhood with easy access to downtown. $265,000. Susan Saia, REMAX, 504-957-7504; saia@bellsouth. net. www.susansaia.com

METAIRIE TOWERS 401 Met. Rd 1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, renovated with new appliances and AC’s. $118,000. Call 504-275-5700

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

The Historic House, Luxury Home and Second Home Specialist Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

455 Phillip Street, $ 239,000

817 Amelia Street, $239,900

Was gutted to the studs in 2004/05 and underwent a high quality renovation. 3 independent bedrooms, 2 full baths, master with whirlpool plus nice walk-in closet, off street parking in a great close to town location.

Rustic charm on this unique home fashioned from joining two separate cottages. Great flowing floor plan and with a second front door that’s great for working from home. Off street parking.

Properties For Lease and For Sale

Full Service Property Management Over 30 years of selling properties & filling vacancies!

504-736-0544

www . mauriceguillot . com

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

Shadows fall as light as feathers from the tree lined Avenue. Quality & detail are evident throughout this historic restoration. Unit A:1 BD/1BA grnd flr condo. Unit D: 2BD/2BA 2nd lvl condo. High ceil & orig wood floors. Granite counters & stainless appl in kitchen. Whirlpool tub. The pool is cool! In the trendy Treme. Bank must approve short sale.

4BR, 2.5 2 story. Heart pine & brk floors. Lg master suite w/ 2 lg walk-in closets. Delightful front porch. Corner lot, steps to the lake. REDUCED TO $399K . Jenny Matherne, J. Louis Matherne & Assoc. 504-885-8478

CAROL JAMBON, JR. LATTER & BLUM

79

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE 1122 THIRD ST #3

Renov Victorian Garden Dist condo. 2 BR, 1 BA, Chef’s kit w/Wolf Sub-Zero appl, hi ceils & wd flrs. Marble & ceramic ba w/ spa tub. Large balcony. $265,000. Sue Brausen, Latter & Blum, 504-453-1815.

1302 JACKSON AVENUE

Historic Garden District luxury renov of the finest quality. Premium finishes & fixtures. Sophisticated & tasteful choices. Call Ricky Lemann, 504-460-6340 (cell) 504-862-0100 (o) Keller Williams

1550 2ND ST. #2E

1 BR, 1BA CONDO , Large Liv/Din rm, penthouse for residents & rooftop patio overlooking city. Faces St. Charles. Streetcar at corner. $179,900. Judy Phillips, Latter & Blum, 504-669-4969 cell or 985-641-1000 (ofc).

1446 CAMP STREET Coliseum Square Condos

Greek Revival - completely rebuilt! Sold as luxury Rental 6-plex for $1,790,000 or purchase individually as 1 & 2 BR condos. Low condo fees. From $254k to $455k. Walk to St. Charles, streetcar, Coliseum Sq. or dog park. Gated pkg, fabulous floor plans, high end finishes. Shannon Sharpe Briand, Broker/Owner, Sharpe Realty, LLC. Direct: 504-616-7000; Ofc: 504-684-4448. email: Shannon@SharpeRealtyLLC. com. www. SharpeRealtyLLC.com

1539 ANNUNCIATION

Arts & Crafts cottage “Hollywood South” historic dist. 3 BR, 2 BA, Wd flrs, bonus workshop & more. Ann Farmer, deMontluzin Investments Realtors, 504-895-1493; 430-8737. www.demotluzinrealtors.com

737 Huckleberry Lane Terrytown

3 BR, 2 BA, new roof in 2011. $139,900. Jennifer Z. LeBlanc, Le Fleur De Lis Realty, LLC. Realtor/ Broker, Affordable Housing Certified. 504-975-1757. jennifer@lefleurdelisrealty.com. www.lefleurdelisrealty.com

2807 JEFFERSON AVE.

5 BR, 3BA, 2 story POOL home. Large open kitchen, spacious liv & din, large open area up & down. $449,500. Gail Ruddock, Prudential Gardner REALTORS. 504-723-6100 cell or 504-897-6000 ofc.

7608 ST. CHARLES

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT

3 BR, 3 BA Greek Revival. Totally renovated. Completely furnished including linens. $2995/mo. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504491-1591.

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT 2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furnished, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Min 1 mth. $125/day. 781-608-6115.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS CBD OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE

WESTBANK 1100 Perry St., Gretna

3 BR, 1.5 BA. Move-in Ready. $139,000. Jennifer Z. LeBlanc, Le Fleur De Lis Realty, LLC. Realtor/ Broker, Affordable Housing Certified. 504-975-1757. jennifer@lefleurdelisrealty.com. www.lefleurdelisrealty.com

1913 Bradford Pl, Harvey

4/2, 1759 sq ft. Brand new roof & siding being replaced due to hail damage. Great eat-in kit w/ island. Firepl, garden tub w/separate shower. $174,900. Beverly Rambo, Prudential Gardner Realtors 504-416-5004.

2156 Euclid St, Terrytown

Lot for sale, 6534 sq ft. $55,000. Jennifer Z. LeBlanc, Le Fleur De Lis Realty, LLC. Realtor/Broker, Affordable Housing Certified. 504-975-1757. jennifer@lefleurdelisrealty.com. www. lefleurdelisrealty.com

3436 River Oaks Dr, Algiers

3 BR, 2 BA, bonus rm, above ground POOL, sun rm. Roll-down storm shutters, security sys, home warranty incl. Never flooded. $159,900. Pat Arnold, Latter & Blum, 504-915-3184. parnold@latterblum.com

5921 St. Louis 1 Ave, Marrero Home appraised to determine listing price. Renov 4/2 home. Includes all appliances. New outside ac unit. Awesome price! $120,000. Beverly Rambo, Prudential Gardner Realtors 504-416-5004.

127 Carondelet Street Beautiful space available in downtown New Orleans. Office space includes private offices as well as cubicle space. Also includes conference room, kitchen, copy room, private restrooms, and shared reception area. 3510 sq. ft. $15psf. Lease today! Contact Josh Gertler, Basis Brokerage 504.261.8048 josh@basis-development.com

3020 VETERANS BLVD

3000 sg ft for lease off Causeway Blvd. 1 story in small strip mall. A/C, Heat and Water included in lease. Call Rick, 504-486-8951. Kirschman Realty, LLC.

CBD OFFICES FOR RENT

Individual or groups with administrative space & copier, fax, phone, computer & furniture, if needed. $500 per office per month. For information email: sybil.alexander5@gmail.com. Also please call Hayden Wren at Corporate Realty, 504/581-5005 for an update on listing effort in progress.

METAIRIE

1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable included, parking. 24 hr Concierge Service, $970/mo 914-882-1212.

ALGIERS POINT Furnished Riverfront Penthouse Perfect Corporate rental. Near Ferry. 1 month shortest term. $125/day for 2,000 sq ft, 3 BR, 2.5 BA!Pools, tennis, health club, secured pkg, wi-fi, cable util. All you need is your bag. 1st class. 781-608-6115

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BYWATER 822 FRANCE

Newly renov, 2 br, 1 ba, new kit & bath, CA & H, hdwd flrs, hi ceil, ceil fans, side yard. $975/mo. Call 201-5332.

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4228 ORLEANS AVE.

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1275/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep., No Pets. Call 225-8026554/ email dicklea@cox.net

DOWNTOWN 1327 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1100 mo. 432-7955.

MID CITY 3122 PALMYRA STREET

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $650/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

4322 HAMILTON

2BR/1BA lower, 1000 + sf, hdwd flrs, furn kit, w/d, porch, fen yd, off st pkg, no smokers, pet negot. $900/mo + dep. 488-2969

4511 CANAL ST

1 efficiency $800; One 1 bdrm. $850. On red streetcar line. Both include water. Call 504-782-6564

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

2805 Wytchwood Dr.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1050

4608 FAIRFIELD ST.

1508 CARONDELET ST- 2 APTS

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151 3 Br, 2.5 Ba. Approx 1800 sq ft. Lg fenced yard. Small pet OK $1200/mo plus deposits.. 504-442-0618

HIDDEN GEM

Chic seclusion - heart of Metairie. 1 bdrm + bonus room, from $750. Pkg-1 car., wtr pd., laundry. 780-1706 www. orrislaneapts.com

Perfect Corporate Rental

Furn 1 & 2 BR modern apts. Everything incl. Assigned parking. Wi-fi internet, cable, util. 1 BR, $1200/mo. 2 BR, $1500/mo. = From $40/day! 1 mo. is shortest term. 2325 & 2200 Pasadena Ave 504-491-1591

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Aval 9/3. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $800/mo. Util incl. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1100 Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-2396566. mballier@yahoo.com

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

2 Eff apts. Lower $650 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@ yahoo.com

GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO

Adorable gated condo. 1 bd/1ba. O/S pkng, stainless appliances & granite. Garden District Patrol. $900 including utilities. Call (504) 432-1034.

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT 1730 NAPOLEON AVENUE

1 br apt, living rm, furn kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, a/c units. Util incl. 1 blk St Charles. No pets. 251-2564

3219A PRYTANIA

Perfect for prof’, Renov Vict hse, 2br/,1 full + 1/2 ba, LR, DR, kit, wd flrs, w/i balc., appls, ca&h, security, pool privileges. $1500/mo. 813-8186 274-8075.

4917 S MIRO ST

2 BR, 1 BA, pool, cen a/h. $885 mo, water incl. Furn kit, w/d. Safe neighborhood. Call 452-2319 or 821-5567

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT 441 Gravier cor Magazine. Large 1 bdrm, 1 ba, with garage parking, huge windows, fully equippped kit, w/d. Avail Sept 1. $2035/mo. S. Talbot 504-9759763. TALBOT REALTY GROUP

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

579 S CARROLLTON

By St. Charles, Large Studio. $800/ mo utilities paid. 504-913-6999, 504259-6999

BAY ST. LOUIS, OLD TOWN

Charming Main St. Lse 1/2 Dbl hi ceil, hdwd flrs, 2/1.5, full kit, w/d, cov’d rear deck, ca & h, $1000/mo. incl wtr & lawn care. 228-466-4686

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

Weekly Tails

7823 PEARL

Close to Carrollton & St. Charles. 2 BR1A Cottage. Fenced, w&d. $1000 & dep. Call 504-891-7584, lve messge.

Kelly is a 1 1/2-year-old, spayed, Pit Bull. She’s a super-sweet, gentle, gal who LOVES to give kisses and will wiggle all day for treats. To meet Kelly or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

LUXURY APT. - HAMPSON ST

2b/1b furn, kit, w/d, cent. a/h, hrd flrs, alrm sys, 12ft ceil, off st prk, $1900/ m+deposit. Trent, 504-259-4771

RAISED COTTAGE UPPER

Deluxe furn 2 Br, w/10x12 luxury ba, cent. air, wd & tile floors, ceil fans, mini blinds, yd, screen prch, w/d, 5300 Freret at Valmont. $1200-$1400/mo incl. gas/wtr 504-899-3668

MISSISSIPPI

CBD CONDO WITH BALC

KELLY Kennel #A13478853

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

2 BR, Newly renov shotgun style $895/mo Also: Rms by week, private bath. $175/wk all util incl. 504-2020381, 738-2492.

ABBIE Kennel #A13199111

Abbie is an 11-month-old, spayed, DSH with gray/black tabby markings, a unique ring tail and white mittens. Abbie prefers to be the only kitty in the home, so all the snuggling is just for her. To meet Abbie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 16 > 2011

Exquisite condo near park & universities. 2 BR 2 BA, Back of 2nd flr - no noise from St. Charles. Large patios, designated parking space. $299,000. Call Libbie Reiss, Prudential Gardner Realtors, 504-813-1102.

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

METAIRIE TOWERS

2320 - 2322 LOWERLINE

Spacious raised basement duplex. Craftmen windows, built-ins, large balconies. Wd flrs up & down. Lg basement. Off st. pkg. $389,000. Jennifer Pearl, Realtor. Cell 504-258-5724, Ofc 488-0950. www.jennifervpearl.com

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

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Gambit- August 16, 2011