Issuu on Google+


BULLETIN BOARD $ STUDY PARTICIPANTS NEEDED $ RAND, the University of New Orleans, and Dillard and Tulane Universities are currently seeking homeowners in Orleans Parish to participate in an ongoing study study of flooding in the city of New Orleans. Participants will be asked a series of general questions about flooding in New Orleans. Interviews will be conducted at RAND’s office in the New Orleans CBD and will last approximately one hour. Participants will receive $30 for their time and will also be reimbursed for parking fees. To sign up, please contact Lauren at 504.299.3472 or hurricanestudy@rand.org. Please leave your contact information (phone number/email), the best time to contact you about recruitment, and your current neighborhood of residence. Interested homeowners will be contacted to verify eligibility, and all identifying information will remain confidential.

CLASSIFIEDS

Boot Camp iPad 2 Give-Away GET FIT · LOSE WEIGHT · WIN iPad

$99 ONLY (12 Workouts/mo)

Interested in the Health Care field as a career?

Volunteer in our hands on program open to good Caring people, to assist in patient needs. This program is designed to bring extra hands to the bedside. Work along side our exp. Certified Nursing Assistants. Volunteering is an important asset & helps in applying for schools.

3 DAY CAMPS

• City Park (AM & PM) STARTS MAY 23

• Audubon Park (AM) STARTS MAY 24

• Old Metairie Camp

504-818-2723 ext. 3016

NE W

DWI - Traffic Tickets? Don’t go to court without an attorney! You can afford an attorney. Call Attorney Eugene Redmann, 504-834-6430

COMING SOON

ONLY $75 (8 Workouts/mo)

2 DAY CAMPS

• City Park Mid Morning STARTS MAY 30

A GREAT PLACE TO DO YOGA WILD LOTUS YOGA - Named “Best Place to Take a Yoga Class” 8 yrs in a row by Gambit Readers”. www.wildlotusyoga.com 899-0047

NE W

• Mandeville Trailhead (AM) STARTS JUNE 7

bootcampneworleans.com

Buying MIGNON FAGET Jewelry Rolex & Diamond Rings, Gold & Broken Jewelry CHRIS’ Fine Jewelry 3304 W. Esplanade Ave, Met. Call 504-833-2556

F R E E i Pa d 2 1 6 G B W i - F i Get 5 Friends to Purchase Boot Camp in a Single Month! iPad Give-Away does not work with any other discount. Restrictions Apply.. Exp. 5/28/11

02

URBANSUBURBANSOLARSALES.COM 888-316-7029 YOGA 108 NEW ORLEANS LLC Hottest Yoga in Town WWW.YOGA-108.NET 1-866-YOGA-108

GET A POWERFUL RESUME! You Can Get a Better Job! GRANT COOPER, Certified Resume Writer CareerPro N.O. 861-0400 • Metairie 861-8882

SPORTS & FAMILY CHIROPRACTOR Photo Restoration • DVD Photo Slideshow with Music Video Tape to DVD Conversion Professional Video Editing • On-Site Presentation Available view samples at:

www.slideshowmd.com Maria 504.430.0533

Darin 504.722.6005

Dr. JohnWaguespack 504-289-4344

RELIEVING PAIN caused by accident, injury, fatigue, or stress

OFFICES

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

504.821.4896

Classifieds

Dive into Your Happy Place with

Summer Fun Feature pg.63

classadv@gambitweekly.comm

504-483-3100

www.bestofneworleans.com

• METAIRIE

722 Phosphor Ave

• COVINGTON

203 West 21st Ave


>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>

contents

.-'- (0', %(' %(/, (+&%, .,-(&!-,

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>

CHECK IT OUT

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 3923 BIENVILLE ST., NEW ORLEANS, L A 70119 < < < < <(504) < < <486-5900 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > >OPERATING > > > > > HOURS > > > >: 8:30 > > A.M. > > >TO>5>:30> P.M. > MON.-FRI. PUBLISHER

MAY 24, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 21

,."-,

s3T#HARLES3TREETCAR

Commentary

7

Blake Pontchartrain

8

News

11

Bouquets & Brickbats

11

The downspout of America New Orleans know-it-all How a sleeper bill about contaminated oilfield sites became one of the most hotly lobbied issues of the legislative session

19

This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heroes and zeroes

Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;est What?

11

Scuttlebutt

11

Politics / Clancy DuBos

17

Gambitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web poll From their lips to your ears Why the UNO/SUNO merger fell apart

2520 HARVARD AVE., SUITE 2B METAIRIE, LA 70001 â&#x20AC;¢ 504-454-3004 watkinsfootcenter.com

GIFTS&SHOPPING Shoptalk

Herb Import Co.

Weekend Appointments & House Calls Available

26

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT A&E News

31

Gambit Picks

31

Cuisine

49

The Puzzle Page

62

Opa wide: Time for the Greek Festival Best bets for your busy week

49

New MBT Styles!

Ian McNulty on Panchitaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5 in Five: Five places to ham it up Brenda Maitlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wine of the Week

GAMBITGUIDE MUSIC

PREVIEW: Johnny & Stantonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New Thing

4119 MAGAZINE ST â&#x20AC;¢ 526 ROYAL ST LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER (504) 899-6800

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

A PINOT GRIGIO FOR YOUR THOUGHTS

FEETFIRSTSTORES.COM

HOW MERLOT CAN YOU GO? iWine iBeer iMojito iMargarita iMartini iWine iDrink iDrank iDrunk

iCollection

TM

T-shirts â&#x20AC;¢ tea towels â&#x20AC;¢ aprons

33

33

FILM

39

ART

41 41

STAGE EVENTS

44

REVIEW: I Am 39 REVIEW: The Topp Twins: Untouchable Girls 40 REVIEW: Some Restrictions May Apply

TOMORROW IS ANOTHER CHARDONNAY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

SHOE LUST HANDBAG ENVY

04

MARGO DUBOS

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL > > > > > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS&VIEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Cover > > > >Story > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >19 > > > > > >EDITOR > > > > KEVIN > > > >ALLMAN >>> MANAGING EDITOR KANDACE POWER GRAVES As New Orleans gears up for Eat Local month, POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS meet some young farmers who are producing ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO the food youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be eating SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON

PULL-

OUT

CLASSIFIEDS Market Place Employment Weekly Tails Mind / Body / Spirit Real Estate / Rentals Summer Fun

www.wearablevegetables.com

Or Shop Us at the French Qtr. Flea Mkt. this Sat. © 2011, wearable vegetables, 504-731-1027 all rights reserved, this is a parody.

45

COVER PHOTO BY ANDY COOK COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

55

STAFF WRITER ALEX WOODWARD EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, MEG FARRIS, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERNS MARGUERITE LUCAS, MARTA JEWSON, LINDSEY DARNELL PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

DORA SISON

SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO WEB & CLASSIFIEDS DESIGNER MARIA BOUÃ&#x2030; GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT, MARK WAGUESPACK PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR MEREDITH LAPRÃ&#x2030; DISPLAY ADVERTISING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 ········christinj@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com AMY WENDEL 483-3146········amyw@gambitweekly.com JENNIFER MACKEY 483-3143 ········jenniferm@gambitweekly.com MEGAN MICALE 483-3144········meganm@gambitweekly.com MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MARKETING DIRECTOR

JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 483-3100

CLASSIFIEDS FAX: 483-3153 | classadv@gambitweekly.com

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SHERRY SNYDER 483-3122 ········sherrys@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CARRIE MICKEY 483-3121 ·········carriem@gambitweekly.com SALES CONSULTANT MARY LOU NOONAN 985-809-9933 ··········maryloun@bellsouth.net BUSINESS >>>>> billing inquiries: (504) 483-3135 CONTROLLER GARY DIGIOVANNI ASSISTANT CONTROLLER MAUREEN TREGRE CREDIT OFFICER MJ AVILES OPERATIONS & EVENTS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

56

OPERATIONS & EVENTS DIRECTOR LAURA CARROLL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CAROL STEADMAN

57

Gambit Communications, Inc.

56

58

63

CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2011 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


13TH ANNUAL ™

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES FOR BET TER LIVING

06

SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 2011 • 10AM-4PM Traditional and Alternative Health Care · Beauty · Eye Care Green Living · Weight Loss Nutrition · Exercise · Eco-Building

REACH MORE THAN

Contact MICHELE at

25,000

486-5900 EXT. 3140 or

CONSUMERS

com or call your Gambit

IN LOUISIANA'S BUSIEST MALL...

at

BOOTH SPACE IS LIMITED

micheles@gambitweekly. Account Executive


commenTAry

thinking out loud

The Downspout of America

F

have moved to higher ground, and others have raised their houses. Lafourche Parish spokesman Brennan Matherne put it well when he told the Voice of America: “I think most people who have settled here understood that they were building in a flood plain. I mean, we deal with disasters, unfortunately, almost on an annual basis.” The sad truth is that flooding may have been inevitable even had the Morganza not opened. State Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain warned that its gates might have been damaged had they remained closed, resulting in uncontrollable flooding. Strain’s point is that the inundation caused by Morganza’s opening should be considered a natural disaster, allowing affected farmers to file claims for crop insurance. Gov. Bobby Jindal officially

air y linen gauze to the rescue by FLAX

lime

white

lilac

clothes + accessories

maple 865 . mon - sat 10-6

7732

The sad truth is that flooding may have been inevitable even had the Morganza not opened.

asked the White House for a Presidential Disaster Declaration, which would clear the way for the state to request individual and public assistance funds for those affected by flooding. Anyone watching the misery inflicted upriver in Mississippi, Tennessee and Missouri knows what New Orleans and Baton Rouge potentially faced as the downspout of America reached record or near-record levels this year. Our little knoll and wall along the river may appear small, but it’s all we’ve got — and it’s more than many Louisianans have. For that, we should be grateful. And we should be quick to aid those who are suffering. Second Harvest Food Bank of Greater New Orleans & Acadiana is standing by to provide food, water and aid to Louisiana flood victims. To learn how you can help, go to Second Harvest’s website: www.no-hunger.org.

9625

PUNCH

KICK

JAB

UPPERCUT

BURN CALORIES

WIND DOWN

HAVE FUN

NOAC

REPEAT Everything you want and more at the NOAC. For more on what we offer, call 525-2375 or visit us at 222 N. Rampart today. Free Parking.

www.neworleansathleticclub.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

or New Orleanians who don’t see the Mississippi River every day, it’s easy to forget that one of the great wonders of the world sits just beyond a knoll (sometimes it’s a concrete wall) along the waterfront. That knoll and wall run from the Riverbend area where people fly kites and walk dogs, past the wharves and docks tourists never see, past the Aquarium of the Americas and Jax Brewery, down through the Marigny and Bywater and 9th Ward, and around a curve down to the Gulf of Mexico. Most of the time we don’t think about it, but that knoll and wall have never seemed smaller or more fragile in the last two weeks. The Mississippi is the fourth-largest river in the world. More than half the states in America have tributaries, rivulets, streams and rivers that feed it. In normal years, it swells as the northern snow pack melts. Then there are years such as 1927 — and 2011 — in which those who live along the Mississippi are reminded of the mighty river’s awesome power. In all the talk about the volume of water coming down the river, there hasn’t been enough said about what goes up the river: iron and steel, coal and coffee, rubber and timber — and one of every nine gallons of gasoline Americans put in their cars. The Mississippi River throughout Louisiana is lined with grain elevators holding wheat, soy, milo, corn and rice bound for the rest of the country. That’s why it was disappointing to see some in the national media frame the recent opening of the Morganza Spillway as rural Louisianans being sacrificed “to save New Orleans.” (Never mind that Baton Rouge, a larger city, would have been inundated first had the Morganza not opened.) An Associated Press report carried this exact narrative on May 19: “The Army Corps of Engineers, desperate to save Baton Rouge and New Orleans from flooding, opened a spigot on a spillway over the weekend, intentionally flooding this part of Cajun country.” Actually, the situation was more grave than that: The “spigot” was opened, in part, because of pressure on the levees — and the possibility of the river permanently changing course down the Atchafalaya Basin. The Corps already had opened the Bonnet Carre Spillway into Lake Pontchartrain and only opened the Morganza one bay at a time, as needed. It hadn’t been opened since 1973, before many of the people living in the flood path were born. Since then, floodwalls have been built higher along the Atchafalaya, ring levees have been added, some people

07


Invest Smart, Take Advantage of the Sun! Call Direct Source at 504-456-5858 today to ask about our FREE SOLAR HOT WATER SYSTEM.

blake

PONTCHARTRAIN™

NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

Reduces your utility bills by 30%-50% Adds immediate value to your home Replaces your old hot water heater

"Get It Straight From The Source--Direct Source" www.directsourceweb.com

Roe’s Table

AN EXCLUSIVE DINING EXPERIENCE FOR 12 PEOPLE 5 COURSE DINNER AND COMPLIMENTARY WINE PAIRINGS • $60

THURSDAY, JUNE 9TH 7 P.M. RESERVATIONS REQUIRED HOMEMADE ITALIAN SPECIALTIES - Meatballs, Pasta, Sausage & more! WE NOW DELIVER IN THE CBD & FRENCH QUARTER VISIT US AT WWW.REDGRAVYCAFE.COM • 504-561-8822 MON-FRI 6:30 A.M.-3:30 P.M. • SAT. 9 A.M.-2 P.M. 504-561-8844 • 125 CAMP ST.

Come to Camp at the Louisiana Children’s Museum

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

And Spend your Summer Smiling!

08

Week-long themed camps for ages 5-8 May 31 through August 8 Before & After Care available $140 to $175 Museum members / $160 to $200 non-members Call 504-586-0725 ext. 222 or www.lcm.org to register

Learn puppetry, journey to outer space, cook up kitchen chemistry, turn trash to treasure and much more!

www.lcm.org · (504) 586-0725 ext. 222 · 420 Julia Street, N.O., LA · 70130

Antiques & Interiors

wholesale to the public.

over 12,000 square feet of european antiques.

& decorators alike 300 Jefferson Hwy.(A cr oss fr om Lowe’s) New Orleans 504.231.3397 www.dopantiques.com

HEY BLAKE, I WAS TOLD THAT THERE USED TO BE A THEATER ON CAMP STREET. IS THIS TRUE? SALLY

James Caldwell built the St. Charles Theatre, the most grand in the South at the time, at a cost of $350,000. It was destroyed in a fire in 1842. PHOTO COURTESY LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

DEAR SALLY, Indeed it is true, and it was built by one of the most talented men to hit New Orleans in the 19th century: James Caldwell. Caldwell was born in England in 1793 and came to America as an actor. He arrived in New Orleans in 1819 as part of a theatrical troupe and decided to stay. The theater you’re asking about sat on Camp Street between Gravier and Poydras streets; it was called the Camp Theater or the American Theater. Its cornerstone was laid on May 29, 1822. The formal opening was on Jan. 1, 1824. The first theaters in New Orleans featured productions in French. But by 1817, a company came to New Orleans that produced plays in English. This delighted the English-speaking population, especially those living in the Faubourg St. Mary. Caldwell was inspired to erect a theater in which only English language plays would be performed. Affectionately called the “Old Camp” by the public and the actors who played in it, the theater could seat 1,100 people on stuffed seats. It was constructed at a cost of $120,000. While he was building the theater, Caldwell sent to England for a “gas machine” to provide light for the chandeliers, and this theater became the first building in New Orleans to be illuminated with gas. This unique theater acquired an excellent reputation throughout the country,

and most of the stars of the day came to New Orleans to appear on the stage of the American Theater. Caldwell and his successors assembled competent companies and provided novelties along with standard repertory. A member of Caldwell’s company in the early years was Edwin Forrest, who became one of the country’s leading tragedians. Caldwell managed the theater for eight years before leasing it to others. In 1833, he began to concentrate on civic and entrepreneurial projects, which included building more theaters. He also developed real estate and founded the gas business in the rapidly growing city. He established the New Orleans Gas Light Co. and the first commercial gas plant in the Deep South. His plant produced gas made from coal, and New Orleans became one of the earliest American cities to have a public gas system. Caldwell ultimately disposed of his playhouse on Camp Street, and in 1840 it was rebuilt as the Camp Street Exchange. Among his great achievements was construction of the magnificent St. Charles Theatre in 1835, which cost $350,000. It was the first large and important theater in the South, with 47 boxes, 4,000 seats, and a 4,200-pound gas chandelier boasting 250 lights. Sadly, that theater burned in 1842.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MORE SCUTTLES CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 15 17 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“I have no objection in principle to what she is trying to do, except she’s picking on one segment of the community.” — Rep. John LaBruzzo, R-Metairie, commenting on a proposal by Rep. Regina Barrow, D-Baton Rouge, to drug test TOPS recipients whose parents make more than $250,000 per year before letting them accept the free college tuition. LaBruzzo is the author of HB 7, which would mandate that 20 percent of Louisianans who receive welfare payments be subject to random drug testing. LaBruzzo’s bill passed the House 67-26 on May 17.

The Little Issue That Could HOW A SLEEPER BILL ABOUT CONTAMINATED OILFIELD SITES BECAME ONE OF THE MOST HOTLY LOBBIED ISSUES OF THE SESSION.

“I want to make sure every House Republican is protected from some kind of dishonest Democratic ad. So let me say, on the record: Any ad which quotes what I said on Sunday is a falsehood.” — Newt Gingrich on Fox News, trying to dig himself out of a hole after he dismissed GOP Rep. Paul Ryan’s proposed federal budget as “radical.” House Republicans had voted for the budget 235-4.

BY JEREMY ALFORD

“What started out as little land and little oil has become Big Land and Big Oil.” — Rep. Sam Jones, D-Franklin

Early this year, Gov. Bobby Jindal made it clear he would veto HB 63, the proposed tobacco tax introduced by state Rep. Harold Ritchie, D-Franklinton, but the state GOP took no chances, coming out against the tax hike with one voice in recent weeks. Robin Edwards of the Louisiana Tea Party Federation called it another one of “liberalism’s failed experiments in social engineering,” while former congressman-turnedlobbyist Bob Livingston cut a 30-second radio spot against the bill, calling it an “urgent legislative action alert from the Republican Party of Louisiana” and warning, “Liberal lawmakers in Baton Rouge are dead-set on a massive $120 million tax hike.”

O

PAGE 15

Rep. Page Cortez filed House Bill 563 aimed at switching authority to adjudicate claims against oil companies for damage to land from the court system to a state agency. The bill died in committee, but a similar bill in the Senate is still alive. up as the weekend break gave way to chatter about a resurrected bill. This version, which could be tied to yet one more duplicate bill pending in the House, would focus on lessening liability for oil companies while fasttracking cleanup. The sequel could surface as soon as this week. So what’s all the fuss about? Legacy sites are old oilfields that have been contaminated by previous owners or operators, but which still

c'est what? ARE YOU NERVOUS ABOUT THE EFFECTS OF THE RISING MISSISSIPPI RIVER ON NEW ORLEANS?

34% yes

Sammy Knight

starting to be

40% nah

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PAGE 12

BoUQuets

26%

On May 19, the Louisiana House defeated HB 112, designed to curb school bullying, partially on the grounds it might promote “alternative lifestyles.” Did the House do the right thing?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

was elected to the New Orleans Saints Hall of Fame May 17 in recognition of his six years with the team. Knight, who played safety from 1997-2002, still holds the record for the third-highest number of interceptions for the team and was chosen to start in the 2001 Pro Bowl. He will be inducted into the Saints Hall of Fame at a ceremony later this year.

The New Orleans Oyster Festival

donated $20,000 to the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation May 5. The money came from last year’s inaugural festival, and the contribution will go toward construction of an oyster reef in Black Bay. This year’s oyster fest, featuring music as well as shucking and eating contests, will be held June 4 and 5 in the parking lot adjacent to Jax Brewery in the French Quarter.

Heath Evans

held his second annual charity softball tournament at Zephyr Field May 17, and many of his fellow New Orleans Saints turned out to play, including Drew Brees, Jonathan Vilma, Reggie Bush and Chase Daniel. The fullback started the event last year to raise money to fight and raise awareness about childhood sexual abuse. More than 10,000 fans came out to watch the Saints offense whup the defense 25-12.

Some state lawmakers

are pushing bills to repeal all state income taxes in an obvious example of election-year grandstanding. The fiscal impact of the proposal would be roughly $10 billion to $15 billion less in state revenues over the next five years. The state already is struggling to balance next year’s budget in the face of a $1.6 billion revenue decrease. The income tax repeals are a cheap way to get attention right now — with expensive repercussions down the road.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

ur story ends with a rare defeat for Big Oil. Actually, it was more than that. By a vote of 10-7, the House Natural Resources Committee “deferred” the so-called legacy lawsuit bill, which Big Oil desperately wanted to pass. To fully grasp the import of the committee’s action, one must recognize that the layman’s definition of “deferred” differs radically from that of lawmakers. In the legislative lexicon, deferring a bill in committee is the same as spiking it, effectively killing it even before it comes to an official vote. Technically, Big Oil has a duplicate Senate bill, which can be taken up and navigated back to the House, forging potential compromises along the way in the hope of a different outcome before the same House committee next time — but the odds are stacked heavily against success. “There’s discussions going in all ways right now,” Gifford Briggs, vice president of the Louisiana Oil and Gas Association (LOGA), said several hours after the May 18 vote. “But I think the general consensus is we brought the issue to the committee and lawmakers have acted. I think at this point it’s highly unlikely that we’ll proceed again.” With that, Louisiana’s top lobbyists gave a collective sigh — not of relief, but of what might have been. And then eyebrows started to arch and ears perked

UP IN SMOKE

11


news

views

page 11

Offering the latest in minimally invasive body contouring with lasers. N O G E N E R AL AN ESTH ES IA R EQ U I R E D!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

B E F O R E

12

B E F O R E

3,500

$

Body sculpting & liposuction with laser. 3 areas.

*must be within 40lbs of ideal body weight. Offer expires 6/24/11.

A F T E R

A F T E R

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE LIPO CONSULTATION

JOHN L. UHL, MD 3600 ST. CH A RLES AV E.

| STE 201 N E W O R L E A N S , L O U I S I A N A 7 0115 |

5 0 4 .2 2 4 .2 8 0 8

W W W. N O L A L A S E R .C O M I N F O @ N O L A L A S E R .C O M

require mitigation, which is expensive. The issue pitted landowners against oil companies, and it drew a Who’s Who of government consultants and lobbyists to the committee room for last week’s showdown. If a bomb had gone off in the room, the bulk of the Legislature’s institutional knowledge would have gone with it. The battle lines were clear: Big Oil wanted to give a state agency (as opposed to judges) more control over legacy sites in the name of speeding up litigation; Big Land wanted to maintain the status quo, which has courts deciding legacy cases. The status quo itself was the subject of a legislative war several years ago — and the result of an uneasy compromise. Now Big Oil wants to change the rules … again. While the issue went nowhere in committee last week, it served as a case study for what can happen at the Capitol during a very brief period of time when there’s a lot of money at stake. House Bill 563 by Rep. Page Cortez, R-Lafayette, was filed prior to the session’s start, and it flew largely under the radar until this month. By the second weekend in May, just days before last week’s hearing, the energy lobbyists were scrambling to rewrite the bill to satisfy large (read: influential) landowners. “At this point I don’t even know what it’s going to look like,” said one lobbyist involved in the drafting process. Another, on the dole for landowners, suggested, “That’s exactly how they want it.” As the weekend rewrites proceeded, robo-calls in opposition to the bill were unleashed in House districts represented by committee members. Energy lobbyists responded quickly — and so forcefully that LOGA officials, among others, apologized for their full-court press. LOGA alone has 15 paid lobbyists representing its interests, according to the Louisiana Ethics Administration Program. They include top-tier lobbying firms like Courson Nickel and Harris, DeVille and Associates. In carrying out their jobs, the lobbyists mostly spoke with lawmakers about the need to have the state wrest control of the legacy cases from the courts and speed litigation along. “(LOGA) cannot go around and educate every single lawmaker on this very complex issue,” Briggs said of his lobbying phalanx. “We needed help.” Not to be outdone, the Louisiana Landowners Association lined up


don’t want to create another layer of bureaucracy with this,” said Rep. Joe Harrison, R-Napoleonville. “I don’t understand that. I’ve never been neutral in my life.” Environmentalists were responsible for their own fancy footwork. Cheron Brylski, a New Orleans-based consultant working with environmentalists and landowners, says she feared the proposed legislation would take away the right of claimants to go to court. Brylski linked the legacy site bill to last year’s BP oil disaster, arguing that it could potentially affect claimants’ rights against BP or companies like it. While it’s highly unlikely the legislation would have affected anything related to the spill, the claim gained traction when officials from BP showed up last week to endorse the bill. If nothing else, lawmakers may have taken note and realized how easily the situation could have been spun against them in the fall elections. “Big Oil and Gas hire the best lawyers and lobbyists money can buy,” says Brylski, who also oversaw an email campaign that informed opponents in real time as to which lawmakers were wavering. “They don’t want you to hire any lawyer. Ever. Period.” On the other side of the issue, David Russell, president of McGowan Working Partners, which is domiciled in Mississippi but has offices in Roanoke, Va., said he deserves protection, too. “Obtaining proper insurance to cover non-sudden or accidental (legacy) pollution liability for oilfield operations is not difficult to get,” Russell said. “It’s impossible. After 15 years of providing coverage, my company’s provider declined pollution liability insurance coverage simply due to the legacy lawsuit issues in the state. Developments like this are going to shut this industry down, as far as Louisiana is concerned.” While the legacy debate, at least last week’s incarnation, was a case study in how much money can be dumped behind (and against) a proposed bill in a short period of time, it also underscored why the public is so often oblivious to such issues. Only a sprinkling of mainstream media outlets covered the committee hearing, and barely any peeled back the layers of the story. It makes one wonder how many other accounts of power politics are slipping through the cracks — but that’s an entirely different kind of legacy. Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@jeremyalford.com.

811 Conti Street

504-523-8619

CHARCOAL BROILED HAMBURGERS

CHERRY, APPLE & PEACH ALSO SERVING SHRIMP & CATFISH PO-BOYS • GRILLED CHICKEN

500 CITY PARK AVE • 486-2559 2008 CLEARVIEW PKWY • 889-2837

Pet boarding, doggy dayCare & grooming

ZEUS’

WebCamS available

For monitoring 24/7

Family SuiteS in-HouSe groomer Sunday PiCk-uPS available

1st Pet Full Price - 2nd Pet Half Off!

Your Pet’s Home Away From Home! 4601 Freret St. (corner of Freret & Cadiz) 504.304.4718

www.zeusplace.com

Mon-Sun 10am-6am www.erinrosebar.com Saturday, May 28 Top Gear 300 - 2:30PM Sunday, May 29 Coca-Cola - 6PM

GET OUT OF THE HEAT. DRINK HERE. $1.50 HIGH LIFES - Mondays 12am-2am Late Night Food

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 24 > 2011

their own ringers, such as the New Orleans law firm of Adams and Reese. Mix in the lobbying teams of the Louisiana Farm Bureau, the state Timber Association and the Forestry Association, and the big picture comes into focus. Now consider how much each lobbyist earns in salary and how much he or she spends over lunch or dinner with their intended targets — not to mention research and outreach — and the cost of bringing the bill easily goes to six figures. What’s at stake, however, is much more. Plaintiff attorneys and law firms representing Big Oil have made millions pursuing and defending legacy lawsuits, and if an oil company or contractor loses such a suit, the damages can be huge. Wealthy, independent landowners like Roy O. Martin of Alexandria, a big supporter of Gov. Bobby Jindal and all-around lumber tycoon, weighed in personally against Big Oil. He not only wrote personal letters to members of the House Natural Resources Committee, but he also recruited Jimmy Faircloth, Jindal’s former executive counsel, to present the opposition’s case. With statewide elections just five months away, most lawmakers wanted nothing to do with the issue. Still, if there was a tipping point, it may have been Faircloth’s offensive. With the state’s largest landowners sitting not far behind him (including the Louisiana Landowners Association, which represents some 3 million acres in the state), Faircloth was able to accuse the oil lobby of lying about having landowners at the table during the weekend drafting session. “I categorically disagree,” he said. “I won’t go any further than that. You can draw your own conclusions to what I’m saying.” Faircloth also recounted a story about being cornered by an oil lobbyist outside the House chamber unexpectedly and being presented with a bill and being asked on the spot to agree with it. “I couldn’t believe that,” he added. Despite facing the likes of LOGA, which mostly represents independent oil companies, and the Louisiana Association of Business and Industry (LABI), opponents built a strong case for their claim that the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) doesn’t have the resources to take over the claims process from the courts. That case was built without the help of DNR, by the way. In fact, some lawmakers looked irritated when DNR refused to take a position. “Are they capable of doing this job or not? I

13


14

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011


scuttlebutt page 11

    Louisiana  Republican  Party  chairman  Roger Villere Jr.  sent  out  an  email  denouncing  the  bill,  saying  “Our  party  is  firmly  committed  to  getting  Louisiana’s  fiscal  house  in  order  without  increasing  taxes  on  Louisiana  families  and  small  businesses.  Raising  taxes  during  tough  economic times kills jobs.”     Nowhere  in  Villere’s  statement  did  he  mention the nature of the proposed tax,  an  omission  that  almost  certainly  was  deliberate.  Despite  the  general  anti-tax  mood,  an  April  poll  by  Southern  Media  and  Opinion  Research  found  two-thirds  of the state’s likely voters support raising  taxes  on  cigarettes.  (The  bill  also  would  have  boosted  taxes  50  percent  on  cigars  and pipe tobacco.)     On  May  16,  Ritchie  —  facing  the  fact  that  he  didn’t  have  enough  votes  —  pulled  his  bill  from  the  House  Ways  &  Means  Committee,  though  the  committee officially deferred it (meaning it could  be brought up for discussion again later in  the session … but don’t bet on it).     The  bill  would  have  raised  taxes  on  cigarettes  from  the  current  36  cents  per  pack (third-lowest in the nation) to $1.06.  Cigarette  excise  taxes  vary  widely  by  state,  from  New  York’s  $4.35  to  Missouri’s 17 cents. The mean is $1.385 per pack.  Ritchie’s  introduction  of  the  bill  had  a  unique  morbid  irony  —  he’s  a  longtime  smoker who admits he can’t quit the habit … and he runs the Poole-Ritchie Funeral  Home in Bogalusa. — Kevin Allman  

Gulf Coast Claims offiCes ClosinG

House muGs anti-BullyinG Bill

    Despite last-minute revisions designed  to  mollify  conservatives,  Rep.  Austin Badon’s  anti-bullying  bill  went  down  in  flames May 19. HB 112, known as the “Safe  Schools Bill,” was fiercely opposed by the  Louisiana  Family  Forum  and  Louisiana  Baptists. It failed in a 53-43 vote.     When  Gambit  talked  to  Badon  lateThursday, he was still angry. “The doggone religious conservatives made it into  something  it  wasn’t,”  he  said.  “What  it  really  was  was  a  ‘scorecard’  vote  for  the  (Louisiana) Family Forum. It’s an election  year,  and  the  members  wanted  to  look  good  on  the  scorecard  the  Family  Forum  sends out.” Badon said the bill covered the  whole  spectrum  of  human  differences,  but  opponents  focused  on  gays  and  lesbians.  “Talking  about  homosexuality  is  a  taboo  to  them,”  he  said.  “They  fail  to  realize these are human beings who have  every single right they have. Who are they  to cast judgment?”      Most  metro-area  lawmakers  supported  the  bill,  but  a  majority  of  Jefferson’s  opposed it. Voting for the measure were  Reps. Neil Abramson, Jeff Arnold, Wesley Bishop, Jared Brossett, Juan LaFonta, Walt Leger III, Helena Moreno and Charmaine Marchand Stiaes  of  New  Orleans  (all  Democrats), Walker Hines (a Republican)  and  Reps.  Pat Connick,  R-Marrero,  and  Robert Billiot and Girod Jackson of West  Jefferson,  both  Democrats.  Opposing  it  were  Rep.  Nick Lorusso  of  New  Orleans  and Reps. Cameron Henry, John LaBruzzo,  Tony Ligi,  Joe Lopinto III,  Kirk Talbot,  Ricky Templet and Tom Willmott of East  Jefferson  —  all  Republicans.  Recorded  as  “absent”  on  the  final  vote  was  House  Speaker Jim Tucker, R-Algiers. — Allman

FEATURING AUTHENTIC VIETNAMESE DELICACIES

FREE DELIVERY TO MID-CITY & LAKEVIEW

GOI CUON

Spring Roll, salad roll highly recommended

PHO GA

Chicken traditional large bowl of soup

BUN TOM

Grilled Shrimp over rice or vermicelli noodle

BRUNCH WEEKDAYS ONLY DINNER MENU 4PM-9:30PM MON-FRI 11AM-9:30PM SAT 12 NOON-9:30PM DINNER MENU ONLY

135 N. CARROLLTON 309-7286 / FAX 309-7283

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 24 > 2011

    Citing  what  the  Gulf  Coast  Claims  Facility (GCCF) says is a lower than expected  number  of  claimant  visits,  the  GCCF  announced its offices in Grand Isle, Lafitte  and Morgan City will close June 1.     “After  a  comprehensive  review  of  the  35 GCCF site offices throughout the Gulf,  the  GCCF  has  decided  to  close  eight  of  the  claims  offices  throughout  the  Gulf  region,”  says  Camille Biros  of  FeinbergRozen, the law firm headed by Gulf Coast  claims czar Kenneth Feinberg, in an email  to  Gambit.  One  office  in  Alabama  and  four offices in Florida also will close.     The  Grand  Isle  office  will  be  consolidated with the office in Cut Off (16263 E.  Main St., in the Tarpon Heights Shopping  Center);  the  Lafitte  office  will  move  to  the Gretna office (2701 Manhattan Blvd.,  Suite  12A);  and  the  Morgan  City  office  will  move  to  the  New  Iberia  office  (956  S.  Lewis  St.).  Employees  working  at  the  closing offices will be reassigned to other  GCCF offices.     In an email to Gambit, Amy Weiss with  Point  Blank  Public  Affairs,  which  represents Feinberg, wrote, “The consolidation  of  these  offices  continues  the  effort  of  the  GCCF  to  optimize  and  provide  the  most efficient way to assist claimants by  consolidating  and  reassigning  our  most 

knowledgeable  staff  with  experience  in  GCCF  processes  and  procedures  to  the  busiest GCCF Claims Office facilities experiencing the highest volume and frequency of visiting claimants.”      Several  state  lawmakers  whose  constituents  use  those  offices  were  irate  at  the  news.  “For  Mr.  Feinberg  and  BP  to  decide  that  the  Grand  Isle  facility,  the  Lafitte facility and the Morgan City facility  should  be  closed  without  having  100  percent  claims  paid  out  is  a  travesty,”  said state Sen. Norby Chabert, R-Houma.  “For  them  to  say  that  Grand  Isle  is  good  enough  for  the  president  to  come  down  personally  and  call  the  epicenter  of  this  disaster,  yet  it’s  not  good  enough  for  a  claims facility, is just ridiculous.”     Chabert noted that Grand Isle residents  who still need to file claims will now have  to drive into his district, which abuts the  island,  “But  they  shouldn’t  have  to  drive  up at all,” he says. “The BP people should  be knocking on doors to help people, not  closing  down  the  office  that’s  set  up  to  help them.” — Alex Woodward

15


Michael

! S 25 ET $ K C AT TI RT A ST

The Music of

Jackson

with the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra

Do You Want A New Smile? IT’S POSSIBLE WITH ESSIX.® ESSIX IS: INVISIBLE • AFFORDABLE • REMOVABLE • COMFORTABLE • QUICK Essix is similar to Invisalign but much less expensive.

Actual results from a patient treated by Dr. Schmidt after wearing the Essix aligners for 9 months.*

Saturday, May 28 at 8 p.m. Mahalia Jackson Theater

* Actual treatment times may vary.

Las Vegas showman James Delisco takes you through 40 years of legendary Michael Jackson hits, from ABC and I’ll Be There, to Beat It, Thriller, and The Way You Make Me Feel!

BEFORE

Buy Now. Tickets from $25! 504.523.6530 • LPOmusic.com

AFTER

"I am thoroughly satisfied with how my teeth look after this treatment. Within a year and a half, my teeth looked great and straight! I have more confidence now that I can smile without people looking at crooked teeth." — Linda Cobrido, New Orleans "Dr. Schmidt and his staff are the best! Everyone is friendly and professional. Dr. Schmidt made my smile look amazing. I am so pleased with the end result." — Katie Williams, New Orleans

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

AVOID COSMETIC COMPLICATIONS

16

As board certified dermatologists we are concerned about the increasing number of patients being seen in our offices who have suffered complications as a result of unqualified physicians and non-physicians performing medical procedures such as laser, Botox Cosmetic®, Dysport® and facial fillers. TIPS FOR CHOOSING A PHYSICIAN FOR COSMETIC PROCEDURES

ARE YOU A CANDIDATE? • Did you previously wear braces and

your teeth have begun to shift?

• Are your upper and lower teeth crowded? • Is there a gap between your two front teeth? • Are your teeth slightly crooked?

Choose the “Core Four”

If you answered " YES" to any of these, call today for a Consultation. Get the NEW SMILE you've been waiting for!

For a free report, request one from contactriverbend@aol.com.

Dermatology, Plastic Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery and Oculo-Plastic Surgery. These four medical specialties have extensive formal residency training in performing cosmetic procedures, not mere weekend courses.

49

$

Check for Board Certification You can verify any physician’s board certification by checking with the American Board of Medical Specialties. (www.ABMS.org).

*

CONSULTATION SPECIAL TO 1ST 5 CALLERS ONLY

*EXPIRES 06/05/2011

Always Select the Medical Office Setting •

Qualified physicians are trained to handle cosmetic complications.

Non-physicians providing cosmetic procedures in their homes such as lasers and injectables are in violation of the state laws for the practice of medicine. Report any such illegal activity to the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners. (ww.lsbme.org)

Physicians must follow the rules of the LSBME when delegating cosmetic procedures and be responsible for their patients.

Discounted products may be dilute or illegally imported materials not subject to review by the FDA for purity and safety

Mary P. Lupo, MD FAAD

Patricia K. Farris, MD FAAD

GREAT SMILES - WITHOUT BRACES

GLENN SCHMIDT, D.D.S., M.S. GENERAL DENTISTRY UPTOWN 8025 Maple Street @ Carrollton · 504.861.9044 www.uptownsmiles.com


clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

A Bloody Process he failure of a bill to merge the University of New Orleans (UNO) and Southern University at New Orleans (SUNO) offers several lessons about the politics and psychology of legislative sessions. Chief among those lessons is that sometimes a bill’s fate has nothing to do with the merits of the bill itself. Another is the importance of timing. And luck. After House Speaker Jim Tucker announced last week that he was pulling down his merger bill, several sources close to the effort told me that the measure actually had the 70 votes needed for passage earlier in the week. But, as often occurs in the legislative process, stuff happened. So what happened to the merger? The short answer is: Bobby Jindal. The governor wholeheartedly supports the merger idea, which, ironically, is one reason why it failed. To understand how that could happen, you have to recognize that legislative sessions are complex, fluid events. Each has an emotional ebb and flow. Things can change quickly, and emotions often overpower logic. In the case of the UNO-SUNO merger,

T

emotions ran high from the get-go — and in the end other, unrelated emotions buried the merger. Here’s how: The overriding issue of this session is the budget, which has been cut deeply. Unlike past years, the governor has no money to dangle in front of lawmakers in the form of pork projects or funding for favored programs back home. Lawmakers already have grudgingly recognized that they cannot “earmark” any programs this year, and that has many of them in a dour mood. Last Monday (May 16), Tucker wanted to bring the merger bill to a House floor vote, but two key supporters were called away “on business.” At least one was tending to matters in his Cajun district, which was about to be flooded by the opening of the Morganza Spillway. Tucker had to delay the vote for two days. Then came the bad luck. The next day, a House committee voted to amend the governor’s budget by taking millions out of an economic development fund that Jindal considers vital. Committee members made the change to cover a revenue shortfall in the budget. The shortfall

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15

Join Us for LUNCH Specializing in

HOT PASTRAMI & CORNED BEEF • FALAFEL CHOPPED LIVER • MATZOH BALL SOUP

Buy 1 Sandwich & Get 1 FREE

Crescent City Pendant & Earrings

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

PHYLLIS WALLO, M.D. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRY EVALUATION . MEDICATION . THERAPY

of equal or lesser value.

BUDGET ROSES

$6.50

/ DOZEN

CASH & CARRY

G

Dine in only. Up to $5.95 Value. Expires 07/11/11

“Best New York Deli 3519 SEVERN

41 FRENCH MARKET PLACE 299-9225 {Around the b loc k from M a rga ritav ille} ww w . s t erlings ilv ia . c om

Follow us on Facebook.

NOW SERVING ICY HOT CHOCOLATE Decadent Dark Chocolate Zesty Mayan Chocolate Old Fashioned Nectar and more!

Mon-Thur 10am-7pm Fri.& Sun. 10am-3pm www.koshercajun.com

504.444.5640 5707 Magazine St. 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

815 FOCIS STREET [OFF VETERANS ]

837-6400

888-2010

MARK’S

S BOY POD O FO SEA IALS C E P S LY DAI IALS C SPE

MUFFLER SHOP since 1984

AUTHORIZED FLOWMASTER DEALER

Adults and Adolescents

7611 MAPLE STREET NEW ORLEANS

G

BEAUTY ON A

in New Orleans”

Come Have Lunch With Me!

COUNTRY FLAME

Legislative sessions are complex, fluid events. Each has an emotional ebb and flow.

including some Jindal allies — to no end. After all, the governor’s budget as submitted was “balanced” only in theory. It depended on selling several state prisons (an idea that drew so much opposition that Jindal quickly dropped it) and passage of a constitutional amendment that isn’t even on the ballot yet. Rainwater’s “irresponsible” jibe hit a raw nerve, causing some lawmakers to retaliate by backing off the UNO-SUNO merger — as a way of “sending a message” to the governor. It wasn’t a wholesale defection, but enough of them bolted that Tucker could see what was coming. He pulled the bill. It all goes to show why legislating is so often compared to making sausage: It’s a bloody process. It also underscores the importance of timing. Had Tucker been able to bring the bill to a vote on May 16, it probably would have passed. Instead, the opening of the spillway delayed the vote, and then Rainwater’s comment turned the tide. Which offers the final lesson: Sometimes politics all comes down to luck, be it good luck or bad.

F F O re

5 mo r $ o 20 upon

co

5229 St. Claude Ave. New Orleans 504-944-7733 www.mar k smu f f ler sh op .co m

PA R K I N G I N R EA R

$

E DIN L

VA L

IL ID T

N LY 1 1 I N OE 3 0 , 2 0 JUN

504-883-5513 5209 W. NAPOLEON

(NEAR TRANSCONTINENTAL) WWW.RAJUNCAJUNCAFE.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

Best Fajitas in Town!

occurred for several reasons, not the least of which was Jindal’s failure to submit a budget that actually was balanced. Another factor was a recent decision by the Revenue Estimating Conference to lower revenue projections for the next fiscal year. Jindal’s right-hand man, Commissioner of Administration Paul Rainwater, called the committee’s action “fiscally irresponsible.” That comment irritated lawmakers —

17


18

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011


cover story

good earth the

P h o t o e s s ay & c a P t i o n s by a n dy c o o k

/// Folsom

    “All my life I’ve enjoyed the idea of living out in the woods and  not having to deal with the city,” says John Bartlett, 28, owner  and sole operator of The Garden in Folsom, an organic vegetable  farm on his family’s property just outside Covington. “Growing  up in this environment, that’s the way I felt life should be.”     With the exception of a few years at Louisiana State University  (LSU) and a six-month stint in northern California, Bartlett has  lived on this land his whole life. His parents were not farmers,  however; for most of his life, their property was wooded. When  Hurricane Katrina struck, it leveled a large swath of trees near  their house, and Bartlett saw it as a chance to turn his hobby of  backyard gardening into something bigger.     Five  years  later,  Bartlett  Farms  is  producing  free-range  eggs  and  nearly  40  different  types  of  organic  vegetables.  He  sells  produce weekly at the Covington farmers market and offers a 

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

I

n June, New Orleanians will have the chance to participate in the Eat Local Challenge — a pledge to eat only locally grown and produced foods for 30 days. (“Local,” in this case, means within 200 miles of the city.) The locavore movement is gaining steam all over the country, and it’s largely young people who are pushing this movement forward. This photo series focuses on people under 30 in the Greater New Orleans area who have committed themselves to agricultural projects, both urban and rural. It is by no means comprehensive, but offers examples of the different approaches and attitudes that are being taken toward living off the land. — Editor

Bartlett Farms

page 21

19


page 19

popular community-supported agriculture (CSA) program to residents on both sides of Lake Pontchartrain. Bartlett found his interest in farming while in the LSU agriculture program, but quickly became disillusioned with big-agribusiness practices. “In the last 15 years (national agriculture) has been geared towards heavy chemical use and genetic engineering,” he says. “It’s just digging (itself) into a hole it won’t be able to get out of.” Bartlett believes big agribusiness’ heavy government subsidies prove that the model isn’t sustainable, yet the laws favor large farm companies instead of small ones. “If the government was interested in promoting something like this, you wouldn’t have to subsidize it, ’cause it can live on its own,” he says. “If there’s somebody like me in 40 or 50 years, a young person that wants to know about farming, I’ll be able to tell ’em. Historically, that’s how this knowledge is passed down. You gotta get your hands dirty to really know.”

cover story

Grow Dat Youth Farm /// New Orleans

Tyrione Williams, 18, and Victoria Carter, 16 — seen here harvesting greens — are participants in Grow Dat, a youth farming program founded by food educator Johanna Gilligan. Grow Dat’s mission is “to nurture a diverse group of young leaders through the meaningful work of growing food,” says Gilligan, who started the program last fall in collaboration with the Tulane City Center and Tulane’s Social Entrepreneurship Initiatives. Students in Grow Dat receive a stipend to meet twice a week and learn about farming both in the field and in a classroom setting. Currently, they operate at Hollygrove Market and Farm but will be breaking ground on their own two-acre farm in New Orleans City Park this summer. Though the students are learning about agriculture and healthy food choices, Gilligan stresses that Grow Dat’s goals are much bigger. “Communication and coping strategies are two of the things that are most needed in youth populations here and are often not addressed,” she explains. “Farming is the perfect tool to bring out leadership skills in these young people, because (food) is a common denominator and growing it requires teamwork.” Gilligan believes that through open communication and the long-term commitment required of farming, the kids will be better prepared for reallife work environments.

Oakland Organic Farm /// Gurley

Originally from North Carolina, Jessica Barker, 20, found her way to the former plantation-turned-organic farm through the group World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF). The organization pairs volunteers with organic farms all over the world, and it recently has taken root in Louisiana. A year ago, its website (www.wwoof.org) listed only three host farms in the state; it now lists 11. Oakland Organics was one of the first and hosts a steady stream of volunteers, sometimes as many as 15 at once. WWOOFing is largely driven by young people. A study last fall discovered that the average age of WWOOFers is 25.8 years old, with about 72 percent between the ages of 19 and 28. WWOOFing is often categorized as eco-tourism, as many of the young people doing it cite as a reason the opportunity to see other parts of the world at little or no cost while also exploring the world of organic farming. Barker says she chose Oakland as a means of nurturing a lifelong interest in farms and learning more about her neighboring Southern states.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

“We’re not just training them to grow food,” she says. “We’re giving them skills that will have applications throughout their whole lives.”

page 23

21


page 23

Our Light Healing Center and Organic Farm

Showcasing Local Music

/// Hammond

MON 5/23

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 5/24

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 5/25

TBA

    Formerly  the  sprout  salesman  at  Our  School  at  Blair  Grocery  (OSBG),  Cory  Ashby,  23,  moved  his  operation  to  Hammond  a  little  more  than  a  month  ago  and  is  replicating  the  successful  OSBG  sprout  business.  Ashby  and  his  collaborators,  Sunflower  and  Jahba  Andrews,  Bill  Hill  and  Arthur  Levine  are  supplying  Restaurant  August,  Coquette,  Le  Foret,  Emeril’s  and  other  local  restaurants with organic sprouts. In a hoop house built for only  $80, the team is producing 22 pounds of sprouts per week, which  translates to roughly $1,000 in sales.      “Right  now  that  money  is  going  towards  operating  costs,”  Ashby says, “but our goal is to use it to start a youth social entrepreneurship program this summer.”     In addition to being a successful business model, Ashby sees  the  opportunities  to  use  his  company  (Good  Food  LLC)  as  an  educational  tool  at  every  level.  By  recruiting  community  youth  to participate in the farming process, Good Food teaches them  agricultural  and  entrepreneurial  skills  not  available  in  school.  By  tapping  into  the  new  small  plate  culture  of  high-end  New  Orleans  restaurants,  the  company  also  can  reach  a  wealthier  cosmopolitan  audience  with  its  message  of  the  importance  of  sustainable agriculture and community development.

THU The Trio featuring 5/26 Johnny V & Special Guests FRI 5/27

The Radiators

SAT 5/28

Soul Rebels

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter& 5/29 3/13 Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

www.themapleleafbar.com

24

VOTED

Live Music Nightly -No Cover

Zagat Rated

WED 5/25

CHIP WILSON & MARK McGRAIN

9PM

THUR 5/26 DAVE JAMES & TIM ROBERTSON

9PM

FRI 5/27

SAT 5/28 SUN 5/29 MON 5/30

ANNUAL BOB DYLAN TRIBUTE WITH FOOT & FRIENDS

9PM

HEIDI CAMPBELL & PAUL TOBIN RITES OF PASSAGE CHIP WILSON MIKE RYAN

5PM 9PM 8PM 8PM

in the French Quarter

Fresh Lime Juice Sweet sugar cane juice Fresh Mint & Cruzan aged rum Served in a tall glass over ice

Creole inspired,

Caribbean influenced cuisine

Artisinal Rum LIVE MUSIC EVERY NIGHT

331 Decatur St. • 527-5954 www.kerryirishpub.com

Best Mojitos

Fabulous courtyard dining Tues-Sat 10:30a-close Sunday 11a-close

437 Esplanade at Frenchmen 504.252.4800 www.mojitosnola.com

local

food 411

Eat Local Challenge

Get recipes, find resources and  learn the rules of the Eat Local  Challenge. www.nolalocavore.org

Bartlett Farms

www.thegardenveg.com

Grow Dat Youth Farm www.growdatyouthfarm.org

Oakland Organic Farm oaklandorganic.wordpress.com

ArtEgg Rethink Garden www.artegg.com


tropical isle® HOME OF THE Hand Grenade®

cover story

-Sold Only At-

536 Frenchmen St.

504-298-TRIO

www.thethreemuses.com

4:00-Till for Dinner Closed Tuesday

435, 600, 610, 721, 727 Bourbon St.

New Orleans’ Most Powerful Drink! Live Entertainment Nightly

Spa Reyna …

a day spa ~ FACIALS ~ MASSAGE

NAILS WAXING

The best kept secret in New Orleans

Let us take care of your

Spa Day for your Wedding, Bachelorette

and/or Bachelor Party! 5221 MAGAZINE STREET

(504) 899-4171 TUES – THURS 9A – 8P • FRI – SAT 9A – 6P

WWW.SPAREYNA.COM

Coq Au Coin Poultry Farm /// St. Francisville

ANN R. BAEHR

1135 PRESS ST. @ NEW ORLEANS

2900 ST. CLAUDE

(504) 947-7554

op!uby tbmf xf!qbz!zpvs!ubyft"

tpnf!sftusjdujpot!bqqmz

ATTORNEY AT LAW

(504) 835-9248 3231 N. I-10 Service Rd • Metairie, LA 70002 Prevent Increased Insurance Premiums Protect Your Driving & Criminal Record Affordable Fees

10% OFF with this ad

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

to learn more about local farmers markets: 

www.camelliacitymarket.org www.cityofwestwego.com/farmers_market.asp www.covenanthouseno.org/marketplace.htm www.covingtonfarmersmarket.org www.frenchmarket.org www.gretnafarmersmarket.com

www.hollygrovemarket.com www.localharvest.org/our-schoolat-blair-grocery-farmers-marketM38605 www.marketumbrella.org www.noffn.org www.nolagreenroots.com www.sankofafarmersmarket.org

“comfort food incarnate”

Happy Hour Food and Drink Specials from 5-6:30pm 200 Julia St • 504-304-6318 www.feastneworleans.com

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

Every morning, Adam Aucoin, 26, drags his chickens farther down his driveway. His homemade pens are equipped with nylon rope expressly for moving them easily, so his flock can have fresh grass, bugs, and seeds to peck at on a daily basis. After only a year in business, the young proprietor of Coq Au Coin Poultry Farm has made his all-natural chickens a profitable endeavor. He mail-orders 50 chicks a week and keeps them on a strict rearing schedule. “Eight weeks and I’m done with ’em,” he says with a smile. What drew him to chicken farming, Aucoin says, was the opportunity to make a healthy product at a relatively low cost and with a quick turnaround. After eight weeks in the yard, Aucoin slaughters the birds himself and takes them to the Crescent City Farmers Market to sell for $3.75 a pound. He admits his prices can’t compete with factory farmers Purdue or Tyson, but his sales are evidence that people will pay more for a chicken they know is healthy and hormone-free.

TRAFFIC TICKETS ALCOHOL-RELATED OFFENSES EXPUNGEMENTS

Plant sales & rentals

25


sHTo P aLK

BY LINDSEY DARNELL

SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Herb Appeal ituated near the end of the Canal Street streetcar line with the white tombs of historic Odd Fellows cemetery as its backdrop, the Mid-City location of The Herb Import Company (5055 Canal St., 488-4889; 711 St. Peter St., 525-4372; 712 Adams St., 861-4644; 1331 Englewood Drive, Slidell, 985-643-8007; www.herbimport.com) is frequented by both residents and tourists. “It’s the only store like this in America — that is in the middle of a cemetery,” says general manager Den-A. In addition to all the accoutrements of a traditional smoke shop (“We’re on the cutting edge of glass smoke ware,” Den-A says), Herb Import Company carries bath and body products, vitamins, supplements, herbal remedies, detox supplies and handmade and imported gift items including handcrafted fleur de lis gift boxes and religious statuary. Many customers are surprised to find such a diverse assortment of products. “We’re always so much more than anybody ever expects,” says Den-A, who describes the Canal Street location as an emporium of herbal and spiritual supplies. “We’re driven from an herbal standpoint,” he says. “We have culinary herbs, medicinal herbs and magical herbs.” With a background in cultural anthropology and nearly a decade of experience working at Herb Import Company, Den-A, an ordained minister, is well-versed in many visitors’ spiritual needs. “I’ve studied voodoo, shamanism, Buddhism, Taoism,” he says. With Den-A’s knowledge, an experienced staff and an in-house herbalist, the shop is equipped to assist custom-

FETCH! MID-CITY (3536 Toulouse St., 373-5417; www.fetchmidcity.com) kicks off its first Yappy Hour, a happy hour for people and dogs, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 24. CORK & BOTTLE (3700 Orleans Ave., Suite 1c, 483-6314; www.cbwines.com) will provide a wine-tasting bar and there will be treats for the dogs.

S

Sun-San Sandals

For the beach, pool or just cruising

GARDEN DISTRICT BOOK SHOP (The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266; www.gardendistrictbookshop.com) hosts author Karen White for a book signing at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 27. The best-selling novelist will sign copies of her new book, The Beach Trees. ers with health The Herb Import Company carries products. “We can smoking supplies, supplements, herbpoint you in the al remedies, bath and body products, right direction,” detox supplies and gift items. Den-A says. “The people here care.” Herb Import Company also houses Sacred Grinds, a vegan-friendly cafe featuring coffee and specialty drinks like the Green Tea Hemp Freeze, an antioxidant-rich energy booster which Den-A describes as nutritionally “equivalent to a super salad.” A fire in February forced Herb Import Company to rebuild its Canal Street store, and customers now have plenty of space to explore the eclectic merchandise. “It’s been quite a trial to come back, and we have,” Den-A says. “It’s better than ever.”

WHOLE FOODS MARKET (3420 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-8225; 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119; www.wholefoodsmarket.com) hosts community cooking classes at its Metairie and Uptown locations from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 28. Cooks will grilled food for guests to sample at the free event. Expert art appraiser David Goldberg recently opened SHOWCASE ANTIQUES AND FINE ARTS (3501 Tchoupitoulas St.), a new antiques and art resale shop. It is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays and by appointment on weekdays. Call Goldberg at 282-7611 or email mortongoldberg@cox.net to schedule a consultation.

MI

chargrilled

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

OYSTERS DAILY

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

CHILDREN’S CLOTHING • FAMILY SHOES

Monogramming Available 8119-21 Oak Street • 504-866-9944

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

3701 IBERVILLE STREET • NOLA 70119 504.488.6582 • KATIESINMIDCITY.COM MON.11AM-3PM • TUES-THURS.11AM-9PM FRI-SAT.11AM-10PM • SUN BRUNCH. 9AM-3PM

Sandwich Specials! monday: Pulled Pork tuesday: Cuban wednesday: BBQ Shrimp thursday: Chicken Parmesan friday: Soft Shell Crab

A few miles up river there is a place where guys like this still open doors for you.

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI 6215 WILSON ST.

26

OR

YAKONLI DER ON NE OLA @ .CO M

Featured on: DINERS, DRIVE-INS & DIVES

HARAHAN • 737-3933

515 HARRISON AVE.

LAKEVIEW • 484-0841

over 50 Antebellum b&b’s, spA, greAt bArs & restAurAnts! 800-674-6742 www.nAtchezpilgrimAges.com


TWIN SET THE TOPP TWINS: FROM NEW ZEALAND TO NEW ORLEANS PAGE 40 FESTIVAL: GREEK FEST PAGE 31

ART: SOME RESTRICTIONS MAY APPLY PAGE 41 CUISINE: PANCHITA’S PAGE 49


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 33 39 41 44 45 49 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > M AY << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <ALGERNON CADWALLADER >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Philadelphia’s best-named band, Algernon Cadwallader, brings spazzy, herkyjerky, rising-and-falling rock so ’90s-authentic you’ll think this is what the Kinsella brothers have been up to since Cap’n Jazz first set sail. Spazzier Pennsylvania neighbors Snowing and 1994 open. Admission $5. 10 Greek Festival p.m. Tuesday. Dragon’s Den, New Orleans 435 Esplanade Ave.

24

MAY 27-29

HELLENIC CULTURAL CENTER, 1200 ROBERT E. LEE BLVD., 282-0259; WWW.GREEKFESTNOLA.COM ADMISSION $5, CHILDREN 12-UNDER FREE

Traditional dance is one of the cultural highlights at the Greek Festival. PHOTO BY TERRY DEROCHE

KAREN AKERS

Created specifically for Le Chat Noir, this cabaret medley features Broadway veteran Karen Akers (Nine, Grand Hotel) interpreting old and new favorites in French and English, from Cole Porter to Stephen Sondheim, in her commanding contralto. The Thursday performance is sponsored by the Mystic Krewe of Satyricon (call 525-4498 for that show only). Tickets $45 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Thu.Sat., 6 p.m. Sun. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com

M AY

26-28

SAVE PBS

Hellenic Handbasket BY MARTA JEWSON ivi Demarinis-Haik has been to all 37 of Holy Trinity Cathedral’s annual Greek Festivals. Born a year after her parents emigrated from Greece, it’s a part of her heritage. “I remember selling soda at the festivals before I was old enough to dance,” she says. Demarinis-Haik grew up in New Orleans but learned Greek as her first language. She joined the Hellenic Dancers at age 14 and became the group’s director at 23. Now she enjoys teaching young Greek-Americans traditional dances from all over Greece. “(Hellenic Dancers) is a great way to get GreekAmerican kids used to (the culture),” she says. Her group — all between ages 14 and 26 — meets three times a week beginning in February to prepare for the festival. Members don traditional costumes and perform the classic Zorba as well as regional folk dances, this year from Crete, Ikaria, Epirus and Thrace. Greek dance is one of the traditional activities at the 38th annual Greek Festival. The Memorial Day weekend event draws crowds to the Hellenic Cultural Center on Bayou St. John for Greek music, dance, food, games, a market and more.

V

The band Alpha Omega performs traditional Greek music on the outdoor stage overlooking the bayou and inside the Hellenic Cultural Center throughout the weekend. Festival-goers can also tour the Holy Trinity Cathedral, which this year presents a display of Greek Orthodox history and artifacts. The festival’s children’s area features an Athenian playground, moonwalk, face painting, crafts and more. There are plenty of recreational activities, with opportunities to scale a climbing wall, canoe on the bayou or enter a 5K race. The festival’s cuisine includes souvlaki, spanakopita, rotisserie lamb, stuffed grape leaves, gyros, Greek salad, baklava, loukoumades and other Greek pastries. New this year are goat stew and goat burgers with tzatziki. A Greek grocery features a variety of cheeses, olives, breads, olive oil, seasonings, cookbooks and more. A market focusing on Greek imports offers music, art, clothing and jewelry, as well as health and beauty products. The festival starts Friday evening with music, dance and both a 5K race and 1 mile run/walk. The festival concludes with Toga Sunday; admission is free for anyone wearing a toga, and there will be a toga contest.

This all-star fundraiser was put together to support George Porter Jr. (pictured), Russel Batiste and Brian Stoltz, collectively the funk ensemble PBS, who are involved in a lawsuit with their former management company. The lineup includes Ivan Neville, Johnny Vidacovich, Stanton Moore, Billy Iuso, John Gros, members of Voices of the Wetlands and others. Tickets $30. 9 p.m. Friday. The Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 5229653; www.thehowlinwolf.com

BIG EASY COMEDY FESTIVAL

This one-night showcase features four veteran stand-up comics. Mike Epps is also familiar from bit parts in a host of films, including The Hangover. Bruce Bruce (pictured) is a Comedy Central and BET regular. Also performing are Sheryl Underwood and Michael Colyar. Tickets $53.85-$138.35 (including fees). 8 p.m. Saturday. UNO Lakefront Arena, 6801 Franklin Ave., 2807222; www.bigeasycomedyfestival.com

M AY

28

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

THERE’S ALL SORTS OF FUN AND GAMES AT GREEK FEST.

M AY

27

31


  Explores the

Marriage of Wine and Food on selected Wednesdays this summer.

CHEF DE CUISINE BRETT DUFFEE AND CHEF SUSAN SPICER PREPARE DISHES FROM: GR EECE | JUNE 22....................... MOROCCO | JUNE 29................... VIETNA M | JULY 6....................... ALSACE,FR A NCE | AUGUST 24.... SPAIN | AUGUST 31.......................

_ FOUR COURSES FOR $88 _

SKILLFULLY CHOSEN WINE SELECTIONS

FROM WINE STEWARD

SHANON FRISTOE

430 RUE DAUPHINE • RESERVATIONS 504-525-4455

COCKTAILS &

WINE

AFTER

ARE

WORK

WINE SENSE CLASSES EVERY WEDNESDAY • 6-7PM

GUIDED WINE TASTINGS $25 PER PERSON • 10 PERSON MINIMUM • CALL TO RESERVE

3700 ORLEANS AVE. • IN THE AMERICAN CAN BUILDING

483-6360 • 483-6314 www.cleverwines.com • www.cbwines.com NEW OWNERSHIP


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com PAGE 33

Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Buskers Ballroom, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — Dredg, The Dear Hunter, Balance & Composure, The Trophy Fire, 7:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Lisa Lynn, 3; Joe Bennett, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30 & 9

THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; The Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Willie C. Stebon, 6; 19th Street Red, 9:30 MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Alexandra Scott, 9; Roy Schneider, 10

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Peter Nu & Delia Nakayama, noon OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — 726 Jazz Band, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Rocky’s Hot Fox Trot Orchestra, 8:30 SIBERIA — Books to Prisoners Benefit feat. Meschiya Lake, The Tin Types, Fiddles & Fistfights Puppet Theater, 8:30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TIPITINA’S — Ocean of Storms, Greg Banks & the Crooners, Miss Shevaughn & Yuma Wray, 8:30

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Debbie & the Deacons, 5; Late as Usual, 9 WEDNESDAY AT THE SQUARE — Tab Benoit, Navy Band New Orleans Full Steam Brass Band, 5 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Thursday 26 12 BAR — Johnny J., 9:30; Life Without Elvis, 10:30

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Tarriona “Tank” Ball, Suave, Elliot Luv & the Blackstar Bangas, 8 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — (TR) Ttoccs Rekarp, 10

BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Association, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7

BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Beach House All-Stars, 8 THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7 BMC — Ramblin’ Letters, 6; Charley & the Soulabillyswampboogie, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Boot Hill, 8

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; The Half Heart, 11 COLUMNS HOTEL — Fredy Omar, 8

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 D.B.A. — Kenny H Trio, 7; Colin Lake Trio, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Loren Pickford, 9:30 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — John Michael Bradford, 6; The Deluxe, 9:30

OAK — Cristina Perez Trio, 7

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART — Ogden After Hours feat. Matt Lemmler, 6

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Crescent City Joymakers, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Paulin Brothers Brass Band, 8 PRIME EXAMPLE — David Torkanowski, 8 & 10

RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

KERRY IRISH PUB — Dave James & Tim Robertson, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco

Michael Rasch, Attorney at Law

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Home Grown, 7

mhr@chehardy.com www.chehardy.com

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Brian Jack, 8:30

SIBERIA — NON!, Jean-Eric, Mikronaut, DJ Joey Buttons, 10

Divorce & Family Law 3 Personal Injury 3 General Litigation 3 Successions

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Roland Guerin Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 TIPITINA’S — Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, The Tangle, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Beth Patterson, 3 & 6; Captain Leo, 9

A well-crafted legal strategy starts with a well-trained counselor.

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Barrel of Monkeys, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Crizmatik, Evolution, G-Livin, 2Face, Da Gunaz, DJ Radiation, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8

5101 W. ESPLANADE AVE., METAIRIE, LA 70006 504-885-4956 • 800-222-4956

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Richard Bievnenu, 8; Clyde Albert, 9; Lizzy Pitch, 10; Miss Shevaughn & Yuma Wray, 10; Jennie Arnau, 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

“WHERE THE UNUSUAL IS COMMONPLACE.”

MUDLARK THEATRE — Helen Gillet & LadyBabyMiss, The Tigermen, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Late as Usual, 9

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Treasure Fingers, 9

DANCE RECITAL GIFTS

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Friday 27 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Mega Dynasty-5, Narcissy, Brett Eugene Ralph’s Kentucky Chrome Revue, 9 BANKS STREET BAR — Lynn Drury, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — PAGE 36

Chehardy, Sherman, Ellis, Murray, Recile, Griffith, Stakelum & Hayes, L.L.P.

With 39 years of legal experience in matters from personal injury and wrongful death to divorce, family law and successions, Chehardy Sherman’s Michael Rasch is prepared to assist you with your needs. His legal acumen has been time-tested through our state and federal court system.

One Galleria Boulevard Suite 1100 3 Metairie, Louisiana 70001 3 (504)833-5600 3 1(855)833-5600

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 06/05/11

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

Green Parrot Nursery 201 NASHVILLE AVE. NASHVILLE & THE RIVAH

(504) 894-1100 www.greenparrotnursery.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

OAK — Amanda Walker, 7

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Damien Louviere, 5 & 9

MUSIC

35


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

ONE EYED JACKS — Earphunk CD release, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Steve Pistorius, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — NOLA Tuscaloosa Tornado Relief Fundraiser feat. Ryan Kinder Band, 7 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Superchargers, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Terrance Simien & Zydeco Experience, 9:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Brah, Mz Crowley, 9

SIBERIA — The Greenhornes, Bipolaroid, The Jonesbirds, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9 TIPITINA’S — Big Sam’s Funky Nation, MyNameIsJohnMichael, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mojo Trio, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Big Feets, 5; Late as Usual, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

12 BAR — Zebra, 8:30

APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

BACCHANAL — Gypsy Swing Club, 7

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Mike Ryan Band, 8:30

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Ellen Smith, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Luther Kent, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Vieux Carre, 9

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Tim Paco & Company, 8 CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Blues Frenzy, 7; Between the Atom, Power Blvd., 11

COCONUT CLUB — Uncle Wayne Daigrepont, 7:30

OLD POINT BAR — Country Fried, 9:30

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Good Enough for Good Times, 11

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Courtyard Kings, 10

DRY DOCK CAFE — Some Like it Hot!, 7 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 GREEN ROOM — Melo D Productions, 10

HARD ROCK CAFE — Kid Merv, 8 HERMES BAR — Paul Sanchez, 9:30 & 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — Consortium of Genius, Letters to Voltron, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Robert Earl Keen, Paul Thorn, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Scrubradio. com Scrub Raiser feat. Channel of Release, Intervert, Prytania, Burn, Blackwater Burial, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF NORTHSHORE — Summerlife, Epic Flow, The Blue Party, Saydontplay, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Grenade Man, 10

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Glen David Andrews, 8; Brass-A-Holics, midnight

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Heidi Campbell & Paul Tobin, 5; Rites of Passage, 9 KINGPIN — Major Bacon, 7

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Funkifry’d, 11

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 THE MAISON — Soul Project, 10 MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kristina Morales, 5; The Deluxe, 8; Blues4sale, 11

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Todd Lemoine, 8; Badura, 9; Dan Rivers, 10

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Barry Martin’s Down Home Boys, 3:30 OAK — Jayna Morgan Trio, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

ONE EYED JACKS — 101 Runners, 9

PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7

PONTCHARTRAIN VINEYARDS — Jazz ‘n the Vines presents Big Al & the Heavyweights, 6:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1

Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30 FRENCH QUARTER PIZZERIA — Nervous Duane, 8

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 HOMEDALE INN — Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Honey Island Swamp Band, 9:30

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.; Cooly Wright, Jason Lyric, ProtoType, Team Robot, Caesar Parkway and others, 8

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Deacon John & the Ivories, 8 & 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Blackened Blues, 10

SIBERIA — The Angel Sluts, Split Lips, Donkey Puncher, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen St. All Stars, 10 THREE MUSES — Young Spodie, 7; Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

TIPITINA’S — Johnny & Stanton’s New Thing, Anders Osborne, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Jumpin Johnny Sansone, Cyril Neville and others, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 TOOLOULA’S — Money Shot, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late as Usual, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 29 ARNAUD’S — Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 ATCHAFALAYA — Sam & Boone, 11 a.m. BISTREAUX — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

BMC — Nola Music Series, 1; Maryflynn & Prohibition Blues, 7; Andy J. Forest, 10

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 7 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Captain “Chiggy Chiggy” Charles, 7 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.; Davis Rogan, 8 CAFE RANI — Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m. CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m. COURT OF TWO SISTERS — Mary Flynn, 9:30 a.m. D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 9; Coot, 10

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL —

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Chad Reeves, 9

ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

SIBERIA — Yuppies, Tough Shits, Solid Attitude, Dead People, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival Heritage School Showcase, 5; Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses, 6; Pat Casey, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Mary Flynn Thomas & Prohibition Blues, 10 a.m.

THREE MUSES — Linnzi Zaorski, 7 TIPITINA’S — Sunday Music Workshop feat. Billy Iuso & the Restless Natives, 1; Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Marc Stone, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late as Usual, 9

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Chad Reeves, 9

KERRY IRISH PUB — Steve Keith, 4; Mike Ryan, 8 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Marc Stone, 4:30; Jason Bishop, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT — Courtyard Kings, 7 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Dave Easley, 8; Dave Maleckar, 9 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Maynard Chatters, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7

SIBERIA — Black Skies, Royal Thunder, Caltrop, Mountain of Wizard, 10

VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 9 a.m.

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Sunday Brass, 9

Monday 30

ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Lacy Blackledge, 9

ATCHAFALAYA — Burke Ingraffia, Dr. Danny Acosta, 7

KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson & friends, 8

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m.

MADIGAN’S — Anderson/Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON — Courtyard Kings, 7; Corporate America, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom Mcdermott and Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 5; Javier Olondo, 8

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6

APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30 BISTREAUX — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 10 COLUMNS HOTEL — David Doucet, 8

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

D.B.A. — By & By String Band, 7; Glen David Andrews, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Richard Scott, 3

OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 8

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-A-Holics, 8 THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street All-Stars feat. Lars Edegran, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Sandy Hinderlie, 11:30 a.m. RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m.; Catherine Anderson, 2

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 GREEN ROOM — Peripheral, 6 HI-HO LOUNGE — Bluegrass Pickin’ Party, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES — Deftones, Le Bucherettes, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French and The Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 5; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Damien Louviere, 1; Big Feets, 5; Rhythm & Rain, 9

classical/ concerts HOLY NAME OF JESUS CHURCH — 6367 St. Charles Ave., 865-

7430; www.hnjchurch.org — Mon: NOVA Chorale, 8

LAFRENIERE PARK — 3000

Downs Blvd., Metairie — Wed: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, 6

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — 1419 Basin St., 525-1052;

www.mahaliajacksontheater. com — Sat: The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra presents “The Music of Michael Jackson,” 8

METAIRIE RIDGE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH — 215 Phosphor Ave., Metairie — Thu: Jefferson Chorale Spring Concert, 7 ST. JOSEPH ABBEY CHURCH —

75376 River Road, St. Benedict, (985) 892-1800; www.sjasc. edu — Sun: NOVA Chorale, 2

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Navy Band New Orleans, 5; Taize, Mondays, 6

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

Saturday 28

COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers & guest, 9

MUSIC

37


FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

Grand, Hollywood 14 RIO 3-D (G) — A macaw who never

review

learned to fly (voiced by Jesse Eisenberg) and his female counterpart get caught up in a perilous adventure. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

AFRICAN CATS (G) — The Disney film captures the real-life love, humor and determination of the majestic jungle cats of the savanna. Chalmette Movies

struggling woman (Kristen Wiig) tries to get her life in order while also serving as her best friend’s maid of honor. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

COST OF A SOUL (R) — Two Iraq war veterans return to the war-like environs of their home neighborhood. AMC Palace 20 DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences expe-

rience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX

EVERYTHING MUST GO (NR) — After

losing his wife and job, a relapsed alcoholic (Will Ferrell) decides to live on the lawn where his ex-wife has thrown all his things. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

GRAND CANYON: RIVER AT RISK (NR) — Robert Redford narrates a 15-day

river-rafting trip that highlights the beauty of the Colorado River. Entergy IMAX

HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (PG) — In the animated sequel,

a group of storybook characters fight to give good-natured endings to classic fairy tales. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

successful and unhappily single attorney falls for her best friend’s fiance. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Luxury Goods

It’s tempting to be skeptical of I Am, filmmaker Tom Shadyac’s quest for knowledge and enlightenment. He became filthy rich directing goofy comedies (Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, The Nutty Professor, Bruce Almighty, Evan Almighty, etc.), bought bigger and bigger mansions, first in Beverly Hills and then a behemoth 17,000-square-foot place in Pasadena, Calif., and then suffered a cycling accident that left him with a severe concussion and dangerous complications. Once healthy, he set out to find out what matters in life. In pursuing his great questions, he interviews a range of brilliant scientists (David Suzuki), philosophers, religious leaders (Desmond Tutu), political scientists (Noam Chomsky) and psychologists (Dacher Keltner). It’s funny to watch historian Howard Zinn (A People’s History of the United States) apologetically draw a complete blank when asked if he had seen Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. Shadyac is a talented director, and the eye candy in the film is endlessly riveting as he traipses through natural wonders, societal calamities (including post-Hurricane Katrina flooding of New Orleans) and file footage of war and Civil Rights struggles. It’s hard to rub off the New Age-y shine from some of the brief interludes with big thoughts. But to his credit, Shadyac diligently questions the limits and insights of scientific knowledge, common economic assumptions, religious inspiration and psychology. He questions whether materialism is in fact a mental illness and chronicles the behavior of other species that are arguably much more democratic than humans. And he explores unexplained phenomena that at the very least suggest we have only begun to understand the natural world. Even without answering many questions, he is certain people can both be happier with their lives and better to one another. His journey and film are infectiously positive. — Will Coviello OPENS M AY

27

I Am Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, 304-9992; www.chalmettemovies.com

INSIDIOUS (PG-13) — A family

begins to experience inexplicable phenomena after their son falls into a coma. AMC Palace 16

JUMPING THE BROOM (NR) —

Worlds collide when two AfricanAmerican families from disparate socioeconomic backgrounds get together for a wedding in Martha’s Vineyard. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MADEA’S BIG HAPPY FAMILY (PG13) — Director and star Tyler Perry

returns as the tough and eccentric Madea. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies,

A NIGHT OF MUSIC, DRINKS & PRIZES Jenn Howard + Country Fried

1100 Constance St. NOLA | 525-5515

SOUL SURFER (PG) — The film is based on the true story of Bethany Hamilton, the teen surfer who lost her arm in a shark attack. Grand, Hollywood 14 THOR (PG) — Chris Hemsworth

plays the powerful but arrogant Marvel Comics hero who is cast down to Earth to live among humans. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) — Reese Witherspoon stars in

the adaptation of Sara Gruen’s best-selling novel. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14

WIN WIN (R) — A lawyer (Paul Giamatti) who volunteers as a high school wrestling coach finds himself in a complicated situation after some questionable business dealings. Canal Place

OPENING FRIDAY

therustynail.biz From the director of BRUCE ALMIGHTY, THE NUTTY PROFESSOR and ACE VENTURA: PET DETECTIVE

“A PASSIONATE FILM. It’s what Shadyac was saying all along in his comedies, but this time he’s saying it with feeling.” -Tad Friend, THE NEW YORKER

“The transformational movement has a great friend in Tom Shadyac.

ENTERTAINING AND ENLIGHTENING. ‘I AM’ IS A SPARK OF LIGHT AND A WORK OF LOVE.” -Marianne Williamson

What if the solution to the world’s problems was right in front of us all along?

A Film By Tom Shadyac

the shift is about to hit the fan featuring

THE HANGOVER PART II (R) — After

DESMOND TUTU • HOWARD ZINN NOAM CHOMSKY • COLEMAN BARKS LYNNE MCTAGGART and THOM HARTMANN

KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) — The ani-

STARTS FRIDAY, MAY 27

the infamous bachelor party in Las Vegas, Stu (Ed Helms) tries to play it safe for his wedding in Thailand — but things once again go awry. mated sequeal stars Jack Black as the voice of the titular warrior.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT

CHALMETTE MOVIES

Chalmette 504-304-9992

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

CHECK LISTINGS FOR SHOWTIMES

Visit iamthedoc.com for more information

BRIT WIT — The Big Top screens

Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 MIRAL (R) — Freida Pinto plays Miral, a Palestinian girl growing up in the wake of the Arab-Israeli war who finds herself drawn into the conflict. Chalmette Movies PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) — In the

latest installment of the franchise, Captain Jack Sparrow’s (Johnny Depp) past comes back to haunt him when he encounters Angelica (Penélope Cruz), a pirate he once loved.

PRIEST (PG-13) — A priest living

in a vampire-infested, Churchcontrolled dystopian city breaks his vows to find his niece after she’s abducted. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14 POM WONDERFUL PRESENTS THE GREATEST MOVIE EVER SOLD (PG-13) — Morgan Spurlock (Super Size Me)

tackles product placement in his documentary. AMC Palace 20

PROM (PG) — A group of teenag-

ers get ready for their prom in the Disney comedy. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20,

British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND (R) — Director Michel

Gondry’s non-linear story follows a couple undergoing procedures to have each other erased from their memories. Tickets $8. Midnight May 27-28, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

FOOD JUSTICE FILM SERIES — NOLA Locovores and Hollygrove Market and Farm present the series of films about issues related to where, what, and how food is

PALADIN GAMBIT WEEKLY

TUESDAY: 3 full bars5/24 • 10:30-til

738 Toulouse St. • 523-5530

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

FAST FIVE (PG-13) — Vin Diesel and Dwayne Johnson star in the latest installment of the Fast and the Furious franchise. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MAY 26 | 7-11:30PM

SOMETHING BORROWED (PG-13) — A

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) —

BRIDESMAIDS (R) — A comically

Relief Benefit

SCREAM 4 (R) — In the return of the slasher franchise, Sidney Prescott goes back to her hometown — and so does the Ghostface Killer. AMC Palace 20

NOW SHOWING

The museum screens a 4-D film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

TUSCALOOSA TORNADO

1/8 PG (2.281") X

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

ALL.IAM-A1-R1.0524.GW www.originaldungeon.com TM TM

39

ES


FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

review

grown, produced, transported, distributed, accessed and eaten. Visit the website for the complete schedule. Tuesday-Monday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net NEDS (NR) — Peter Mullan’s

film is a savage study of thwarted, violent youth in 1970s Scotland. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9:15 p.m. Friday-June 6 and June 8-9, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

PUSHING THE ELEPHANT (NR) — A mother and daughter

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

Twin Peek

40

SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS A MICHAEL DE LUCA PRODUCTIONS/STARS ROAD ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION WITH TOKYOPOP “PRIEST” PAUL BETTANY KARL URBAN CAM GIGANDET MAGGIEEXECUTIVE Q LILY COLLINS WITH STEPHEN MOYER AND CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER MUSIC BY CHRISTOPHER YOUNG PRODUCERS GLENN S. GAINOR STEVEN H. GALLOWAY STU LEVY JOSH BRATMAN PRODUCED BASED ON THE GRAPHIC NOVEL BY MICHAEL DE LUCA JOSHUA DONEN MITCHELL PECK SERIES “PRIEST” BY MIN-WOO HYUNG WRITTEN DIRECTED BY CORY GOODMAN BY SCOTT STEWART

As their corny stock characters Camp Mother and Camp Leader (see page 31), Lynda and Jools Topp entertain audiences at an Australian folk festival in The Topp Twins: Untoucheable Girls. Dressed in a horrendous strapless pink velour jumpsuit, Camp Mother tramps around the audience asking people where they are from while Jools fills time on the mic. “You know how to drive your wife crazy while you’re making love?” she asks in an embellished New Zealand accent. “Call her up, and tell her where you are.” Sort of a Laugh-In meets Indigo Girls act, Jools and Lynda Topp are immensely popular in their native New Zealand. The two began busking as a guitar-playing, harmonizing country and western duo, but they’re naturally funny, even if their bits are schticky. The Topp Twins: Untoucheable Girls is a great introduction to an act, which on paper sounds like its own punchline: twin lesbian comics who yodel. For their TV show, they developed an array of comic characters including the male, rugby-loving, pub-dwelling buddies Ken and Ken (pictured), the dim-witted socialites Prue and Dilly Ramsbottom, and the frumpy Camp Mother and Camp Leader. They have a salt-of-the-earth charm and seem neither surprised by nor caught up in their success. The twins grew up on a farm, joke that they joined the army to get a free trip to New Zealand’s south island, started busking on the streets, both came out as lesbians and were fixtures on the protest scene, standing up for Maori land rights, a nuclear-free New Zealand and equal rights for gays and lesbians. The documentary is a musical biopic and it has footage of their early days playing on street corners as well as a couple of odd guest appearances, including folk singer Billy Bragg. Even when you know you’ve heard some of their jokes before, the two are entertaining and, as a team, one of a kind. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

M AY

cHEck locAl lISTINgS foR THEATERS AND SHowTImES

IN IN THEATERS THEATERS IN IN

AND AND

27

The Topp Twins: Untouchable Girls 7:30 p.m. May 27-June 9 (except June 7) Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

separated during civil war in the Congo reunite more than a decade later. A Q&A with director Beth Davenport follows the screening. Visit www.neworleansfilmsociety.org for details. Tickets $10 general admission, $5 New Orleans Film Society members, free for NOMA members. 6:30 p.m. Friday, New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org

SHADOW OF A DOUBT (NR) — Alfred Hitchcock’s

1935 film noir stars Teresa Wright, Joseph Cotten and Macdonald Carey. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and June 1, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992 ; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde


LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Annual

student exhibition, through July 23. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The Golden

Legend in the New World: Art of the Spanish Colonial Viceroyalties,” paintings from the New Orleans Museum of Art collection, through Aug. 14. Opening Thursday.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org —

“Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection,” more than 200 pins from Albright’s personal collection, through Aug. 14. Opening Thursday.

GALLERIES 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “Intricacies of

Dialogue: Ink, Thread, Metal,” works by Margaret Hull, Niki Fisk and Meg Turner, through June 4.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “Coun-

terfeit,” works by Louviere + Vanessa, through June.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear

Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — “The Art of Dr.

Seuss: Rare Editions Collections,” prints and sculpture by Dr. Seuss, through May.

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org — “My Mom Says

My Work Has Really Improved,” a group exhibition of artists’ childhood work displayed next to recent work, through June 5.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Cheryl

Finfrock, jewelry by Shea Yetta, neon and acrylic sculptures by Anne Ashley and photographs by Laura Cox, through Monday.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St.,

524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing. ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — Paintings

by James Barsness; “Postcards From Plaquemines,” oil paintings and drawings by Simon Gunning; both through June 25.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. ASYLUM. 608 Julia St., 525-4633 — “Horses,” works by Joshua

Walsh, through May.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery.com — Works by

Marcel Flisiuk, through June 11. BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com —

Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United

We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings

by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective.com — “Shoot for the Wall,”

photographs by Zack Smith, through May.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery. com — Works by gallery artists, through May. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Be-

tween Two Thoughts,” abstract

West, ongoing.

review

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery

I-conned When Samuel Johnson said “Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel,” he wasn’t rebuking actual patriots, just opportunists hiding behind the flag. Symbols and icons have always been, well, iconic, and Jesse Shaw explores them in linoleum block prints such as his War on Terror (pictured), a kind of ballistic-expressionist freak show with masked jihadists, Abu Ghraib inmates, Osama bin Laden and oil barrels orbiting around a Dick Cheneyesque figure clutching a gas nozzle like a weapon. In less skillful hands this could seem sophomoric, but Shaw has a killer instinct and wields a sharp knife as we see in his American Religion depiction of apocalyptic conditions — as men in suits spew filth from every orifice. In this show, Shaw skewers everything from consumerism and the military to sports and funeral parlors in densely patterned prints so acerbic they make George Grosz look like a piker. Jessica Goldfinch tweaks iconic figures by emphasizing their human aspect in a series of small paintings and Shrinky Dink icons that imbue mythic symbols with human frailties. So Our Lady of Siam features a Madonna holding conjoined Siamese twins, and her Shrinky Dink icon, Sacred Heart of the Self Contained, looks almost normal until you see the little serpents writhing amid an anatomical tangle of blood vessels. Others update baroque and classical imagery with tattoos or cutaway anatomical views in an investigation of the archetypes that we ordinarily take for granted — at least until Goldfinch recasts them in a new light. All this is complemented by J. David Lindsley’s sculptures such as Restraint, in which a couple of life-size cast-glass arms wrapped in barbed wire effectively evoke the passionate, if not always coherent, protests gripping the world today. What all three artists convey is a sense that symbols not only matter but should be subjected to a healthy dose of skepticism lest demagogues subvert them to their own dubious agendas. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU JUNE

05

Some Restrictions May Apply: Work by Jessica Goldfinch, J. David Lindsley and Jesse Shaw Du Mois Gallery, 4921 Freret St., 818-6032

ink and watercolor drawings by Robert Lansden, through Saturday. COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the Blue

Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. 2820 St. Claude Ave., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com — Group

exhibition featuring Arlyn Jimenez, Anthony Schoenecker, Robere Lord Mike Kilgore and others, through Monday.

June 5.

Chalew, ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “In My End is My Beginning,”

FIELDING GALLERY. 525 E. Boston St., Covington — Eliza-

hand-sculpted clay vessels by Eileen O’Donnell, through June 2.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Some Restrictions

May Apply,” multimedia by Jessica Goldfinch, glass works by J. David Lindsley, prints by Jesse Shaw, through June 5.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “Stay Crazy,” mixed-me-

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

DEITY ARTS OF THE EXTREME ORIENT. 2001 Magazine St., 529-3171; www.deitynola.com —

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www. fairfolksandagoat.com — “An American Memory,” a group exhibition curated by Michael Martin, through July 15. “Foot-aNight,” installation by Hannah

dia works by Mason Saltarrelli, through June 11.

“Gum,” handmade dolls by Miss Oblivious, needle work and drawings by Lee Kyle and paintings by Sherry Dooly, through

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

beth Brown, David Henson, Tracy Lambert, Keith Villere and Stephanie Schoen, through June. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “Cellular

Automata,” works on paper by Taney Roniger; “Fire,” works by Leah Bailis and Andrew Suggs; “Man Up,” works by Claire Rau, all through June 5.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche

artists, ongoing.

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing. GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com — “Fit for Consumption,” a group exhibition curated by Aaron McNamee, through June 5. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Conversation,”

paintings, prints and drawings by Jill Moser, through June 2. HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave.; homespace411@ gmail.com — Group exhibition

featuring Lisa Silvestri, Julia Haw, Brian St. Cyr and others, through June 4.

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, 615 City Park Ave., 671-6363; www.dcc.edu — Delgado Fine

Arts Student Exhibit, through Sunday.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com —

“The American Sector,” a group exhibition of paintings featuring Terry Kenney, through May. JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “May I Have a Revolution

Please,” works by Dan Tague, through June 1.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ART

41


“Since 1969”

roses COUPON

$

stock colors

.99

7

DZN

6/24/11 EXPIRES RRY ONLY

UPON CASH & CA R COUPONS. CO SE. HE HA W/ ANY OT E OF PURC NOT VALID PRESENT AT TIM BE ST MU

SPECIAL OFFER SIGN UP FOR VILLERE’S FLORIST EMAIL LIST & YOU WILL BE ENTERED TO

WIN A

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www.julieneill.com —

“Facade,” photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www.photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com —

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart.com —

Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces of Treme,”

works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings

by Holly Sarre, ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “I Can Fly: Songbirds & Singers,

On a Wing and a Prayer,” paintings and prints by Jon Langford; “Long Live the Living,” paintings by Leslie Staub, through Saturday.

1027 VILLAGE WALK (985) 809-9101 VISIT US ON

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

through May.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Kathleen

Grumich, Vitrice McMurry, Deborah Morrissey, Cathy DeYoung and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by Ri-

cardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts. org — Group show featuring works

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com —

MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings

by Mallory Page, Mondays-Fridays.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart. com — Works by Travis and Lexi

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www.martinechaissongallery.com — Photographs

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I Genti H2O,”

acrylics by Marlena Stevenson, through July.

by Aaron Ruell, through June 1.

COVINGTON

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www.newmanschool. org — Sculpture by Sally Heller,

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue,

(WINNER WILL BE SELECTED – MAY 31, 2011)

750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716

“Vintage New Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “New Orleans is Alive,”

$100 METAIRIE Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

LISTINGS

from guild members, ongoing.

GIFT CERTIFICATE!

42

ART

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle Y.

Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Glass spring flowers by Teri Walker, hand-blown drams and quaichs by Dave Lindsley and Stephen Kraft, hand-pulled prints by Melissa Clark and Tish Douzart, through May. NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www.newcombartgallery. tulane.edu — “The History of the Future,” photographs by Michael Berman and Julián Cardona, through June 29. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “Deep Blues Outsider

Menagerie,” a group exhibition of music-inspired works, through Saturday.

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

ongoing.

Hand-blown glass works, ongoing.

Linde, ongoing.

works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing. SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www.sheilaart. com — Works by Sheila Phipps,

ongoing.

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — Group exhibition

featuring Anthony Carriere, Hayley Gaberlavage, James Henderson, Susan Madacsi, Caroline Sokol and Wanda Sullivan, through June 8.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-4375 —

“Salad Days,” a juried student art exhibition, through June 10.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www.sorengallery. com — “Downlow,” mixed-media

paintings on oil and canvas by Gretchen Weller Howard, through May.

STAPLE GOODS ART GALLERY & STUDIOS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., 940-5771; www.strochcc.org — “Interstitial

Spaces,” paintings by Anne C. Nelson, through Sunday.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart. com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 9420200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel

YA/YA artists, ongoing.

by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Intricate

MARIGNY PHO. 2483 Burgundy St., 267-5869 — Selections from “B

Terrain,” works by Maysey Craddock, through June 22.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill

Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www. venusiangardens.com — “Luminous

Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — “Françoise Gilot and the Figure: 1940-2010,” paintings and drawings by the artist, through June. WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works by Juli

Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS AT NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO. The studio invites

artists to submit 2-D and 3-D art entries inspired by the fascinatorstyle hat for an upcoming exhibition. All styles of media except giclee prints are welcome. Email neworleansglassworks@gmail. com or visit www.neworleansglassworks.com for details. Submissions deadline is June 20. THREE RIVERS ART FESTIVAL. The

Covington arts festival seeks works in a variety of mediums for the Nov. 13-14 event. Call (985) 327-9797 or (985) 893-4060 or visit www.threeriversartfestival.com for details. Submissions deadline is June 1.

SPARE SPACES ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 5962667 — “Youth,” sculpture by Betty

Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing. DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www. dosjefescigarbar.com — Works by

Mario Ortiz, ongoing.

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge. net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing. INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel.com —

Paintings by YA/YA senior guild and alumni, ongoing. JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www. marriott.com — Works by Charlene

Sessions: First Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

Insley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas

Movie Double Feature,” photographs and ceramic collectors plates by Heather Weathers, through July.

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — “The

Unconventional Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent exhibits of

jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-3222 — “Richmond

Barthe: Builder of Pictures,” an exhibition highlighting the life and career of the Harlem Renaissance sculptor, through June.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org — Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno. org — “Then & Now,” works by 14 artists who have exhibited at the center, curated by Dan Cameron, through June 12. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gacc-nola. com — Museum exhibits depict the

colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 523-5525 — The museum features fossils,

taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The Threads of

Memory: Spain and the United States,” a travelling exhibition of rare materials from the Archive of the Indies in Seville, through July 10.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — “Magic Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through Fall 2011. LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum features

props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.


STAGE

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER A CHORUS LINE. Rivertown Repertory

Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 4687221 — Patrick Mendelson directs the musical about the behind-the-scenes struggles of Broadway dancers. Tickets $35 general admission, $33 students and seniors, $17 children. 8:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

I LOVE YOU, YOU’RE PERFECT, NOW CHANGE. Le Petit Theatre, 616 St. Peter

St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre.com — The Jefferson Performing Arts Society reprises its production of Joe DiPietro and Jimmy Roberts’ series of vignettes about love and relationships. Call 885-2000 or visit www.jpas.org for reservations. Tickets $30 (a portion of sales benefit Le Petit Theatre). Opens May 20. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM. Sydney

and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, 658-4100; www. noma.org — The NOLA Project presents an outdoor production of the Shakespeare comedy. Call 658-4100 or visit www.noma.org/nolaproject for reservations. Tickets $10 general admission, $8 students and seniors, $6 children. 7 p.m. Friday.

THE NIGHT LARRY KRAMER KISSED ME.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 24 > 2011

Cutting Edge Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 2900760; www.cuttingedgeproductions.org — The Northwestern State University theater company Fish Tank Theatre presents the one-man show exploring the gay male experience in urban America. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday.

44

THE NORMAN CONQUESTS. Southern Rep Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com — Alan Ayckbourn’s trilogy recounts the events of one weekend from different areas of a house. Table Manners plays 8 p.m. Saturday and June 3; 11 a.m. Sunday and June 5. Living Together plays 8 p.m. Thursday and June 4; 3 p.m. Sunday and June 5. Round and

Round the Garden plays 8 p.m. Friday and June 2; 7 p.m. Sunday and June 5. Tickets $29 Thursday and Sunday, $35 Friday and Saturday. ON THE AIR. Stage Door Canteen at The

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Bob Edes Jr., Gary Rucker and others star in the musical that pays tribute to the heyday of radio broadcasts. Call 528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org for details. 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday through June 26.

ONE FAMILY AT A TIME. Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — The Golden Heart Players, a theater troupe for seniors, perform the play exploring problems in New Orleans and proposes solutions. 7 p.m. Tuesday. THE TAVERN. Playmakers Theater, 19106

Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc. com — George M. Cohan’s comedic mystery takes place on a dark and stormy night after a group of people encounter a mysterious wanderer. Call 893-1671 for reservations. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?

Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — Silk Dress Productions presents the Edward Albee play depicting tumultuous marriage. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 students and seniors. Call 931-8297 or email silkdressproductions@gmail.com for reservations. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 4 p.m. Sunday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin Mayfield’s

Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 5532270; www.sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

COCKSURE CABARET: THE DEVIL IN DISGUISE. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude

Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge. com — Ben Wisdom hosts the stage tribute to popular male performers including Elvis, Prince and David Bowie. Tickets $10 (available 30 minutes before the performance). 10 p.m. Saturday.

KAREN AKERS. Le Chat Noir, 715 St.

Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — The singer and actress sings songs from Cole Porter, Rodgers and Hart, and Sondheim musicals, as well as French language classics. Mystic Krewe of Satyricon performance is 8 p.m. Thursday (Tickets $35; call 525-4498 for tickets for this show only). Tickets for all other performances $45 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday.

STORYVILLE STARLETS BURLESQUE. Hi-Ho

Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — The burlesque troupe performs. 10 p.m. Friday.

TROIS BELLES VOIX. Actor’s Theatre of

New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — Chelle Duke, Gina Abromson and Louise Cappi sing in the cabaret show celebrating romantic Broadway and contemporary standards. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Saturday.

DANCE AN EVENING OF DANCE. Louis J. Roussel

Performance Hall, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www.montage.loyno.edu — Dance companies Ballet Hysell, Lula Elzy Dance Theater, Micaela y Fiesta Flamenca and Komenka Folk Dance Ensemble perform selected pieces. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 children. 8 p.m. Friday.

FUNDRAISERS SOUTHERN REP ANNUAL GALA. Windsor

Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-1922; www.windsorcourthotel.com — The gala honoring Southern Rep founder Rosary O’Neill follows an interactive murder mystery format, with Ricky Graham starring as Detective Flambeaux. Call 522-6545 or visit www.southernrep. com for reservations. Tickets $150. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.

TSUNAMI DANCE COMPANY FUNDRAISER.

The Bricks Courtyard Bar & Grill, 735 St. Joseph St., 525-2396 — The fundraiser benefits the contemporary dance company’s upcoming performances and events, and it features a silent auction and a performance. Tickets $10 (includes food and two drinks). 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday.

CALL FOR THEATER NEW ORLEANS FRINGE FESTIVAL. The annual theater festival, to be held Nov. 1620, seeks applications for 30-60 minute alternative theater performances. Visit www.nofringe.org for details. There is a $25 application fee. Submission deadline is July 1.

COMEDY BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The weekly longform improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BIG EASY COMEDY FESTIVAL. UNO

Lakefront Arena, 6801 Franklin Ave., 280-7171; www.arena.uno.edu — Standup comedians Mike Epps, Bruce Bruce, Sheryl Underwood and Michael Colyar perform. Visit www.bigeasycomedyfestival.com for details. Tickets $45-$77. 8 p.m. Saturday. BROWN HQ. Pip’s Bar, 5252 Veterans Blvd.,

456-9234 — Audience members can participate in the show performed by the improv comedy troupe. Visit www. brownimprovcomedy.com/BrownHQ for details. Tickets $5 general admission, free for performers. 8 p.m. Tuesday.

BROWN IMPROV COMEDY. 12 Bar, 608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola.com — The improv troupe performs. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. Tickets $10 general admission, $7 students. 9 p.m. Friday. COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost Love

Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday. FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com

— The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Friday. FRIDAY NIGHT LAUGHS. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the open-mic comedy show. Free admission. 11 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www. therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441 A.P. Tureaud

Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s,

1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www. carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

For complete lisitngs, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

EVENTS

com for details. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays through June 11.

EVENTS Tuesday 24 BOULIGNY LECTURE SERIES ON SPANISH LOUISIANA . Historic

FAMILY Tuesday 24 KINDER GARDEN: CREEP, CRAWL & FLY. Longue Vue House and

Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of gardens through age-appropriate activities. Admission $10 members, $12 non-members, $5 each additional adult. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue. com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

TODDLER TIME. Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 26 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 28 6500 Magazine St., 581-4629; www.auduboninstitute.org — The group provides support, information and recreation opportunities for children ages 8-13 who have siblings with disabilities. Call 943-0343 or email sibshopsnola@yahoo.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. HOME BUYING SEMINAR. RE/

MAX Real Estate Partners, 710 Brownswitch Road, Suite 3, Slidell — The program discusses the home buying process from start to finish, from financing options to the closing process. The event also features refreshments and door prizes. Call (985) 690-1564 or email bphillips@1stchoicenola.com for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. NEW ORLEANS WINE AND FOOD EXPERIENCE. The five-day event

brings together winemakers, chefs and industry professionals for a series of events that include special dinners, wine tastings, seminars and more. Visit www.nowfe.com for the complete schedule and other details. Through Saturday.

Parish Public Library, Mandeville Branch, 844 Girod St., (985) 626-4293; www. sttammany.lib.la.us — The library hosts a night of Scrabble playing for adults and teens. 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

VINE & SPIRIT. Eiffel Society,

2040 St. Charles Ave., 525-2951; www.eiffelsociety.com — Marian Farms steward Gena Nonini and local culinary expert Poppy Tooker present the benefit for the Waldorf School of New Orleans featuring wine and food pairings. Reservations are required. Visit www.waldorfnola.org for details. Tickets $75 per person, $140 per couple. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Wednesday 25 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local produce or every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE.

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday. MODEL GREEN HOUSE. Global

Green Holy Cross Project, 409 Andry St.; www.globalgreen. org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. A NIGHT OUT FOR THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS. 12 Bar, 608 Fulton

St., 212-6476; www.12barnola. com — The fundraiser for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Southeast Louisiana features food, music, a raffle and auctions. Call 8643389 or visit www.bgcsela.org for details. Admission $5. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. ROUND TABLE LUNCHEON. Royal

Sonesta Hotel, Evangeline Room, 300 Bourbon St., 5860300; www.sonesta.com/royalneworleans — The monthly luncheon features a number of speakers. Call 553-2220 or email nscallan@royalsonestano. com for details. Admission $42. Noon.

TAPAS CRAWL . Riverbend-area

restaurants including Saltwater Grill, Brigtsen’s Restaurant, Barcelona Tapas, Sara’s and Hana serve wine and a choice of tapas-sized dishes. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fourth Wednesday of every month.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave. at Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

WWII PUB QUIZ . Stage Door

Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — The quiz tests knowledge of general trivia as well as WWII questions. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Thursday 26 ALLIGATOR LIFE. Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The program focuses on of Louisiana’s most-well known residents: the American alligator. 11 a.m.

GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost & Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter.org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible Scriptures. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

ALVAR CHESS. Alvar Library, 913

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 525-3377 for details.

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Alvar St., 596-2667 — Library guests can play chess with expert player Bernard Parun Jr. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

ETHICAL TASTE TEST. Edible

Schoolyard, Samuel J. Green

Charter School, 2319 Valence St., 267-9053; www.esynola. org — Religious Action Center presents the event featuring local chefs who cook sustainable foods, a chance to explore the Edible Schoolyard, and eco-friendly cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. Email jmoss@rac. org or visit www.rac.org/ethicaltaste for details. Tickets $12 in advance, $15 at the door. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

JAMBALAYA FESTIVAL. Gonzales Civic Center, 219 S. Irma Ave. — Besides jambalaya served daily, the festival features live music and entertainment, carnival rides, cooking contests, food, a fun run, a car show, arts and crafts, and more. Call (225) 6472937 or visit www.jambalayafestival.org for details. Through Sunday. RENOVATORS’ HAPPY HOUR.

The Preservation Resource Center event features two renovations-in-progress in the Holy Cross neighborhood. The event also has wine and light refreshments. Check-in is at 6113 Bienvenue St. Call 6363399 or email sblaum@prcno. org for details. Admission $5 for PRC members, $7 non-members. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. TUSCALOOSA TORNADO RELIEF BENEFIT. Rusty Nail, 1100

Constance St., 525-5515; www. therustynail.org — The event raises money for victims of the PAGE 47

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

SIBSHOPS NOLA . Audubon Zoo,

New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — Thomas E. Chavez discusses “Spain and the Independence of the United States: An Intrinsic Gift.” The annual program examining the shared history between Spain and Louisiana is in conjunction with the exhibition “The Threads of Memory: Spain and the United States.” Free admission. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

SCRABBLE NIGHT. St. Tammany

45


LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT EVENTS

PAGE 45

recent tornadoes in Tuscaloosa, Ala. and features live music and prize giveaways. 7 p.m. to midnight. VOICES NOT FORGOTTEN: OLD SCHOOL TO NEW SCHOOL .

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — Seniors from the Central City Economic Opportunity Center present a stage production comparing “old school” dances to “new school” moves. Admission $3. 10 a.m. ThursdayFriday.

Friday 27 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds. com — The weekly support group meets at 6:15 p.m. Fridays. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details.

GREEK FESTIVAL. Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, 1200 Robert E. Lee Blvd., 957-7201 — The annual celebration of Greek culture features food, live music and other performances, a Greek grocery, a raffle for $1,000, chil-

dren’s activities, a run/walk and more. Visit www.greekfestnola. com for details. Tickets $5 general admission, free for children 12 and younger. Admission is free Sunday for those wearing togas. 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday.

New Iberia City Hall, 457 E. Main St., New Iberia, (337) 3692300; www.cityofnewiberia. com — The festival features food, music, arts and crafts and special events. Call (888) 9423742 or visit www.iberiatravel. com for details. 10 a.m.

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, North

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

BUNK JOHNSON JAZZ FESTIVAL.

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

EAGLE WATCH. Fontainebleau

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 28 BIRD NESTS. Bogue Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The program discusses the different types of nests birds use in the wild, and participants take a walk through the park to locate some. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m. EASTERN NEW ORLEANS NEIGHBORHOOD ADVISORY COMMISSION HOUSING FAIR. St.

Maria Goretti Catholic Church, 7300 Crowder Blvd. — The fair provides those interested in rehabbing and occupying a property sold to the Road Home program in eastern New Orleans the opportunity to meet with banks, mortgage lenders and home inspectors, as well as nonprofit groups and other resource providers. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Insulation + Home Weatherization Your Home Weatherization Specialist Lower Utility Costs!

Call Today For Your Free Consultation

(504) 250-9487

Qualify for federal tax credits and much more Open and Closed Cell Foam • Blown-In Cellulose Commercial/Residential Building Efficient Commercial Assessment and Weatherization Air Infiltration Sealing • Radiant Barrier

retro-fitz.com

Fully Licensed & Insured

Authorized Weatherization Contractor

J. Singleton School, 1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon.

GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rainor-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. I WANT TO READ THE BIBLE ON MY OWN: ADULT LITERACY & CHURCH OUTREACH. Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — YMCA Educational Services presents the program for church leaders and community members to discuss the role clergy can play in encouraging

adults to seek adult literacy and GED assistance. The event features a light breakfast. Call 596-3842 or visit www.ymcaneworleans.org for details. 10 a.m. NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. RENAISSANCE MARKETPLACE OF EASTERN NEW ORLEANS.

Email ampnola@gmail.com for details. Free admission. 3 p.m. DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE.

New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www. lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Renaissance Marketplace, 5700 Read Blvd. — The market offers cuisine from area restaurants, shopping, arts and crafts, children’s activities and more. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www. sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays.

Sunday 29 AMP MEN’S GROUP. Du Mois Gallery, 4921 Freret St., 8186032 — The mens group’s monthly meeting explores issues related to authenticity, masculinity and purpose in life.

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING.

Monday 30 MEMORIAL DAY AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM . National World War

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum hosts a series of events in honor of Memorial Day, includ-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

RetroFITZ

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING.

47


EVENTS

LISTINGS

ing ceremonies, presentations and a performance by the Victory Belles. 9 a.m. to 3:10 p.m. TOASTMASTERS MEETING.

Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 2518600 or visit www.notoast234. freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@ yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

SPORTS NEW ORLEANS JESTERS. Pan American Stadium, City Park, 1 Zachary Taylor Drive — The Jesters play the Laredo Heat at 7 p.m. Friday, and they play the RGV Grandes Football Club at 7 p.m. Saturday. Visit www. nolajesters.com for details. NEW ORLEANS ZEPHYRS. Zephyr

Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www.zephyrsbaseball.com — The Zephyrs play the Albuquerque Isotopes. 7 p.m. Friday, 6 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, 1 p.m. Monday.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

L’OREAL PARIS WOMEN OF WORTH. Ten women dedicated

48

to volunteerism and community will be awarded money for their charities of choice. Visit www.womenofworth.com for details. Application deadline is June 30.

PROJECT HOMECOMING . The

faith-based nonprofit seeks homes to rebuild that suffered damage of 50 percent or more from Hurricane Katrina. Call 942-0444, ext. 244 for details.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 8334024 or (800) ACS-2345; www. cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling

BE THERE DO THAT depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 543-3480, anotherlifefoundation@hotmail.com or visit www.anotherlifefoundation.org.

Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details.

BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 3097304 or (877) 500-7304; www. bbbssela.org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. Thorough training and support is provided. Call Mike Madej at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email mmadej@casaneworleans.org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. CCFM and marketum-

brella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella.org for details.

EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION .

The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@ degashouse.com for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER .

The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@ gnofairhousing.org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The

volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email nkennebrew@ handsonneworleans.com or visit www.handsonneworleans. org for details.

HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS.

Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie

seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 837-0175 or email daveharrell@ yahoo.com for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL . The charter school

that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 8360808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/ SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www. la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org.

LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS. Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www. lowernine.org or email lauren@ lowernine.org for details. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details. MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/ summercamp for details. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM . National World War

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine.alpert@nationalww2museum.org for details.

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FESTIVAL . Volunteers are need-

ed for the festival’s production team. Visit www.nojazzfest. com/volunteer for details.

OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS. Operation REACH

BILL LOEHFELM . Garden District

Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs The Devil She Knows. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday.

LYNN BRYANT. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Catfish Alley. 1 p.m. Saturday.

PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS.

BOOKS SANDWICHED IN . St.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar. com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday.

New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach afterschool program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach. org or call 654-1060 for information.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program

holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@ scapc.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES. Touro Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www. touro.com/content/careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, patient information desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call volunteer services at 897-8107 for information.

WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — Poet Lee Meitzen Grue signs and reads from Downtown. An open mic follows. VIsit www.17poets.com for details. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. ALAN GEAUTHREAUX. Old

bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information.

weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleansarea inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www. operationreach.org.

Tammany Parish Library, Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 8936280; www.sttammany.lib. la.us/covington.html — The library hosts a lunchtime book club. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Fourth Tuesday of every month.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at

the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

GLENN SINGLETON . St. Charles

Parish East Regional Library, 160 W. Campus Drive, Destrehan, (985) 764-2366 — The author signs Crossing Over: A Tribute to Don Raymond. 6 p.m. Saturday.

HARLA L. ROBERTSON. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The children’s author reads from Beatrice La Bat. 11:30 a.m. Saturday. KAREN WHITE . Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs The Beach Trees. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Metairie Library, 2350 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-4353 — The author reads from and signs An Extreme Prejudice: Anti-Italian Sentiment and Violence in Louisiana. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.

LIZ SCOTT MONAGHAN . Octavia

BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author, writing as persona Modine Gunch, signs and reads from Never Clean Your House During Hurricane Season. 2 p.m. Saturday. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The

PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays. POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WALLACE STEVENS GROUP. New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The group meets every other Sunday to discuss the poet’s works. Call 460-9049 for details. 10 a.m. WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121 — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail. com for details.

CALL FOR WRITERS SWAMP LILY REVIEW. The online

journal of Louisiana literature and arts accepts submissions for its fall issue. The journal publishes poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, art and photography. Email swamplilyreview@gmail.com or visit www. swamplily.com for details.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <BEST OF THE SOUTH > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Stephen Stryjewski of Cochon (930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123; < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <ww.cochonrestaurant.com) won the James Beard Foundation’s award for Best Chef: South, an honor also won in 2007 by Donald Link, his co-chef and business partner at the upscale Acadian restaurant. Stryjewski worked for Link at Herbsaint before partnering with him to open Cochon in 2006. WHAT

am

B

Panchita’s Mexican Criolla Cuisine WHERE

1434 S. Carrollton Ave., 281-4127 WHEN

Lunch and dinner daily HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

RESERAVATIONS

Not accepted

TWO TONY’S, PART II

Two Tony’s (8536 Pontchartrain Blvd., 831-0999; www.twotonys.com) has moved to the former location of Pontchartrain Point Cafe in New Orleans. The Creole-Italian standby, originally opened in the French Quarter and moved to Bucktown in 1994. As construction began on the new flood gates and pumping station for the 17th Street Canal, chef/owner Anthony Montalbano Jr. decided to relocate. The format and menu remain the same, mixing Italian standards with plenty of local seafood.

five 5 IN

Five handsome hams

WHAT WORKS

Seafood dishes, fresh tortillas, distinctive sauces WHAT DOESN'T

930 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 588-7675 www.cochonbutcher.com

CHECK, PLEASE

KOZ’S

The loud, cramped dining room can feel hectic First-rate taqueria with seafood specialties

Veracruz Control MEXICAN-STYLE SEAFOOD SHINES ALONG CARROLLTON.

T

House-made ham goes in the Cuban sandwich and the muffuletta. 515 HARRISON AVE., 484-0841; 6215 WILSON AVE., HARAHAN, 737-3933 www.kozcooks.com

Barbecued ham is cooked debris-style, soaked with jus.

Panchita Delgado and Eva Torres serve Mexican favorites at Panchita’s. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

BY IAN MCNULT Y

The menu covers all the usual taqueria standards, and it’s worth ferreting out the seafood specialties. The tacos are good enough, but remember to ask for the thicker, more distinctive house-made tortillas, which are not always advertised but usually available. Sauces are another strength at Panchita’s, especially the red salsa coating the chilaquiles. The mole that goes over enchiladas is impenetrably dark but only slightly sweet, with just a backbeat of heat beneath the main thread of toasted spices. Meals start with a complimentary basket of chips and a changing number of varying salsas. Sometimes you get one, sometimes four, and even those that look alike rarely taste the same from one visit to the next. This is a good sign, showing that someone is making them daily and without too much of a formula. Appetizers are beside the point for anyone intending to finish an entree. But for something extra to taste around the table, skip the puny and all-tooliquid cheese dips and have the jarochas. It’s another Veracruz specialty made on a masa corn cake with the texture of thick pie crust, smeared with black beans and covered with onions, peppers and crema. It’s like a hearty tostada, and it functions better as a shared starter than a main event. Margaritas are decent, but I prefer asking for a tequila-spiked version of the normally harmless watermelon agua fresca. After all, as New Orleans continues to learn Mexican cuisine, I figure we’re all entitled to a few of our own detours.

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP 3454 MAGAZINE ST., 899-3374 www.mahonyspoboys.com

A Chisesi-brand ham is glazed with root beer for a po-boy.

MOTHER’S RESTAURANT

401 POYDRAS ST., 523-9656 www.mothersrestaurant.net

The “black ham,” cut from the crisp, dark edge, is an enduring classic.

TARTINE

7217 PERRIER ST., 866-4860 www.tartineneworleans.com

Ham is packed into a house-made baguette with slices of Brie.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 Bodega Tamari Reserva Malbec MENDOZA, ARGENTINE / $11-$15 Retail

Grapes for this concentrated wine were sourced from the higher elevations of the Uco Valley. The terroir imparts a freshness that is balanced with the grape’s bold qualities. The wine offers aromas of black fruit, cocoa and hints of spice, as well as hazelnut and almond from aging in oak. Drink it with steak, duck, pork, burgers, strong cheeses or wild game. Buy it at: Breaux Mart, Prytania Liquor Store, Zuppardo’s Family Supermarket, most Rouses, Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket, Langenstein’s and Canseco’s in Metairie. Drink it at: Maximo’s Italian Grill, Hoshun Restaurant and Theo’s Pizza. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

he post-Katrina proliferation of places serving good Mexican food quickly transformed New Orleans from a city with scant options to a burrito boomtown. But once we got over the initial delight with the expanded offerings and began exploring beyond the basics, we started parsing the new Mexican restaurants according to their specialties and our preferences, just as we do with other types of restaurants. That’s why when I think of Taqueria Guerrero in Mid-City, I imagine its huge bowls of pozole bobbing with hominy, and when Taqueria Chilangos in Kenner comes to mind so do its thin-pounded Milanesa steaks. And when I pass by the festively painted, light-strung exterior of Panchita’s Mexican Criolla Cuisine I think of seafood, at least for starters. Opened in 2010, Panchita’s specializes in dishes from Veracruz, a state along Mexico’s Gulf coast. One classic of this region is the huachinango a la Veracruzana, which Panchita’s prepares traditionally with red snapper grilled to a darkened crust, piled with a piquant hash of tomatoes, olives, garlic and capers, blasted with lime and topped with avocado. Thick-cut fillets of tilapia are breaded and fried for the fish empanizado, or they sizzle on fajita platters, or they tumble in chunks from massive fish burritos. Broiled, three-bite shrimp are crammed with wads of cheddar and bundled with bacon. Similarly sized beauties, which taste as if they were just plucked from a backyard boil, are added to a surprisingly lush entree salad of mixed greens, apples, pineapple and almonds.

COCHON BUTCHER

49


>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) < < < < < < <345-6789; < www.tryyuen.com — specialties include fried > > > > > > > >House > soft-shell crab topped with Tong <<< Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style >> stir-fried alligator and mushrooms <in<oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave.,

Harahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pitcooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

50

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Pan-seared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters

include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905

Canal St., 488-7357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or housemade hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 8617890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollan-

daise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com ��� The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette

St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www. threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA —

600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N.

COFFEE/ DESSERT

ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www. oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSY NAIL —

1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www. therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-

5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the halfshell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola. com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437

BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn PAGE 52


OUT2EAT page 50 Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N.

19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/ owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St.,

52

529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” su-

shi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 5817253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-

0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St.,

309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942

— Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St.,

310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafeno-

The staff at the original Bud’s Boiler (citywide; www. budsbroiler.com) on City Park Avenue assemble burgers and cheeseburgers. PHOTO BY CHerYl GerBer

la.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636

Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iber-

ville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 4840841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Bara-

taria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Na-

poleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.

italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto page 54


ce en ll ce ex n ig es d l ca lo g in or - Hon

JuNe 16 The RiTz-CARlTON 4PM-5PM

FINALISTS will be announced, and you the reader will vote on your favorites, and hopefully become aware of some very cool spaces in the New Orleans webosphere!

New Marketing Strategies fOR YOuR SMAll buSiNeSS interactive Promotions, Creating Content, QR Codes, Social Media And More

SPEAKERS Damien Lamanna

Tom Martin

Adele Tiblier

Digital Media Director

Founder

Director of Interactive

MORGAN & COMPANY

CONVERSE DIGITAL

FSC INTERACTIVE

FREE FOR LOCAL NEW ORLEANS BUSINESSES RSVP TODAY Jeannee@gambitweekly.com (limited seating)

Visit bestofneworleans.com

between NOW and JUNE 3RD to nominate your favorite local websites. sponsored by:

HAPPY HOUR NETWORKING EVENT TO FOLLOW IN THE DAVENPORT LOUNGE SPONSOReD bY:

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 24 > 2011

3

Following the nominations, a selection of industry experts will vote on the nominations.

The Audubon Room ( 1sT flooR)

53


Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

PINTS & POBOYS

Storyville String Band New Orleans traditional Jazz on strings

MAY 26

Choose a 3-inch Poboy & a Pint of Beer • $8

Every Night • 8-10pm

NEW HOURS! Now Open

Mon-Sat 11am-10pm

3454 Magazine St. NOLA 504-899-3374

page 52 sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

plus tax

Choices include: Fried Green Tomato & Remoulade, Overstuffed Shrimp, Root Beer & Glazed Ham & Cheese, Pattons Hot Sausage, Certified Angus Roast Beef, or French Fry, Roast Beef & Cheddar Poboy

OUT2EAT

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 4880133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 8180111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $ SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles

Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 24 > 2011

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

54

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave.,

486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations.

Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN

— 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave.,

943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a trainingtable feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson

Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, poboys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd.,

241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memo-

rial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S

IN

THE

MARIGNY

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles

Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135

N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS MANAGEMENT OFFICE BUSINESS MANAGER

DRIVERS/DELIVERY DRIVERS

Some Local & Out/Back. Free Health Ins.& Benefits. CDL-A w/Hazmat, Tanker End., TWIC Card & 1 yr TT Exp. Required Martin Transport, 1-888-380-5516

FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Fiddlesticks Farms, Midkiff, TX, has 2 positions for vegetables. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.65/ hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 7/1/11 - 5/1/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX4832954.

CBD firm with national client base seeking Office Business Manager. Zehno Cross Media Communications is a marketing communications firm serving educational institutions around the country. We are seeking an experienced business manager to oversee the financial and administrative operations of the company. The financial roles include controller, bookkeeping, invoicing, collections, reporting and project estimating. The administrative arena involves human resources, business development, office equipment maintenance and the general tasks that encourage efficient daily performance. The successful candidate will have a related bachelor’s degree and at least three years previous experience in accounting and office management. Full-time position with a generous benefits package including health insurance and retirement plan. Email cover letter and resume in PDF format to apply@zehno.com.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

Metairie deli Manager-in-training

A great opportunity to develop into management and learn catering function! FT. Day and weekend availability required. Evening availability a plus. High school diploma or equivalent required, some college and/or culinary education a plus. Restaurant/deli experience required. Supervise deli front counter including working a cash register. Expediting. Work sandwich making line. Close, clean and breakdown deli. Typing, reading, writing, answering multiple phone lines required. PosiTouch, AS400 and ability to use general deli equipment preferred. PT Front Counter/Cashier & Porter opportunities also available. w w w.martinwine.com

Part time / Full time

• WAITSTAFF •

VOLUNTEER

Houston’s Restaurant in the Garden District is accepting applications for professional servers. We are located at 1755 St. Charles Avenue in Uptown New Orleans. We are currently searching for friendly, outgoing, highly motivated individuals who will thrive in a fast-paced, team-oriented environment. Full-time and parttime positions are available. High earnings potential, reasonable business hours! Prior restaurant experience is a plus, though not necessary. Please apply directly at the restaurant between the hours of 3 PM and 5 PM Mon-Fri, and be prepared for an interview. Professional attire required for interviewing.

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

Fax resume to (504) 894-6559 or apply in person during deli hours except noon-2pm.

Weekly Tails Benjamin is a 1-year-old, neutered, Boxer/Pit mix. He has the most beautiful brindle coat and the most kissable face—drool and all! He’ll require TLC during his complimentary heartworm treatment. To meet Benjamin or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

MISCELLANEOUS $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

NOW HIRING

LOOK WHAT’S COOKING!

Grill Cooks

BENJAMIN Kennel #A12876422

serviCe Bartenders

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

Cashiers/hosts

56

2-3 years experience in a high volume restaurant required. If you are a hard working, fun-loving person with a passion for great food and customer service, come open your career oyster and find a pearl of a job today! apply at 724 iBerville street Monday through Thursday between 2:00pm and 4:00pm

Ralph Brennan’s new restaurant NOW OPEN & HIRING

Experienced Cooks • Experienced Servers Experienced Warewashers 2700 Metairie Road Flexible schedule, Competitive wages, Free gym membership, paid vacation, insurance, 401-K, dining disc & more Apply in person Tuesday – Saturday 1:00 – 3:00 pm or Email hr@neworleans-food.com

MADDIE Kennel #A12493861

Maddie is a 1-year-old, spayed, Siamese mix with cream markings and sparkling blue eyes. Lazy-Daisy-Maddie enjoys long naps and just hanging-out, so is looking for a new couch to call her own. To meet Maddie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Professional training in mixology and casino dealing

EMPLOYMENT Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

Dealingschool.com • 1-800-BARTEND


CLASSIFIEDS King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

DOMESTIC AUTOS ‘08 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY $18,995 504-368-5640

IMPORTED AUTOS 2 Door, $12,995 504-368-5640

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

LOST/FOUND PETS

‘’08 Mitsubishi Eclipse

GREY CAT LOST MID-CITY

2 door Spyder $18,995 504-466-6200

‘08 VW JETTA SE

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Leather, sunroof $14,995 504-368-5640

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

‘09 MAZDA 3

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Free Ads: Private party ads for

‘09 SUBARU IMPREZA $13,995 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA FIT $15,995 504-368-5640

‘10 SUBARU IMPREZA WGN 37k mi $28,995 504-466-6200

‘10 SUBARU LEGACY 2.5i Auto, 12k mi $21,995 504-466-6200

TRUCKS ‘08 Chevy Avalanche 2WD Crew cab LS $25,995 504-466-6200

‘08 Lincoln Mark LT 2WD Supercrew 139 Red with gray interior 504-466-6200

‘97 FORD RANGER

5 speed, ac, good tires & body. 129K. Eng problems. Ideal for mechanic. $995. 504-568-1359

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278 Providing a relaxing light pressure Swedish or a super deep tissue massage in a beautiful peaceful environment Introductory price 1 hr

$40

90 min. avail

5 min from Elmwood

Hours: 10am-7:30pm Mon - Sat

Alicia

LA Lic# 520

16 yrs exp. • Non-Sexual

call 504-317-4142

A Touch of

Aloha

massage & body work

Real Estate

‘04 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER

2209 LaPalco Blvd

Employment

‘07 FORD EXPLORER

Rentals &

$7995 Call 504-368-5640 $10,995 504-368-5640

40K MI $15,995 Call 504-368-5640

504-258-3389

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com La Lic #2983 • Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

MERCHANDISE

‘09 SUBARU FORESTER

Advertise in

NOLA

MARKETPLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

AWD $10,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘10 Mitsubishi Endeavor Auto, 4 door $21,995 504-466-6200

‘10 SUBARU OUTBACK 3.6R Limited, Pwr Moonroof. $28,995 504-466-6200

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

REWARD- LOST

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

PET ADOPTIONS Catahoula mix, male

Buddy boy is sweet and gd with other dogs.Loves to play w/toys. Best in home w/no sm kids. all med done and house broken. Please contact CINDY foxcfox@cox.net 504-451-9335

Cuddly, Grey striped adult male cat.

Hercules loves to enjoy the company and atten. of ppl, children, dogs, & other cats. Lives to cuddle & purr. Please contact Tracy- tbkestler@cox. net 504-975-5971

APPLIANCES 18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Almond Color. $50. Call 943-7699.

ELECTRIC RANGE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $50. Call 943-7699

CLOTHING Nursing Uniforms-Small

Elastic waste and tuck in top. Assorted colors/ no white. 8- $10/ per set. 833-2478

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403

3 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Husky/ Shepherd mix

Satchmo is a 2 yr old, male. Super sweet, playful spirit. Good 2 everyone, incl. cats, dogs, and kids. If int. Please contact Tracy- tbkestler@ cox.net 504-975-5971

Itty Bitty Inky

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

KOJAK

large cuddly orange Morris the cat look a like. Neutered ,shots rescue 504 462-1968

Lab/Gold Retriev Mix perfect companion dog.

Jelly-male 40 lb,VERY sweet &mellow. Loves to be social w/ ppl & dogs. Contact Sue @ sumico95@yahoo.com, 504-454-0476

Princess Leila

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 SFS Cat Adoptions has a large variety of sweet beautiful rescues that need good indoor homes-Siamese , Russian blues, etc all cats are spayed /neutered and vacs. 504 462-1968

Staffordshire terrier mix ppl lover

Peanut -F/tan . quiet intell, easily trained with treats or toys. Housebroken & crate trained. Loves ppl. contact Sue @ sumico95@yahoo.com, 504-454-0476

SERVICES

AIR COND/HEATING GULF STATES AIR

Service & Sales 3 TON A/C Condenser & Installed $1399 5 Year Warranty Service Calls only $49.50 Gulf States Air (504) 464-1267

SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

FLOORS/CARPET/TILE REFURBISHED HARDWOOD FLOORS & STEPS

Free Estimates. Experience. Reasonably priced. Call (504) 95-6305

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE Landscaping Services

Lawn Maintenance. Licensed and Degreed Horticulturist. (504) 913-3952

TREE MEDICS

$50 OFF Trimming & Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru May Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

PEST CONTROL ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE FOR FORMOSAN TERMITES Injected into Trees. One Price: $185. ADRIAN’S TREE SERVICE 504-367-1160 www.adrianstrees.com

TERMINIX

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

POOL SERVICES MAGNOLIA POOLS

Specializing in Saltwater Systerms Service, Maintenance, Repair 504-270-7307 www.magnoliapools.org

TUTORING Summer Math and LEAP Prep

Louisiana Certified Math Teacher available for tutoring. Middle School Math or Pre-Algebra and Algebra 1. Also prep for the LEAP Summer Re-Test. Specialize in struggling students, at risk students and children with learning differences. Hourly Rates tutoring@ nolaschneiders.com or 504-208-1661

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

‘04 HYUNDAI SANTE FE

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

SHINY GREY TABBY WITH PURPLE COLLAR, LAST SEEN ON THE CORNER OF SAINT ANN ST. AND ORLEANS RIGHT NEXT TO CITY PARK. NAMED SAILOR. VERY FRIENDLY, SMART, AND LOVED! IF FOUND OR IF YOU HAVE ANY INFO PLEASE CALL (504)444-8557 OR (337)281-8797. PLEASE HELP BRING SAILOR HOME!!

Elijah

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Waxing Services Available evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

ADOPTIONS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

PETS

‘08 HONDA CIVIC COUPE EX

$13,995 504-368-5640

ANNOUNCEMENTS

57


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 9012 ROSECREST LANE

1,420sq. ft, lot 62x120. Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors throughout, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 minutes from St. Matthews & St. Rita. REDUCED! $184,000.

OLD METAIRIE METAIRIE TOWERS 401 Metairie Rd

1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, renovated with new appliances and AC’s. $118,000. Call 504-275-5700

VACANT LOT - METAIRIE HEIGHTS

50 x 120. Ready to build $120,000 (504) 451-8118

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. REDUCED PRICE! $149,900. Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

NEAR PRYTANIA SHOPS

1621 Dufossat @ St Charles. Renov 3/2 in great Upt n’hood, hdwds, 10’ ceil, cen a/h, screened porch, w/d, off st pkg. $1975/mo. 504-717-3821.

LOTS/ACREAGE BIG BEAUTIFUL AZ LAND $99/mo. $0 down, $0 interest, Golf Course, Nat’l Parks. 1 hour from Tucson Int’l Airport. Guaranteed Financing, No Credit Checks. Pre-recorded msg. 800-631-8164 code 4057 www. sunsiteslandrush.com

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 3020 VETERANS BLVD

3000 sg ft for lease off Causeway Blvd. 1 story in small strip mall. A/C, Heat and Water included in lease. Call Rick, 504-486-8951. Kirschman Realty, LLC.

740 N RAMPART

1350 sq ft, zone VCC-2, across from Armstrong Arch, corner of St Ann. $1750. Contact: 504-908-5210

BIG OFFICE SPACE ON CANAL 4220 Canal Street - Ground Floor On Streetcar Line 1,800 Sq. Ft. Large Central Room, three Separate Offices, Great for Group Practice or Studio $1,575/Mo + Utilities peggy.leblanc@ live.com, 488-6401

THERAPIST OFFICE SPACE

Victorian Building in Lower Garden District. Fridays Only. Call 670-2575 for information

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

1023 PIETY ST

1 BR, 1 ba, lr, furn kit, w/d hkups. Quiet neighborhood., carport, $650/ mo. Call 504-390-1784

2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

DOG LOVER

Upr dplx, 3 br, 1.5 ba, wd flrs, cei fans, furn kit, w/d, off st pkg. Nice area. $1200/mo. Louis, 874-3195.

METAIRIE TOWERS

Rent $970/mo 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service- 914-882-1212.

CBD

METAIRIE

339 CARONDELET LUXURY 1 BDRM APTS

LUXURY APTS

Newly renovated 1850’s bldg on CBD st car line. 600-1000 sq ft. $1200-$2000/mo. 18 Units. Catalyst Development L.L.C. Owner/Agent. . 504-648-7899

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BYWATER

4228 ORLEANS AVE.

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1300/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep, No Pets.. Call 225-8026554/ email dicklea@cox.net

1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, $1150/mo. 432-7955.

2340 Dauphine Street

(504) 944-3605

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 1301 N.RAMPART FURN-1bd/1.5ba $2000 1301 N.RAMPART FURN-2bd/2ba $3000 1301 N. RAMPART-2 bd/ 2 ba $3200 4721 MAGAZINE - Comm. $1700 1029 ESPLANADE - 1 bd/ 1 1/2 ba $1950 824 ROYAL - 2 bd/ 2 ba $3500 1026 DUMAINE - 2 bd/ 1 ba $1350 925 CLOUET - 1 bd/ 1 ba $880

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

GENTILLY

OLD METAIRIE

with

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN

ESPLANADE RIDGE

O/S prkng, wtr paid, all kit appls, priv yard, conv. location, cable ready, Pets ok. $1000/mo. 504-913-4803.

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

1 bedroom, 1 bath, balcony with view of Mississippi & Fr Qtr. $1000/mo w/ dep. Call 504-909-2104.

3626 Upperline

3BR/2.5BA TOWNHOUSE

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

FRENCH QUARTER

BROADMOOR

Share private home near Metairie Rd. $450/mo incl utilites, cable. Refs & dep. 504-838-6161.

KENNER

APARTMENTS

58

547 RIDGEWAY

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

BYWATER STUDIOS

1103 ROYAL UNIT A

2 apts available, one mid-July and one mid-August. Located between Chartres and Royal, furnished including linens, kitchen ware, tv, cable, wi-fi, bottled water...the works - $850/ mo, 900 for short term, free laundry on premises. Call Gloria 504-948-0323

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

927 ST. ANN

Slave Qtr Cottage. 1 BR, tiled bath, cable & water included, 2 patios. No dogs. $995 + deposit. 504-568-1359

SINGLE FAMILY HM

Across from Pontchartrain Golf Course! 4 BR/2 BA, CA&H. Built In electric. No smokers. Avail now! $1500/mo + deposit. Call 504-491-9834

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

1 BR $695/mo. 2 BR, $900/mo (2 BR includes utilities), hardwood/carpet floors. . 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

The Historic House, Luxury Home and Second Home Specialist Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

Washers and Dryers • Gated • Home Office Spaces Pet Friendly • 24/7 Emergency Maintenance 24/7 Online Resident Services Features vary by community.


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe GENTILLY

WAGGAMAN

RIVER RIDGE

GENTILLY

MID-CITY

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

1132 Dorgenois St. $125,000 CHARMING! Raised basement Double/4plex on corner lot w/ original features: hdwd flrs, claw foot tubs, etc. Beautiful side Gallery with brick Courtyard garden. Owner/Agent, Agents Protected. 504-382-1788 or 504-202-3698

9012 Rosecrest Lane

4336 St Anthony $99,000

Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

55 Richelle Street 3BD/2BA Additional Large Lot $135,000 Prudential Gardner Kathy Hunter 985-688-5873

Charming renovated 2 bedroom/1 bath/ Cen a/h/Off street Parking/ Ceramic Tile/Corner lot/ Near Universities. Southern Spirit Realty Keisha Washington 504-319-2693

Reduced! $184,000

Call (504) 915-3220

CLASSIFIEDS LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter • Kaysie • Billy

504-949-5400 $875

3/2.5 lrg bdrms, 3 blacs, lg kit, 2 wet bars! $2650

835 Julia #3

1/1 Furn chic renov w/parking!

937 Barracks

2/2 Apt w/2nd floor gallery balcony $1200

$1750

519 Iberville

1/1 renovaptw/balconyovercourtyard $1200

718 Barracks #7

1/1 newly remodeled,prvt pool,great Loc! $2200

2168 Esplanade Ave

1/1 newly ren, prkng, close to fairgrounds $1000 Parking spaces available

931 Bienville

2 story, 3 BR upstairs, 2 half BA, 1 full BA. Formal dining. Washer, dryer, backyard. $1200. 504-301-7239

MID CITY

222 London(Metairie) 2/1.5 pool, pkg, w/d on site, 2nd flr 1824 Dauphine

TOWNHSE- 6604 BELLAIRE

$175-$200

1908 Dauphine #2

1/2 beautiful crtyrd,great location,

937 Barracks #2

2/2 charming,inlowerquarterw/balc! $1200

$950

421 Burgundy #3

1/1 recentlyupdatedssappls&hrdwdflrs. $850

CONDOS FOR SALE

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $700/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

3508 Cleveland Ave.

1b/1b fur kit w/stove/fridge. wind unit. 1 1/2 blks to canal/Jeff davis $525 water incl. no pets. Joseph 504-453-9679

4322 HAMILTON

2BR/1BA lower, 1000 + sf, hdwd flrs, furn kit, w/d, porch, fen yd, off st pkg, no smokers, pet negot. $900/mo + dep. 488-2969

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 Blk to St. Charles

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

1014 WASHINGTON AVE

Completely renov 2 br, 2 ba, cen a/h, wood flrs, w/d hkps, new appls, lg rear yard. $1395/mo. O/A, 891-3180.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573.

4129 VENDOME PLACE

Beautifully renovated spacious home. 3/4 br, 3 BA, kit w/ ss appl. w/d, cen a/h, lg yard, small gar. $2500/mo. $1500 dep. 504-621-9337

We have qualified tenants for your rentals. Call us!

4328 Bancroft Drive $625,000

1 br, liv rm, kitch w/all appls, wd flrs, hi ceil. No pets. $750/mo + dep & lse. 895-6394 or cell 289-9977.

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

2 Eff apts. Lower $625 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

6317 S. PRIEUR

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

AWESOME UPT DPLX UNIT

5419 STORY ST. 3 br, 2 ba duplex. Cen a/h, unfurn w/all appl inc m’wave & w/d. Close to univ & hosp. On bus line. Lg fncd bkyd. Safe n’hood, sec sys. $1350/mo. 289-5110.

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

GRT LOCATIONS!

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew - O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up 2833 MAGAZINE 1BR/1BA Mod kit, o/s pkng, pool, coin op laun, $800/mo 2100 BARONNE 2BR/1.5 ba, hdwd flrs, w&d hkups, Newly renov. $850/mo 891-2420

2011 GEN PERSHING Beautiful Neighborhood!

3 BR 2 BA, Close to Univ, med & law schools. The best apt you’ll see. Cent a/h, hdwd flrs. Lots of closet space. Offst Pkg, Water pd. Avail 6/1. No smokers, no pets. $1800. Paula 504-952-3131

S. FRONT - NR. CHILDREN’S HOSP

Newly renov cottage. 1BR, lr, kit, w/d hkups. $750 + dep. No sec 8, no pets. New Owner Special: $100 off 1st mo. rent. 504-891-1889, 473-0821

IRISH CHANNEL 2707 ST. THOMAS

2 BDRM Camelback double. CA&H, all wd flrs. $675 per month + deposit. Call (504) 416-5923.

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

1726 St. Charles 1br/1ba Apartment Over Pralines $800 628 Julia 1br/1ba "Arts District Apartment"

899-RENT

$1000

1207 Jackson 1br/1ba "Aquatic Garden Apt"

$750

1514 Euterpe

$600

HARAHAN

"Efficiency Off St. Charles"

OLD METAIRIE CLUB GARDEN

UND ER C ONT RAC T

A LARge WAteRfRont HoMe on pReStIgIouS StReet. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter. Owner financing via Bond for Deed with 25% down on this property.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in new orleans, LA 70130

7301 Sheringham Dr.

Well maintained traditional home in great demand area of Harahan. Beautiful original flooring, plenty of storage space, sprinkler system, never flooded. 3 bds/2 ½ baths, wonderful sunroom and study. $499,000

33 naSSau Dr. Excellent location in Old Metairie Club Garden. Flooded in Katrina, perfect opportunity for renovation, original marble flooring in foyer and two original marble mantels. Great backyard for entertaining and outdoor cooking. 4 br/ 3 ½ baths. $890,000

Beau Box • 504.525.5354

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

1233 Esplanade #19 studio studio furn,renov w/open flr plan $69,000 929 Dumaine #14 studio cozy, skylights, common ctyd $114,500 222 London (Met.) 2/1.5 pool, pkg, w/d on site, 2nd flr $99,000 511 Gov Nicholls D 1/1 updated,modern, 533 sqft $229,000 1119 Dauphine 2/1.5 fab condo w/balc! 1040 sqft $369,900 812 Esplanade #2 1/1 grnd flr w/pool! 481sqft $189,000 1233 Decatur #8 1/1 3rdflw/tonsofcharm 608sqft $199,000 921 Chartres #9 2/1.5 spacious,fabloc!Crtyrd,1188sqft $359,000

3122 PALMYRA STREET

3452 CONSTANCE

REAL ESTATE

59


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS BAYOU ST. JOHN • 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 24 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 58

62

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

1216 NORTH LOPEZ Bayou St John 4 Plex on huge lot. Well maintained. Owner’s unit has open floor plan, crown molding & whirlpool. Hardwood floors throughout. Totally renovated in 2007. Re-wired, plumbing, roof, drywall, & central A/C throughout. Living room

(504) 895-4663

opens onto patio & pool. Enjoy this tranquil setting from porch or huge balcony. POOL HOUSE Has storage & guest accommodations with 2 full baths. 4153 sq. ft. plus 576 Sq ft pool house. $595,000.



Gambit's May 24, 2011