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scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“Some of my left-wing critics call me a fanatic. Well, they’re certainly right that I’m a fan. And I set my priorities that way. I sent out the following comment on social media today: ‘Will listen to President’s speech carefully . . . from my priority area for job creation, Who Dat nation. Family and friends coming over for big game. On to recovery — and super bowl!’” — Sen. David Vitter in an email and on Facebook, explaining why he was choosing to watch the opening game of the 2011 NFL season at his home in Metairie rather than attend President Barack Obama’s jobs address in Washington D.C. His plans were spoiled when Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid scheduled a last-minute floor vote requiring Vitter to remain in the Capitol.

Attack of the Kevlar Tomatoes BARRY ESTABROOK’S NEW BOOK DISHES THE DIRT ON THE MODERN TOMATO AGRIBUSINESS. BY MEGAN PECK

A

Q: I’ve been reading interviews that you’ve done for the book and reviews of the book, and you’ve likened your relationship to tomatoes to [Marcel] Proust and his madeleine. Can you describe that association? Barry Estabrook: Well, I’m talking about a good tomato, a real garden-ripe tomato — not a winter tomato. Proust tasted a madeleine, and it brought back all these memories to him. Tomatoes are a thing that I really do associate with pleasant memories from when I was

BoUQuets Ludacris

“It’s a sad commentary on the state of the Republican Party when a Republican senator whines about having to show a modicum of respect to the President of the United States, and do the job his constituents hired him — and are paying him— to do.” — Adam Jentleson, a spokesman for Reid, responding to Vitter.

In his new book Tomatoland, Barry Estabrook says he tried to answer the question: “What has industrial farming done to this thing, from a flavor point of view, from a gastronomical point of view?” younger. My father was a businessman who spent a lot of time traveling around the country, and I wasn’t a great athlete or anything, but the one thing we sort of bonded over were tomatoes. Wherever we lived and whatever the circumstances were, he’d plant a few tomatoes — half a dozen tomato plants. I can remember their smell. I remember the leaves, and their little white roots when he took them out of the container to transplant them. I remember in the heat of summer pulling a few tomatoes off the vine and eating them, and then bringing some in and serving them with a little salt and pepper. And mayonnaise. The way you talk about it, about how you can taste all the elements in the tomato, sounds like drinking wine.

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“This is not a collegial body anymore. It is more like gang behavior. Members walk into the chamber full of hatred. They believe the worst lies about the other side. Two Senators stopped by my office just a few hours ago. Why? They had a plot to nail somebody on the other side. That’s what Congress has come to.” — Rep. Jim Cooper, D-Tenn., to New York Times columnist Joe Nocera. Cooper was first elected to Congress in 1982. PAGE 12

c'est what? DO YOU AGREE WITH THE DECISION TO CLOSE CITY HALL EARLY WHEN THE SAINTS PLAY AT HOME ON A WEEKDAY?

42%

31%

YES

NO

27%

IF CITY WORKERS MAKE UP THE TIME

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

WWL-AM’s Garland Robinette admits he took a $250,000 loan from landfill owner Fred Heebe, but says he’s “done absolutely nothing wrong.” Do you believe him?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

helped collect 250,000 books for New Orleans’ Recovery School District with his “Epic Book Drive,” which he launched last spring. The rapper encouraged his fans to hold community book drives for the public schools in New Orleans and gained the support of more than 100,000 people in the process. The largest contributor was Central Bucks East High School in Doylestown, Penn., which collected 16,000 books.

Bob Hurwitz,

president of Nonesuch Records, was honored with a central walkway in his name at the newly opened Musicians’ Village Toddler Park in the Upper 9th Ward. “Hurwitz Way” is a keyboard- and treble clef-shaped path in the middle of the park. In the month after Hurricane Katrina, Nonesuch rush-recorded a benefit album, Our New Orleans, which raised $1.1 million for the New Orleans Habitat for Humanity. Nonesuch is a division of the Warner Music Group.

New Orleans cops

issued several tickets to drivers who created wakes while driving down flooded streets during Tropical Storm Lee. Laws against it had been on the books, according to Superintendent Ronal Serpas, but were publicized and enforced for the first time in years. Nothing is worse for a homeowner or renter than to escape street flooding — only to have a motorist unnecessarily push water into a dry house. If it takes a few tickets to get the message across, so be it.

Garland Robinette

failed to disclose to his listeners that his family obtained a $250,000 loan from River Birch Landfill co-owner Fred Heebe, who is now reported to be the subject of a federal investigation. Robinette also should have repaid the loan long ago. When the news broke earlier this month, Robinette promised to explain, but on his first day back on the air, the WWL-AM host whiffed. “I’ve been asked to refrain from discussing these matters,” he said. Garland the radio host wouldn’t settle for that. Neither should his listeners.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

nyone who has ever bitten into a sandwich and, on second thought, removed that sad, pink, watery slice of tomato will appreciate Tomatoland, Barry Estabrook’s new book about Florida’s tomato trade. Estabrook’s detective work started years ago on the road in South Florida. As he was driving behind a produce truck, he saw a bright green fruit break free, strike the highway and emerge intact. The food writer was shocked to see that this was a tomato, usually a soft, red fruit that splits and oozes at the slightest rough handling. That tomato led Estabrook to travel from South Florida farms to rural Peru in search of answers. In his travels, Estabrook discovered that year-round demand for the summer fruit has created a troubled tomato industry in Florida. Farmers pump the soil full of pesticides to combat the challenges of an inhospitably humid climate, and, since vine-ripened tomatoes are too delicate to withstand cross-country shipment, they’re picked well before they’re ripe and gassed with ethylene to turn them red. In Tomatoland, Estabrook uncovers a trade fueled by low prices and, alarmingly, incidents of slave labor.

09


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A good tomato, to me, is like a good red wine. Its flavors are very, very complex. That’s what I like. The sweetness and the tartness play off of each other, and all the other elements that are in a good-tasting tomato are very similar to drinking a good burgundy. In 2009 you published “The Price of Tomatoes,” an article about migrant slavery in South Florida tomato fields, in Gourmet. The book is equally concerned with the taste of the tomatoes themselves. So how did this interest come about? I first got interested in tomatoes because there were issues around the flavor. Years ago that tomato came flying at me off the truck. It hit I-75 at 60 miles per hour and I thought, “My God! These are the things that grow at home in my garden … but here they’re these rock-hard things that are hitting me at 60 miles an hour without suffering any harm!” So that’s the way that I came into it, and it was doing that that brought my attention to the labor issues. Before I realized all the labor practices existed, I [wondered]: What has industrial farming done to this thing, from a flavor point of view, from a gastronomical point of view?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

GOT

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If Florida is such a hostile environment for tomatoes, then why are we growing them here? And what are Florida farmers doing to enable these tomato crops? The reason you’re growing them there has nothing to do with horticulture and botany, and everything to do with commerce. You load a trailer up and in two days that’ll be in a supermarket or warehouse in twothirds of the country —from the East to the Midwest. That’s the only reason they’d ever grow tomatoes in a place like Florida. The problems start with the weather — the humidity. The tomato’s wild ancestors are a desert plant. They love dry, sunny weather. They hate humidity, as anyone trying to grow them in the garden in Florida will know. They’re susceptible to all sorts of funguses and wilts and rusts. There are blights and all manner of insects all year round. So from that point of view, Florida is the wrong place to grow tomatoes. In the parts of the state that tomatoes are grown, they’re grown in the sand, which has no more nutrients than the sand on Daytona Beach. Everything the plant needs, all the nutrients, have to be put in the sand and sealed under plastic. So they plant the tomatoes in this hostile sand, which doesn’t have very many nutrients, and then they cover it with plastic. Well, before the growers do anything, they go along and create the rows in the sand, and then they inject methyl bromide, which is a fumigant which kills every living organism in the soil — every germ, every bug, every bacteria. Then they put the plastic

over the plants at that point to keep the bromide in there for a couple of weeks to do its job. They also put fertilizer in. After a couple of weeks, when the soil is sterile — dead — they then poke holes in the plastic and put seedlings in. If they’re putting all these deadly chemicals into the ground to kill everything in the soil, is there any chance that the tomato plants will pick up traces of those chemicals? The USDA has found … traces of more than 30 different agricultural chemicals — I’m talking about pesticides — in supermarket tomatoes. So there are more than 30 pesticides on slightly more than half the tomatoes tested by the FDA. They have residues on them. They say that it’s not a level that’s going to hurt you.

Tomatoland: How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit By Barry Estabrook Andrews McMeel Publishing; 240 pp. So these pesticides are found on the skin of the tomatoes, and we can at least get the comfort that we’re washing part of that off. But are we really washing all of it off? According to the officials [the chemicals] are in quantities that are below those which would hurt you. They’re there, but in quantities below the threshold of being toxic … to consumers. It’s a different story if you’re in the fields picking the tomatoes. Fresh tomatoes have to be picked by hand. Machines can pick canning tomatoes, but that will bruise the fruit. What kind of lifestyle are these pickers facing? The people who pick tomatoes are at the very, very bottom of the last rung of the working poor in the U.S. You may be able to get a crummier-paying job, although I can’t think of one offhand, or you can get a harder or more dangerous job, but you’re not going to find one that combines all three in the way

that tomato harvesting does. They average about $10,000 to $12,000 a year. For a lot of hours. Yeah, but they never know. They have to be on call every day, but they might not be called. If it rains they’re sunk, and if there’s been heavy dew, they’ll keep them out in the fields until the dew dries. Also, it seems to happen almost every year now — you get a freeze, and that puts them out of work for six weeks. And on and on. So it’s erratic work that comes in fits and starts. They have to be there. They have to be available for when tomatoes need to be picked. It seems like pickers are mostly migrant workers. While out researching this book, did you get an idea of how many of the workers are here without documents? The National Farmworkers Association has an official figure of 70 percent as undocumented. That’s farmworkers overall. The whole industry is dependent on workers who are not properly documented. It’s intentional. If you don’t have the proper documentation, you’re not going to go running to the cops or screaming about somebody shorting you on your hours. ... So it’s really a business built on people who are desperate for work. [Florida] governor Rick Scott ran on a hard-line anti-immigration stance. He’s since taken heat for backing down. Might this have anything to do with agriculture companies and migrant workers? He may have taken a look across the border at what’s happening in Georgia. Florida’s agricultural sector is huge. [In Georgia] you have a situation where they had enacted one of these crazy laws, and right now there’s $300 million lost so far, with crops rotting in the fields because the workers simply — well, they are nothing if not migrant. Can migrant workers get any kind of visas? There are [H-2A] guest visas, which are like tickets to exploitation. Some of the worst exploitation and slavery cases in the country have been with people on these guest worker visas. ... The problem is that you can’t leave the farmer who hired you. So it’s not like you can leave Farmer Joe, who underpays and doesn’t house you properly, to work for Farmer Smith. So that’s not a solution. [The guest worker visa] ties you to one person, and if he chooses to be abusive, what are you going to do? Why can’t big agriculture afford to pay more for labor? [The] Florida tomato industry has been engaged in market-share war for decades. The farms are smaller than the big billion-dollar corporations they sell to. The


more scuttlebutt page 9

    “I came in third place behind Michele Bachmann  and  Ron Paul.  I  think  that’s  enough  for  any  one  person  to  endure.”  —  Former Minn. Gov. Tim Pawlenty  on  The  Colbert  Report, explaining to Stephen Colbert  why he dropped out of the 2012 presidential race after the Iowa straw poll.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

QUALIFIED QUANTITIES

12

    Voters are mad, mad, mad and they’re  looking  for  alternatives.  That’s  the  conventional  wisdom — borne out  by polling  —  but  you’d  never  know  it  from  this  week’s  filings  for  the  fall  elections.  Two  of  the  biggest  will-they-or-won’tthey  candidates  —  John Georges,  who  has  run  both  for  governor  and  mayor  of  New  Orleans,  and  former  lieutenant  gubernatorial candidate Caroline Fayard,  who had indicated some interest in running  for  secretary  of  state  —  officially  became  won’t-theys  when  they  didn’t  file for elections by the Sept. 8 deadline.  That leaves Plaquemines Parish president  Billy Nungesser  as  the  main  challenger  to  incumbent  Lieutenant  Governor  Jay Dardenne,  and  the  little-known  Tara Hollis, a teacher from Haynesville, as the  Democrats’  biggest  hope  against  Gov.  Bobby Jindal.  Seven  other  candidates  also filed to run against Jindal.     So  who’s  in  statewide?  Without  Fayard,  the  secretary  of  state’s  race  will  be a GOP clash between incumbent Tom Schedler  and  outgoing  House  Speaker  Jim Tucker  —  as  will  the  contest  for  attorney  general,  which  pits  incumbent  Buddy Caldwell  (the  state’s  most  high-profile  Dem-turned-Republican)  against  former  Rep.  Anh “Joseph” Cao,  who had also reportedly flirted with the  idea of seeking the position of Louisiana  Secretary  of  Education.  State  treasurer  John Kennedy drew no opposition, while  insurance  commissioner  Jim Donelon  was  challenged  by  political  newcomer  Donald Hodge, a Baton Rouge attorney.  Mike Strain, the incumbent Secretary of  Agriculture, drew two opponents, including  Belinda Alexandrenko,  a  perennial  statewide  candidate  running  under  the  Reform Party banner.     Many Orleans Parish officials drew no  opposition,  serious  or  token,  including  Sens. Ed Murray, Karen Carter Peterson, David Heitmeier and  Conrad Appel  (all  but  Appel  are  Democrats).  Reps.  Walt Leger III, Helena Moreno, Jared Brossett  and  Austin Badon,  all  Democrats,  will  run unopposed.      The few local horse races in the legislature were mostly due to the 2010 redistricting.  Senate  District  3  will  see  a  battle  between  two  familiar  names  when  former  city  councilwoman  and  state  Rep.  Cynthia Willard-Lewis  challenges  incumbent  J.P. Morrell  (Willard-Lewis  was elected to represent Senate District  2  last  year  when  Ann Duplessis  left  to 

join Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s administration). State Sen. A.G. Crowe will face off  against  current  Rep.  Nita Hutter for  his  seat  (both  are  Republicans).  Rep.  Neil Abramson drew three challengers, while  Reps.  Wesley Bishop  and  Jeff Arnold  drew one apiece.      Perhaps  the  biggest  surprise  was  Jefferson  Parish’s  comfort  with  its  own  status  quo,  given  the  number  of  suburban  scandals,  feuds  and  resignations  there  in  recent  years.  The  only  challenged  council  seats  are  those  with  no  incumbent,  and  only  three  legislative  incumbents (all in the House) have been  challenged. Parish President John Young,  Assessor  Thomas Capella,  Councilmen  at-large Chris Roberts and Elton Lagasse  and  Clerk  of  Court  Jon Gegenheimer drew no opposition. West Bank representatives Robert Billiot and Girod Jackson each now have a challenger, but the big  race  among  Jeff  Parish  representatives  will  be  the  clash  between  incumbent  Rep.  John LaBruzzo  and  Nick Lorusso  for the redrawn District 94 seat. Anyone  who’s  driven  down  West  Esplanade  Avenue in Metairie knows that LaBruzzo  has  had  the  “sign  advantage”  in  the  lakeside  communities  for  months,  but  Lorusso  is  certain  to  hammer  home  LaBruzzo’s  enthusiastic  support  for  the  2008  legislative  pay  raise  —  a  position  LaBruzzo  later  frantically  reversed  after  voters began a recall campaign.     Despite  some  bluff,  vague  talk  from  state Democratic Party leaders in recent  months  about  the  strength  of  their  candidates,  for  Democratic  voters  in  Louisiana,  it  was  the  expected  apocalypse  even  before  the  races  had  officially  begun.  When  a  relative  unknown  from Haynesville is the best a party can  muster against the formidable and wellfinanced  Jindal,  Democrats  have  a  right  to feel blue. “Huey Long must be turning  over in his grave,” noted an editorialist at  the conservative website RedState.      The primary is Oct. 22. — Kevin Allman

STAT oF ThE CITy

    Deputy Mayor Andy Kopplin will present a status update Sept. 13 to the Bureau  of  Governmental  Research  (BGR),  the  government  watchdog  group,  on  the  Landrieu administration’s ongoing efforts  to  reform  city  government  operations.  Kopplin is expected to measure the city’s  progress  against  a  report  produced  last  year by the Public Strategies Group (PSG).       Last  year,  Mayor  Mitch Landrieu’s  office  reached  out  to  Minnesota-based  PSG to produce a series of recommendations  for  streamlining  city  government  operations. As PSG put it in its final report,  City of New Orleans: A Transformational Plan for City Government,  released  in  March, the goal was to “conduct a diagnostic  assessment  of  the  city  organization  to  identify  opportunities  for  trans-

formational change that will increase the  organization’s  effectiveness,  efficiency,  adaptability, and capacity to innovate.”      PSG  consultants  studied  city  budgets  and  policies  and  conducted  interviews with more than 60 people in New  Orleans  —  including  politicians,  citizens  and  city  workers.  The  group  was  led  by  the  company’s  senior  partner  David Osborne.  Osborne  —  who  last  year  authored a study on California’s troubled  budget  for  the  libertarian-leaning  think  tank the Reason Foundation — is something  of  a  government  efficiency  guru  for the post-Reagan era, when politically  salable  government  reform  means  less  regulation,  smaller  public  payrolls  and,  often, increased private competition for  work  that  has  traditionally  been  performed by the public sector. 

“Huey Long must  be turning over in  his grave,” noted  an editorialist at  the conservative  website Red State.

Janet Howard.  “And  we  haven’t  really  heard too much about it lately.” Howard  tells  Gambit  she  hopes  to  hear  from  Kopplin  on  parts  of  the  PSG  report  she  said the city has yet to address, particularly the civil service recommendations.      Asked about the city’s overall status in  meeting  the  goals  in  the  plan,  Landrieu  spokesman Ryan Berni wrote in an email  that the administration had “divided into  internal  working  groups  to  begin  work  on each overall issue [identified in PSG’s  ten-point  first  phase  of  the  plan].  …We  also  have  a  group  working  on  internal  communications.  Generally,  we’re  making progress on most of these fronts.”     Landrieu  previously  worked  with  PSG  in  2005  as  the  state’s  lieutenant  governor.  He  and  then-state  Department  of  Culture,  Recreation  and  Tourism  head  Angele Davis  commissioned  the  group  to  reform  that  department’s  budgeting process. In 2007, Mayor Ray Nagin’s  administration  awarded  a  $1.1  million  city  contract  to  Philadelphia-based  municipal  advisory  firm  Public  Financial  Management  (PFM)  to  develop  a  fiveyear fiscal strategy for the city. City contract  records  show  that  PFM  brought  PSG in as a subcontractor for that work.      This year’s transformation plan, however, was not funded publicly, according to  the Landrieu administration. “Their work  was paid for by a number of community  partners  including  the  Business  Council,  Baptist Community Ministries, RosaMary  Foundation, the Urban League of Greater  New Orleans, and Loyola and Tulane universities,” Berni wrote. “It was not a contract with the City.” — Charles Maldonado

ThE FLACk Who WASN’T ThErE

    Osborne’s  assessment,  as  reported  in  March  in  The Times-Picayune:  “I  think  [the  Landrieu  administration]  inherited  the least competent city government I’d  ever  seen  in  this  country  and  the  most  corrupt  —  a  really  tough  experience.  I  just  haven’t  run  into  this  level  of  dysfunction before, and I’ve been doing this  work for almost 25 years.”     The report called for a multi-year, twophase set of strategies for the city. They  include civil service reform — a management-friendly  type  of  reform  centered  around  lifting  or  easing  rules  for  hiring  and  firing  employees;  transparency  and  accountability  improvements  —  making  public  data  more  readily  available,  in  many  cases  through  the  city’s  new  data-and-meeting  driven  “Stat”  programs  (all  under  the  umbrella  program  PerformanceStat) like the already enacted  BlightStat;  and  fewer  regulations  in  the procurement process.      “We  thought  this  was  a  very  important report,” says BGR president and CEO 

    The  Louisiana  Democratic  Party  is,  to  put  it  mildly,  in  some  disarray,  with  a  landslide of high-profile defections to the  state GOP and a dearth of candidates for  statewide office in the fall elections. But  it was still a surprise to get an email from  the  state  Dems  last  week  mourning  the  loss of Louisiana AFL-CIO president emeritus  Victor Bussie.  The  sentiment  wasn’t  surprising,  but  the  sender  was:  Kevin Franck, the pugnacious former communications director who left last May to head  up  messaging  for  the  Massachusetts  Democratic Party. Clearly the “from” line  on the email had never been updated.     So who’s been the mouthpiece for the  Dems  all  summer  —  and  who  will  be  guiding  their  public  image  and  statements through the fall elections? Gambit  sent an email to the party’s communications  office  and  heard  back  from  Renee Lapeyrolerie, the party’s executive director. “It’s me for now,” Lapeyrolerie wrote.     No official spokesperson for the state’s  Democratic Party after more than three  months, on the eve of some historic fall  elections? That explains a lot right there.  — Kevin Allman


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

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Got Gas? AmericA’s Top 10 GAs Drillers by NicholAs KusNeTz • propublicA

atural gas — often touted as an abundant, comparatively clean source of domestic energy — has come under intensifying public scrutiny in recent months, with federal regulators and reporters challenging some of the industry’s rosy business projections. The Securities and Exchange Commission is probing whether gas companies have exaggerated their reserves and adequately disclosed the risks to investors from drilling’s potential environmental damage. New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has requested similar information from several companies. Natural gas production has grown steadily in the United States since 2006, reaching new highs this year. But who are the leaders in this burgeoning field? More than 14,000 oil and gas companies, many of them small businesses, were active in the United States in 2009, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). But multinational giants like Exxon Mobil and BP now produce much of the nation’s gas. The 10 biggest drillers account for one-third of all production, data from the Natural Gas Supply Association and the EIA show. The 40 largest producers pump more than half of all domestic natural gas. We’ve compiled a list of the top 10 drillers in the country, ranked by their daily natural gas production, and pulled together some key facts about their operations. Though there are other ways to measure these companies—revenue, market capitalization, reserves—industry experts say production numbers give the best snapshot of today’s landscape and also separate drillers’ gas operations from oil. The list features both “integrated” oiland-gas giants, such as Exxon Mobil, which refines and sells gasoline around the world, and “independents,” such as Chesapeake Energy, which are primarily in oil and gas exploration and production. Though industry P.R. initiatives often emphasize independent mom-and-pop drillers, most of the companies on our list are Fortune 500 corporations. Much of the growth in gas production has come from drilling into shale formations, which provided 23 percent of the nation’s gas in 2010, according to the EIA. Our list shows how integrated behemoths have expanded into this area as production has become proven, sometimes by swallowing up independents that led the way. Last year, Exxon (No. 8 in 2009) bought XTO (No. 2 in 2009) to catapult to the top of the list. Also last year, Chevron (No. 9) bought Atlas Energy (No. 50 in 2009 and an early entrant into Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale).

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1. Exxon Mobil — The biggest natural gas producer is also the country’s biggest oil company and one of the most profitable corporations in the world. Exxon has operations in every continent but Antarctica. Its oil and gas operations range across several states, from Pennsylvania to Colorado, and Exxon also has wells in the Gulf of Mexico and off the California coast. With the purchase of XTO, Exxon produces nearly 50 percent more gas than its closest competitor. Earlier this year, Exxon began running ads touting natural gas as a safe, clean source of domestic energy. About two-thirds of the company’s domestic reserves are now in natural gas, with the rest in oil. Gas Average Daily natural Production: 3.9 billion cubic feet. Revenue, 2010: $370 billion. Reserves, 2010: 8.9 billion barrels of oil (2.3 billion in the U.S.), 2.1 billion barrels of bitumen (none in the U.S.), 681 million barrels of synthetic crude (none in the U.S.), 78.8 trillion cubic feet of natural gas (26.1 trillion in the U.S.). Executive Compensation, 2010: Rex Tillerson, Exxon’s chairman and CEO since 2006, received almost $29 million in total compensation. 2. ChEsAPEAkE EnERGy — Chesapeake calls itself the most active driller in the country, with operations in 15 states, from the Rockies to Texas to Pennsylvania. The company is a good example of how “independent” doesn’t necessarily mean small. As of last year, the company owned an interest in 45,800 wells, of which 38,900 were primarily gas wells. Chesapeake has built itself as a gas company, but it is increasingly looking for “liquids-rich plays,” according to its annual report. Gas wells generally produce oil and other hydrocarbon liquids as well in varying amounts, depending on the geologic formation. With oil prices high and gas prices low, many companies are seeking more wells that are oil- and liquids-rich, particularly in North Dakota, southern Texas and Pennsylvania. Average Daily natural Gas Production: 2.6 billion cubic feet. Revenue, 2010: $9.4 billion. Reserves, 2010: 14.3 trillion cubic feet of gas equivalent (10 percent of that is oil or other liquids, converted to the equivalent volume in gas). Executive Compensation, 2010: Aubrey McClendon, the chairman and CEO, is also the company’s founder. He has the unusual option of purchasing


#7 - GAMBIT - 09-13-2011

THURSDAYS a small stake in every well the company drills. He received $21 million in total compensation. 3. AnAdArko — Anadarko is one of the biggest independent oil and gas producers in the country, with exploration or production work in all major domestic drilling areas as well as South America, Africa, Asia and New Zealand. The company was a minority owner in BP’s Macondo well, which exploded last year, killing 11 people and spilling more than 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Worldwide, natural gas makes up just over half of Anadarko’s reserves, but 87 percent of the new wells it drilled in the United States last year were gas wells. Like many other companies, Anadarko is increasingly looking for oil- and liquidsrich production this year. Average daily natural Gas Production: 2.4 billion cubic feet. revenue, 2010: $11 billion. reserves, 2010: 749 million barrels of oil and condensate (458 million in the U.S.), 320 million barrels of natural gas liquids (307 million in the U.S.), 8.1 trillion cubic feet of gas, all in the United States. Executive Compensation, 2010: James Hackett, the chairman and CEO, received $24 million in total compensation.

5. BP — Fortune lists BP as the fourthlargest corporation in the world. The company drills in 29 countries and sells its products in 70. While BP is headquartered in London, 42 percent of the company’s assets are in the United States. BP

6. EnCAnA — Encana is one of the largest independent gas companies in the world, with operations mostly in the western United States and Canada, where it is based. The company has focused almost exclusively on gas. Average daily natural Gas Production: 1.8 billion cubic feet. revenue, 2010: $8.9 billion. Reserves, 2010: 93.3 million barrels of liquids (38.5 million in the U.S.), 13.8 trillion cubic feet of gas (7.5 trillion in the U.S.). Executive Compensation, 2010: Randy Eresman, president and CEO, received $10 million in total compensation. 7. ConoCoPhilliPs — ConocoPhillips is currently an integrated oil corporation, but it recently announced plans to split into two companies, one focused on refining, the other on production. The company has listed acquiring more shale reserves in North America among its top strategic goals over the past couple of years, and it drills in several western states as well as in Louisiana and Arkansas. It is exploring for shale gas in Poland and has operations in six continents. Average daily natural Gas Production: 1.6 billion cubic feet. revenue, 2010: $198.7 billion reserves, 2010: 3.4 billion barrels of oil and natural gas liquids (1.9 billion in the U.S.), 1.2 billion barrels of bitumen (none in the U.S.), 21.7 trillion cubic feet of gas (10.5 trillion in the U.S.). Executive Compensation, 2010: James Mulva, chairman and CEO, received almost $18 million in total compensation. John Carrig, who retired as president in March, received more than $14 million.

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8. southwEstErn EnErGy Co. — Southwestern is another independent page 16

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

4. dEvon EnErGy — Devon is an independent driller primarily active in the United States and Canada. The company is in the process of divesting operations in Angola and Brazil, its only holdings outside of North America. More than 70 percent of Devon’s U.S. reserves are in natural gas, with most of that lying in Texas’ Barnett Shale. Like its peers, however, Devon says that this year it will focus on drilling in areas rich with oil and other liquids. Average daily natural Gas Production: 2 billion cubic feet. revenue, 2010: $9.9 billion. reserves, 2010: 681 million barrels of oil (148 million in the U.S.), 479 million barrels of natural gas liquids (449 million in the U.S.), 10.3 trillion cubic feet of gas (9 trillion in the U.S.). Executive Compensation, 2010: J. Larry Nichols, the chairman, received almost $19 million in total compensation. John Richels, president and CEO, received almost $18 million.

reported a $3.7 billion loss last year after spending nearly $41 billion on cleaning up the Gulf oil spill and compensating those who were affected. The company remains primarily an oil producer, with about 40 percent of its reserves in natural gas. Average daily natural Gas Production: 1.9 billion cubic feet. revenue, 2010: $297 billion. reserves, 2010: 10.7 billion barrels of oil (2.9 billion in the U.S.), 42.7 trillion cubic feet of gas (13.7 trillion in the U.S.). Executive Compensation, 2010: Chief Executive Robert Dudley received $1.7 million in total compensation.

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wardell Quezergue: 1930-2011 egendary bandleader, producer and arranger Wardell Quezergue, who died Sept. 6 at the age of 81, made an indelible mark on New Orleans and American music. Beginning with hits in the 1950s, he became a leading architect of the New Orleans R&B sound and a fixture in the local music community. Prolific into his later years, Quezergue completed his classical A Creole Mass in 2000 and released an album in 2009. Known to many by his nickname, “The Creole Beethoven,” Quezergue enjoyed a prolific career as the producer and arranger. He wrote the classic New Orleans tune “It Ain’t My Fault” and helped engineer Professor Longhair’s “Big Chief,” the Dixie Cups’ “Iko Iko,” Jean Knight’s “Mr. Big Stuff,” and King Floyd’s “Groove Me.” Quezergue worked with artists including Fats Domino, Earl King, Dr. John, Neville Brothers, Paul Simon and Willie Nelson. Quezergue learned to play music at an early age and began writing arrangements in high school. After military service in the Korean War, he started the band the Royal Dukes of Rhythm and later was hired by Dave Bartholomew to work for Imperial Records. In the mid-1960s, Quezergue cofounded Nola Records, which released Robert Parker’s Top 10 hit “Barefootin’.” Quezergue’s wife Yoshi Tamaki Quezergue died in May. He is survived by his brother Leo, 13 children and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

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driller that focuses exclusively on natural gas. The company has operations in Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania, with most of its production coming from the Fayetteville Shale formation underlying parts of Arkansas. Average Daily Natural Gas Production: 1.3 billion cubic feet. Revenue, 2010: $2.6 billion. Reserves, 2010: 1 million barrels of oil, 4.9 trillion cubic feet of gas. Executive Compensation, 2010: Steven Mueller, president and CEO, received $5.7 million in total compensation. 9. ChEvRoN — Chevron is the secondlargest oil company in the country, and the third-biggest company overall in terms of revenue. It has been building its gas reserves recently, most notably with the purchase of Atlas Energy, an active shale gas driller. Still, more than 60 percent of the company’s worldwide reserves are in oil. The majority of Chevron’s oil and gas production comes overseas. Domestically, Chevron operates in seven states, including Pennsylvania, Texas and California, and in the Gulf of Mexico. Average Daily Natural Gas Production: 1.3 billion cubic feet. Revenue, 2010: $198.2 billion. Reserves, 2010: 6.5 billion barrels of oil and other liquids (1.3 billion in the U.S.), 24.3 trillion cubic feet of gas (2.5 trillion in the U.S.). Executive Compensation, 2010: John Watson, chairman and CEO, received $16 million in total compensation. 10. WilliAms ENERGy — Williams is an

independent producer focused largely on natural gas. It owns 13,900 miles of pipelines, which it says deliver 12 percent of the natural gas consumed in the United States. The company recently announced plans to separate its exploration and production activities from its other operations. Williams has holdings in many of the major shale basins across the country, from Pennsylvania to North Dakota to Texas. The company also owns interests in several international companies. Average Daily Natural Gas Production: 1.2 billion cubic feet. Revenue, 2010: $9.6 billion. Reserves, 2010: 4.3 trillion cubic feet equivalent (3 percent of that is oil or other liquids, converted to the equivalent volume in gas). Executive Compensation, 2010: Alan Armstrong, president and CEO, received $2 million in total compensation. Sources: The production numbers are from the Natural Gas Supply Association and reflect the average for the first half of 2011. Revenue figures are from the companies’ 2010 annual reports and reflect total revenue from all sources, not just gas production. Revenue may include sales and other income and may not be adjusted for taxes. Reserves numbers are from the companies’ annual reports. Bitumen and synthetic crude represent oil from Canadian tar sands or other unconventional reserves. The compensation information is from Forbes and Bloomberg Business Week.


clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Stubborn, Stubborn Facts

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Meanwhile, Robinette continued to rail against the eastern New Orleans dump site. Now here’s a fact that somehow has escaped the media’s attention, even though it is common knowledge: The following year, in October 2007, Robinette contracted a rare, life-threatening disease and was given less than two years to live. To make matters worse, his vocal cord was severed during a medical procedure, leaving him unable to speak. He was faced with the prospect of either dying within two years or surviving without being able to earn a living. Robinette made a decision that people facing their own mortality often make:

Clearly, Robinette had an ethical dilemma, which he should have addressed and disclosed. He turned to a passion he felt he had not fulfilled in his life, which was painting. It is undisputed that he is a gifted artist. He decided to open a studio and use his remaining time to paint, but he needed money to do that. Here’s where the media narrative picks up again. He asked several wealthy acquaintances to lend his wife money, secured by a piece of property she owns on the Northshore. He was asking a personal favor, no doubt about it, but anyone who knows anything about borrowing money knows that no bank would ever lend $250,000 to a dying man, particularly one who would not be able to work even if he survived. Fred Heebe, who has extensive real estate holdings, agreed to make the loan. This was in October 2007. Now, let’s not be naive here. While it was generous of Heebe to make the loan — interest free — he very well may

have had ulterior motives. He owns a large and very successful landfill that could have brought him even more millions had FEMA used his landfill and not eastern New Orleans. But remember: this was in October 2007, not right after the storm or in 2006. Up to then, all of Robinette’s comments on the eastern New Orleans landfill mirrored those of others in the media. Another salient fact: Heebe at that time was not under federal scrutiny. That investigation didn’t begin until about two years later, in late 2009 or early 2010. After five months off the air, Robinette not only beat the disease but also got enough of his voice back to return to the air in 2008. Now here’s where Robinette, in my opinion, made his mistakes, and they were twofold: First, as soon as possible after returning to work — or at least immediately upon learning that Heebe was in the federal crosshairs — Robinette should have gone to a bank and borrowed enough money to repay Heebe, who had become radioactive. Second, Robinette should have disclosed the loan — and its repayment — not only to his employers but also to his listeners. He failed to do either of those things, and those mistakes are now costing him dearly. But do those mistakes make Robinette a “sellout,” as some now claim? Clearly, Robinette had an ethical dilemma, which he should have addressed and disclosed. Friend or not, I cannot excuse his mistakes — but I do not join those who proclaim him a sellout. There are too many stubborn facts in the way. My other friends in the media may criticize me for taking this position, but my loyalty is not to them or even to Robinette; it is to those stubborn, stubborn facts. Which brings me back to John Adams, who was ostracized by his fellow Bostonians for defending the soldiers accused of murder. The full text of his quote is instructive: “Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.” After all the facts were presented into evidence in 1770, six of the eight soldiers were acquitted. Two were convicted of the lesser charge of manslaughter. Shouldn’t we consider all the facts in Robinette’s case as well?

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

ohn Adams famously declared, “Facts are stubborn things.” That quote came to mind as I read the various media tirades against WWL radio talk show host Garland Robinette, who is accused of selling out to wealthy landfill owner Fred Heebe Jr., who is under federal investigation, by accepting a $250,000 personal loan from Heebe. Adams’ quote comes from his impassioned closing argument in defense of eight British soldiers accused of murder during the Boston Massacre of 1770. It occurs to me that some salient facts have been consistently omitted from accounts of Robinette’s transgressions. I write this not to defend Robinette — whom I consider, by way of disclosure, a professional friend — but merely to present additional facts, to posit that even more facts may yet come to light, and to suggest that final judgment be withheld until then. First, let’s review what’s been presented thus far: Robinette rose to hero status in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. He gave voice to south Louisianans who felt abandoned by local, state and federal governments. He also took up the cause — as many in the media did, including this newspaper — of eastern New Orleans residents who, in addition to losing everything in the federal flood, suddenly found themselves living near a massive under-regulated dumpsite that was being filled daily with all manner of potentially toxic storm debris. Robinette, a veteran environmental reporter, gave voice to this particularly powerless group of New Orleanians. This was in late 2005 and 2006. Remember that, for timing is crucial in this narrative. At one point — but before the loan from Heebe — Robinette visited The Times-Picayune with an offer to turn over previously undisclosed government documents that he felt proved that the eastern New Orleans dump site would become a health hazard, possibly a Superfund site. The newspaper’s editors declined his offer, saying their reporters were already on the story. (They recently claimed that Robinette’s offer was “unusual.” I and other reporters have passed along many tips to the T-P many times, for the same reason Robinette approached them in 2006: The One Big Daily has more resources than all other area newsrooms combined. The same thing happens on a national level at The New York Times and The Washington Post.)

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all AWS LEAD TO

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sHTo P aLK

BY MARGUERITE LUCAS

SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Curve Appeal was a frustrated shopper,” says Jaclyn McCabe, owner of The Voluptuous Vixen (818 Chartres St., 529-3588; www.thevoluptuousvixen.com), explaining why she opened a clothing boutique that caters to women sizes 12 to 28. “[Before], my only option was to either buy low-quality clothing or clothing that was way too old or way too young for me,” says the tall brunette. “And [I didn’t have] a lot of options. I would go to a party and see a girl in the room with [either] the same outfit I had on or one that I had in my closet.” McCabe opened her store nearly five years ago, aiming to provide a unique, pleasant shopping experience for customers who want high-quality, well-cut garments that flatter their curves. “You can find something here to wear to a party or to work or to a Mardi Gras [celebration],” McCabe says of the store’s inventory, which ranges from jeans and dresses to lingerie. “If you shop here, you’re not going to see your (clothes) anywhere else.” The store’s elegant decor and congenial staff adds to its allure. Light teal walls Shoppers refer to Voluptuous create a calming oasis in the midst of the bustling French Quarter, and whimsical Vixen owner Jacyln McCabe as a oil paintings line the walls. McCabe and her sales associates help customers find “goddess of plus-size fashion.” the perfect articles of clothing and accessories to enhance their individual looks. “If my customers are looking for something, I try to find it,” McCabe says. “We really try to give [our customers] the boutique experience.” Fortunately, the boutique experience will not break the bank, as The Voluptuous Vixen carries merchandise in a range of prices. A bra-fitting specialist, McCabe says wearing the correct bra size can completely change your body’s appearance, and she is especially proud of the store’s wide range of bra sizes. In her stylish dress and high heels, McCabe looks like a born fashionista, but she insists this was not always the case, admitting she once hid behind indifference and the large sweatshirts and flannel shirts popularized by the grunge trend. “I would always [act] like I didn’t care about fashion because I couldn’t find it, and it was easier than crying in the dressing room,” McCabe says. “But there’s no crying in my dressing room.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

Fat Hen = Award Winning BBQ

From 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, the Metairie location of HEMLINE (605 Metairie Road, Suite B, Metairie, 309-8778; www.shophemline.com) hosts a Fashion Night Out in conjunction with SNAP (617 Metairie Road, Metairie, 849-9988) and MIRABELLA (605 Metairie Road, Suite C, 828-3888). There will be a DJ, refreshments, raffles, discounts and trunk shows by Bijoux Jewelry and Pearl Southern Couture.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

NEW BAG

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Gambit’s first-ever New Music Issue features some young faces as well as some more seasoned ones, but they’re all aiming to hit the big time — jumping to larger labels, working with new groups and releasing new music. At just 18 years old, Kourtney Heart has already been working on music for seven years. Signed to Jive Records last year, she’s poised to reach ever bigger national audiences. King Louie Bankston is a familiar face to local rock fans, and now, together with the Missing Monuments, he’s set to claim the mantle of Southern power pop. Punkers the Small Bones also are getting buzz from media exposure. And hip-hop group the Rap Pack features a collection of seasoned performers banding together as the city’s newest crew of rappers. Indie rockers Big History and Empress Hotel also are making waves with new music. Chosen from across the spectrum of New Orleans music, these are bands you’re sure to hear more from soon.

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COLOR The Rap pack

By Charles Maldonado

make sure (for) the people that doubt that title, we have to live up to that title. “ That means two things for the Rap Pack. One is demonstrated skill, which Suit Music Vol. 1 — a mixtape with a few originals but mostly a collection Rap Pack vocals over some of their favorite artists’ music — more than accomplishes that with its catchy, radio-friendly singles “Ooh La La La” and “Dead Presidents,” and its more cerebral lyrical showcases like “Johnny Blaze” and “Alpha Numerics” — the latter featuring dizzyingly fast, intelligent word (and number) play by Gates, Luck and The Show. The group also is aiming for national exposure. There are precedents for New Orleans rap groups making it big, most notably the Hot Boys and the 504 Boyz, but Luck says the Rap Pack is aiming even higher than that. “In my eyes, we can be the biggest group to ever come out of New Orleans,” he says. The single “I’m Feeling Like” is tentatively set for release this week on RapPack.net and WeArePSP.com, Cooper says.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

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he Rap Pack — formed late last year by emcees Dappa, Y. Luck, The Show and K. Gates plus producer Lovel “U-P “ Cooper — is a concept supergroup, the concept being that it’s loosely modeled after entertainment’s most famous and de facto supergroup. “Basically, Y. Luck — it was his idea,” K. Gates says. “He had this idea about having a group called the Rap Pack, a hip-hop group modeled after the Rat Pack.” The group performs, at the very least, in suits and ties, and just as often in tuxedos, as in the music video for the most recent single “Ooh La La La.” The upscale “jazz persona” as Show describes it, reinforces the Rat Pack image and the band hopes it will help the group reach a broader audience. The group already has a built-in local audience. Each emcee already has an impressive resume as a solo artist, hence the supergroup concept. “I’m definitely comfortable with that,” K. Gates says, half-jokingly. “The point is, not only am I comfortable with that, I want to

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Big History By Noah BoNaparte pais

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

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eg Roussel has something to confess. “I’m a history nerd,” she says over coffee at Rue de la Course on Magazine Street. It’s lunchtime on a late August Tuesday, and Roussel has sneaked away from her day job as a curator at the National World War II Museum, where she’s currently planning her first major exhibition. Clad in neatly pressed khakis and a polo shirt, Roussel, 24, looks like your everyday academic. Concertgoers in New Orleans may know her as another kind of exhibitionist: the sultry, smoky-voiced electro lounge singer at the center of the pop band Big History, cradling a microphone and moaning seductions like “The heart is an army and all of its guns are drawn” from behind mirrored shades. Don’t be fooled, Roussel says. It’s a disguise. “I’m so not a performer,” she says. “It’s why I wear those glasses — my eyes are closed under there. People are like, ‘You need to look at people.’ I’m like, ‘I don’t want to look. I don’t want to see how many people are there.’” Big History formed in early 2010, unveiling its live set to a packed house at Carrollton Station in September. A melange of veterans from other Crescent City rock outfits (Silent Cinema, Antenna Inn, Rotary Downs), the incipient six-piece had one rookie: its frontwoman, staring out at almost everyone she knew. “I was terrified,” Roussel says with a shiver. It didn’t show. Where most bands wobble through their debut like a toddler learning to walk, Big History didn’t miss a click. Singer/ songwriter Matt Glynn fingered synthesizers and triggered samples from a deck of electronics at stage left, while guitarist Blandon Helgason and bassist Cory Schultz injected organic countermelody and thrummed steady rhythms from stage right. But Roussel was the eye magnet. Halfway through the short set — the band only had four songs — she was jumping up and down, feeding off the crowd, a natural performer born onstage. She still isn’t buying it. “I hate that feeling,” Roussel says with a laugh. “I had always been writing (music). It was, for me, my little therapy. I never intended to play in front of people.” Her initial opportunity actually came earlier in 2010, with Empress Hotel, another pop group that rose from the ashes of Silent Cinema and Antenna Inn. After a solo show at the inaugural Foburg Music Festival in March, Roussel says, Helgason approached her with an unexpected offer. “This was right when I had been kicked out of Empress Hotel — but I didn’t know that yet. ‘So, now that you’re not in Empress Hotel anymore ...’ I went, ‘What?’ ‘Just wondering if you’d like to be in our band.’ I was like, ‘Well, hell yeah. Hell yeah, I’ll be in your band.’” Any hard feelings dissolved with the success of both bands. Roussel and Schultz hit the road this month with Empress Hotel to play the Hopscotch Music Festival in

Raleigh, N.C., and Big History closes out September with a gig at Eiffel Society (Friday Sept. 23) before going into brief hibernation in advance of its debut EP release party, scheduled for Nov. 19 at One Eyed Jacks. The record has five tracks, all familiar to Big History fans: leadoff charge “Wardrum,” the slick, love-is-a-battlefield first single, all percolating synths and urgent yearns; live staples “Every Bone,” “All at Once” and “Wolf Blood,” inflated and rerecorded from their spare MySpace demo versions; and “Baby,” a Roussel ballad fleshed out in shiny metallics by Glynn and Helgason. Amid a flurry of whirring computer effects and precise metronomic beats, her voice is the most striking instrument, husky and deprived, Kathleen Turner as a dance-pop Fembot. “I keep getting compared to Adele,” Roussel says. “I don’t see it. When I first recorded ‘Every Bone,’ whenever we went to play it live, it sounded totally different. I think I went into it using my little folk voice. ... I haven’t found all that I can do. We haven’t pushed it yet.” The band takes inspiration from self-made Internet sensation The Weekend, whose single “Wicked Games” was the skeleton for a recent Big History video shoot at Eiffel. “Like, how on earth did this dude do this?” Roussel starts, and then stops. “I’m a little scared to tell you about it because there’s a lot of cursing in it, and I’m really worried my job’s going to hate me.” It might be time to add a fake mustache to those shades.

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COLOR KourtnEy HEart E

Magnolia Shorty, who was murdered in December 2010. “(Working with Magnolia Shorty) was amazing. She was such a sweet and humble person,” Heart says. “She was so outgoing in her music, but just as a human she was just shy, cool, down to earth.” While the beat and Magnolia Shorty’s verses in “My Boy” give the track its unmistakable New Orleans bounce sound, Heart’s other music pulls from a wide range of influences. Heart says she doesn’t really listen to the radio — though she admires R&B radio queens Beyonce, Kerry Hilson and Rihanna — and instead seeks inspiration from gospel groups like the Inspirations and the soul of the Temptations. More obvious influences include ’90s singers Brandy and Aaliyah (who also was on Jive at one point), with whom Heart shares a similar sweet-butstreet aesthetic. Vocally, there’s hints of Destiny’s Child-era Beyonce, and a recent YouTube video of Heart covering Adele’s soulful “Rolling in the Deep” during a performance at the club Vaso shows her range and maturity. “I do see my sound evolving a lot. I study so many genres of music,” she says, “I was signed (to Jive) as an R&B and pop artist, but I don’t see myself as just those two genres of music.” Heart has the look of her radio-pop idols: She’s tall and pretty with dark, almond-shaped eyes. When she talks about singers she admires, she talks a lot about their songs’ arrangements and production, demonstrating a well-rounded knowledge of music and the hands-on approach she takes with her songs (she has some co-writing and co-arranging credits on Eye Dee Kay). While she’s mostly focusing on performing and promoting “My Boy” at the moment, she’s also working on new music she hopes will express the more grownup side she’s ready to debut.

“The stuff that I’m working on now, I’m handson,” she says. “I’ve learned a lot about being in the studio — I live in the studio, I guess you could say — … and I’m actually arranging and producing my music now, and also writing like I had been before. I’ve been getting more hands on with how I want the sound to come out. I feel that my fans will really see the growth, because it’s coming from me.” page 28

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

ver since signing to Jive Records — the label behind a slew of successful pop, hip-hop and R&B acts since the 1980s — New Orleansbased singer Kourtney Heart has learned there’s much more to being a singer than just singing. Participating in Jive’s two-month artist development program, Heart got a crash course in what it takes to be a pop artist. “I thought I could just get onstage and sing my heart out, but I learned different techniques of singing — I learned things as small as how to hold a microphone, how to put the microphone on the mic stand, how to walk away from the mic stand, about working out, and how to work out while I’m singing,” she says. “Oh man, it was amazing. So many little things.” Eighteen-year-old Heart says ever since signing to Jive in September 2010 she has “been moving on a train that is nonstop,” and her days are filled with traveling, doing shows in local venues and working in the studio. Before the record deal, Heart had a minor hit in her bubblegum-bounce single “My Boy,” which features the late Cash Money Records artist Magnolia Shorty. The song got radio play in New Orleans and across the South (“Even some people in California said they heard it,” Heart says) and got the attention of Jive, but Heart says the music she’s working on now has a much more grown-up sound. “It’s nothing like ‘My Boy’ … I can tell you ‘My Boy’ was just a fun, young Kourtney trying to get her name out,” she says. “I recorded ‘My Boy’ when I was about 16.” Heart has been performing around the city since she was 11, and at age 13 connected with local hip-hop DJ Raj Smoove — who is currently her manager — to record a 90-second demo of Heart singing the National Anthem in hopes of singing at New Orleans Hornets games. The two continued to collaborate, and during Heart’s senior year at Edna Karr High School they recorded her first album Eye Dee Kay (that’s “IDK,” or “I don’t know,” in Internet parlance). The album includes the R&B-flavored unrequited high school crush anthem “Spell it Out” and the breakthrough single “My Boy” with

Photo By CheryL GerBer

By Lauren LaBorde

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page 27

DIY CItY By Alex WoodWArd

Small Bones gained attention with their 2010 self-titled album.

N Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

Ruby Slippers Music Box

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ew Orleans took to punk rock as soon as it made waves in the late 1970s and early ’80s, but it wasn’t fertile ground — bands and the venues that supported them fizzled out. Metal boomed, however, and by the mid-’90s, a growing horde of New Orleans teenagers were putting on do-it-yourself punk shows in makeshift all-ages venues and punk houses. It was a small scene compared to the Fugazi-championed one in Washington, D.C., and more-populated, less-isolated enclaves in California and elsewhere. It was there before the postHurricane Katrina rock “revival” and renewed interest in “indie rock,” and it’s still there. “When I was 18, I was going to a show — even in high school, I’d go to shows, even on weeknights. Now I barely go to shows,” says Eric Martinez, pushing up his thick-frame glasses under a freshly shaved head. “With out of town bands, all the time. Now it’s just big clubs.” Halfys is the latest in a string of bands Martinez has started since the late ’90s, when he and drummer Stephen Roussel co-founded the seminal New Orleans punk band Hatchback. Halfy’s is their third band together, and they are joined by bassist Melissa Guion. “I feel what we play is exactly the same as Hatchback,” Martinez says. “One of the songs is a song Hatchback wouldn’t play.” (“What’s different about Halfys is we’re just like, ‘Eh, whatever,’” Roussel says.) Instead of the start-stop, jittery adolescent punk

of other ’90s-influenced outfits, Halfys rely on near-sloppy riffs and propulsive rhythm, with Guion’s vocals ringing clearly above the racket. Martinez’s infamous feedback is scaled back, leaving jangling or charging guitars. The former Hatchback song, Guion notes, is dissonant only in its beginning. “Then it’s like a classic rock song. It’s like Boston,” she says with a laugh. “We are the Boston of New Orleans.” Martinez and Roussel met in high school, when Martinez answered an ad in a Werlein’s music store on the West Bank. “We were looking for a girl bass player, and Eric was the only one that responded,” Roussel says. “The flyer said like, ‘Do you like Smashing Pumpkins, Foo Fighters, Nirvana?’ I was like, ‘Yeah!’” Martinez says. “Then it said, ‘Do you play bass?’ I was like, ‘Yeah!’ Want to be in a band? Are you a girl? I took it anyway. I meet most of these things, so, maybe they’ll let me have at it.” The two later created Hatchback, whose members would help spawn dozens of bands, including seminal New Orleans hardcore outfit Dear Diary I Seem To Be Dead and Gathered Here, among others formed in the early 2000s. During that period, Martinez joined Red Beards, Promis and Secret Passage, all typically featuring his screeching guitar (or flailing drums). Bands broke up, others formed, and following Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures, bands dispersed. Some returned, but many called it quits.

The short-lived Rougarou featured Martinez on drums, Guion on bass, Adam Beebe on guitar and Paul Thibodaux. It self-released a seven-song demo (packaged, on tape, in wood blocks) and parted ways in 2009. Martinez and Guion regrouped with Roussel as Halfys and recorded an EP at A Studio in the Country in Bogalusa. The EP, Half, made its digital debut in July. Following the split of Rougarou, Beebe joined Opposable Thumbs, which revisited melody- and punk-driven ’90s alternative rock, much like the band’s familiars Lovey Doveys. Halfys’ contemporaries Small Bones — hailing from New Orleans via Norco and the east and west coasts — landed on the August 2011 cover of longtime national punk ’zine Maximumrocknroll. That feat likely had to do with the band’s 2010 self-titled album, released by PlanIt-X, an infamously, fiercely DIY label and one of the last vestiges of independent punk (it launched the recording careers of Against Me!, Japanther and dozens of others). The album walks a thin, brittle line between anthemic pop and chaotic hardcore, but it’s all parts full-throttle and playful urgency. Darin Acosta’s and Nathan Jessee’s dueling guitars aren’t guttural, chugging monsters but are bright and wide-open against call-andresponse, shouty vocals and breakneck drums. The album received thumbs up throughout the punk press, and a 2011 summer tour ended this month.


COLOR King LouiE BanKston and thE Missing MonuMEnts By Will coviello

K

ing Louie Bankston has performed in many notable bands over the past 20 years, including the Royal Pendletons, the Persuaders, the Exploding Hearts, the Black Rose Band and the King Louie One Man Band. But with the Missing Monuments’ first album, Painted White, he’s hit a milestone: It’s the first album he’s truly happy with. “It’s all there,” he says. “(My bands) have had albums where the lyrics were all there, but we recorded in a bathroom. Or sometimes I was in the studio but I didn’t have all the nuts and bolts together. This has all of it.” The South’s king of power pop, Bankston wanted Painted White to have a clean, solid sound, so after recording it in a house in late 2009, he spent five months in a TV studio mixing the final cut (just released in June 2011). “I didn’t want a low-fi garage-y sound,” he says. “You can listen to it low and it’s clear. But when you turn it up, it doesn’t get fuzzy, it just gets louder. You can go to 11 and it’s clear.” The album opens with the slick pop tune “The Girl of the Nite.” “(The sound) is pure pop bubblegum,” Bankston says. “It’s not me just growling,” he adds, referring to his typically more gritty and aggressive lyrics. The album loosens up with more raucous tunes such as “(It’s Like) XTC” and Bankston’s favorite, “Dance All Nite.” The Missing Monuments, are getting ready to record a three-song EP before touring the East Coast starting in November.

Kynt

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E

lectronic house music is not New Orleans’ best known export. Kenneth Bryan, known as Kynt, may be New Orleans’ only documented male house singer. “My version of house is repetitious but complex,” Kynt says. “It’s vocal, tribal, with full choruses, storylines and plots based on my personal experiences.” Unlike many artists, says Kynt, “I write and sing songs.” Kynt also is a trained dancer. He studied ballet at Loyola University. That training gives him something many electronic artists lack: stage presence. “My shows are full of real singing and dancing,” he says. “And big elaborate costume changes.” Bryan had a rocky childhood and lived at Father Flanagan’s Boys’ Town. He was a drum major and choreographer for his high school marching band, and he snuck out at night to go

to now-defunct black, gay dance clubs. On the dance floor he discovered himself and his talents. In 1992, Kynt began recording and performing his own high-energy dance music, mixing house with a little R&B. Kynt was one of the first MP3.com artists to reach No. 1 on its charts. Inclusion on a compilation by EMI Germany led to prominent use by DJs Junior Vasquez and Roger Sanchez, who spun Kynt’s underground hits including “Show Da DJ Some Luv,” “Adrenaline” and “Makes Me Hot.” Following the success of those songs, Kynt moved to New York, but it wasn’t the perfect fit he expected. “I found it was easier to do all my music here in New Orleans and then just fly up there,” he says. After he returned home, Kynt learned a hard lesson about the competitive nature of the business. “I had gone to Brazil to record five demo songs,” he says. “Soon after, (Brazilian duo) Altar and Jeanie Tracey re-recorded one of those songs, ‘Party People,’ without my permission.” The song hit the Billboard charts, and found its way onto more than 20 compilations. “It was like watching my dream come true, but for someone else,” he says. “And that really made me reclusive for a while.” Kynt settled down in New Orleans as a ballet and hip-hop dance instructor at the Lighthouse for the Blind, as well as for Loyola University, New Orleans Ballet Association and several other organizations. “I purposefully tried to keep myself out of music, for healing purposes,” he says. “I didn’t want to perform at all.” Only recently has Kynt, now 36, returned to the stage for performances at Oz and a benefit show at The Howlin’ Wolf. Kynt will perform several shows in November to celebrate his self-released comeback album The Whole World is a Stage.

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RAISING THE

BAR FUN FACTS ABOUT THE BARS WE LOVE. BY WILL COVIELLO, KANDACE POWER GRAVES, LAUREN LABORDE, CHARLES MALDONADO, MISSY WILKINSON AND ALEX WOODWARD P H OTO S BY C H E RY L G E R B E R

I

The Warehouse District music destination 12 Bar on Fulton (608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola. com) is housed in a former coffee warehouse. Its name alludes to the chord progression popularized by 12-bar blues. Ancient Babylon was famous for its hanging gardens, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Robert Burke, owner of Babylon Music and Sports Bar (2917 Harvard Ave., Metairie, 324-9961; www.babylonsportsbar.com) shares the Babylonians’ interest in horticulture. Along with the Babylon, he owns Warrior Services LLC, a lawn maintenance company in Metairie. Banks Street Bar & Grill (4401 Banks St., 4860258; www.banksstreetbar.com) wears its love for

If you can’t get enough trivia, join Gambit at the Rusty Nail for a trivia contest from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 12. The quiz will cover categories including New Orleans food, entertainment, current events and more (things you read about in the pages of Gambit). Prizes include a set of two tickets to Voodoo Music Experience, a $100 gift certificate to Chop House and other good stuff. Hint: You might want to study this list.

a diversity of music on its sleeve, with a collection of album covers and vintage guitars hanging on the walls. There’s local music every night — ranging from singer-songwriter sets to rollicking indie bands — and there’s never a cover charge. The bar is open 24/7. The renovated deck and lush landscaping alone are worth a trip to Bayou Beer Garden (326 N. Jefferson Davis Pkwy., 302-9357; www.bayoubeergarden.com), then there’s also the long menu of beers from around the world (and a fully stocked bar), and the eight large plasma TVs for watching the Saints and LSU. Bayou Park Bar and Grill (542 S. Jefferson Davis Pkwy.,n.a.) — formerly the Delta Blues bar — showcases both musical legends, such as Walter “Wolfman” Washington, and talented newcomers. The bar recently unveiled a new coconut drink served in a 16-ounce coconut cup that customers get to keep. At barely 6 months old, the bar was voted one of New Orleans’ top 10 bars by Gambit readers. The Beach House (2401 North Woodlawn Ave., Metairie, 456-7470) bar, restaurant and karaoke club was one of the first restaurants in Metairie to open after Hurricane Katrina, and many of its customers were military personnel, firefighters and police assisting with the recovery. The bar still offers a 25 percent discount to all men and women in uniform. The building housing Blue Nile (532 Frenchmen St., 948-2583; www.bluenilelive.com) was constructed in 1832 and is one of the oldest structures in the Marigny. In the early days of the Frenchmen Street music scene, it was the Dream Palace where the Radiators got their start. Today everyone from new brass bands to musical legends perform here. Boomers (Boomtown Casino, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www. www.boomtownneworleans.com/boomers-nightclub.aspx) covers a lot of taste bases with its signature Boomtown Bomb, exploding with a variety of flavors from the Hurricane

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

n New Orleans we are passionate about our history and rarely pass up opportunities to tell people what we know about the city we love. We never tire of learning tidbits about our streets, our buildings, people who have lived here and those who have visited. We keep our history alive by telling its tales over and over — and quizzing our companions about them. Here is some fuel for the next round of trivia — focusing on New Orleans music clubs:

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VOICE OF THE WETLANDS ALL-STARS I S A C R A S H C O U R S E I N L O U I S I A N A’ S R I C H M U S I C A L H I S T O R Y.

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THE VOICE OF THE WETLANDS ALL-STARS ARE TAB BENOIT, DR. JOHN, CYRIL NEVILLE, ANDERS OSBORNE, GEORGE PORTER JR., BIG CHIEF MONK BOUDREAUX, JOHNNY VIDACOVICH, JOHNNY SANSONE, AND WAYLON THIBODEAUX.

“Box of Pictures” CO-WRITTEN BY ALLEN TOUSSAINT, CYRIL NEVILLE, AND WAYLON THIBODEAUX.

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PROCEEDS BENEFIT VOICE OF THE WETLANDS. VISIT WWW.VOICEOFTHEWETLANDS.ORG OR LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY TO PURCHASE YOUR COPY! BE THEIR VOICE -DO YOUR PART IN HELPING TO PRESERVE LOUISIANA’S WETLANDS.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

FEATURING ALLEN TOUSSAINT, KIRK JOSPEH, AND MITCH WOOD. WITH THE TITLE TRACK,

33


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 43 49 52 57 61 67 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< SEPT >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > DRALION << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < Cirque du Soleil’s Dralion is a vibrantly colored >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> vision of East meets West. Set against a story of mankind seeking balance and harmony with the four eleSept. 15-17 ments, a mythical hybrid Ponderosa dragon/lion roams as the Stomp Music troupe performs tradiFestival tional Chinese acrobatics 907 S. PETERS ST., and clowns in the elegant 522-9653; WWW. Cirque du Soleil style. THEHOWLINWOLF.COM Tickets $45-$111.50 (includes fees). 7:30 p.m. Wed.-Fri., 4 TICKETS $40-$50 PER p.m. Sat., 8 p.m. Sun. New NIGHT Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod Music St., (800) 745-3000; Conference & www.cirquedusoleil.com Clandestine

14

Celluloid Film Series RENAISSANCE ARTS HOTEL, 700 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 613-2330 WWW.PONDEROSASTOMP.COM

Guitar “Lightnin’” Lee plays at the Ponderosa Stomp.

Stomp Collection

PHOTO BY EDGAR MATA

THE PONDEROSA STOMP CELEBRATES ITS 10TH ANNIVERSARY BY KEN KORMAN

T

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival’s two weekends. “We decided it would be better to have our own weekend and not compete with anything else,” Padnos says. “In the long run, it will develop into more of a destination event.” The festival added the Ponderosa Stomp Music Conference in 2008. “During the day you learn where the music came from, and at night you see it in action,” Padnos says. “It works really well.” Padnos is particularly proud of this year’s panel called “Advocating for New Orleans’ Musical Treasures.” “The panel will address the big problem of New Orleans preserving its musical landmarks and promoting them for music tourism, which hasn’t been done here like it has in Austin and Nashville,” Padnos says. “Obviously jazz has played an important role here, but it never sold as many records as rhythm and blues. New Orleans has not really embraced its rock ’n’ roll history head-on. There should be tours, and the city should be playing this up. Hopefully this will be the start of some serious discussion.” This year’s Stomp features a tribute to New Orleans’ R&B studio kingpin Cosimo Matassa, featuring Allen Toussaint and Dave Bartholomew; an Excello Records tribute starring Classie Ballou, Carol Fran and Lazy Lester; and a full-fledged Stax Records-Memphis soul revue. Padnos rejects the idea that the Stomp is crafted mainly for record collectors. “You can take anybody to the Stomp,” he says. “I tell people this: Just come. You’ll know the songs. People are always amazed that they do.” PAGE 40

SEPT

THE CAROLINA CHOCOLATE DROPS

SEPT

CHROMEO WITH MEYER HAWTHORNE

SEPT

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Southern Rep opens its season with God of Carnage by Yasmina Reza (Art). Two sets of parents meet to resolve a conflict between their 11-year-old sons but soon find themselves embroiled in their own childish feud. Tickets $20-$35. The Krewe of Satyricon hosts Wednesday’s performance. Call 525-4498 for tickets to that show only. Opening night is Saturday. 8 p.m. Wed.-Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. Southern Rep, The Shops at Canal Place, 365 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com

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A tribute to 1930s string band The Tennessee Chocolate Drops and innumerable roots musicians, The Carolina Chocolate Drops — an old-timey trio from Durham, N.C. — augment their Grammy-winning, pickin’-and-singin’ 2010 debut Genuine Negro Jig (Nonesuch) with ragtime and blues multi-instrumentalist Hubby Jenkins and Carnegie Hall beatboxer Adam Matta. Meschiya Lake and the Little Big Horns opens. Tickets $16. 9 p.m. Wednesday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 8958477; www.tipitinas.com

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Eighties-awakening Canadian space-funk duo Chromeo was born in the wrong decade, in the wrong country and on the wrong planet. The funniest thing about the Astroglide pickup lines, Casiotone sound effects, chintzy beat machines and talkboxed interjections of 2010’s Business Casual (Big Beat) is that they aren’t remotely joking. Michigan soul man Mayer Hawthorne opens. Tickets $25. 8 p.m. Sunday. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

enth anniversaries don’t always come easy. It’s no coincidence that 10 years of marriage are commemorated as the “tin” or “aluminum” anniversary, symbolizing how flexible and durable anything must be to last a decade. While it’s hard to imagine the free-spirited Ponderosa Stomp as anything but a swinging single, the annual New Orleans roots-music festival celebrates 10 unlikely years of perseverance this weekend at Howlin’ Wolf. In addition to two nights of music, there is a conference with musician interviews and panel discussions and the Clandestine Celluloid Film Series (see p. 49). Over its first 10 years, the Stomp has grown over time while remaining true to its original ideals, says founder Ira “Dr. Ike” Padnos. “The mission of the Stomp has always been to celebrate the legacy, preserve the history, and revitalize the careers of American music and musicians,” Padnos says. “Basically it’s a festival of unsung heroes, unrecognized influential bands, one-hit wonders and sidemen. Never in my wildest dreams did I expect it to last this long. When we first started out, I was happy doing a show every once in a while at the Circle Bar.” The years have brought a number of venue changes for the Stomp, plus a one-year “Stomp in Exile” Memphis edition after Hurricane Katrina. The Stomp also organizes regular programs at the SXSW Conference in Austin and at Lincoln Center in New York City, giving it a national presence. Last year Padnos and company moved the annual festival to September. Previously the Stomp had filled the gap between the

GOD OF CARNAGE

39


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Sat • Sept 17

The Don Vappie Trio 9:30PM

Call for details

DINNER AND ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY

830 conti st. (in the prince conti hotel) 504.586.0972 • 800.699.7711

www.thebombayclub.com dinner & music nightly

validated parking (at Iberville & Dauphine)

40

Proof of this will likely be found in Saturday night’s Bo-Keys Tribute to Stax Records and Memphis Soul. It features singers William Bell, Eddie Floyd, Sir Mack Rice and Otis Clay. Bell, in particular, is hailed as one of the true architects of the Stax sound, as both a singer and a songwriter responsible for such indelible classics as “Born Under a Bad Sign” and “You Don’t Miss Your Water.” For Bell, it’s all about the melting pot of local sounds he and his collaborators stirred up in the 1960s and early ’70s. “There is actually a Stax sound,” Bell says. “It’s hard to pinpoint, but it’s a combination of gospel, blues, country-andwestern — and then some jazz thrown in. These are all influences we had as youngsters coming up in Memphis.” Bell points to the ’60s Stax house band — otherwise known as Booker T. & the MGs — as final proof. “You had Steve [Cropper] and Duck [Dunn], who came out of what you might call a rockabilly band, and Al Jackson, his dad had a jazz-blues Count-Basie-type band. Booker came right out of church. And the singers — we were all schooled in the church.” Bell also can attest to the authenticity of Stomp regulars the Bo-Keys, a band that features a variety of Memphis musical heroes including trumpet player Ben Cauley, who survived the plane crash that took Stax’s biggest star, Otis Redding, in 1967. This year the Bo-Keys will provide the foundation for the Stomp’s Stax tribute. “They have captured more of that sound than any other instrumental group since the ’60s,” Bell says. “It’s an organic thing.” The multi-racial make-up of the Bo-Keys signifies another key factor that led to the magic created at Stax. It also points to larger, non-musical trails blazed by the label during the pre-Civil Rights era, and to yet another legacy worth celebrating this weekend. Some historians argue Stax was the first fully integrated company in

Legendary New Orleans musician and producer Dave Bartholomew speaks on a panel at the Ponderosa Stomp Music Conference. PHOTO BY EDGAR MATA

America, from the time it was founded in 1961. “Stax was situated right in the heart of the ghetto in Memphis,” Bell says. “But inside that building we didn’t think of color. We only thought about what each person brought to the table in terms of musical ability. The execs, the office help, the musicians, the backup singers — everything was integrated. When you think back on it, it’s amazing.” But, according to Bell, reality set in as soon as Stax employees stepped outside. “The police would sit across the street in the parking lot of the Big Star grocery, wait for us to come out after a session and drive across the street just to harass us. It was ‘Up against the wall’ and ‘What are you doing here at night?’ Just because there were blacks and whites coming out of the building, shaking hands and saying good night. We fought against this, and we were instrumental in changing a lot of attitudes in and around Memphis, and actually throughout the South.” Times certainly have changed, but the 72-year-old Bell — who now has his own Atlanta-based label, Wilbe Records, along with a stable of promising young artists— remains devoted to the romantic ballad. And Bell likely will acquire some new fans on Saturday night, just as he always has. “Kids are usually amazed we are producing these sounds live,” he says. “We’re not sampling, it’s not a computer. To them it’s a new sound, even though it’s been around for 50 years. But for people like me, it’s just doing what I do.”


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Gambit > Menu guide > september 2011

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2

SAL ADS CHICKEN SALAD $4.49 TUNA SALAD $4.49 POTATO SALAD $3.99 CHEF SALAD $6.99 CUCUMBER TOMATO SALAD $3.99 QUINOA TABOULI $6.99 PASTA SALAD $3.99 MAC & CHEESE $3.99

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CHECK OUT OUR GRILLED AHI TUNA SPINACH SALAD ....................................$11.79 Ahi Tuna placed on baby spinach w/ mandarin oranges, grape tomatoes, sprouts and almonds, tossed with a mango pepper jelly vinaigrette

HERE ARE A FEW

NEW MENU ITEMS

REUBEN DELI SANDWICH.........................$9.99 Corned Beef sliced thin & served piled on Rye w/ swiss cheese, sauerkraut & 1,000 island dressing. Served w/ coleslaw GRILLED PORTOBELLO SANDWICH........$8.99 Marinated & Grilled Portobello Cap topped w/ melted Havarti, pesto aioli, baby spinach & sliced tomatoes on a toasted Ciabatta roll. Served w/ fries. SHRIMP REMOULADE WRAP....................$10.29 A New Orleans classic of cold boiled shrimp, remoulade sauce, baby spinach, diced tomatoes, red onions in a tortilla wrap. Served w/ fries CAJUN BURGER.............................................$9.49 Spicy Patty made w/ a blend of Hot Sausage & Ground Beef. Topped w/ our cool & crunchy cajun coleslaw & Zydeco sauce. Served on a Sweet Jalapeno Cheddar Bun.

Tuesday through Saturday

WE TAKE RESERVATIONS SAMPLE LUNCH MENU

SOUPS AND SALADS

DEEP FRIED OYSTER PO-BOY

CHICKEN & ANDOUILLE

Seasoned Louisiana Oysters Lightly Battered, Fried until Crispy on the Outside and Juicy on the Inside. Served on 8” French Bed with our Oyster Mayo $13.50

GUMBO TURTLE SOUP

632 S. CARROLLTON IN RIVERBEND

866-9741 8859 VETERANS BLVD. NEAR DAVID DR.

461-9840 WWW.OHENRYS.COM

DANCING SHRIMP SALAD Fresh Butterflied Shrimp Battered with Almond Flour, Fried, Tossed in a Spicy Sauce and Served on a Bed of Mixed Greens with Diced Cucumbers, Tomatoes and Avocado Cucumber Dressing $12.50

BRONZED SPICE-CURED SALMON SALAD Fresh Salmon Fillet Cured with Herbs and Spices, Fresh Dill, Leeks, Carrots and Celery then Bronzed. Served with Fresh Marinated Asparagus on a Bed of Mixed Greens with Cool Dill Caper Dressing $12.50

FRIED CHICKEN CAESAR SALAD K-Paul’s Version of a Classic! Romaine Lettuce Served with a Dressing made from Egg Yolks, Homemade Vinegar, Olive Oil, Lemon Juice, Anchovies, Creole Mustard and Ground Parmesan and Romano Cheese. Topped with Fried Chicken Bits tossed in Garlic Butter $11.50

Sunday - wedneSday 7am-10pm | thurSday - Saturday 7am-late

SandwicheS

StarterS Eight fried or grilled jumbo shrimp Boudin Balls Boudin battered, fried, and served with Somethin Else Secret Sauce Crabcake Two crabcakes served with creamy corn machoux

Comes with One Side Dish

SomeThin eLSe CheeSeBurger Our juicy burger with a mound of cheddar cheese, smoked bacon, & carmelized onions

DEEP FRIED SHRIMP PO-BOY

hearT STopper Two 8 oz patties with chicken fried bacon, choice of cheese, and fried truffle egg The Shrimp Burger Shrimp patty, pepperjack cheese, avocado, bacon, Somethin Else Secret Sauce

SaladS The Wedge Quarter chunk of iceberg, creamy bleu cheese dressing and thick-cut bacon The ToWer Vine ripe tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, basil, garlic oil, and balsamic vinaigrette Warm SpinaCh Baby spinach tossed in warm bacon vinaigrette. Served with grapes, cranberries, toasted candied pecans, apples and bleu cheese

6 2 0 C o n T i S T. •

BLT Chicken fried bacon, lettuce, tomato, mayo

CoChon de LaiT Slow roasted pulled pork served with our coleslaw and honey mustard

homemade SideS mac-n-cheese / Coleslaw / hand cut French fries / Truffle fries / potato salad

For LoCaL deLivery pLeaSe CaLL:

504 373 6439

neW orLeanS, La 70130

Seasoned Shrimp Battered & Fried then Piled on a 8” French Bread $11

Sliced Corned Beef, Sauerkraut, Swiss Cheese and K-Paul’s Thousand Island Dressing on 8“ Rye Focaccia Bread and Grilled $11

ROAST BEEF PO-BOY Choice Beef Inside Round Seasoned and Slow Roasted for Hours, Sliced and Smothered in it’s Own Juices. Served on Buttered French Bread $10

K-PAUL’S JAMBALAYA LASAGNA Ground Andouille Smoked Sausage and Ground Chuck Meat Sauce Layered with Lasagna Noodles, Ricotta, Mozzarella, Cheddar Cheese and Baked. Served with Garlic Toast $10

HOT CAJUN CURRY Julienned Beef Tenderloin, Smoked Andouille Sausage, Duck, Rabbit and Chicken Seared and Smothered with Onions, Bell Peppers, Celery, Jalapenos, Asian Spices and Beef Stock. Served with Basmati Rice $10.95

CRAWFISH MARIGNY Fresh Louisiana Crawfish Tails Sautéed with fresh Dill, Diced Tomatoes, Mushrooms, Stock and Butter Emulsion. Served with Basmati Rice $11.50 Chef Paul Prudhomme & Exec. Chef Paul Miller

NIGHTLY

3 COURSE

DINNER SPECIALS Choice of appetizer, entree & dessert ONE GREAT PRICE!

416 CHARTRES STREET

Dinner Monday through Saturday (5:30PM to 10:00PM)

Reservations (504) 596-2530

Gambit > MENU GUIDE > september 2011

Shrimp Basket

SANDWICHES & PLATE LUNCHES

REUBEN PANINI

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Family of Restaurants

S E A F O O D & I TA L I A N

OCTOBER FEAST October 3rd - 15th SERVED WITH SOUP OR SALAD FROM $13.95-$15.95

Weiner Schnitzel with Sauerkraut & POtatOes Jaeger Schnitzel & SOur Cream & MushrOOm Sauce ith Sauerkraut & POtatOes Schnitzel ala HOlstein, Egg & AnchOvies with Sauerkraut & POtatOes COrned Beef & Cabbage with POtatOes Bratwurst with Sauerkraut & POtatOes Warstiener Beer Dark & Light • PiespOrter Michelsberg German ChOcOlate Cake Special Lunch & Dinner excluding sundays

3524 SEVERN AVENUE · METAIRIE • 455-2266 SERVING BREAKFAST & LUNCH DAILY 7AM-3PM · DINNER WED-SUN 3PM-CLOSE

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Eggs Benedict · Huevos Rancheros Eggs Sardou • Crabcake Benedict Belgian Waffles Buckwheat Pancakes Omeletes · Burgers Grilled Chicken Sandwiches Lunch Specials Daily Breakfast Served Anytime Monday - Sunday 7am - 2pm

[NEAR CITY PARK]

504-483-8828

GAMBIT > MENU GUIDE > SEPTEMBER 2011

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Full Breakfast Every Morning

C OR N E R OF BU R DE T T E / U P TOW N

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1/2 block from jackson square

local catering & nationwide shipping

FRench quarter patio dining

AUTHENTIC CREOLE CUISINE IN THE CASUAL ELEGANCE OF A RESTORED 1795 CREOLE COTTAGE AND GARDEN PATIO.

Appetizers & SIDES

po-boys

Hot Roast Beef Po-boy Sauteed Shrimp Po-boy Sauteed Sausage Po-Boy Veggie Po-Boy

8.99 9.99 7.99 6.99

Seafood Okra Gumbo with Shrimp and Crabs Chicken Andouille Gumbo selected by locals as The Best in the city! Large Shrimp or Crawfish Remoulade Salad Blackened Chicken Salad Grilled Shrimp Salad

7.99 7.99 11.99 9.99 11.99

Spinach & Artichoke Dip Blackened Fish Nuggets Crawfish Etouffee Macque Choux Corn

6.99 8.99 7.99 3.99

GUMBOS & SALADS

entrees

Jambalaya with Smoked Sausage, Shrimp & Chicken Shrimp Creole Shrimp in a spicy Creole Tomato sauce Red Beans & Rice with Smoked Sausage Creole Combination: Shrimp Creole, Jambalaya, Red Beans & Rice Creole Vegetarian Dish of the Day Crawfish Etouffee in a Spicy Sauce, served over rice Crawfish & Pasta in Tasso Cream Fresh Catfish Florentine over seasoned spinach, topped w/ hollandaise Blackened Catfish pan-broiled in a hot iron skillet, w/ vegetable Fresh Fish Creole Catfish topped w/ Shrimp Creole, w/ vegetable Chicken Espagnole simmered w/ mushrooms, shallots, garlic & wine Grilled/blackened Chicken w/ garlic mashed potatoes & vegetable Filet Mignon topped w/ seasoned sauteed mushrooms, w/ potatoes

11.99 12.99 10.99 12.99 9.99 15.99 15.99 15.99 14.99 15.99 13.99 13.99 23.99

Gambit > menu guide > september 2011

This is a taste of our menu. View our entire menu at gumboshop.com!

“Become a patron of the artZ!” BAGELS • CREAM CHEESES • LOX

call uS to cater your next meeting. We deliver! ($25 minimum-limitEd dElivEry arEa)

SanDWiCHeS uptoWn - lox, cream cheese, red onion, tomato capers broadmoor - pastrami, swiss, creole mustard, dressed marigny - sun-dried tomato cream cheese, avacado, mushrooms, sprouts, lettuce, tomato cbd club - ham, turkey, bacon, American, dressed

garden diStrict - ham, swiss, dijon mustard, dressed doWntoWn - turkey, bacon, swiss, avocado, sprouts, dressed treme - roast beef, provolone, red onion, horseradish sauce, dressed bouligny blt - bacon, lettuce, tomato , mayo lakevieW - choice of chicken salad, tuna salad or egg salad, dressed

SaLaDS city park - mixed greens, hard boiled egg, tomato, mushrooms & grated cheese audubon - half an avacado in bed of greens & tomato wedges w/a scoop of chicken, tuna or egg salad lafayette Square - spinach, bacon, red onion, almonds, strawberries & poppy seed dressing

3138 Magazine St (Enter on 9th Street) 504.309.7557 Tue-Fri 7am-3pm • SaT & Sun 8am-3pm

See full menu at: artzbagelz.com

12


LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

MUSIC

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 13 BANKS STREET BAR — Michael Matthews & Friends, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 9 BLUE NILE — Kyle Cripps, 10

BMC — Spillway, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11

BULLETS SPORTS BAR — Kermit Ruffins, 6 CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic & Matt El DeOrazio, 7; Blues Frenzy, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Waylon Speed, 8

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Bart Ramsey, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Olga, 9:30

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 GENNARO’S — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES — Bright Eyes, First Aid Kit, 8 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Miniature Tigers, Little Maker, King Rey, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF NORTHSHORE — The Groove, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — The Session, 8

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Maryflynn & Prohibition Blues, 6; ADO & Hot Lyrix, 9:30

On Friday, in the fifth date of a 10-show tour, Wye Oak (pictured) opens for Okkervil River at Tipitina’s. The rock bands continue on to Texas, Kansas, Missouri and Wisconsin, concluding their circuit on Sept. 24 in Rochester, N.Y. Four days later, in the first date of another 10-show tour, Wye Oak opens for Explosions in the Sky — at Tipitina’s. Outside of a pathological po-boy fetish or hurricane death wish, the circuitous scheduling is hard to figure. The upshot for New Orleanians is two chances to catch the Baltimore duo’s seething live set, which pulls back the shroud from gauzy March release Civilian (Merge). On record, singer/ guitarist Jenn Wasner is a chameleonic mood swinger, moving without pause or warning from chiming chords and matronly assurances to cleaving shreds and suspicious aspersions. In person, backed by percussionist Andy Stack’s rattling kickdrum wallops and clattering snare clacks, she’s a captivating snake charmer, fixing the audience in her gaze as she raises serpentine melodies only to release their stinging venom. Austin, Texas’ Okkervil River, which gave One Eyed Jacks a dress rehearsal of sixth album I Am Very Far (Jagjaguwar) in April, returns for a deserved encore. Tickets $16 in advance, $18 at the door. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

SEP

16

Okkervil River with Wye Oak 10 p.m. Friday Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

SPOTTED CAT — Ben Polcer, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

Wednesday 14 BANKS STREET BAR — Micah Mckee’s Songwriters Showcase, 8; Major Bacon, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — U.S. Nero & Friends, 9 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Gravity A, 10:30

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

BMC — Bryce Eastwood, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Futurebirds, J. Roddy Walston & the Business, New Grass Country Club, 10

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8

SIBERIA — Dead Earth Politics, Necrotic Priapism, Marais Noir, 10

CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Nervous Duane, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Tom McDermott & Meschiya

Lake, 8

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — John Autin, 6:30

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 DISH ON HAYNE — Kermit Ruffins, 6

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8 HI-HO LOUNGE — DJ Bees Knees, Sinful Friends, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hopetoun Collective, Gravy Flavored Kisses, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Kristin Diable & Mia Borders, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

Oakkervil Combo

PAGE 45

43


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

PAGE 43

Wilson, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

LAFAYETTE SQUARE — Harvest the Music feat. Big Sam’s Funky Nation, Mia Borders, 5 THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Up Close & Personal feat. Cornell Williams & Big D Perkins, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Alexey Marti Band, 6; Lagniappe Brass Band, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Earth, Mt. Eerie, 10

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — Marc Stone Band, 7

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Joe Krown, 8:30

RUSTY NAIL — Jenn Howard, 8 SIBERIA — Vockah Redu, Noir Fonce, Prom Date, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Ben Polcer, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, 12

TIPITINA’S — Carolina Chocolate Drops, Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 9

Thursday 15 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Pocket Aces Brass Band, 9

THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

BLUE NILE — Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 7 BMC — Ramblin’ Letters, 6; Troy Turner Band, 9:30 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Tom McDermott & Aurora Nealand, 8

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; The Great In Between, 11 COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bosworth, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 D.B.A. — Ponderosa Stomp feat. Hip Drop, 11

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Todd Duke Combo, 9:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges

HOUSE OF BLUES — J. Cole, 8

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Amanda Shaw, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Kipori Woods, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Michael Brown, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFRENIERE PARK — Jefferson Chamber of Commerce concert series feat. Bucktown All-Stars, 6

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Gris Gris, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Andre Bouvier, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9:30 OAK — Kristin Diable, 9

BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Mike Dillon Drum Summit, 9; Brass-AHolics, 10:30

BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Dana Abbot Band, 10; The SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 12:30 a.m. BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Smoking Time Jazz Club, 8 CARROLLTON STATION — N’awlins Johnnys, Hillbilly Hotel, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Motherlode, Justin McCain Band, Riffs, Barnson Adams, 7

COLUMBIA STREET, DOWNTOWN COVINGTON — Sunset at the Landing Concert feat. ARPA, St. Tammany Blues Annex, 6 CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 10

PEACHES RECORDS — J. Cole CD listening party, 4

HI-HO LOUNGE — Meta the Man, 10

ONE EYED JACKS — Meat Puppets, Tomatoes, Mahayla, 7

HERMES BAR — Shannon Powell Trio, 9:30 & 11

PRESERVATION HALL — Survivors Brass Band feat. Jeffrey Hills, 8

RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION — Concerts in the Courtyard feat. Shamarr Allen & the Underdawgs, 6

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Chris Ardoin, 8:30

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Myra Taylor & Carol Fran, 8 & 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — The Professor Piano Series feat. Joe Krown, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Trixie Minx, 12 a.m.

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Major Bacon, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Ponderosa Stomp, 7

SIBERIA — Royal Pendletons, Redondo Beat, Cheveau, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Javier Guitterrez & Vivaz, 8

TARPON JOE’S BAR AND GRILL — Minus Linus, 9:30 THREE MUSES — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Washboard Rodeo, 7:30

TIPITINA’S — MyNameIsJohnMichael, G-Eazy, Christoph Andersson, 10

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

KERRY IRISH PUB — Patrick Cooper, 5; Beth Patterson & Kenny Klein, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Courtyard Kings, 7; Soul Project, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Revivalists, 10

Friday 16

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Bryce Eastwood, 4; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30; The Mumbles, 12:30 a.m.

12 BAR — Consortium of Genius, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Johnny J & the Hitmen, 9:30

407 — Mo Jelly Band, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Righteous Buddha, 10

OAK — Coco Robichaux, 9

ONE EYED JACKS — She’s Still Dead, Crotchbreaker, A Hanging, 10

BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Jeb Rault Band, 9

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE LOUNGE — Frank Williams Jr. & Friends feat. Bobby Love, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Sgt. Pepper’s Beatles Tribute Band, 9:30

BAYOU PARK BAR — Revealers, 9

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Pig Pen & the Porkchops, 9:30

MON 9/12

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 9/13

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 9/14

Up Close & Personal

THU The Trio featuring 9/15 Johnny V & Special Guests

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Pfister Sisters, 5:30; Paul Sanchez, 8

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; The Mumbles, 9

SPOTTED CAT — Sarah McCoy, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

Showcasing Local Music

FRI 9/16

The Revivalists

SAT 9/17

Jon Cleary’s Philthy Phew

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter 9/18 3/13 & Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

A True Mid-City Neighborhood MusiC bAr

SEPTEMBER MUSIC LINE-UP EVERY

SUN 4PM

ROARSHARK

TUE 9PM

JEREMY RENEAU

TUE COMEDY NIGHT RETURNS 8PM 9/13 WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 9PM 9/14 THU NOLA X PRESENTS 9/15

HAWAII 504 9PM

FRI BROWN IMPROV 8:30PM

WED 9PM

OPEN MIC W/ U.S. NERO

9/16 CONSORTIUM OF GENIUS 10PM

THU 9PM

JIM JONES AND THE KOOLAIDES

FRI 9PM

THE REVEALERS REGGAE NIGHT

SAT THE ULTIMATE BREAKDOWN 9/17 OFFICIAL UFC AFTER PARTY SUN IN THE REDZONE 9/18

SATURDAY SHOWS

SEP

BUNGA BUNGA AND PILE

SEP

DEMONIC DESTRUCTION, A HANGING & RUINIVERSE 10PM

17 24

10PM

542 S. JEFF DAVIS PKWY

W/ JOHN FOURCADE & MITCH GIBBS 3-6PM

MON TWO AND A HALF MEN/

9/19 CHARLIE SHEEN ROAST PARTY 7PM

608 FULTON STREET NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

THREE MUSES — Mike Hood, 4:30; Hot Club of New Orleans, 7

Brass Band, 9:30

THE HOOKAH — Udachi, Deathface, SamoSoundBoy, The Captain, 9

MUSIC

45


MUSIC

LISTINGS

RUSTY NAIL — Jenn Howard & Crazy McGee, 10:30

KERRY IRISH PUB — Speed the Mule, 5; Rites Of Passage, 9

SIBERIA — Goddamn Gallows, Jayke Orvis & the Broken Band, My Graveyard Jaw, James Hunnicutt, 10

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

SHAMROCK BAR — Karma, 9

3109 Magazine St. · 895-4102 1125 Decatur St. · 524-1122 940 Decatur St. · 528-8559 NEW ORLEANS INSPIRED DESIGNS SINCE 2001

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Trio, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Shotgun Jazz Band, 4; Jayna Morgan, 6; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10

THREE MUSES — Moonshiners Trio, 4; Joe Cabral, 6:30; Glen David Andrews, 10

Saturday 17

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kristina Morales, 4; The SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 11

ABITA SPRINGS TOWN HALL — Steve Anderson Group, Porch Rockers, Driskill Mountain Boys, Rodney Thibodeaux & Tout les Soir, 7 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — La Nola Sirene, Saint Bell, 10

New Orleans’ Premier Jazz Venue

LIVE JAZZ 7 NIGHTS A WEEk • 8PM MON-SAT • 7PM SUNDAYS

BANKS STREET BAR — Zero Dialect, 10

TUESDAY, Sept 13 at 8PM SUNDAY

4, 11, 18, 25

SEPTEMBER 2011 7PM TYLER’S REVISITED FEATURING

GERMAINE BAZZLE & PAUL LONGSTRETH

MONDAY 8PM THE ORIGINAL TUXEDO JAZZ BAND

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

5, 12, 19, 26

46

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

GERALD FRENCH

TUESDAYS 8PM 9/6 & 9/20 JASON MARSALIS 9/27 THE DAVID PULPHUS GROUP WEDNESDAY 8PM 7, 14, 21, 28

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S NOJO WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

THURSDAY

SHANNON POWELL Saturday, Sept 17 - 8PM

irvinmayfield.com

For schedule updates follow us on:

IMJazzPlayhouse

1, 8, 15, 22, 29

FRIDAY

2, 9, 16, 23, 30

JAM

8PM SHAMARR ALLEN 8PM

SATURDAYS 8PM 9/3 JOE kROWN SWING BAND 9/10 & 9/24 ALEXEY MARTI & URBAN MINDS

300 BOURBON STREET • NEW ORLEANS 504.553.2299 • WWW.SONESTA.COM

Monday-Friday 11am-2pm

BAYOU PARK BAR — Bunga Bunga, Pile, 10

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Andrew Duhon (upstairs), 9; e.company CD release feat. Gravity A & Big Rock Candy Mountain, 10

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; The Revealers, 9:30; Ashton & The Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 8

CARROLLTON STATION — Outside Lights, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Stephanie Nilles, 7; Sweet Jones, 11

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 THE CYPRESS — Pacific Skyline, Calibrate the Massacre, The Mothercell, 7

GR OPEILL LAT N E!

LUNCH SPECIALS

BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Dave Jordan, 9

CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7

LEON “kID CHOCOLATE” BROWN

LIVE MUSIC

Friday & Saturday Nights!

NO COVER AT ALL!!! Check website for listings.

3449 River Rd. (at Shrewsbury in Jefferson Parish) • 834-4938 • www.therivershacktavern.com

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — John Sinclair, 2; Christian Serpas & Ghost Town, 3; Michael Hurtt & His Haunted Hearts, 4

THE MAISON — Magnitude, 7; Two-Year Anniversary Party feat. Jeremy Phipps, Ashton Hines, Phil Breen and others, 10

TULANE LAVIN-BERNICK CENTER QUAD — Mia Borders, 4

THE SESSION

KING PIN — Major Bacon, 9

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Rotary Downs, 11 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Gringo do Choro, 10 HERMES BAR — Johnny Sansone, 9:30 & 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — Lighthouse Music, Loud Valley, Youth Sounds, 10 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Ponderosa Stomp, 7 THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Cyril Neville, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Shannon Powell, 8; Brass Band Jam feat. Brass-A-Holics, 12 a.m.

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Jon Cleary’s Philthy Phew, 10

MUDLARK THEATRE — Carla Bozulich, John Eichenseer Duo, Rob Cambre, Donald Miller, 8 OAK — Sunpie Barnes, 9

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART — Roland Guerin CD release, 6 & 8 OLD POINT BAR — Dana Abbott, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Grant Watts, Old Family, Coyotes, Howl, Danny Burns, 10

PRESERVATION HALL — Gregg Stafford’s Jazz Hounds, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Archnemesis, Kastle, 2 a.m.

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Austin Sicard & the Medics, 10 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. T’Canaille, 2; Vince Vance & the Valiants, 9:30 SIBERIA — Malcolm Weston benefit feat. HAARP, Mountain of Wizard, Ponykiller, She’s Still Dead, Dummy Dumpster, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Tim Laughlin & Connie Jones CD release, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Charlie Chan, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Davis Rogan Band, 10

THREE MUSES — Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 6:30; Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TIPITINA’S — Bonerama, Super Fans feat. Whistle Monsta & others, Cha Wa Mardi Gras Indians, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

Sunday 18 BANKS STREET BAR — Elliott Cohn, 9

BAYOU PARK BAR — Roarshark, 4 BLUE NILE — Sasha Masakowski, 7; Mainline, 10:30

BMC — Andy J. Forest, 7; Kipori Woods Band, 10 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.; Beth Patterson, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; The Fessters 10th Anniversary, 10

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Dancing Man 504, Skin ‘N’ Bones Gang, 6; Mardi Gras Indian practice, 7 HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.; Chromeo, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Tyler’s Revisited feat. Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

KERRY IRISH PUB — Traditional Irish Session, 5; Crescent City Celtic Band, 8 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON — Dave Easley, 5; Cristina Perez, 7; DJ RQ Away (upstairs), 10; Low-Stress Quintet, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Ricardo Crespo, 4:30; Javier Olondo & AsheSon, 8

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Tyrone Chambers, 2 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1

OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-A-Holics, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Tommy Sancton’s New Orleans Legacy Band, 8 THE SAINT — RYAT, Pretzlcoat, Beautiful Bells, Isidro, 9

THE SALOON — Major Bacon, 5

SIBERIA — Ryan Rousseau & His Desert Children, King Louie’s Missing Monuments, Midnight Snaxx, Cyclops, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Mark Growden Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales & the Bayou Shufflers, 6; Pat Casey, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 10 a.m. THREE MUSES — Rick Trolsen Group, 7

TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 PAGE 48


FILM

FEATURE

Guitar Hero BY WILL COVIELLO

D

debut, Kiel starred as the last caveman, the title character who miraculously survived undetected in California. He stumbles upon and terrifies teenage Roxy, and when she tells her father (Hall Sr.) about the giant, he heads into the mountains to see for himself. When he doesn’t return, Tom (Hall Jr.) and girlfriend Roxy go looking for him. Eegah captures Roxy, and in a sometimes campy way the film flirts with the giant’s sexual attraction to her.

Arch Hall Jr. played a young musician in Wild Guitar and Eegah. It doesn’t have the fast pace of a contemporary monster film (though it’s not intended to be a monster film), but it’s got an amusing and precocious take on cultural sensitivity. The Sadist (1963) achieved cult status for its dip into criminal depravity and was ahead of its time for drive-in movie releases. Hall Jr. plays a young psychopath on a killing spree, and he likes to watch his victims suffer in anticipation of their fate. It’s in black and white, and the cinematography was handled by Vilmos Zsigmond, who went on to do The Deer Hunter and other classic films. Of the three, Eegah is the most entertaining, but together they offer a fun look at modest-budget independent filmmaking from the early 1960s.

SEPT

1617

CLANDESTINE CELLULOID FILM SERIES RENAISSANCE ARTS HOTEL, 700 TCHOUPITOULAS ST.; WWW.PONDEROSASTOMP.COM TICKETS $20 PER DAY

SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS A BATTLEPLANMUSICPRODUCTION “STRAW EXECUTIVE DOGS” DOMINIC PURCELL LAZ ALONSO WILLA BASED HOLLAND AND JAMES WOODS BY LARRY GROUPÉ PRODUCERS BEAU MARKS GILBERT DUMONTET BASED ON THE ABC MOTION ON THE NOVEL “THE SIEGE OF TRENCHER’S FARM” BY GORDON WILLIAMS PICTURE SCREENPLAY BY DAVID ZELAG GOODMAN AND SAM PECKINPAH DIRECTED PRODUCED SCREENPLAY BY ROD LURI E BY MARC FRYDMAN BY ROD LURI E starts fridaY, sePtemBer 16

check local listings for theaters and showtimes

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

uring one of Arch Hall Jr.’s first trips to New Orleans, he played music to promote a movie. His band Arch and the Archers starred in the 1963 film Wild Guitar, created by and also staring his father Arch Hall Sr. After their show, the band went to an after-hours club. “It was at a place called the Dreamroom and it had a revolving stage,” Hall says. “We got to play with Mac Rebennack – or Dr. John.” More recently, Hall has returned to New Orleans to perform at the Ponderosa Stomp (see page 39). He grew up an avid fan of blues and R&B, and the Stomp has been a treasured experience for him. “These guys are some of my heroes,” he says. This year, Hall will reunite with some members of his band onstage (9:20 p.m. Saturday), and he’ll be a guest for a daylong program in the festival’s Clandestine Celluloid Film Series. Hall made several films with his father in the early 1960s, and he’ll do a Q&A following Saturday’s screenings of Wild Guitar (11 a.m.), Eegah (1 p.m.) and The Sadist (3 p.m.). The Clandestine Celluloid program features rare concert footage, features and documentaries. Friday’s screenings include a Fats Domino concert film from 1962, the documentary The Original Soul Men: Sam & Dave and a compilation of clips of Stomp performers. Although Hall has performed at the Stomp before, these are the first screenings of his films at the festival. Hall and his father worked together on a diverse collection of films from 1959 to the mid’60s. Wild Guitar (1962) lifts and melds parts of both of their lives. Hall Sr. grew up in South Dakota and moved to Hollywood to work in radio and film. In the film, Hall Jr. plays Bud Eagle, a young guitarist from South Dakota who moves to Hollywood to break into the music business. He’s spotted by an unscrupulous talent agent, played by Hall Sr., and the story pits the wide-eyed and good-hearted youngster against the industry’s unseemly practices, including payola and publicity stunts. Although the young Hall actually loved blues and R&B music, in the film Eagle is more of a crooning teen idol. Eegah (1962) also features Hall as a young musician, but it’s a beauty-andthe-beast story. James Bond fans will recognize the 7-foot-tall Richard Kiel, who starred as Bond nemesis Jaws. In his film

49


FILM

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

review Working Relationships

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING APOLLO 18 (PG-13) — The

found-footage-style horror depicts a failed mission to the moon. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand

ATTACK THE BLOCK (R) — A

London teen gang is up against savage alien invaders. AMC Palace 20

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

BUCKY LARSON: BORN TO BE A STAR (R) — Nick Swardson

plays Bucky Larson, a nerd from the Midwest who moves to Hollywood to follow in his parents’ footsteps and become a porn star. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

COLOMBIANA (PG-13) — After

50

witnessing the murder of her parents as a child, a woman (Zoe Saldana) grows up to be a professional assassin with a goal of revenge. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand

CONAN THE BARBARIAN (R) — The warrior embarks on a

journey across the continent of Hyboria to avenge the murder of his father. AMC Palace 16

CONTAGION (R) — A lethal

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A HAPPY MADISON PRODUCTION NICK SWARDSON “BUCKY LARSON: BORNMUSICTO BE A STAR” CHRISTINA MUSIC RICCI WITH DON JOHNSONWRITTENAND STEPHEN DORFF SUPERVISION BY MICHAEL DILBECK BRYAN BONWELL BY WADDY WACHTEL BY ADAM SANDLER & ALLEN COVERT & NICK SWARDSON PRODUCED BY ADAM SANDLER JACK GIARRAPUTO ALLEN COVERT NICK SWARDSON DAVID DORFMAN DIRECTED BY TOM BRADY check local listings for theaters and showtimes

airborne virus rapidly spreads across the world in the drama starring Matt Damon, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jude Law, Kate Winslet and Laurence Fishburne. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9

COWBOYS AND ALIENS (PG13) — A desolate city in 1873 is

attacked by marauders from space. Grand

CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE (PG-13) —

A recently divorced 40-something (Steve Carrell) gets back into the dating game with the help of a young Lothario in the romantic comedy. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20 CREATURE (R) — Friends on a road trip to New Orleans encounter a terrifying swamp creature that is half-man, half-alligator. Chalmette Movies, AMC Palace 16, AMC

Three decades before the 2009 release of Kathryn Stockett’s novel The Help, on which the current film is based, Gary L. Goldman filmed a documentary in New Orleans which featured interviews with black domestic laborers and the white families they worked for. The 48-minute film screened at a couple of documentary film festivals and was broadcast on PBS. It gets a rare theatrical screening this week at Chalmette Movies — technically its local premiere. Goldman worked on Louis Malle’s Pretty Baby (1978) and stayed in New Orleans to make Yes Ma’am with the help of Bethany Bultman and Tulane University’s Amistad Research Center. It has some narrative but mostly stitches together interviews. The restored film is grainy, and many scenes feature seated subjects talking directly to the camera. But the interviewees are candid and it’s a powerful juxtaposition of the experiences and perceptions of employers and employees. There’s also a wide range of attitudes about the arrangements, including workers who defend their relationships as friendships that include generous caretaking, and others who candidly critique the value placed on sycophancy. Often, children and teens offer the most inadvertently revealing insights. One group of teens is interviewed while swimming and they talk about their triangulated relationships with their mothers and the maids who work in their homes. In another story, a woman recounts a little girl’s inadvertent revelation that in private her mother uses the word “nigger.” While it exposes some of the racism entrenched in the domestic arrangements, it sensitively explores how people felt and how they dealt with the situation. The film is 30 years old and this ground was broken long ago, but it’s a very good document of its time. — Will Coviello

SEPT

1622

Yes Ma'am 2 p.m.-7 p.m. Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992; www.chalmettemovies.com

Palace 20, Grand DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences

experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX THE DEBT (R) — Helen Mirren

stars as a former Israeli Mossad agent who must confront her haunting past when a Nazi war criminal she believed to be dead resurfaces. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand

DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (R) — Katie Holmes and Guy

Pearce star in the horrorthriller about a family that moves into a mansion already occupied by hellish spirits. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand

FINAL DESTINATION 5 (R) —

Survivors of a bridge collapse learn there’s no way to evade death in the latest installment of the horror franchise. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20 THE GUARD (R) — An Irish cop with a subversive sense of humor is teamed up with an uptight FBI agent to investigate a drug ring. AMC Palace 20 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) — The Harry Potter

series culminates in an epic showdown with Lord Voldemort. AMC Palace 20 THE HELP (PG-13) — In the

film adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s hit novel, an aspiring journalist shakes up her conservative Southern


town when she interviews the black maids of the city’s upper class. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Prytania HORRIBLE BOSSES (PG-13) — A group of friends devise a convoluted plan to get rid of their intolerable bosses. AMC Palace 20

bers. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX WARRIOR (R) — A man trains

HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — The film tells the story

for a mixed martial arts tournament and is forced to confront his estranged older brother, a former MMA fighter. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

LAUGH AT MY PAIN (R) — The

OPENING FRIDAY

of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX

film documents Kevin Hart’s Los Angeles show during his 90-city stand-up comedy tour. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG) — In the Woody Allen film, a dissatisfied screenwriter and aspiring novelist (Owen Wilson) finds himself travelling back in time to the Jazz Age while touring Paris at night. Canal Place ONE DAY (PG-13) — The film

depicts two friends (Anne Hathaway and Jim Sturgess) during key moments of their relationship on several July 15ths in their lives. AMC Palace 20

OUR IDIOT BROTHER (R) —

After being released from prison, an idealistic organic farmer crashes at his sisters’ homes and wreaks havoc in their lives. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand story of the cult classic takes place in modern-day San Francisco, where a geneticist’s engineering begets intelligent apes. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand SEVEN DAYS IN UTOPIA (G) — A failed golfer finds himself stranded in Utopia, Texas, where he meets an eccentric rancher who prompts him to re-examine his life. AMC Palace 20 SHARK NIGHT 3-D (PG-13) —

While at a Louisiana lake house, a group of friends happens upon hundreds of flesh-eating sharks in the Shreveport-filmed horror. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand THE SMURFS (PG) — After getting chased out of their village, CGI Smurfs end up in New York and must find a way back home. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD IN 4-D (PG) — The

family-oriented fantasy series returns, this time with scratch-and-sniff cards distributed to audience mem-

plays a Hollywood stunt driver by day and a getaway driver for heist operations by night.

I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT (PG-13) — Based on Allison

Pearson’s best-selling novel, Sarah Jessica Parker plays an ambitious career woman trying to have it all.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS 13 ASSASSINS (R) — Takashi Miike’s acclaimed Japanese period film follows a group of samurai tasked with bringing down a sadistic lord. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

CLANDESTINE CELLULOID FILM SERIES — The Ponderosa

Stomp event screens rare concert footage, features and documentaries. Visit www. ponderosastomp.com for the full schedule and other details. Admission $20 per day (includes music conference admission). 11 a.m. FridaySaturday, Renaissance Arts Hotel, 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2330

DIRT! THE MOVIE (NR) —

Narrated by Jamie Lee Curtis, the film explores the environmental, social and political impact of soil. The screening is part of the Green Project and Charitable Film Network’s Green Screen series. Free admission. 7 p.m. Thursday, Green Project, 2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www. thegreenproject.org

Sports Physicals • Flu Shots • Vaccinations Doctors Express is open 7 days a week. We treat adults and children for everything from coughs and colds to fractures and sprains.

MISS REPRESENTATION (NR)—

Jennifer Siebel Newsom’s documentary uses interviews with teenage girls and public figures Condoleezza Rice, Nancy Pelosi, Katie Couric, Rachel Maddow, Gloria Steinem and others to explore how media messages affect young women. A Q&A session with Tulane professor Celeste Lay follows. The screening is part of the Newcomb Feminist Film Series. Free admission. 7 p.m. Friday, Newcomb College Campus, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, 327-0009; www.newcomb. tulane.edu

504-315-7788

WE DO TAKE OUT, DELIVERY & CATERING SERVING HEALTHY, LOW CALORIE,NO MSG & MICROBIOTIC COOKING

CELEBRATE MOON FESTIVAL SEPT. 13

Three poor African-American kids in rural Mississippi reap the consequences of their family’s abuse, addiction and violence in Tina Mabry’s film. The screening is a sneak preview of the New Orleans Afrikan Film & Arts Festival Project’s Mississippi River 9th Ward Film and Arts Festival (Oct. 6-9), and Mabry appears at the event. Seating is limited; call 942-8542 or email noafest@neworleansafrikanfilmfest.org for reservations. Free admission. 6:30 p.m. Friday, New Orleans African American Museum, 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www. noaam.com

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THE BIG LEBOWSKI (R) — NOLA

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012

LOCAL LISTINGS THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES SEPTEMBER 16 IN THEATERS EVERYWHERE FOR CHECK

4.729" X 2.569" TUES 09/13 NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY DUE FRI 9AM Aurelio Emmett

Confirmation #:

of band leader and pianist Eddy Duchin. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and Sept. 21, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

Artist: (circle one:) Heather Staci Freelance 2 Jay

Steve

Philip

Best Fajitas in Town!

PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15 Come Have Lunch With Me!

FUNNY GIRL (G) — Barbra

Scan for movie times.

– Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

RYAN GOSLING

Drive-In screens the Cohen brothers’ cult comedy on the rooftop of 840 Carondelet St. (at St. Joseph Street). Tickets $5. 7 p.m. Saturday.

Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

Mon-Fri: 8AM-8PM Sat & Sun: 8AM-5PM www.DoctorsExpressMetairie.com

3348 W. Esplanade Ave., Suite A, Metairie, LA 70002

MISSISSIPPI DAMNED (NR)—

THE EDDY DUCHIN STORY (NR) — The 1956 film is a biopic

Streisand stars in the 1968 biopic of comedian Fannie

Back to School

Brice, which traces her life from her early days in vaudeville to her career with the Ziegfeld Follies. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

COUNTRY FLAME

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

AE: (circle one:) Angela Maria Josh Tim

McCool

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) — The origin

DRIVE (R) — Ryan Gosling

URGENT CARE • NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

FILM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

ART APPROVED AE APPROVED CLIENT APPROVED

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Crescent City

ART

LISTINGS

Steak House

A Legendary Dining Experience in New Orleans

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

1934 – 2011

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “Pictures for Books,” photographs by Thomas Roma; “Jazz People: New Orleans Portraits,” photographs by Lee Friedlander; “Pop Shots,” Polaroid portraits by Andy Warhol; all through Oct. 9. Reception 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday. REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www. newmanschool.org — “Poetry

& Motion,” mixed media on panel and canvas by Demond Matsuo and Karoline Schleh, through Oct. 13. Opening reception 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

TUES–FRI 11:30am–9:30pm SAT 4-10pm • SUN 11:30-9pm

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Sportman’s Paradise,” works by Ed Smith, through September. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday.

821-3271

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

GALLERIES

52

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1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — Mixed media and ceramics by Dana Beuhler, Hannah Scheurich, Brandon Zeringue and Chris Scheurich, through Oct. 8. 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — “Greet-

ings from Louisiana: Graphic Grattitude,” screenprints and mixed-media typography by Daniela Marx, through Sept. 24. A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Exhibition of gallery artists

featuring Louviere + Vanessa, Sebastiao Salgado, Joshua Mann Pailet and Herman Leonard, through September.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Faculty

exhibition, through Sept. 24.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 —

Works by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.pressstreet.com — “Ash Column,”

drawings by Angela Driscoll, through Oct. 2.

Dead Ringers

Of late, New Orleans in general and St. Claude Avenue in particular have emerged as something of a national epicenter of DIY emerging artist activity, and in some ways it is extraordinary. But it’s also a phenomenon with deep roots tracing back to institutions and galleries that have focused on emerging artists all along, not just in the present. In that sense, the 15th annual No Dead Artists show at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery marks a continuation of an old tradition. As always, it is something of a grab bag. The 37 works were selected by jurors Toby Devan Lewis, William Morrow and Susan Taylor from the roughly 1,500 submitted by more than 300 artists, and viewing them is like reading tea leaves as portentous trajectories of talents and trends converge to reveal names and ideas that, if history is any guide, may later resurface with increasing luster. Many of this year’s offerings focus on questions of identity and appearance with an emphasis of how traditional perceptions are affected by ongoing technological evolution. That things are not always what they seem is evidenced in Rebekah Miller’s Skins sculpture of suspended birch tree trunks that, up close, reveal zippers in their bark with telltale traces of lace showing underneath in a kind of trans-species cross-dressing. But Britney Penouilh’s mixed-media collages of technological breakthroughs suggest the scientific process may always have been more nuanced than we thought. Alissa Polan’s psychodramatic portraits explore a realm where photography, identity and the subconscious coalesce in emotionally charged imagery, and Ema Sintamarian turns the visible world inside out, reducing it to colorful vortexes (pictured) in works that remind us that everything we thought was solid is really energy in motion. That energy reverts to gravitas in Meg Turner’s meticulous photogravures of old industrial structures, suggesting the processes of entropy are like a slow dance in which the grandeur of the past yields, often grudgingly, to an ever more conjectural future. — D. Eric Bookhardt THRU

SEP

24

No Dead Artists: Juried Exhibition of 14 Emerging American Artists Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com

ANTIEAU GALLERY. 927 Royal St., 304-0849; www.antieaugallery. com — “Gambling for Souls,” works by Molly McGuire and Stephen Warde Anderson, through Oct. 10. ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by

Martin Welch and Dexter Brecht, jewelry by Don David, through September. ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculp-


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

ture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing. ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery.com — “Precipice,” paintings

and constructions by Kathleen Loe, through Oct. 1.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www. bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United We Stand

to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries. com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com —

“Altered Spaces: Conversations, Reflections, and Observations,” silkscreen prints by Brian Folley Kelly, through Oct. 4.

CAFE BABY. 237 Chartres St., 3104004; www.markbercier.com —

Paintings and works on paper by Mark Bercier, ongoing. CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and PostImpressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Italian art-

ists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery show-

cases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — “Blueprints:

Reflections of Modern Design,” works on canvas by Nell Tilton, through Sept. 24.

CARROLL GALLERY. Newcomb Art Department, Woldenberg Art Center, 314-2228; www.tulane.edu/~art/carrollgallery — “Text/Image,” a group exhibition featuring works that integrate text and images, through Sept. 22. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim Casell;

etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery. com — Paintings by Andrew Bucci,

David Rex Joyner and Stephan Hoffpauir, through Sept. 24.

the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. 2820 St. Claude Ave., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Works by members of Galerie

Nothburga, featuring Elisabeth Melkonyan, Johanna Bair, Inge von Reusner, Anna-Maria Achatz and Gabriela Nepo Stieldorf, through September. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “And the

Earth Begot ...” works by Michele Basta, through Oct. 8.

COURTYARD GALLERY. 1129 Decatur St., 330-0134; www.woodartandmarketing.com — Hand-carved wood-

works by Daniel Garcia, ongoing.

DIGEST. 723 Louisa St.; www.digest.723louisa.org —

Monotypes, watercolor, paintings and mixed media by Patch Somerville, Cayla Zeek and Mark Waguespack, through September. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 —

“Jump ’N’ Jive,” oil paintings by Perry Morgan III, through Sept. 29.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Fear is a Man’s Best

Friend,” paintings by Jeremy Willis, through Nov. 5.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 412-9220; www.dutchalleyonline.com — Works

by New Orleans artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery.com —

Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www. gardendistrictgallery.com — “Sum-

524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www.georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces of Treme,”

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and Saints,”

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by

mer Showcase,” works by 16 gallery artists, through Saturday.

works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,”

works by Susan Dory, ongoing.

GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www.guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino. com — “Perchance to Dream,” box

assemblages by Audra Kohout, through Sept. 24.

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, 615 City Park Ave., 671-6363; www.dcc.edu —

“Boys/Bunnies/Singles/Doubles,” works by Alex Podesta, through Sept. 27.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www. isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown

glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

JACK GALLERY. 900 Royal St., 588-1777 — Paintings, lithographs and other

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www.fairfolksandagoat.com — “Foot-a-Night,” instal-

works by Tom Everhart, Gordon Parks, Al Hirschfeld, Stanley Mouse, Anja, Patrick McDonnell and other artists, ongoing.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www. nolaframing.com — Prints by Tommy

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

lation by Hannah Chalew, ongoing.

Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by Fredrick

Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Works by

Clay Blancett, Tod Seelie, Megan Hildebrandt and Valorie Polmer, through Oct. 2.

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Sunstruck,” paintings

by Carol Hallock, through September.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www.jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com — No Dead Artists

White, ongoing.

National Juried Exhibition, a show featuring 14 emerging artists, through Sept. 24.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Photography by

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www.julieneill.com —

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by Todd

Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 5815881 — Works by gallery artists,

ongoing.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “Bending the Curve,” acrylic on panel by Michael Kessler, through Sept. 25. GALLERY VERIDITAS. 3822 Magazine St.; 267-5991 — “Cycles of Discovery,” photos by Thomas Kiefer and Stewart Harvey, through Oct. 9.

“Facade,” photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com —

Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KEN KIRSCHMAN ARTSPACE. NOCCA Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St. — Alumni exhibition, through

September.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St.,

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works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

Holly Sarre, ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries. com — Paintings by Billy Solitario,

through Sept. 24.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — Venetian glass mosaics

by Randy Sanders; “Capture the Moment,” clocks made from vintage and collectible vinyl albums by Judy Di George; oil paintings by Sean Friloux; all through September.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts. org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, Mondays-Fridays. MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www.martinechaissongallery.com — Acrylic and

oil on linen by Matthew Abbott, through Sept. 24.

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos. com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle Y.

Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Fascinate

Me: A Culinary & Sculptural Extravaganza,” culinary sculpture by Jean-Luc Albin of Maurice’s French Pastries, ice carving by Dawson, chocolate sculpture by Cloud Candi and 3-D designs by The Bikery, through September.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — Mixedmedia paintings by Meredith Keith, through Sept. 24. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

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PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www.photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart.com —

“Vintage New Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Priscilla

Busch, Natalie Nichols, Andrew Jackson Pollack, Barbara Roberds and others, ongoing.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 13 > 2011

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de Blass,

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com — Paintings from

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LISTINGS

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 5259988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by

Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing. SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by

Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 444 Erlanger St., (985) 646-4375 — Annual Artists of the Year

exhibit, through September.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Small Heads/Little Busts,” works by Alan Gerson, through Oct. 2.

al Treasures of New Orleans,” works by Marlena Stevenson; paintings by Sarah Stiehl; both through September.

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CALL FOR ARTISTS ANTENNA GALLERY. Emerging and established artists and curators can apply for an opportunity to exhibit in the Bywater gallery during the 2012 season. Email bob@ press-street.com or visit www. press-street.com/antenna for details. Application deadline is Oct. 1. CRESCENT CITY BLUES & BBQ FESTIVAL T-SHIRT. Creative

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by Maysey Craddock, Drew Galloway, Ruth Marten and Jamie Baldridge, through September.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — “Architectur-

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kyotonola.com • cloSed SundayS

Allies hosts a contest to create the design for the festival’s official T-shirt. The winner also receives a $400 cash prize. Visit www.creativeallies.com/ contests for details. Submissions deadline is Sept. 23.

PROSPECT.2 OPENING EVENT.

Artist William Pope seeks photographs that respond to the questions “when you dream of New Orleans, what do you dream of?” and “when you wake up in the morning, what do you see?” for a video installation for events celebrating the opening of Prospect.2. Email blinkprojectNOLA@ gmail.com for details. Submissions deadline is Thursday.

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Perma-

nent exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “The Center Cannot Hold,” paintings and drawings by Brooke Pickett; “Drip: The Music of Water in New Orleans,” sound installation by John Kleinschmidt and Andy Sternad; “Patterns and Prototypes: Early Paintings by Tina Girouard and Robert Gordy,” curated by Dan Cameron; all through Sept. 25. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The 18th

Star: Treasures From 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood”, through Jan. 29.

AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — “Drapetomania: A

Disease Called Freedom,” 18thand 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection; “Restore the Oaks: Art Under the Overpass in Treme,” paintings by artists of the murals under the 1-10 overpass; both through Oct. 29. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Thalassa,” a 20-foot-

tall suspended sculpture by Swoon, through Sept. 25. “The Elegant Image,” figural bronzes from the Indian Subcontinent from the collection of Siddharth K. Bhansali, through Oct. 23. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits about 19th-

century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — “Self-Taught, Outsider

and Visionary Art from the Collection of Alexa Kleinbard & Jim Roche”; “Spotlight on Mississippi,” paintings, drawings and sculpture by Mississippi artists; “Mississippi Photographs: 1860s-Present”, through Sunday. “Mississippi Mud: The Potters of Mississippi”; “Looking to Learn,” works by New Orleans Center for Creative Arts visual art students, through September. “Whispering Pines,” photographs by Birtney Imes, through Oct. 16.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com —

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through March 31.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Living With Hur-

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun:

“Magic Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011.

ricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, through Sept. 25.

MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,” pho-

tographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Roosevelt,

Rockwell, and the Four Freedoms: America’s Slow March from Isolation to Action,” original posters by Norman Rockwell and museum artifacts, through Nov. 13.

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN

Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; all ongoing. “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; both ongoing. TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November. For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.


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beNefitiNg

55


LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com; FAX:483-3116

STAGE

preview

THE ADDAMS FAMILY. Mahalia

Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com — The musical brings the macabre television family to the stage. Tickets start at $30. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and Sept. 20-24, 2 p.m. Sunday and Sept. 24.

CHICAGO. Rivertown Repertory

Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 468-7221 — John Kander and Fred Ebb’s musical satire is set in Prohibition-era Chicago, where the justice system is corrupt and murderers have celebrity status. Tickets $35 general admission, $33 students and seniors, $17 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday, through Oct. 2.

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL’S DRALION.

New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3663; www.neworleansarena.com — The show fuses traditional Chinese acrobatics with Cirque du Soleil’s brand of avant-garde circus elements. Visit www. cirquedusoleil.com/dralion for details. Tickets $24-$75. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday.

FOOTLIGHT FRENZY. Playmak-

ers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — In the farce, a desperate PTA group produces an ambitious benefit play to try and save their bankrupt School for Unusual Children. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 25.

THE FUTURE IS A FANCYLAND PLACE. AllWays Lounge, 2240

St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — Andrew Vaught and Christopher Kaminstein’s play follows a group of Americans obsessed with apocalyptic prophecies. Call 264-1776 for reservations. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. FridaySunday through Oct. 2. GOD OF CARNAGE. Southern

Rep Theater, The Shops at

End of the Road

Millennial moments come and go, raptures are prophesized and postponed, the end is always near — like a carrot on a stick. The American brand of endtimes lust and apocalyptic pre-occupations is the subject of an original piece created by Cripple Creek Theater’s Andrew Vaught (Major Swelling’s Salvation Salve Medicine Show) and Chris Kaminstein of Goat in the Road Productions (Our Man). In The Future is a Fancyland Place, Jarville’s life is already unsettled when he starts picking up on strange animal behavior, hears about cryptic messages in the static of technology and broadcasting and notices his sister is assembling a tent camp. But what does it all mean? Tickets $15. — Will Coviello

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Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com — In Yasmina Reza’s comedy, a meeting of two sets of parents hoping to resolve a conflict between their sons becomes increasingly chaotic as the evening progresses. Krewe of Satyricon performance Wednesday. Call 525-4498 for tickets for that performance only. Tickets $25 Krewe of Satyricon performance, $20 preview performances (Sept. 15-16), $29 Thursday and Sunday, $35 Friday and Saturday. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and Sept. 14, 3 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 9. IS HE DEAD? University of New Orleans, Performing Arts Center, Robert E. Nims Theatre, 280-7468; www.uno. edu — Theatre UNO and The NOLA Project present the play adapted from a lost script written by Mark Twain, in which an unsuccessful French painter fakes his death to achieve wealth. Tickets $8-$12. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. JITNEY. Anthony Bean

Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater. com — August Wilson’s drama depicts the African-American experience in 1970s Pittsburgh through his portrayal of men working as jitneys, or unlicensed taxicab drivers. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 8 p.m.

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Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 25. THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES. Cutting Edge Theater at

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions. org — In Roger Bean’s jukebox musical, an all-girl quartet in the 1950s sings the hits of the era. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through Sept. 30, and 2 p.m. Sunday.

SPEECH & DEBATE. Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIXFM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — Three high school outcasts are connected when a sex scandal comes to light in Stephen Karam’s dark comedy. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students. 7:30 p.m Thursday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 24.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

FEEDING THE MOONFISH.

Byrdie’s Gallery, 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — Four Humours Theater presents Barbara Wiechmann’s character study of two young people and the unlikely bond they form over the course of a night. Tickets $6, or two tickets for $10. 9 p.m. Friday and Monday through Sept. 26.

PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRY EVALUATION . MEDICATION . THERAPY

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER

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57


LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT STAGE

PAGE 57

for burlesque dancers and enthusiasts features performances, parties and daytime workshops. Visit www.neworleansburlesquefest. com for the full schedule and other details. Thursday-Saturday.

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show with vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors is followed by the improvised comedy program. Admission $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Friday.

review

NOTHING LIKE A DAME: THE WOMEN OF RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN. Eiffel

Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave., 5252951; www.eiffelsociety.com — Amy Alvarez and Jefferson Turner star in the cabaret show. Call 975-5504 or email jon@onepartharmony. net for reservations. Tickets $30 (includes one cocktail) or $60 (includes three-course meal and one cocktail). 7 p.m. dinner service, 8 p.m. show. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www. maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www. therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

AUDITIONS CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday. JEFFERSON CHORALE. First Christian

Church, 8121 Airline Hwy., Metairie — The chorus holds auditions by appointment only. Rehearsals begin Thursday. Call 390-3598 or 390-5331, or email llabruyere70123@ yahoo.com, fstoppixlator@me.com or choralmusicrules@hotmail.com for details.

SYMPHONY CHORUS OF NEW ORLEANS. Loyola University, College

THE WOMAN IN BLACK. Playmakers

Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — The theater holds auditions for its November production of Stephen Mallatratt’s horror play. Call (985) 789-4024 for details. 7 p.m Tuesday.

OPERA BON OPERATIT! The Inn on Bourbon,

541 Bourbon St., 524-7611; www. innonbourbon.com — The opera trio performs “The Best of Rodgers & Hammerstein.” Free admission. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

CALL FOR THEATER RUBY PRIZE. Southern Rep will award a $10,000 prize, a 10-day writer’s retreat, development workshops and readings at Southern Rep New Play Bacchanal to a female playwright of color. Visit www. southernrep.com for details. Submission deadline is Thursday.

COMEDY BROWN IMPROV COMEDY. 12 Bar, 608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola.com — The improv comedy troupe performs. 8:30 p.m Friday.

Dino Might

The Corbian Visual Arts and Dance recently presented one of the most imaginative shows I’ve ever seen in this town. Darwin the Dinosaur has toured internationally, but the run at the Contemporary Arts Center was its first appearance in New Orleans. Darwin can be taken anywhere because it has no dialogue: It’s all dance, mime, music and captivating visuals. It’s almost a puppet show with the puppeteers (dressed in black on a black stage) inhabiting large-as-life puppets. The piece begins with a phantasmagoric prehistory with a pair of pterodactyls. They, like all the creatures, are animated skeletons made of electroluminescent wire. A magical scientist creates a dinosaur — the eponymous Darwin, who toys with the idea of devouring his creator when he realizes he has teeth. So the scientist creates a heart for Darwin, and the beast becomes a gentle pet. Darwin wanders off to explore the world and much of the story follows his often comic and entertaining adventures, like a dance with an ostrich who likes to get down and boogie. But evil lurks in the form of a fierce tyrannosaurus. There is a special sensibility at work in the piece. At one point, the tyrannosaurus crosses the stage growling and to our surprise (and the delight of kids in the audience) he drops blue poop as he goes. After he exits, four blue droppings transform into flowers which come to life and dance. Another haunting effect is a glowing blue line on the floor. A turtle tries to convince Darwin to cross the line, but he’s afraid. The line is the shore of a body of water. Darwin jumps in and the line zooms up over his head, leaving him swimming with glowing fish. The scientist is distraught over his runaway dinosaur and sets out to find him. The tyrannosaurus tries to eat the man for dinner, but Darwin appears and the two dinosaurs engage in a duel — with light swords, no less. Ian Carney and Corbin Popp created, choreographed and directed the piece (with additional direction by Coy Middlebrook). The cast included Carney, Eleanor Carney, Stephen Charles Nicholson, Jonathon Whalen and Michael Quintana. The group is preparing a production of The Ugly Duckling. Don’t miss it. — Dalt Wonk

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Free admission. 10 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

(The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday.

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-allages team comedy competition. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 7 p.m. Saturday.

COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300;

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS/ GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf

Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www. nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

SNACK TIME WITH THE ANVIL COMPANY. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The improv and sketch comedy troupe performs. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The improv comedy troupe performs. Tickets $5. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday. THE TIM & MICAH PROJECT. Shadow-

box Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — Improv comedians and Second City Training Center faculty members Tim Soszko and Micah Philbrook perform. 10:30 p.m. Friday and 9 p.m. Saturday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

of Music, 6363 St. Charles Ave — The principal chorus of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra holds auditions for its 2011-2012 season. Auditions are by appointment only. Call 525-2111 or visit www.symphonychorus.org for details. Tuesday.

LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC. La

59


LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

EVENTS

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 13 KINDER GARDEN: BACK TO SCHOOL IN THE GARDEN.

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through ageappropriate activities. Tickets $10 members, $12 nonmembers. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 15 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during its weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

KIDS MURAL WORKSHOP WITH RAJKO RADOVANOVIC . Staple

Goods, 1340 St. Roch Ave., 9087331; www.postmedium.org/ staplegoods — The children’s event is a part of Local Threads, a free arts festival in the St. Roch Neighborhood. Noon. SOUTHERN ART, SOUTHERN STORIES. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Children can hear stories, explore the museum and create art inspired by themes found throughout the museum in the monthly event. The program is for children ages 4-7 accompanied by a caregiver. Call 539-9608 or email ebalkin@ogdenmuseum.org for details. Admission $15 members, $18 nonmembers. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 13 C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF NEW ORLEANS PROGRAM. Parker

Memorial United Methodist PAGE 63

Dancer Lola van Ella (pictured on right) started a burlesque festival in her native St. Louis, but she should be a familiar face to local burlesque fans. She’s performed several times in New Orleans’ Bustout Burlesque shows and she competed in both previous Queen of Burlesque competitions at the New Orleans Burlesque Festival. At the inaugural pageant in 2009, Lola sang and stripped to “If I Knew You Were Coming I’d’ve Baked a Cake,” an act that left her wearing only pasties, a smear of icing and a spatula. It earned her second runner-up honors, and last year she improved to first runner-up by singing “Dream a Little Dream of Me” and incorporating a giant swing and some aerial acrobatics. This year she’s aiming for top honors with an act she promises will be much edgier, titled “More than VanElla.” “I’m known for my charm and humor and singing,” Lola says. “This is my grandest, most over the top, sparkly, bawdiest act yet.” It’s inspired more by RuPaul than the classic American songbook. Lola was a singer who mostly performed jazz standards in cabaret theaters before she switched to burlesque. She now runs her own troupe, the Bon-Bons, who also will perform at the festival, and she started a dance studio. At the festival, Lola will conduct several workshops for dancers. Lola is one of many headliners at the New Orleans Burlesque Festival making a living as professional burlesque dancers. Many travel to other high-profile burlesque events including the Miss Exotic World Pageant and Striptease Reunion held at the Burlesque Hall of Fame in Las Vegas and the London Burlesque Festival. Lola says she likes the New Orleans competition because it requires working with a live band, which is part of the traditional approach highlighted by the festival. Many new burlesque dancers use modern music and embrace the retro-culture looks of Bettie Page hairdos and colorful tattoos. The competition takes place Saturday night at the theater at Harrah’s New Orleans. There are burlesque showcases at both Harrah’s and the House of Blues featuring a host of touring dancers including Catherine D’Lish, Kitten De Ville, Medianoche, Coco Lectric, Perle Noire and many others. Festival events also include workshops, panel discussions, appearances by burlesque performers from the 1950s and ’60s and the closing night party at Republic New Orleans. See www.neworleansburlesquefest.com for schedule and details. — Will Coviello

SEPT

15–17

New Orleans Burlesque Festival www.neworleansburlesquefest.com

XAVIER UNIVERSITY PRESENTS A PANEL DISCUSSION RACE, CITIZENSHIP & CIVIL RIGHTS

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

Saturday 17

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61


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Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

PAGE 61

Church, 1130 Nashville Ave., 895-1222 — The meeting features a screening of The King’s Speech, followed by a discussion led by analysts Marilyn Marshall and Karen Gibson. Visit www.jungneworleans. org for details. Admission free for members, $10 nonmembers. 6 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. LOUISIANA SEAFOOD RESTAURANT WEEK . More

than 30 local restaurants offer two-course lunches for $20 and three-course dinners for $35 for the Louisiana Restaurant Association and We Live to Eat’s inaugural event. Visit www.welivetoeatnola.com/restaurant-week for the list of participating restaurants. Tuesday-Sunday. NEW DOCENT TRAINING .

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden trains prospective docents, people who lead museum tours, in museum techniques and education strategies for engaging visitors. Call 539-9608 or email ebalkin@ogdenmuseum.org for details. 10 a.m.

NEW ORLEANS FIRE FIGHTERS FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER .

NEW ORLEANS LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS REDISTRICTING FORUM . The

Chapel of the Holy Comforter, 2220 Lakeshore Drive — Gambit’s Clancy DuBos, research analyst Silas Lee and consultant Greg Rigamer discuss the political effects of redistricting in Orleans and Jefferson parishes. 7 p.m.

THE PEOPLE SAY PROJECT: BURLESQUE PERFORMERS WILD CHERRY & TRIXIE MINX .

Louisiana Humanities Center, 938 Lafayette St., Suite 300, 523-4352; www.leh.org — Louisiana Humanities Center program director Brian Boyles moderates a discussion with local artists and musicians. Call 620-2632, email boyles@ leh.org or visit www.thepeoplesayproject.org for details. Catered reception at 5 p.m., program 6 p.m. PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSOCIATION OF LOUISIANA SOCIAL . Ralph’s on the Park,

900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com

Wednesday 14 AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS MEETING .

Maximilian’s International Showroom, 8600 Oak St., 895-1115; www.maximiliansinternational.com — The New Orleans chapter of the group hosts a buffet supper meeting with an orchid raffle. Call the store for reservations. Visit www.asidneworleans.org for details. 5:30 p.m. COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. HARRISON AVENUE MARKETPLACE . Lakeview

Grocery, 801 Harrison Ave., 293-1201; www.lakeviewgrocery.com — The market features items from local artists and crafters, food, drinks and live music. Free admission. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

HIDDEN TREASURES OF THE LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM .

Louisiana State Museum Cabildo Collections Facility, 1000 Chartres St., 568-6968; lsm.crt.state.la.us — The Friends of the Cabildo hosts behind-the-scenes viewings of the paintings, portraiture and photography at the Louisiana State Museum’s storage facility lead by curator Tony Lewis. Reservations are required. Call 523-3939 or email rebecca@ friendsofthecabildo.org for details. Tickets $10 Friends of the Cabildo members, $15 general admission. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

MAKING BOOKS SYMPOSIUM . Newcomb College Campus, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, 3270009; www.newcomb.tulane. edu — Photographer Thomas Roma, curator Susan Kismaric and author Phillip Lopate discuss the creative process involved in making photography books. Free admission. 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. ROUND TABLE LUNCHEON .

Royal Sonesta Hotel, 300 Bourbon St., 586-0300; www.sonesta.com/neworleans_royal — The monthly luncheon hosted by Margarita

Bergen features a panel of speakers and live entertainment. Call 553-2220 or email nscallan@royalsonestano. com for details. Admission $42. Noon. WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Thursday 15 CELEBRATE RECOVERY. Victory

Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The group addresses addictions and other emotional issues through a spiritual perspective. Call 733-5005 for details. 6:30 p.m.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

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EPILEPSY & SEIZURE EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT GROUP. East Jefferson General

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Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www. ejgh.org — The Epilepsy Foundation of Louisiana holds a monthly support group for adults who have or are impacted by epilepsy or seizure disorders. The group meets in the Foundation Board Room. Call (800) 9600587 or email kelly@epilepsylouisiana.org for details. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

EXHIBITION WALK-THROUGH . Newcomb Art Gallery, Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www.newcombartgallery. tulane.edu — Thomas Roma leads a gallery talk and walkthrough of Pictures for Books: Photographs by Thomas Roma. A reception with light refreshments follows. 1:30 p.m.

3200 Severn Ave., Suite 118 Metairie • 455-8591

Visit our Smoking Lounge SURGEON GENERALʼS WARNING Ciagr Smoking can cause cancers of the mouth and throat, even if you do not inhale.

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Don Vappie Early Jazz style

SEPTEMBER 15

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

LIFE HURTS, GOD HEALS.

Victory Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The support group focuses on teens and young adults with addictions, hang ups and emotional pain. Call 733-5005 for details. 7 p.m. PARENTS OF TROUBLED ADULTS MEETING . Jewish Family

Service, 3330 West Esplanade, Suite 600, Metairie, 8318475; www.jfsneworleans. org — The bi-monthly meeting offers support to parents whose adult children suffer

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

OPEN AT

8AM FOR ALL

HOME GAMES • bloody mary bar • omelette station • breakfast burritos

(504) 483-9488 St. • NOLA • 1100 Constance ailable

525-5515

Parking Av lliope Enter/Exit on Ca

therustynail.biz

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 13 > 2011

The District, 711 Tchoupitoulas St., 301-1476; www.districtnola.com — Mr. New Orleans, fire fighter Leonard Daigle Jr., hosts the event to benefit the organization. Visit www. nationsbravest.com/events for details. Admission $10. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

— The newly formed New Orleans chapter of the public relations association hosts a happy hour event with drink specials and a tasting menu. Email ashley@gambelcommunications.com for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

63


EVENTS

LISTINGS

from depression, mental illness, addiction disorders and other difficulties. Dr. Edward Foulks discusses “Creating Boundaries With Your Troubled Adult Child That Promote A Healthy Sense Of Self.” Call 8318475 or 828-6334 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. SAVE OUR CEMETERIES & DELGADO FUNERAL SERVICES PROGRAM LECTURE . Delgado Community

Hungry?

We’re Cookin’... Big Momma’s

“FAMILY REUNION” Wings $19.99 20-piece 2 Waffles

College, Isaac Delgado Hall, Drama Hall, third floor, 616-6066; www. dcc.edu — The program will discuss the history of the funeral service, burial preparations, dynamics of grief and other topics. A Q&A session follows. Reservations are required to receive a parking pass. Call 525-3377 for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

FRESH Everything is fresh to order

Friday 16

FLAVORS 7 Different Chicken Flavors

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, N. Rampart

BREAKFAST Served All Day Long Hamburgers, Sandwiches & More

and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

PONDEROSA RECORD SHOW.

64

Renaissance Arts Hotel, 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2330 — Held in conjunction with the Ponderosa Stomp music conference, the show features rare and collectible records for sale. Visit www.ponderosastomp.com for details. Admission $5, or free with the $20 conference daily admission fee. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday-Saturday. SCALES & ALES. Audubon Aquarium

5741 CROWDER BLVD. 12 MINUTES NEW ORLEANS EAST ONLY FROM DOWNTOWN WE TAKE PHONE ORDERS

504.241.2548

Hours: Mon-Fri 10am-6pm Sat 8am-6pm • Sun 8am-3pm www.BigMommasChickenandWaffles.com

of the Americas, 1 Canal St., (800) 774-7394; www.auduboninstitute.org — The Audubon Nature Institute fundraiser features live entertainment, a silent auction, food, beer and wine and “animal encounters.” Visit www.auduboninstitute.org/scalesandales for details. Tickets $35 general admission, $75 patron party. 7 p.m. patron party, 8 p.m. general admission.

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM SYMPOSIUM AND GALA .

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 09/25/11

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — Chefs, food scholars, writers, policymakers and others discuss a broad range of topics related to the history of eating in the South. The gala features food, cocktails, live music and auctions. Tickets $65-$165. Symposium 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday; gala 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 17 BROADMOOR DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GALA . Muriel’s

Jackson Square, 801 Chartres St., 568-1885; www.muriels.com — The fundraiser includes food, auctions, and live music from Roots of Music, 3 Pc. Spicy and others. Call 309-2571 for details. Admission $100. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

BUCKY THE LAKE MONSTER NIGHT. Live Bait Bar and Grill,

200 Hammond Hwy., Metairie, 840-0902; www.livebaitnola. com — The New Orleans Bigfoot Society and the Intergalactic Krewe of Chewbacchus present the “community forum on Bucky the Lake Monster,” with performances from The Valparaiso Men’s Chorus and Eat Moby Dick Moby, raffles and more. Call 301-8201 or visit www.nolabigfoot.com for details. Admission $7. 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.

CATHERINE BROWN MEMORIAL LECTURE COMMUNITY WORKSHOP.

New Orleans African American Museum, 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — Landscape historian Thaïsa Way leads a discussion on the future of the museum’s Treme Villa garden. Reservations are requested. Call 293-4726 or email hschackai@ longuevue.com for details. Free admission. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. CITY BARK ADOPTION DAY. City Park, 1 Palm Drive — The Plaquemines Animal Welfare Society hosts a dog adoption event. 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET.

Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. EDIBLE GARDENING SYMPOSIUM .

Loyola University (Joseph A. Danna Center), 6363 St. Charles Ave. — Local food experts and representatives from the LSU AgCenter discuss growing and preparing vegetables and herbs at home. Visit www.mggno.org for details. Admission $10. 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. FALL ARTS & CRAFT SHOW.

Northshore Harbor Center, 100 Harbor Center Blvd., Slidell, (985) 781-3650 — The show features goods from Louisiana artists. Visit www.steinhauerproductions.com for details. Admission $5. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. GALLERY TALK . Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Jim Roche discusses and leads a tour of the museum’s Self-Taught, Outsider and Visionary Art from the Collection of Alexa Kleinbard and Jim Roche exhibition. Free for museum members, $10 nonmembers. 2 p.m. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET.

Ormond Plantation, 13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon.

GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD SELLABRATION . Preservation

Resource Center, 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-7032; www.prcno.org — The homebuyer fair provides prospective homebuyers neighborhoods with the tools to find, purchase and renovate historic homes. Call 636-3399 or email sblaum@ prcno.org for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET. Gretna

Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

GUIDED CANOE TOUR . Bayou

Segnette State Park, 7777 Westbank Expwy., Westwego, 736-7140 — The park staff leads a canoe trip around the park’s waterways, during which participants learn about the park’s ecology. 10 a.m.

HORNETS BUZZ PATROL AUDITIONS. Alario Center, Bayou Segnette Complex, Westwego, 349-5525 — The New Orleans Hornets hold auditions for the group that energizes home game crowds with cheers, on-court promotions, dance routines and skits, as well as make appearances at community events throughout the year. Auditioners must be 18 or older. Visit www.hornets.com for details. Noon. MADISONVILLE ART MARKET. Madisonville Art Market, Tchefuncte River Front at Water St., Madisonville, (985) 871-4918; www. artformadisonville.org — The monthly market features fine art from local artists including painting, mixed media, photography, jewelry, wood carving, sculpture, stained glass and more. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Holy

Angels Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www.sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock Barn, 409 Aycock

St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 355-4442 or visit www.visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

TREME UNDER THE BRIDGE MARKET.

North Claiborne Expressway, between Ursulines Avenue and Gov. Nicholls Street — The new monthly market highlights local artwork and features live music from local bands, high schools and choirs; community services like health and legal aid; and educational services and exhibits. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

WOMEN BUSINESS FAIR . Dillard University, Samuel DuBois Cook Theatre, 2601 Gentilly Blvd., 8164857 — The workshop discusses how female business owners can take advantage of opportunities available through the government. Call 589-2756, 589-6688 or e-mail jo.lawrence3@sba.gov for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. to noon.

Sunday 18 ABITA ARTISTS. 9th Street Gallery,

71377 St. Mary St., Abita Springs — Local artists hold a monthly meeting. Call Lana at 898-3071 for details. 3 p.m.

SATELLITE MAGAZINE LAUNCH PARTY. The Front, 4100 St.

Claude Ave.; www.nolafront. org — Satellite, the new biannual magazine focusing on cities, culture and politics, hosts a launch event. Reservations are recommended. Email info@satellitemagazine.ca or visit www.satellitemagazine.ca for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

WORDS C.S. FRIEDMAN. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs Legacy of Kings. 6 p.m. Thursday. GERALD ELIAS. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author and musician performs, as well as signs and reads from Death and the Maiden. 6 p.m. Saturday. “THE RED FEATHER” LAUNCH PARTY.

The Shop Gallery, 509 Royal St., 304-6493; www.blackettpeckgallery.com — The event celebrates the release of Sherry “Leddy” Milam’s new children’s book. Big Chief Kevin Goodman and the Flaming Arrows Band perform. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

ROBERT OLEN BUTLER . Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses A Small Hotel. 5:30 p.m. Thursday. TIFF HOLLAND. Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from Betty Superman. 6 p.m. Friday.

VINCENT CELLUCCI . Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 8664916; www.maplestreetbookshop. com — The author signs and reads from An Easy Place to Die. 6 p.m. Friday. WILLIAM DERESIEWICZ . Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses A Jane Austen Education. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday.

CALL FOR WRITERS WORKSHOP IN FICTION/ NONFICTION . Arts Council of New

Orleans, 818 Howard Ave., Suite 300, 523-1465 — James Nolan teaches a 12-session fiction and creative nonfiction workshop on Tuesdays from Sept. 20 to Dec. 13. Call the Arts Council to register. WRITING WELL-CRAFTED FICTION . Author Stephen Rea (Finn McCool’s Football Club) teaches the 10-week class starting Sept. 27. The class is open to writers of all levels. Visit www.loyno.edu/wpc for details. Registration deadline is Tuesday. For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.


A KNOCKOUT WEEKEND WITH

ARIANNY CELESTE

Presented by

Arianny Celeste

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

DVDJ Biggie

66

DJ San-D

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 • 11PM DVDJ BIGGIE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 • 10PM FIGHT AFTER-PARTY

Hosted by Arianny Celeste, Ultimate Fighting Octagon Girl

DVDJ BIGGIE & DJ SAN-D SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 DJ SAN-D • 4PM DJ CAPTAIN CHARLES • 7PM Plus the Ladies of Masquerade®. To reserve bottle service in Ultra Lounge, call 504-533-6139.

Be Our Friend On

Follow Us On

Entertainment schedule subject to change without notice. Drink specials are while supplies last. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

V1_61127.2_4.729x10.833_4c_Ad.indd 1

9/8/11 5:25 PM


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> NEW DINING DEALS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Organized by the Louisiana Restaurant Association, Louisiana > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Seafood Restaurant Week runs from Sept. 12 to Sept. 18. The < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <format is familiar: Two-course lunches for $20 and threecourse dinners for $35 are available at nearly 40 restaurants. Find details and menus at www.welivetoeatnola.com.

am

B

MEATLESS AT MAT & NADDIE’S

Vegetarians have always had options on the wide-ranging menu at Mat & Naddie’s (937 Leonidas St., 861-9600; www.matandnaddies.com), but for the next month they’ll also find meatless wine dinners. Pick from a panzanella salad or tempeh sloppy Joe to start, and the roasted pepper cannelloni or sesame-crusted oyster mushrooms for an entree. Dessert is saffron rice pudding. Get it all with wine pairings for $48, or without for $28. The restaurant offers a separate deal combining any three salads or appetizers and a glass of wine for $28.

five 5 IN

Five Seafood Tacos

COWBELL

8801 OAK ST., 298-8689 www.cowbell-nola.com

Grilled fish tacos are topped with green rice and mirliton slaw.

EL GATO NEGRO

Creole Revival

AN UPTOWN BISTRO GETS YET ANOTHER REDO. BY IAN MCNULTY

M

straightforward, contemporary Creole menu, though cutting-edge ingenuity is not. Most meals here have been highly satisfying, though the sparks of excitement that get you planning your next visit were few. Pasta jambalaya, stuffed flounder and pork loin with mango are all good, and they’re all dishes you’ve had countless times before. The menu has its moments though. Shrimp and grits is almost unavoidable on local menus, but Springfloat’s rendition is a standout, with a fried grits cake oozing its creamy interior into a spicy, buttery sauce akin to the base of barbecue shrimp. Another head-turner is quail stuffed with boudin, wrapped in bacon and paired with collards. Though tight preparations are the rule, exceptions turn up, like an over-salted snapper lost in a muddle of black beans, and the crab cakes and fried green tomatoes were separate appetizers that seemed to share the same bland batter. The salvation for the latter dish, though, was the lode of crabmeat escorting it. In fact, Atchafalaya’s appetizer list reads like a crab tasting menu. Large, beautiful lumps turn up everywhere, and their best turn might be over an exuberantly fresh, lightly dressed salad with cilantro, hearts of palm and peanuts. Crab gets plenty of play at brunch too, but duck confit hash is my first choice here. The extremely popular brunch service can approach bedlam, and even those with reservations often must wait for tables. However, a self-serve bloody Mary bar helps keep antsy, hungry customers pleasantly distracted.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Lobster meat is the highlight of a unique taco.

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO

2018 MAGAZINE ST., 569-0000; 4724 S. CARROLLTON AVE., 486-9950; www.juansflyingburrito.com

Blackened redfish is dressed with creamy cilantro slaw.

OAK WINE BAR

8118 OAK ST., 302-1485 www.oaknola.com

Shrimp fill handmade tortillas topped with lime crema. WHAT

Atchafalaya WHERE

901 Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www.cafeatchafalaya.com

TAQUERIA CORONA

1827 HICKORY AVE., HARAHAN, 738-6722; 3535 SEVERN AVE., METAIRIE, 885-5088; 5932 MAGAZINE ST., 897-3974 www.taqueriacorona.com

Fish fried with a golden puffy crust are dressed with red cabbage and tartar sauce.

WHEN

Dinner daily, lunch Tue.-Fri., brunch Sat.-Sun. HOW MUCH

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

Expensive

RESERVATIONS

Recommended

WHAT WORKS

A highly consistent kitchen with pristine seafood WHAT DOESN'T

Few dishes break from a familiar script

CHECK, PLEASE

A reinvented Uptown bistro serves reliable Creole cuisine

2008 Robin K. Pinot Noir

CENTRAL COAST, CALIFORNIA / $20 RETAIL Grapes for this wine were sourced mainly from vineyards in and near the Santa Lucia Highlands and there is a small amount of fruit from the Russian River area. The complex wine offers aromas of ripe red fruit and black cherry, toasty oak and floral notes. On the palate, taste berries earthy undertones and a pleasing finish. Drink it with either lighter or heavier dishes from seafood, salads and vegetables to grilled chops, braised meats and roasted fowl and game. Buy it at: Whole Foods Market in Metairie Drink it at: Ste. Marie, Stanley, The Rum House, The Delachaise and Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza in Mid-City. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

aking a name for a restaurant takes a lot of work. But remaking that name once established — and particularly recasting it as something better — can be more challenging still. That was the tall order for Tony Tocco when he bought Cafe Atchafalaya in 2009. The Uptown restaurant has seen a succession of owners, and each had a different idea of what it should be. It took a turn toward the upscale after Hurricane Katrina, but soon began a decline that would drive it nearly into the ground. Today, however, the place seems like the successful subject of one of those restaurant improvement reality shows, only without the cameras and consultants. Tocco is a local service industry veteran who started the indispensible Uptown dive Snake & Jake’s back in 1992. He had finer things in mind for his new restaurant, however. He charged chef Mark Springfloat with transforming the menu and then set about rebranding the place. He shortened the restaurant’s name to Atchafalaya and knocked on doors, asking neighbors to give the place another chance. He set up a food booth at the downtown concert series Wednesday at the Square to woo the after-hours crowd there, and he started hosting wine dinners to bring back a skeptical fine-dining crowd. He also brought in popular musicians, and today there’s live music at Sunday brunch and at dinner on Sundays and Mondays. Atchafalaya now comfortably occupies a desirable yet nebulous culinary niche, one considerably above the neighborhood restaurant but decidedly below the top tier. Consistency is a hallmark of Springfloat’s

Owner Tony Tocco and chef Mark Springfloat have remade Atchafalaya.

81 FRENCH MARKET PLACE, 525-9752; 300 HARRISON AVE., 488-0107 www.elgatonegronola.com

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CUISINE

Scuttlebites ALL THE NEWS THAT’S FIT TO EAT.

LUNCH

STARTING SPECIALS AT $10.95 8550 PONCHARTRAIN BLVD. 267-3263 900 FRENCHMEN 943-9433

WWW.WASABINOLA.COM

THE

K A E T S MB BO

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HO

- getta bo

ut i

t

D AVA ELIVE IL A RY BLE ! STEAK

R S ODNES W/GO NCH TENDE

E ON FR AD. BRE

7329 FRERET • 861-7890 (1 block off Broadway)

Now Accepting NOLA Bucks!

113 C Westbank Expwy • Gretna, LA 70053

(504) 368-9846 • Open Daily 9am-9pm (Kitchen Closes at 8:30PM) • Closed Sun & Thurs

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

Julie’s Little India Kitchen at

68

NOW SERVING

276-9095

Weekend

Brunch

sat 9am-noon sun 9am-3pm

IT’S

YES! A CA KE

CAFE AND BAR | BALCONY GUEST HOUSE GROCERIES | BEER | WINE | LAUNDROMAT TAKE OUT 944-6666

• schiroscafe.com

2483 Royal street • balconyguesthouse.com

One of the best places to eat Po-Boys -Brett Anderson

Home of the Original Seafood Muffuletta

www.flourpowernola.com

Green Parrot Nursery 201 NASHVILLE AVE. NASHVILLE & THE RIVAH

3939 Veterans • 885-3416

(504) 894-1100

Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

www.greenparrotnursery.com

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview)

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

CARE PACKAGES

A new pizzeria opened last week, serving slices and pies along a stretch of Tulane Avenue in Mid-City that’s seen quite a bit of change lately. Pizzicare (3001 Tulane Ave., 301-4823) is the work of Jeff Baron and Bart Bell, who also run Crescent Pie & Sausage Co., a restaurant known for handmade meats, creative pizzas, Cajun dishes and craft beer. But Pizzicare will be a different type of restaurant. Fitted with gleaming white tile and dominated by a large, glass-topped service counter, Baron likens it to a style of pizzeria common in the Northeast, where an entire menu’s worth of different pies are served by the slice. Pizzicare also serves whole pizzas, calzones, stromboli and salads. Baron plans eventually to add beer and wine at Pizzicare, though it’s serving just soft drinks for now. He also has plans to expand. “I’m building it as a model for a franchise from the ground up, but you have to start with one and so right now we’re just focused on doing this one right,” says Baron, who also runs the Dough Bowl (1039 Broadway, 861-2200), a take-out pizza parlor close to the Tulane University campus. Baron and Bell have been busy lately. In addition to the Pizzicare venture, they’ve been retooling Crescent Pie & Sausage Co. Last weekend they closed Huevos, their breakfast/lunch joint adjacent to Crescent Pie & Sausage, and they’re now renovating that space to be a production kitchen and retail spot for the sausages and artisan meats that gird the Crescent Pie menu. These meats are Bell’s particular specialty, and he’s making more as toppings for Pizzicare. Many of the breakfast dishes from Huevos will live on through a new brunch service at Crescent Pie & Sausage that starts this Sunday, Sept. 11. Meanwhile, those headed over for a slice at Pizzicare (the Italian name translates as “to pinch,” as in what you do when making pizza dough) may notice a new look in this long run-down part of town. The new restaurant is in the center of a sleek new strip mall built in concert with the new Crescent Club apartments just across the street. Both are projects from the local real estate developer the Domain Cos., which has built other residential complexes in Mid-City since Katrina. The Domain Cos. also figures into something else Baron and Bell have in the works. The real estate developer plans to build a new residential and retail

complex on what is now a cluster of surface parking lots near the Superdome. Baron says for Saints home games this fall, Crescent Pie & Sausage Co. and NOLA Brewing will set up public tailgate events on one of those lots, selling jambalaya, pork shoulder sandwiches, sausage on a stick and other pre-game snacks. — Ian McNulty

... AND STILL MORE PIZZA (AND BURGERS)

Along Freret Street, two more restaurants have recently joined the resurgent Uptown corridor’s new restaurant row. The latest is Midway (4725 Freret St., 322-2815, www.midwaypizzanola.com), a Chicago-style deep dish pizza restaurant which opened Sept. 2. The guys behind Midway are Ben Sherman and Steve Watson, who also run the King Pin Bar. Midway will serve lunch and dinner and late-night (until at least midnight) every day. Watson says the restaurant is serving a limited menu for now with just pizzas and salads, and the bar is open and ready. Local foodies likely know by now that the other new Freret addition, just one block down, is the Company Burger (4600 Freret St., 267-0320, www.thecompanyburger.com). This stylish new burger joint is the work of Adam Biderman, a New Orleans native who recently moved back home after a culinary career in Atlanta where he was a chef at the widelyacclaimed Holeman & Finch Public House. At the Company Burger, which he opened in mid-August, he’s replicating a specialty burger that attained cult status at Holeman & Finch. It’s worth noting that the Company Burger is in a building that used to house a Wagner’s Meat (as in “You can’t beat ...”), which seems appropriate enough, and also a fitness center and a yoga studio, which is just plain hilarious. So even as the weather comes down, things are still perking up along Freret. In our cover story last month on Freret Street’s emerging restaurant row (“The Rebirth of Freret Street,” Aug. 9, 2011), we included a “Freret by the numbers” sidebar. Looks like it’s already time for an update, so here goes: 10 new bars and restaurants since 2009; five so far in 2011; two more announced with plans to open later in 2011 (a Japanese restaurant called Origami and a bar and music venue called Publiq House). — McNulty • Got a tip for Scuttlebites? Contact Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net.


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YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

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<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

AMERICAN

BARBECUE

CAFE

FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Harahan, 287-4581; 7457 St. Charles Ave., 266-2921; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pit-cooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. Reservations accepted. St. Charles Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Hickory Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $$

ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N.

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks

St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq. com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat. Cash only. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Grilled Brewhouse ribs are served with house-made barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with red pepper aioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL —

S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

4905 Canal St., 488-7357; www. beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jeffer-

BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www.

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133

son Hwy., Jefferson, 832-0830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers, alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. Thrusday’s steak night special features a filet mignon, butter-garlic potatoes, salad, grilled French bread and a soft drink for $15. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $

budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

985/345-6789

ECO CAFE & BISTRO — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — Eco Cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. There are fresh squeezed juices, and Friday and Saturday evenings feature tapas dining. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. The cochon de lait panini includes slow-braised pork, baked ham, pickles, Swiss, ancho-honey slaw, honey mustard and chili mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 5811112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $ PAGE 70

PARKWAY FOR

PO'BOYS! IN NOLA CALL (504)

482-3047 11AM TO 10PM CLOSED TUESDAYS

Celebrating over 100 years of Serving New Orleans the Best!

Homemade Gelato Pastries · Cannoli · Spumoni

HOMEMADE ITALIAN ICE CREAM & PASTRIES SINCE 1905

214 NORTH CARROLLTON AVENUE MID CITY | 486-0078

IN SEASON

PEACH, WATERMELON, CANTALOUPE ICE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

985/626-4476

69


THINK COOL!

Out2Eat page 69 VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-

1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave.,

CELEBRATING 90 YEARS • FAMILY SHOES

Monogramming Available

8119-21 Oak Street • 504-866-9944

September Special 2.50

$

SATURDAY MARGARITA WEDNESDAY SANGRIA

865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans. com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road.,

Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton Y

ou

rN e ig hbor hood Restaurant

3001 MAGAZINE ST. · 891-0997 www.joeyksrestaurant.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

LUNCH MON-FRI 11-3, SAT 11-4 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9

70

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N.

95 BUFFET $9 DAILY LUNCH

OPEN TUE-SUN

LUNCH 11:30AM-2:30PM DINNER 5:30-10:30PM 4308 MAGAZINE ST • 894-9797

Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERt ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 5814422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830;

www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601 Maga-

zine St., 899-4260; www.pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters

St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CONtEMPORaRY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange

Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola. com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www.

oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl. com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 5251486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

CuBaN/ CaRIBBEaN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www.mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL —

1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www. therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $

ommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine

St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro. com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOuRMEt tO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIaN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-6666; www.

schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Mag-

azine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie,

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave.,

ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th

888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $ Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine. com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. The Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-5171;

www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St., 895-

0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and corianderspiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations rec-

ItaLIaN St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-

2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, 455-2266

— This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411

Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like veal- and spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-3644

— Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave.,

488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-

9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253;

www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St.,

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-

0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-

7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 301-9570

— Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. The alligator pear and crabmeat salad combines avocado and crabmeat over tomatoes, red onions and greens in balsamic glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark. com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 3093570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitou-

las St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRA—NEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St.,

587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTH� WESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickorysmoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Maga-

zine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www.juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexicaninspired cooking. It’s known for its meal-and-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242

Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www. nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-

0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE — 755

Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-

8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St.,

310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffetstyle gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola. com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Frank-

lin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, po-boys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-0841;

6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sand-

wich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe. com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

OPEN AT 9AM FOR BRUNCH

3-6PM on gamedays

COME TRY OUR BLACKBERRY JALAPENO SMOKED RIBS

3701 IBERVILLE STREET • NOLA 70119 504.488.6582 • KATIESINMIDCITY.COM MON.11AM-3PM • TUES-THURS.11AM-9PM FRI-SAT.11AM-10PM • SUN BRUNCH. 9AM-3PM

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napo-

leon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www. rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

DISCOVER THE TASTE

OF INDIA

LUNCH BUFFET DAILY

LUNCH: 11:30-2:30 DINNER: 5:30-10:30

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.italian-

pie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125

Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

923 META IRIE RD.

836 - 6859

$5 OFF {WHEN YOU SPEND $50.} MUST BRING IN AD TO RECEIVE DISCOUNT. GW. EXP. 10-10-11

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-1414;

817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 7126868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www. reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Ham-

mond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave.,

525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen top-

page 72

3700 Orleans Ave.

in the Shops at the American Can Company

504.483.6314 • www.cbwines.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 2673263; www.wasabinola.com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

happy hour

TUES-SAT

71


Out2Eat

MOSCA’S

vietnamese restaurant The Best Beef Noodle Soup in Town

EST. 1946

Open Tuesday - Saturday 5:30 pm –9:30 pm

504.436.8950 4137 Hwy 90 WestWego

www.moscasrestaurant.com WE ACCEPT RESERVATIONS

page 71 pings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton

Banh Mi • Beef Stew • Rice O P E N 7 D AY S | 7A M -7 P M

1308 manhattan blvd 504.302.2094

HARVEY

Ave., 888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SaNDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-

7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP —

2368 Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of poboys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

CATERING!

72

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

FOR YOUR BLACK & GOLD & LSU PARTIES

D EMOLITION

& D ECONSTRUCTION S ERVICES A VAILABLE 6215 WILSON ST.

HARAHAN • 737-3933

515 HARRISON AVE.

LAKEVIEW • 484-0841

2801 Marais St., NOLA 70117 504.947.0038 • www.rtno.org Monday-Saturday, 9 to 4:30

-Sold Only At-

435, 600, 610, 721, 727 Bourbon St.

New Orleans’ Most Powerful Drink! Live Entertainment Nightly

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy. com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

tropical isle® HOME OF THE Hand Grenade®

PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

and Bistro FRESH GREEN FRIENDLY

Viva Mexico! FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 Celebrate Mexico’s Independence Day with Chef Guillermo Peters. Call to make your dinner reservations.

3903 CANAL ST

(CORNER OF N. SCOTT)

MID-CITY, NEW ORLEANS 561.6585 | WWW.ECOCAFENO.COM

899-2054; www.traceysnola. com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEaFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 5208530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted.

Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www.lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOuL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd.,

241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

StEaKHOuSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS —

322 Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy.com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a section of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001

N. Broad St., 821-3271; www. crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled

in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

taPaS/SPaNISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY —

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles

Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIEtNaMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$ PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transconti-

nental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


EmploymEnt 2011 Federal Postal Positions.

$13.00-$36.50+/hr., Full Benefits plus Paid Training. No Experience plus Job Security. Call Today! 1-866-477-4953 Ext .152. NOW HIRING! Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

Farm labor TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Texas Farms LLC, Perryton, TX has 100 positions for swine & oilseed crops. 3 mos. experience; able to obtain clean DL within 30 days of hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.65/hrday; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 10/3/11 - 8/3/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6811277.

rEtail FT ASSISTANT

miscEllanEous

Needed for French Quarter fine jewelry store. Must be available on weekends. Web design, adobe, and extensive computer knowledge a must. Email resume to frenchquarterjewelry@gmail.com

Joli Preventative HealtHcare resource center @ the New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave HIRING

CERTIFIED GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTORS with a passion for helping our community Please send your resume and references to beautyvsthebeast@gmail.com or call 504-390-8951

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

You can apply in person Monday through Friday at 201 Julia Street between the hours of 2:00-5:00 pm.

(Corner of St. Roch and St. Claude)

promote healthy lifestyles

74

Mulate’s Cajun Restaurant is looking for SERVERS with at least 2 years experience in restaurant business. You must be reliable and available to work holidays and special events. References will be checked.

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

8 Block

Kitchen and Bar

Is seeking waitstaff for its soon to be open Central Business District restaurant. Seating over 300 guests, 8 Block requires organized and energetic individuals seeking to make a healthy living. Experience is not necessary. If you ever wanted to wait tables, are available to work breakfast and lunch, and enjoy talking with people from all over, this is the job for you. A full two week training program will take you from learning about food and beverage to being a professional server. 8 Block will serve customers from area hotels, the Central Business District, and Superdome and Arena events. With a focus on New Orleans area farmers and cuisine, 8 Block provides a familiar dining experience, in a casual setting, that provides tourists and locals alike with a memorable dining experience. Why work a retail job at a set wage when instead you can learn how to work in a restaurant and make an average of a $150 in tips daily.

Requirements:

• Strong verbal and written communication • Moderate lifting • Ability to remain organized • A desire to meet new people • A desire to make people happy • Ability to work in a team environment

Join our team of CAREGivers:

Please fax resume; Attn: Joshua at 504.523.0488

METAIRIE

504-455-4339

NORTHSHORE

readers need

985-726-2669

homeinstead.com

You can help them find one.

A NEW JOB

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Employment” Section call 504.483.3100.


CLASSIFIEDS MERCHANDISE WANTED

AUTOMOTIVE

WANTED: WAR SOUVENIERS German, Japanese, U.S. Helmets, Daggers, Swords, Flags, Guns, Civil War. ALL MEMORABILIA. Call 985722-7051

DOMESTIC AUTOS ‘10 CHEVROLET HHR $11,995 504-368-5640

PETS

IMPORTED AUTOS

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

‘06 LEXUS IS 350 $20,995 504-368-5640

‘07 INFINITI M35 $22,995 504-368-5640

‘’09 NISSAN SENTRA $10,995 504-368-5640

‘’09 TOYOTA YARUS $11,995 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$15,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

‘10 Mitsubishi Galant

Advanced Healing Massage Norman Nail, #0458

Relaxation Aromatherapy Swedish Shiatsu Customized Deep Tissue Medical Acupuncture Available

& On Call Staff

$12,995 504-368-5640

4710 Canal St. • NOLA, 70119

‘10 VOLVO S40

www.healingneworleans.com

$19,995 504-368-5640

‘11 HYUNDAI SONATA $17,995 504-368-5640

504-214-2314

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

MASSAGE EXTRAORDINAIRE

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘09 SUBARU FORESTER

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

AWD $16,995 Call 504-368-5640

76

WANTED TO PURCHASE CASH FOR CARS

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

PET ADOPTIONS 6wk sweet m kitten striped cat Archie is fun & full of gusto. If interested Please contact Traci-tbkestler@ cox.net 504-975-5971

Alexa

Purrfect 14 wk old adorable, beautiful & sweet kitten silver tabby ,vacs & spayed . rescue 504 462 -1968

ALLEY CAT

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

Blk. Cocker Spaniel ,sweet & loving Maggie- sweet & loving dog. She is blind, but gets around very well by hearing & excel scenes of smell Loretta 504-715-0674

Adorable male 12 wk old Bobtail kitten Very sweet and playful ,tested vacs neutered 504 462-1968 DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

MISHKA

Beautiful long hair Russian Blue mix 5 yr old sweetie ,spayed vacs ,504 462-1968

Nina-female boxer

sweet, friendly, loves belly rubs, kids & to be near you Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Princess Leila

solid white 6yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Sugar-rodesian ridgebace/ hound mix

6mth big loving eyes, affectionate, enjoys playing w/ oth dogs, in obed training. call Ann Marie zmom8699@ yahoo.com ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

Caffe

CHATTY CAT

Itty Bitty Inky

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

REWARD- LOST

$7,500 504-812-5975

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Kit Kit

LOST/FOUND PETS

‘05 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT

Elijah

Weekly Tails Lab mix. She’s been at the shelter for over ½ of her life and has no idea why people keep passing her by. Cassie is a happy/playful pup and looks forward to romping in the park. To meet Cassie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

ART/POSTERS VINTAGE N.O. JAZZFEST POSTERS

Dating back to 1980, Still in protective tubes, Will sell as collection or by year. 704-681-4914.

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

CASSIE Kennel #A13428640

MISC. FOR SALE STEP LADDER 12’

RYDER Kennel #A13541540

Residential Service All Makes & Models Service - Installation- Repairs Free Estimates on Replacements & New Installations 504-701-3605 - jcollins51@cox.net

HANDYMAN CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS NOMATA

New Orleans Metropolitan Area Tennis Association See our ad in today’s NOLA Marketplace

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE

Headshot Film Productions, LLC has completed photography. Louisiana accounting offices wil close on September 16, 2011. Through then, send claims to: 1231 Prytania Street, FL4 New Orleans, LA 70130 Phone: (504) 521-6205 After September 16, claims should be mailed to: 15821 Ventura Blvd. Ste. 535 Encino, CA 91436 (818) 905-0151 Email: headshotfilm@gmail.com

SERVICES

HOME SERVICES Affordable Fast Gutters LLC

Local Family Owned & Operated. All work guaranteed. Fully insured. 6” Seamless Gutters; Half -round 6” Seamless Gutters; Facia; Soffit, Patio Covers & Carports. Free Est. 504838-9885

Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Cassie is a 4-month-old, spayed,

Fiberglass, Green Bull. heavy duty. Cost $250. Sell for $125. Call 782-8418

No Selling! Give away our free RX card. Help others, including pets. Save up to 75% off prescriptions at 56,000 pharmacies. all 866-612-3733 visit nulegacyrxcard.com/ddw

MERVYNS Heating & A/C Service

HARRY’S HOUSE HELPERS * Small Jobs *Repairs *Carpentry *Painting *Install AND MORE! Insured & Priced-Right Harry’s Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown * 504-896-1500 Metairie * 504-896-1550

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE JEFFERSON FEED

Pet & Garden Center GREEN GRASS - REAL FAST The Only Certified Grade A St. Augustine Sod For New Orleans Conditions. Save with our Do-It-Yourself Lawn Maintenance Program. 733-8572.

Trees Ready For HURRICANE SEASON?

TREE MEDICS $25 OFF Trimming $50 OFF Tree RemovaL Thru August Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

ADOPTIONS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

MERCHANDISE

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

ANNOUNCEMENTS MAKE MONEY EACH TIME SOMEONE FILLS A PRESCRIPTION

Ryder is a 4-month-old, neutered, black/white DSH. He’s the smallest kitty at the shelter, but wants to make sure you notice him, so is the most vocal. Ryder is still a bit uncoordinated, so is quite comical to watch. To meet Ryder or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

RELIABLE DISPOSAL CO

Now Offering Portable Toilet Service. Container Trash Removal Free Quotes; Same Day Service Keeping our Water & Environment Clean One Job at A time Since 1969 504-835-1696

AIR COND/HEATING SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

GULF STATES AIR

Service & Sales 3 TON A/C Condenser & Installed $1499 5 Year Warranty Service Calls only $79.50 Gulf States Air (504) 464-1267

PEST CONTROL TERMINIX

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

PLUMBING Earl’s Plumbing & Heating

Complete Plumbing Service & Under Slab Repair Specialist. THE FLOW MUST GO ON! $25 off any plumbing service thru 9/16/11. LMP #521. Call 888-8888. www.earlsplumbingandheating.com

ROOFING GEAUX CONSTRUCTION

“Your Roofing Professional” Shingle roofs, flat roofs, slate roofs, tile roofs, roof repairs, insurance claims. FREE INSPECTIONS. Member BBB & HBA. GAF certified. (504) 810-1100

MISC. HOME SERVICES CONTAINER TRASH REMOVAL Self Contained & Stationary Compactors. Rentals, Sales, Service. Roll Off Containers (15, 20, 30, 40 Cu. Yds.) Fully Insured. Construction, Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Maritime. Free Quotes, Same Day Service, No Delivery Fee. RELIABLE DISPOSAL CO. INC. 835-1696

LIKE NU

GUTTER CLEANING & REPAIR. Make your old stained gutters look new at a fraction of the cost of replacing them. Lic & Ins. Free Est. Family owned & Operated. Call Mike, 504-236-3238 (cell) or 504-235-3329.


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe FRENCH QUARTER

RIVER RIDGE 9012 Rosecrest Lane Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

Call (504) 915-3220

Reduced! Asking $169,000

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $216K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. $365K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

CLASSIFIEDS GENTILLY

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

2500 GENTILLY BLVD. 2BR/2BA, Lr, dr, den, kit w/granite, fp, hdwd flrs, inground pool. Call (504) 669-7263.

OLD METAIRIE METAIRIE TOWERS 401 Metairie Rd

1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, renovated with new appliances and AC’s. $118,000. Call 504-275-5700

EAST NEW ORLEANS LOOK NO FURTHER! $175,000

7516 Ebbtide Dr. 3/2, Mstr w/jac tub & dbl vanities, wbfp, hdwd flrs, ss appl, vltd ceils, granite, custom closets, fnced yd, 2 car garage, tiled patio, auto sprinkler 504-421-4841.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 1161 ROBERT E. LEE BLVD

Luxury home in Lake Vista near the lakefront. Over 4000 sq ft. 4 BR, 4.5 BA. Custom kit Lovely pool. $775,000. G.L. Schroeder Realtor, Contractor. 504.241.1000. Cell 504.722.2928. schroederbuild@yahoo.com

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 514 DUMAINE , Units 3 & 6. Charming ground & 2nd fl courtyard/ balcony. Awesomely located. Each unit $105,000 www.JudyFisher.net; Judy Fisher, Inc, 504-388-3023 301 Decatur St. Rare corner. Zoning allows live entertainment. 9,000 sq ft (Approx 3,000 sq ft ea. floor). Beautiful light filled loft style spaces. Possible owner financing. $1,650,000. Judy Fisher Inc. 504-388-3023. www. JudyFisher.net

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

2320 - 2322 LOWERLINE

Spacious raised basement duplex. Craftmen windows, built-ins, large balconies. Wd flrs up & down. Lg basement. Off st. pkg. $359,000. Jennifer Pearl, Realtor. Cell 504-258-5724, Ofc 488-0950. www.jennifervpearl.com

CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. REDUCED PRICE! $148,000. Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

Chic, 3 BR,4.5BA. Gourmet kit, Mstr suite w/ custom closets & shower. Upstairs room w/ full bath. Front porch & back screened porch. $675,000. Darci Lambert, Prudential Gardner. 504-338-3055. www.darcilambert.com

TCHEFUNCTA COUNTRY CLUB New remod 4 or 5 br, 3.5 ba, gour kit w/gran & Italian tile. Toto whirlpool & spa. It tile shwr in mstr. Designer fixtures. 4700+ total sf. $595K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836/504-9443605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realty

ABITA SPRINGS HISTORIC ABITA SPRINGS

Steps to Tammany Trace & Abita fairs & festivals. 5 br, 3 ba cottage w/ porches. Less than a year old. $255K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504944-3605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realty

COVINGTON COVINGTON COTTAGE

Charming 3 or 4 br, 3.5 ba, 2500 sf. Close to park. Lush landscaping, oversized lot, pool. $359K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504-944-3605. D. B. Sotheby’s Int’l Realty.

ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

Min. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main house 3500 sf ft 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest house 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

FOLSOM

621 BOCAGE CT. TERRA BELLA

LACOMBE

LUSH FOLSOM ACREAGE

LACOMBE OAKLAWN AVE

50175 SAGE RD, FOLSOM $249,000

STUNNING OAKLAWN/ LACOMBE

40 rolling acres w/2500sf cottage & 4000sf barn. Pecan & walnut grove, blueberry orchard, live oaks, friuit trees, pond. $625K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504-944-3605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realtors

Adorable Acadian Cottage on 5 cres. 3BR/2BA w/new kitchen, all new appl & updated baths. Only 40 min from NOLA. Country living close to the city! Delery Comarda Realtors, 504-8753555 www.NOLAHomefinder.com

Classic, well kept on acre. 4 or 5 br, 3 ba, gamerm,bonusrm, scr porch. 3000sf liv. Close to La. Heart Hosp. $369K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504-944-3605. DB Sotheby’s INt’l Realtors.

Beau pool w/wtrfall/jacuzzi,1400sf putting gym, home theat, gamerm, library, fab mst ste w/sep ofc/gym, chandlrs, 10,500 sf tot. $1,250,000. Suzy McDaniel, 985-640-1836, 504944-3605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realty.

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

1016 NAPOLEON AVE • $350,000

3 br, 2.5 bA, 2088 Sq Ft. Spacious 1st floor w/ wrap around pvt brick patio. Separate dining room and living room with built in bookshelves. Wood burning fireplace in den with French doors opening onto the patio. Located at rear of complex so very private. Assigned parking space. Located on parade route and close to Magazine Street and many amenities. Must see!

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

FOR SALE

NEW ACADIAN HOME

New 3BD, 2BA, Jacuzzi, screened porch, stainless steel appliances, wd flrs. 2 acre lot. Workshop and two car carport 10 min N of I-12 from Goodbee Madisonville Exit 57.

51136 Spirit of the Forest Louisiana • $299K 985-796-9130 • lapolofarms.com • lapolofarms@gmail.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

FRENCH QUARTER STUDIOS

PRIME FQ COMMERCIAL

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

$174,900

REAL ESTATE

77


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE Metairie house for Lease

5 BR, 3.5 bath house for Lease, near Transcontinental & W. Esplanade, great neighborhood, schools and churches, convenient shopping. Pets ok. $1950 per month + deposit.

A HIDDEN GEM

Chic seclusion - Heart of Metairie. 1 bdrm + bonus room, from $735. Wtr pd., Rsvd pkg,1 car. No smoking/ pets 504-780-1706 orrislaneapts.com

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

DOWNTOWN 1329 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1100 mo. 432-7955.

MID CITY

1205 ST CHARLES/$1050

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Avail 10/1. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

1508 CARONDELET ST 2 APTS

Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $800/mo. Util incl. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1100 Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-2396566. mballier@yahoo.com

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

Efficiency $575; On red streetcar line Includes water and WiFi. Call 504-782-6564

2 Eff apts. Lower $650 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@ yahoo.com

METAIRIE TOWERS

SMALL OFFICE SPACE

1750 ST CHARLES #424

MID CITY - Offstreet parking for one vehicle. Separate entrance. Available 10/1. Contact Jane, (504) 482-5292

1 br + study, total renov, SS appls, wd flrs, gar pkg. Mardi Gras parade rt. $1700. Debbie w/L&B, 952-09591

215 MILLAUDON

WEST BANK TERRYTOWN

434 Bruce Ave, 3 BR, 1.5 BA, patio, util rm, carport, lg liv/din, kit w/oven, refrig, cabinets, cooktop. Lg yd. Lse $1000/mo. No smoke. 451-0913.

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR 1819 S. LOPEZ ST.

Broadmoor 1/2 Shotgun dbl 2BR/1.5BA. Hrdwd flr. Cen. A/H, w/d. $1100/mo. 1 yr lse req. + sec. dep. Avail. 10/1. 504-577-0938. edgeglow@yahoo.com.

Good landlord looking for good tenant! 1 blk off Carrollton. 2br/1ba, 1/2 dble, hdwd flrs, CA&H. $850/mo Call Chuck at 504-236-3609

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4228 ORLEANS AVE.

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1275/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep., No Pets. Call 225802-6554/ email dicklea@cox.net

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

1006 WASHINGTON AVE

1 BR, 1200 sf, furn, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, d/w, w/d, gated parking, pool, no pets, $750/mo. Lse. 504-458-6509.

3921 CONSTANCE

1/2 double, living room, bedroom, kitchen, bath, a/c unit. $675/mo. Call 895-6394 or 289-9977.

4917 S MIRO ST

2 BR, 1 BA, pool, cen a/h. $885 mo, water incl. Furn kit, w/d. Safe neighborhood. Call 452-2319 or 821-5567

Great landlord looking for great tenants! Near Tulane Univ., 1 br, 1 bath, CA & H, equip’d kit, fenced in yard. $695 Call Chuck, 504-236-3609.

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

SNGL SHTGN - RIVERBEND

Double parlor, furn kit, br, ba, c-a/h, wd flrs, hi ceil/fans, lg closets, deck, yd, offst pkg $1100. Lyn, 504-8667000 #136

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES

2 BR, Newly renov shotgun style $895/mo Also: Rms by week, private bath. $175/wk all util incl. 504-2020381, 738-2492.

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

FRENCH COUNTRY BRICK HOME FOR LEASE

4 br, 3 ba, Jacuzzi & full shower, 9 ft ceil, antique pine flrs, porches, 2 car gar, sep workshop. Loc on 6 acres 10 min N of I-12 off Turnpike Rd. 50275 Huckleberry Ln. $1950/mo. 985-7969130. lapolofarms.com

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

ROOMS FOR RENT CANAL ST - 1 ROOM

Very, very clean. Great n’hood, 6 mo rent agreement. $140/wk, incl wtr & elec. 282-7296. NO CALLS AFT 7PM

CBD CONDO WITH BALC

441 Gravier cor Magazine. Large 1 bdrm, 1 ba, with garage parking, huge windows, fully equippped kit, w/d. Avail Sept 1. $2035/mo. S. Talbot 504-9759763. TALBOT REALTY GROUP

FOLSOM

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call 483-3100

REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804 6608 Marshall Foch 3br/2ba "Lakeview Duplex" $1400 87 Egret 2br/2ba "Sanctuary Living" $1275 1406 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" $1100

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

CARROLLTON 8216 FIG

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

Perfect for prof’, Renov Vict hse, 2br/,1 full + 1/2 ba, LR, DR, kit, wd flrs, w/i balc., appls, ca&h, security, pool privileges. $1500/mo. 813-8186 274-8075.

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

4511 CANAL ST

1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable included, parking. 24 hr Concierge Service, $970/mo 914-882-1212.

3219A PRYTANIA

79


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS EXCELLENT VALUE UPTOWN NEW ON MARKET

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 13 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 79

82

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

RENOVATED VICTORIAN GEM! 3br, 2ba charming Uptown cottage. Open floor plan, bright airy great room. Spacious eat-in kitchen with stainless appliances. High ceilings, crown molding, hardwood floors. Large private backyard, great for gardening and entertaining. $225,000

504.895.4663 (504) 895-4663



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