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MAY 3, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 18

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News

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Bouquets & Brickbats

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New Orleans know-it-all

Municipal recycling begins again this week in New Orleans

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Sam Edelman Sandals

Commentary

Embarrassing Louisiana

SHOE LUST HANDBAG ENVY

This week’s heroes and zeroes

C’est What?

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Scuttlebutt

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The State of the State / Jeremy Alford

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Politics / Clancy DuBos

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Gambit’s Web poll From their lips to your ears Jindal’s M.O.

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2011 Big Easy Music Awards

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Cuisine

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The Puzzle Page

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Quintron’s listening party for his latest release, Sucre du Sauvage Best bets for your busy week The winners and the photos

Ian McNulty on Mimi’s of River Ridge 5 in Five: Five out-of-town dining options Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

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STAGE EVENTS

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PREVIEW: Smith Westerns

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commEntary

thinking out loud

Embarrassing Louisiana

E

federal courts wasted no time striking it down as unconstitutional. Doing the same thing now would be a waste of time, legislative attention and money. That doesn’t seem to faze LaBruzzo, however. His abortion bill is similar to some of his other ideas, including paying poor women to be sterilized and making everyone who wants to receive state assistance take a drug test, purportedly to save money — though he admitted he didn’t know how much the program would cost. Perhaps what LaBruzzo really hopes to accomplish is to distract voters from remembering that he was among the legislators who voted to more than double his own pay — immediately — in 2008. He also signed an affidavit accepting the raise despite voters’ protests. When voters filed a petition with the Secretary of

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The Louisiana Legislature ‘clarifying’ the U.S. Constitution would be like a sitcom writer ‘clarifying’ Shakespeare. State to recall him, LaBruzzo pulled an about-face and desperately begged Gov. Bobby Jindal to veto the raise he had previously worked so hard to pass. He apparently remains in damage-control mode as the election approaches. While Crowe, Seabaugh and LaBruzzo puff, posture and pander, the state faces a $1.6 billion anticipated shortfall starting July 1. In his opening-day address to lawmakers, Jindal made it clear he’ll veto any tax hikes. If LaBruzzo, Seabaugh and Crowe were serious about helping their constituents, they’d spend more time figuring out how to keep the state afloat and less time grandstanding on behalf of spurious bills that have no chance of surviving constitutional challenges. Their shameless attempts to garner headlines for themselves at election time only serve to embarrass Louisiana. We hope their colleagues quickly consign these bills to the legislative trash bin.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

ven before the Louisiana Legislature convened last week, lawmakers were busy embarrassing themselves and all Louisianans by trotting out proposed bills that made national headlines — for all the wrong reasons. The bill that’s received the most attention is House Bill 561, the “Louisiana birther bill,” crafted by Rep. Alan Seabaugh, R-Shreveport, and Sen. A.G. Crowe, R-Slidell. HB 561 would require candidates for president and vice president to present a birth certificate before being allowed on the Louisiana ballot. Both Crowe and Seabaugh have said their bill has nothing to do with the conspiracy theory that President Barack Obama or those around him somehow faked his U.S. citizenship, but it’s obvious where they came up with the idea. The “birther” conspiracy, which largely faded after Obama’s election, bubbled up again in recent months, and Obama defused the whole thing April 27 when the White House released a photostat of the original document. Seabaugh and Crowe then pointed fingers everywhere but at themselves, chiding Obama and complaining the whole exercise had been “time-consuming” (true, but that was hardly Obama’s fault) and saying they’d been subject to “attacks by certain members of the media.” Their statement concluded, “We look forward to moving forward with this important legislation this session.” The irony here is that Seabaugh and Crowe, who champion smaller government, are proposing a wholly unnecessary and duplicative law. Candidates for president and vice president already must prove their eligibility by filing the necessary documents with the Federal Election Commission (FEC). Crowe has said passage of HB 561 would “clarify the Constitution.” That’s rich. The Louisiana Legislature “clarifying” the U.S. Constitution would be like a sitcom writer “clarifying” Shakespeare. Meanwhile, Rep. John LaBruzzo, R-Metairie, is making national news for his House Bill 587, which Mother Jones has dubbed “Louisiana v. Roe” — a direct assault on the landmark 1973 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Roe v. Wade. LaBruzzo’s bill would ban all abortions in Louisiana — no exceptions for rape, incest or the life of the mother — and charge both doctor and patient with feticide. (LaBruzzo now says that goes too far; he intends to have the language changed.) No state law can nullify a Supreme Court ruling, but LaBruzzo is frank about his intentions: He wants to mount a court challenge to Roe v. Wade. LaBruzzo, who faces re-election in a new district that has a voting majority in New Orleans, is only 20 years late on this one. Louisiana lawmakers passed a “no exceptions” anti-abortion bill in 1991 — and the

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Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

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DEAR LL, In each parish there are federal, state and local roads, and various groups are responsible for determining the speed limits. Federal legislation gives individual states the authority to establish their own maximum speed limits. Speed limits are set by the legislature of each state. Louisiana’s statute is LRS 32:64, which states speed limits shall be “reasonable and prudent,” with due regard to weather, traffic and road conditions. States generally allow a statewide transportation agency and lesser authorities to change speed limits. When the Louisiana Legislature changes speed limits on state and federal roads, it directs the State Department of Transportation and Development to carry out its directives. Local governments such as cities and parishes also establish speed limits by ordinance. For example, the Jefferson Parish Council passed an ordinance in November 2010 changing the speed limit on South Causeway Boulevard between Veterans Memorial Boulevard and Airline Drive. The purpose was to have a uniform speed limit of 35 mph on Causeway Boulevard from Airline Drive to Lake Pontchartrain. The Jefferson Parish Council also decided a speed limit of 20 mph on residential streets would be conducive to keeping children safe. In the case of St. Charles Avenue, speed limits are often reduced temporarily while roadwork is in progress. HEY BLAKE, A MAN I WORKED WITH ATTENDED MCDONOGH 35 HIGH SCHOOL. THEIR NICKNAME IS “THE RONEAGLES.” I TRIED TO FIND OUT WHAT A RONEAGLE IS, BUT WAS UNSUCCESSFUL. JEFF

DEAR JEFF, A Roneagle is a mythical bird. Originally, this emblem of McDonogh 35 was called the “Ironeagle,” but the “I” was intentionally dropped to make it easier to pronounce. Don’t believe any stories about the “I” falling off the school’s sign and getting lost by the janitor, or that lack of money kept it from getting replaced until eventually the new name stuck. In the first issue of the school’s yearbook in 1928, the Roneagle was described as resembling an American bald eagle. However, because it is fashioned of solid iron, it is larger, stronger, faster and more resourceful than all other birds. McDonogh 35 was founded in 1917. At that time a dual school system existed, and African-Americans who wished to attend school after the eighth grade were required to enroll in one of the private

schools available to blacks. A mural at the However, in front entrance of 1917 a group of McDonogh 35 depicts private citizens the school’s mascot, the Roneagle. petitioned the Orleans Parish School Board to convert McDonogh 13 Boys’ School, a white elementary school, into a secondary school for AfricanAmericans, a school which also provided a two-year teacher training course from 1924-1931. Over the years, the school has been located on four different streets: South Rampart, Camp, St. Ann and Kerlerec, its current site. Students who attend McDonogh 35 are also known as Roneagles, and the school has produced many successful graduates. Perhaps the most famous was Ernest N. “Dutch” Morial, who graduated in 1947. In 1978 he became the first black mayor of New Orleans.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >MORE > > SCUTTLEBUTT JEREMY ALFORD CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 15 17 13 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“The NFL is, far and away, the most egregious, self-absorbed and greedheaded entity when it comes to displaying any logo, player, uniform, jersey, game film, highlight. If money isn’t shoved into their pocket at every single opportunity and if the script itself doesn’t extol the NFL and American football as the saving grace of our civilization, then they reserve all rights to the depiction of football as it exists in the lives of regular folk. … [We] reference the return of the Saints and their march to the playoffs that year whenever possible. We just can’t show much of it onscreen.” — Treme creator David Simon, writing on the Back of Town blog (backoftown.wordpress.com) about Season 2 of the show, set in 2006, the year the Saints first made it to the NFC championship game.

Bin There: Do That WHILE CLIMBING OUT OF A MASSIVE BUDGET HOLE, NEGOTIATING CONTRACT SPATS AND ORGANIZING TASK FORCES, THE CITY REINTRODUCES ITS CURBSIDE RECYCLING PROGRAM. BY ALE X WOODWARD

STATE OF THE CITY 2

F

Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s second State of the City address, which he delivered in the Mahalia Jackson Theater in Armstrong Park on April 28, contained the usual mix of laundry-list accomplishments and promises for the future. Landrieu snapped off stats from his first year: 18,000 potholes filled, 3,000 streetlights fixed; 464 take-home cars reclaimed; 12 New Orleans Recreation Department pools to be operational this summer (up from eight in 2010); 31 summer camps to be opened (up from four in 2010); and a doubling of the summer jobs program to accommodate 3,000 teenagers (that got big applause from high school students who sat near the front). Some of the numbers, however, were not so impressive, especially those relating to crime. “Last year, New Orleans Metro Disposal and Residents who registered Richard’s Disposal. for curbside recycling By 2011, Richard’s, receive a large wheeled which serves parts cart from the city to store of Mid-City, Uptown their recyclable waste. and Algiers, agreed to drop its rate ($17.99 a month per household from its previous $22). Metro, which serves Mid-City, Lakeview and the 9th Ward, also agreed to lower its rate ($15.99 per month from $18.15). Both contracts include recycling pickup. “This has been a long time coming post-Katrina, and we’re really happy we’re able to add (recycling) when we renegotiated the contracts,” says Landrieu spokesman Ryan Berni. But the program isn’t citywide yet. The French Quarter, Central Business District and Warehouse

PAGE 13

c'est what? MAYOR MITCH LANDRIEU GAVE HIS STATE OF THE CITY ADDRESS LAST WEEK. HOW DO YOU THINK NEW ORLEANS IS FARING COMPARED TO A YEAR AGO?

62% better

DirecTV employees

worse

26%

same ole same ole

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PAGE 11

BoUQuets

12%

Jazz Fest tickets are $45 in advance, $60 at the gate. What do you think of the price?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

joined KaBoom! April 11 to help build a new community playground at Oakdale Park in Gretna. More than 600 volunteers from DirecTV and KaBoom!, the national nonprofit group that’s constructed many playspots in the metro area since Hurricane Katrina and the federal floods, came together to complete the project. At 10,000 square feet, it’s the largest of the nearly 2,000 playgrounds KaBoom! has ever built.

Cheri Deatsch

returned home to New Orleans after spending 10 days in Japan providing aid to animal victims of the earthquake and tsunami there. Deatsch is a volunteer with Kinship Circle, a nonprofit specializing in disaster rescue for animals, and has traveled in the past to Iowa, Chile and Brazil after natural disasters. Deatsch, a criminal defense attorney, is considering a return trip to Japan in May.

Ludacris

has teamed up with the charity DoSomething. org to promote the Epic Book Drive and get New Orleans public school libraries restocked with books. The rapper and actor, whose real name is Chris Bridges, has recorded public service announcements urging students across the country to collect books for their counterparts in the Crescent City. Nearly 1.5 million books have been pledged so far.

NOPD Superintendent Ronal Serpas

landed in hot water this week when it was revealed the city had outsourced traffic-camera photo review to a company owned by his friend Cmdr. Edwin Hosli, head of NOPD’s 8th District. Though Serpas hadn’t awarded the contract personally, Hosli’s company employed both Serpas’ son-in-law and bodyguard. If Serpas didn’t know about the arrangement, as he insists, that raises a whole new set of questions.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

rom the back of a flatbed truck on Claiborne Avenue on a Saturday morning, two men wearing neon safety vests unload 64-gallon plastic bins stamped with a fleur-de-lis. Those bins are designated for the city’s curbside recycling services, which resume May 2 for the first time since 2005, when Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures swept recycling off city budgets and priorities. At his second State of the City address April 28 inside the Mahalia Jackson Theater, Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s reminder that recycling would be back within days drew one of the biggest breaks for applause. Before he took office in 2010, Landrieu established his Transition New Orleans team, which included the Sustainable Energy and Environmental Task Force, co-chaired by Global Green’s New Orleans director Beth Galante and Beverly Wright, director of Dillard University’s Deep South Center for Environmental Justice. On its board were representatives from the Alliance for Affordable Energy, the Sierra Club, farmers markets, green builders and universities. No. 1 on their agenda: resurrecting the city’s curbside recycling program, “a really fundamental need to show that the city was serious about working towards sustainability,” Galante says. “With the new administration, it really was a sea change in attitude on that. It made it a commitment from Day 1.” Landrieu took those recommendations, presented in the task force’s April 2010 report, and managed deals with two of the city’s garbage contractors —

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

5 y a M â&#x20AC;˘ y a d s r u Th m p 9 5 to


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conferences, and frankly, we will continue to lose conference opportunities, because so many corporations and professional organizations have very basic sustainability criteria in host cities,” Galante says. “The fact that the city didn’t have a recycling program during the last five years absolutely damaged our ability to attract national and international visitors and organizations and conferences. ‘Does the city have a composting program? Are there LEED-certified hotels? Are there

green taxicabs?’ Really up until this point, it had been ‘no, no, no’ to everything.” Metro and Richard’s will haul recyclables to the Recycling Foundation of Baton Rouge, one of a handful of recycling processing plants in the state (and the closest to New Orleans). The city’s challenge now, Galante says, is how to run the recycling program without its own local materials recovery facility (or MRF, pronounced “murf”), where recyclable materials are received, separated and processed before hitting the

recyclables market. If New Orleans had a MRF, Galante says, there would be job (and business) opportunities in the burgeoning “green” field while providing a service few others handle. “That type of facility would create a small business, potentially, and several good, sustainable jobs, and create additional revenue streams,” she says. “We could market our recyclable materials outside of the state and the country.” Phoenix will continue to serve commercial customers and residents in Orleans,

St. Bernard, St. Tammany and St. Charles parishes, and it has started document imaging services to help customers go paperless. McDonough says the company also is looking into potential glass recycling options for hotels, restaurants and bars (though the state has no recycled glass processors). “We’ve been around almost 20 years — we’ve had as many as 20 employees, a bunch of trucks and a bunch of baling equipment, and as few as one employee and one truck,” McDonough says. “We’ll end up somewhere in between.”

page 9

MORE scuttlEbutt

mayor tweeted, “Must b nice to have inherited so much construction, new medical district, streetcar extensions, lowest unemployment, etc.” — Allman

@RayNagiN vs. @MayoRLaNdRieu

An ongoing political tug-of-war over the future of the Crescent City Connection and the tolls that drivers pay to cross it has heated up again, but a compromise resolution may be in the works. State Rep. Pat Connick, R-Marrero, has been trying to expose what he calls “a mission of selfpreservation” at the bridge agency, which is part of state government. Connick’s mission has put him at odds with some of his fellow West Bank lawmakers. Connick has once again filed a bill to abolish the current, politically appointed Crescent City Connection Division (CCCD) “oversight board” and replace it with an advisory board whose members would be nominated by business groups. Connick’s House Bill 551 also would direct the new advisory board to develop a plan for either extending or ending tolls on the bridge — and returning full oversight and management of the span to the state Department of Transportation and Development. The current board is appointed by the governor from a slate of persons nominated by local lawmakers. Since 2008, Connick has been trying to reform — or replace — the CCCD board, whose real purpose is to spend “excess” toll revenues on West Bank road projects. The problem, Connick says, is that CCCD managers always made sure there were never any excess toll funds. Connick says the CCCD has misspent toll money on unrelated projects and patronage — and he has a legislative audit to back up his claims. In addition to filing HB 551 to replace the CCCD board, Connick has asked Gov. Bobby Jindal to eliminate the tolls, abolish the 32-member CCCD police force, reduce ferry operations and impose a “realistic toll” on ferries, and fully investigate CCCD finances. Last week, the Bureau of Governmental Research (BGR) issued a report saying

The New Orleans City Council voted April 28 to restore the name Congo Square to the area just inside the perimeter of Armstrong Park. Though everyone knows it as Congo Square, it was officially named Beauregard Square in the 19th century. Much of the area has been closed since last summer, after former Mayor Ray Nagin had dedicated a new “Roots of Music” sculpture garden in late April 2010 — the last week he was in office. One month later, the area was closed for repairs after crews found the concrete had been poured shoddily. It remains closed today, nearly a year later. Oddly, Nagin used the Congo Square renaming occasion this week to hop on his Twitter account. “Since we are not allowed to visit Armstrong Park-Congo Square I will take you on a virtual tour,” he tweeted, before sending out a series of photos showing the original dedication, with beautiful sculptures of Buddy Bolden, Louis Armstrong and others in place rather than the rubble that stands there today. “Some tried to say the park was F-up,” was his caption on one of the photos. “Hope u enjoyed virtual tour of Armstrong Park-Congo Square,” Nagin concluded. “Maybe 1 day soon, sidewalks & Louie’s toe will be fixed & we can visit again.” Landrieu fired back in a statement the next day. “Armstrong Park is just another example of a deal the previous administration improperly executed. It was ill-conceived and was fraught with problems from the outset,” he wrote. In his State of the City speech the day after, Landrieu drew applause when he said he intended to have the park reopened by year’s end. But Nagin managed to have the last word. Shortly after Landrieu’s speech ended, the former

FoR WhoM the BRidge toLLs

NOPD chief Ronal Serpas (back) and 8th District Commander Edwin Hosli at the mayor’s State of the City speech. pHOTO BY CHeRYL geRBeR

lawmakers should let the tolls expire at the end of 2012. BGR found that only 19 percent of the toll funds collected were used to maintain and police the bridge. “BGR has confirmed there is a better way to pay for our regional transportation needs other than with the continuation of tolls,” Connick told Gambit. “BGR must also be commended for its efforts in helping expose the mismanagement and bureaucratic waste that has permeated the CCCD for over a decade. BGR’s findings confirm that for years, CCCD’s mission was one of self-preservation.” Connick says he is putting his bill “on hold for now” while he meets with state Sen. David Heitmeier, D-Algiers, and West Bank business leaders to devise a citizendriven solution to the problem. Connick and Heitmeier have butted heads over this issue in past years; Connick’s reform bills cleared the House in prior years but died in the Senate. In the wake of the BGR report, Connick says, he and Heitmeier will try to forge a compromise that will resolve questions about the future of the CCCD and the tolls. — Clancy DuBos

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

had 175 murders,” Landrieu said. “In the first four months of this year, there have been another 72.” He didn’t pencil out the fact that if the rate continues at that pace, 2011 will end with 216 murders — well below the 265 murders committed in 2004, but on a sharp upward trend. Landrieu proposed a Mayoral Strategical Command partially overseen by the city’s new Criminal Justice Commissioner, James Carter, the former District C councilmember who went into private practice as a lawyer after leaving the council. Nor did the mayor address the latest traffic camera controversy. After a court ruling that all traffic camera images must be reviewed by law enforcement, the city outsourced the job to Anytime Solutions — a company owned by NOPD 8th District Cmdr. Edwin Hosli, a longtime friend of Serpas’. Among the company’s hires: Officer Travis Ward, Serpas’ sonin-law. Off-duty cops reading traffic camera photos were paid as much as $35 per hour of taxpayer money. The program has been suspended, and Landrieu has ordered Serpas to submit a plan by May 15 suggesting ways to enact a complete overhaul of the NOPD’s paid-detail policy. Asked after the meeting if he’d spoken to Hosli about the arrangement, Serpas told Gambit, “I’m letting the PIB (Public Integrity Bureau) look into that.” So the two longtime friends hadn’t spoken? “No,” said Serpas. Landrieu, as is his wont, also touted the artistic and financial benefits of New Orleans’ cultural economy, particularly Hollywood South, the combination of tax breaks given to movie and TV productions in the state. “At this very moment, nine more movies are in production in your city,” Landrieu told the crowd — without mentioning the critically acclaimed HBO show Treme, which has been filming its second season here for months. The mayor and Treme creator David Simon had a he-said/he-said public spat a couple of weeks earlier over some blighted

housing, and relations still appear to be frosty. An unintentional omission? Hard to believe when the State of the City was being delivered in … the Treme. — Kevin Allman

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jeremy ALFORD

THE STATE OF THE STATE

Jindal’s M.O. WHAT TO EXPECT FROM GOV. BOBBY JINDAL DURING THIS YEAR’S LEGISLATIVE SESSION.

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the University of New Orleans and Southern University at New Orleans as well as the privatization of three state prisons and the Office of Group Benefits. Jindal’s sales pitch is simple — and blunt. Jeffrey D. Sadow, an associate professor of political science at LSUShreveport and Jindal booster via his blog (jeffsadow.blogspot.com), observes: “To date, Jindal’s only real strategy to back these ideas is that if not made into reality, more budget cuts loom on the horizon. That may cut it as a practical explanation, but scaring people doesn’t persuade them, and enough people may not be scared enough to give Jindal the majorities necessary to get these things passed.” Elsewhere, expect Jindal to cater to his conservative Christian base and the Tea Party movement by backing bills dear to those groups. For example, the governor promises to sign a so-called “birther” bill (HB 561) by Rep. Alan Seabaugh, R-Shreveport, who wants to force presidential contenders to provide their birth certificates in order to run in Louisiana. Obama released his long-form birth certificate last week, but some folks are keeping the issue alive. Conservatives also will have to play defense. Senate Bill 70 by Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, D-New Orleans, would repeal the Louisiana Science Education Act. Critics say the law allows creationism to be taught in public schools. Forty-one Nobel Laureates have sent a letter to Jindal, who majored in biology, urging him to back Peterson’s bill and to consider that “biological evolution is foundational in many fields, including biomedical research and agriculture.” The biggest fight of the eight-week session remains the budget. Lawmakers must decide whether to rubber-stamp Jindal’s $25 billion spending plan or rewrite it to their own liking. With a $1.6 billion revenue shortage anticipated, neither option is appealing. No matter what the budgetary outcome, there will be plenty of blame to go around by election time, which starts right after the session ends on June 23. The blame game, too, is central to Jindal’s modus operandi — and it’s liable to be equally dangerous to his GOP allies as well as Democratic foes. Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@jeremyalford.com.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

ov. Bobby Jindal’s package of bills this legislative session is 11 pages long. As in previous years, many lawmakers with bills in the gubernatorial package describe a process by which the administration makes vague statements about what should be filed — if a request is made at all — leaving Jindal’s bill sponsors with little guidance. From there, administration wonks add details to favored bills as discretely as possible — in the fashion, some say, of the president’s relationship with Congress. Just like the commander-inchief (and, in fairness, other governors before him), Jindal relies on Chief of Staff Timmy Teepell to do the heavy lifting and arm-twisting. State Rep. Walter Leger III, D-New Orleans, has three bills in Jindal’s official package: two dealing with tax credits for historic buildings and another stiffening laws against human trafficking. “The human trafficking bill [is one] the administration asked me to handle,” Leger says. “The historic building credits are bills I filed and they later included in the package. In fact, they just informed me that they were being included in the package. They didn’t really ask my permission.” While Jindal is picky about where government gets its revenues, he is less choosy about donors from whom he accepts campaign cash. It’s another example of the Washington, D.C. political philosophy that has become a hallmark of his brand. Jindal took a great deal of flak for attending a fundraiser in March hosted by Mike Worley of Hammond. Worley is the CEO of Worley Catastrophe Response LLC, the company tapped by BP to process claims related to last year’s Gulf oil disaster. Worley’s company also has a $380,000 consulting agreement with the Division of Administration — which makes it a state contractor. According to Jindal’s most recent campaign finance report, which covers the first quarter of this year, the governor not only attended the controversial fundraiser but accepted $15,000 from Worley on March 29. The state has a $5,000 limit on contributions, so Worley wrote one personal check and two others from business accounts. That, too, is a hallmark of Jindal’s “ethics reform” brand. On the policy side, Jindal is pursuing a proposed merger between

Delicacies from China to intrigue the eyes and delight the tongue.

15


clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Devil in the Details ast week was supposed to be a good week for Mayor Mitch Landrieu. It was the run-up to his first anniversary in office. He had planned an uplifting State of the City speech in which he could tout the progress of his freshman year. And he was to be featured glowingly on 60 Minutes on Sunday, May 1. Then reality came crashing in. In the midst of the positive reviews in which he had hoped to bask, news broke of yet another scandal at the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) — and this time the errant behavior occurred on his watch. Unlike all the other crap he’s had to deal with since May 3, 2010, this mess could not be blamed on Ray Nagin or BP. Landrieu has to own this one. The latest scandal involves, almost predictably, abuses of the private “paid detail” system, which is not really a system at all. Therein lies the problem. For decades, cops have been able to legally supplement their income by working private security details outside their regular hours. That’s fine on its face, but there have been abuses over the years — so much so

L

that one federal study of NOPD called paid details “an artery of corruption” in the department. Here’s why: Paid details are not controlled by NOPD. The “system” is essentially an unregulated flea market, a freelancers’ bazaar for renta-cops. That allows entrepreneurial officers to “employ” their supervisors on the side. It doesn’t take a genius to see how that can undermine departmental integrity and the chain of command. It also can lead to inside deals, conflicts of interest, appearances of impropriety (if not actual impropriety) and reduced public confidence in NOPD. Truly, at NOPD, the devil is in the details. The most recent example: One of Police Chief Ronal Serpas’ closest friends at NOPD, 8th District Commander Maj. Edwin Hosli, formed an LLC that was retained last fall by the company that provides traffic camera services to the city. Traffic violations alleged via the cameras must be confirmed by cops, so the city’s traffic camera vendor — with the blessing of the Department of Public Works, which previously oversaw the camera program — hired Hosli’s company

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The ‘system’ is essentially an unregulated flea market, a freelancers’ bazaar for rent-a-cops.

As scandals go, this one is a perfect storm. It involves traffic cameras, which are very unpopular; the police chief, who was brought in to reform the department; friends and family of the chief; and the fact that it all broke on the mayor’s first anniversary in office. The only good news for Landrieu is he appears to have had nothing to do with it personally. Still, it’s now his mess to clean up. So far, Landrieu has made the right moves. He ended the deal with Hosli’s company, put police review of the tickets under NOPD’s Traffic Division (where it should have been all along), and turned the scandal over to the city’s inspector general, who is independent of the mayor’s office. Landrieu also has ordered Serpas to get control of paid details so they are centrally managed from within NOPD. The mayor wants a plan by May 15. Landrieu says the scandal “only highlights how deeply embedded the problems with details are within the NOPD.” Hopefully, by the end of Year Two, Landrieu will be telling us how he and Serpas have cleaned up the paid detail system.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 03 > 2011

Shop for

to provide cops on paid details to review the tickets. Turns out the cops hired by Hosli included Serpas’ son-in-law and one of the chief’s bodyguards, which prompts a familiar question: What did the chief know and when did he know it? (And, if he knew nothing, how does he explain such ignorance?)

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

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tone up and cool down

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With notes of sweet olive, oak, moss, kumquat and citrus, this candle’s aroma is reminiscent of a moonlit stroll through a New Orleans neighborhood. A percentage of proceeds benefits the Preservation Resource Center and Music for Tomorrow. The 13-oz. New Orleans soy candle is $50, and the 8-oz. version is $30 at Williamson Designs (3646 Magazine St., 899-4945; www.williamsondesigns.net).

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Photos meet function with display options that range from vases ($32) and decorative boxes (round box $45, square box $54) to cuff bracelets (jewelry $16-$38) at Lakeside Camera (2121 N. Causeway Blvd., Mandeville, 985626-1776; 3508 21st St., Metairie, 885-8660; www.lakesidecamera.com).

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The Weave Collection Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

ELEGANCE IN STERLING

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The modern mother is more likely to be a breadwinner than a breadmaker, but she’ll appreciate the charm of this antique dough bowl, even if she uses it for display purposes instead of baking. Pine dough bowl, $35 at Dop Antiques & Architecturals (300 Jefferson Hwy., Suite 201, 231-3397; www.dopantiques.com).

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Lofty Goals he first shampoo and blow-dry after a haircut often yields disappointing results — many customers find the look of salon-fresh tresses difficult to recreate at home. But at Hair Loft by Le Unique (5300 Tchoupitoulas St., Suite F4, 895-2911; www.hairloftnola.com), employees never want clients to dread styling their own hair. “You can give someone a great haircut, but if they don’t know how to (style) it, it’s a problem,” stylist Kaye Mitchell says. “Our goal is for clients to go home and recreate the style so they’re close to the finished product they leave with.” Open since January, Hair Loft’s interior features modern paintings and warm beige and red walls, making it a comfortable place for customers to relax with a complimentary soda, coffee or glass of beer, wine or Champagne. With thoughtful touches like these, the familyrun business realizes its goal: providing premium services at reasonable prices. Educated under L’Oreal Professional and Vidal Sassoon, owner Maritza Valle has At Hair Loft, Andrea 32 years of experience. Daughters Nichole Valle-Lobo, Hair Loft’s manager, and Andrea Valle, assistant Valle, Maritza Valle manager, inherited their mother’s passion, and also trained under Vidal Sassoon. Hair Loft services for men, women and children include color, cuts, highlights, deep-conditioning thera- and Nichole Valle-Lobo (left to right) offer pies, keratin treatments, makeup application and hair styling for special events. Haircuts and styles begin premium services at at $45 (men’s cuts begin at $22); a color and style begins at $75; and a color, cut and style package begins reasonable prices. at $85. “We specialize in color and highlights, and give kick-butt bobs,” Andrea says. Stylists analyze clients’ home hair-care routines, recommend hairstyles compatible with each person’s hair texture, and give step-bystep instructions during the styling process. “(Education) is key to maintaining clients,” Valle-Lobo says. “We have no beauty secrets.” Mitchell emphasizes Hair Loft’s high-end products, such as L’oreal INOA coloring and Kerastase products, which contribute to the quality of service. “I’ve been dressing hair for over 20 years, and the thing that brought me here was our endless search for perfect products and groundbreaking services,” Mitchell says. “We use what the movie stars are using in the finest upscale salons. I love that we’re on the cutting edge of hair technology.”

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Three local comic book stores participate in the 10th annual FREE COMIC BOOK DAY Saturday, May 7. BSI COMICS (3030 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5250; www.bsicomics.com), MEDIA UNDERGROUND COMICS (4953 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 301-2435; www.mediaundergroundcomics.com) and CRESCENT CITY COMICS (4916 Freret St., 891-3796; www.crescentcitycomics.com) will give away special-edition comics. ESPLANADE MALL (1401 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 468-6116; www.shoptheesplanade.com) hosts its inaugural NATIONAL MOM’S NIGHT OUT from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 5. The free event features food and wine tastings, shopping incentives, live demonstrations, interactive activities, prize giveaways and more. The N’AWLINS AIR SHOW (www.nawlinsairshow.com) hosts the WAHL LET IT GROW TOUR from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, May 7 and 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, May 8. The 30-foot mobile barbershop features stylists who provide free grooming tips and facial hair trims using Wahl products. For every trim, Wahl will donate $1 to the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation. ZEA ROTISSERIE & GRILL (citywide; www.zearestaurants.com) offers moms a complimentary $10 gift card when they dine at the restaurant on Mother’s Day.

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PAGE 31

PHOTO BY GARY LOVERDE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

lay ‘The Treme Song!’” The woman’s voice rose from somewhere in the center of a tightly packed crowd at d.b.a. during one of John Boutte’s regular early Saturday evening sets. He already had launched into Annie Lennox’s “Why,” but his fan was not to be dissuaded. At the next break between songs, she shouted her request again, and then started singing the song herself, as if to jog Boutte’s memory. Boutte finally obliged. Now in his early fifties, the musician only recently has discovered what it is like to have a hit song. “I know I need to sing it, even when I might feel like singing something else at that moment,” he says. “I was raised Catholic. There’s some things you got to do. You got to genuflect when you walk into church. You get down, boy.” It is a warm Monday morning in Treme, not too different from the Sunday morning years ago — it was around 2000, Boutte isn’t exactly sure of the date — when the singer stuck his head outside his door and heard a bass drum echoing off the Creole cottages on his street. Coffee in hand, he stepped outside to see a band stepping out of a nearby church — and that’s when it hit him. This is his home. They don’t do this anywhere else. “You know how they say you don’t see the forest for the trees?” he asks. “I finally saw the forest and the trees at once.” That morning, Boutte went back inside, sat down at his piano, and immediately composed a little musical narration of the moment: “Hangin’ in the Treme/Watchin’ people sashay/ past my steps/ By my porch/ In front of my door.” He now laughs at the apparent simplicity of the lines. “It’s not brain surgery,” he says. But the simplicity of “The Treme Song” is deceptive. It’s what isn’t in that song that makes it so appealing. Unlike most city anthems, there

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to New York. When Boutte first received the call about Treme, he admits, he initially felt wary. He was having one of those “bad Katrina days.” Instead of sashayers, unearthly figures in hazmat suits were floating by his street. Too many people around him were dying and, he says, the devil seemed to be right behind his feet. “I didn’t want to set myself up for a disappointment. I just had to hope that David (Simon) and Eric (Overmyer) and Nina (K. Noble) would tell the story right. If not, well, I’m poor anyway. Why should I sell out my songs and be poor and disgraced?” Happily, that didn’t happen. Boutte says he couldn’t be more pleased with the series’ nuanced depiction of his city and the renewed interest it has brought to the history and culture of his neighborhood. “When I wrote that song, people were running from the Treme,” he says. “Every tourist was warned not to cross Rampart Street.”

VIP seating

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is nothing here about what is bought and sold in New Orleans. No gumbo, no voodoo, no pralines, not even a cold drink. There’s nothing except action: the groans of a Sunday preacher, the responding blessed moans of sisters, the bass drum and trombone, buck jumping and having fun. Paul Sanchez, Boutte’s frequent collaborator, has watched the song travel far beyond the city limits. “It’s his first original song, a classic New Orleans groove with John’s beautiful Creole voice melting you,” he says. “It’s an insider’s look at any typically wonderful New Orleans Sunday. With it, John’s voice has officially become what it has always been for me. The voice of New Orleans, calling people here.” By “official,” Sanchez is referring to television. People around the world know “The Treme Song” as the theme to the HBO series Treme, now in its second season. Boutte also has made frequent cameo appearances in the show, most notably in the final episode of the first season, when Davis McAlary (Steve Zahn) drags Boutte to the front stoop of chef Janette Desautel (Kim Dickens) in order to show to her the reasons why she should not move

SUN

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PHOTO BY GARY LOVERDE

over their heads and egging him on as if they were in church.” Among those in the audience was Chris Joseph, founder of Threadhead Records. “I stumbled in halfway through and at that point had never heard of John Boutte. It was incredibly emotional. People were crying, raising their hands, everybody was on their feet.” Boutte has been suspicious of major labels (“I’m just cautious, I never jump in water head first.”) and found the Threadhead model to his liking. With Sanchez, John Boutte made his Good Neighbor album from a Threadhead loan, which he paid back within a year. He owns the masters and publishing. A portion of the proceeds go to the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic, another Threadhead stipulation that Boutte is all too happy to endorse. “I’m not saying I got a right to be rich,” he says. “But I’ll be damned if I don’t have a right to wake up and have access to someone who can tell me if I’m sick or not. “Those values came from my mom and dad. You got nine siblings, you got to learn how to share everything. I could say it’s the Catholic upbringing, although I’m more of a practicing humanist than a good practicing Catholic. But who are you if you can’t feel the suffering of your fellow human being?” That philosophy has sparked some of Boutte and Sanchez’s most beloved songs, including “At

the Foot of Canal Street,” a song they wrote after they realized their fathers were both buried in Canal Street cemeteries. Like “The Treme Song,” it’s a tune that d.b.a. audiences know well enough to sing along, verses as well as chorus. “I always look for a universal theme,” Boutte says. “Love, death, the things we’re all confused about.” Current projects include his participation in the musical adaptation of Dan Baum’s Katrina book Nine Lives, which features both Boutte vocals along with piano work that is credited to “Skinny Parcheesi” because, Boutte says, he doesn’t consider himself credit-worthy in a keyboard city like New Orleans. His Jazz Fest appearances include joining Irma Thomas in the Gospel Tent on May 6 for a Mahalia Jackson tribute. The future holds, he hopes, a new album. He gives credit to his collaborators, especially Sanchez and longtime guitarist Todd Duke. But, he warns, don’t expect anything too familiar. “I like R&B, some country, some bluegrass, gospel, jazz. Everybody’s always told me I need to focus. Let me tell you if there’s a buffet in front of me, I’m going to eat off it if that’s what I want to do. I want to be like Monty Python: Now for something completely different.” Michael Tisserand is a former Gambit editor. He is currently working on a biography of the New Orleans-born cartoonist George Herriman, who happens to be a cousin of John Boutte.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

life, from growing up in a musical 7th Ward family through playing cornet and trumpet in school marching bands, through Xavier University and even the military, where he directed and sang in Army gospel choirs. Back in civilian life, he tried a stint in a bank job. It didn’t take. A tour of Europe with his sister Lillian helped lead Boutte toward the more uncertain life of a jazz singer. So did some career counseling from one of his heroes and mentors, the late Danny Barker. “I didn’t see a glass ceiling but a brick wall above my head,” Boutte says. “I decided I had to do what was in my heart. The only limitations I wanted were the ones I set on myself.” He earned critical raves and new fans for his 2000 collaboration with ¡Cubanismo!, leading to the acclaimed release Mardi Gras Mambo, which explored the close musical kinship between Havana and New Orleans. He gigged regularly around town, but those jobs took on a new meaning after the 2005 levee failures. First at the nowshuttered Cafe Brasil and then at d.b.a., Boutte says his sets became “like church.” “It was our meeting place,” he says. “It was on high ground, and there would be these kids at the shows with Common Ground and the health clinic. I knew it was a turning point.” Boutte has never shied way from speaking his mind. He’s a five-foot-one-and-a-half-inch pacifist, he says, but he still packs a punch. “And not a lightweight, either,” he adds. Then he grows serious, which in a conversation with Boutte can happen quickly and often. “Are you culpable if you see someone beating somebody down and you don’t try to intervene? I believe that if you’re silent, you’re just as culpable,” he says. Current shows might include a timely political rant or even a laser stare at some talkers in the back of the club when he sings the line “You don’t really care for music, do you?” from Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah.” Challenging his audience had never been unusual for him. But at his post-Katrina shows, something new was taking place. “I always used to say shit,” he says. “Now I realized that people were taking me seriously.” By that point, Sanchez already had been making music with Boutte for a few years, ever since they first met at a party at singer Michelle Shocked’s house. “Here the city was devastated and this little guy was carrying so many people, when he himself was broken,” Sanchez recalls. “He was into doing jazz standards. We talked about it. I said, ‘Right now, at this moment in New Orleans history, for whatever reason thousands of people are turning to you. If you don’t tell the tale and sing the story, who’s going to do it?’” The result was a stunning set at the 2006 Jazz Fest, culminating in Boutte’s recasting of Randy Newman’s “Louisiana 1927” with updated lines like “President Bush flew over in an airplane/ with about 12 fat men with double martinis in their hands.” Geoffrey Himes wrote in The New York Times: “The song’s most dramatic recasting was by Mr. Boutte ... when he started dropping local references into the lyrics, older women rose from their plastic folding chairs, waving their hands

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Jazz Fest

/// T W E N T Y E L E V E N

THE 42ND ANNUAL JAZZ FEST LETS THE GOOD TIMES ROLL.

BY COUNT BASIN™ WITH HELP FROM TR AV IS A NDRE WS, WILL COVIELLO, MARGUERITE LUCAS, M A R TA JE W S ON ,

T

he 42nd annual New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival concludes with a blockbusting second weekend of music. Performers include Willie Nelson, Wilco, Lucinda Williams,

Sonny Rollins, The Strokes, The Neville Brothers, Allen Toussaint, Arcade Fire, a special Radiators farewell performance and much more. There’s music, art and cultural demonstrations from Haiti at the Haitian Pavilion and on festival stages.

LAUREN LABORDE,

Count Basin™ looks forward to another long weekend of Jazz

MICH A EL PAT RICK W ELCH

Fest’s special blend of music, food, crafts and culture. See you at the

AND ALE X WOODWARD

Fair Grounds.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

occasions

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THURSDAY/// MAY 5

Jazz Fest PAGE 35

Belton Richard & the Musical Aces

11:10 a.m., Fais Do-Do Stage During his long career, singer/ songwriter and accordionist Belton Richard has played traditional Cajun music and swamp pop.

Loyola University Jazz Ensemble

11:15 a.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent Trombonist John Mahoney directs the Loyola University Jazz Ensemble. The 19-piece ensemble plays jazz standards.

A note from Count Basin™ MY PICKS ARE MARKED THROUGHOUT THE LISTINGS.

Thursday, May 5 PARADES 1:45 p.m. Cheyenne and 7th Ward Creole Hunters 2:45 p.m. VIP Ladies Social Aid and Pleasure Club with Young Fellaz Brass Band 3:05 p.m. Men of Class Social Aid and Pleasure Club (in Peoples Health Economy Hall Tent)

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

4 p.m. Roots of Music Marching Crusaders Band

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5:20 p.m. Ladies of Unity and Bon Temp Roulez Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs with Tornado Brass Band

NATIVE AMERICAN POW WOW — LA. FOLK LIFE VILLAGE Noon, 2:45 p.m. and 5:35 p.m. The Boyz

HAITI PAVILION 1 p.m. Vodou Ceremony with RAM Drummers 3:05 p.m. and 4 p.m. Vodou Drumming

PERFORMANCES Gov’t Majik

11:10 a.m., Acura Stage This trippy funk band combines AfroCuban beats and rock.

Robert “Bilbo” Walker’s Blues Revue

LUCINDA WILLIAMS

Lake Charles, La. native and singer/songwriter Lucinda Williams returns to Jazz Fest. 1:40 P.M. THURSDAY, MAY 5, ACURA STAGE PHOTO BY S C O T T S A LT Z M A N

11:15 a.m., Blues Tent Born in Clarksdale, Robert “Bilbo” Walker plays stripped-down Mississippi blues. He released Rock the Night in 2001.

Eleanor McMain “Singing Mustangs” Gospel Choir

11:15 a.m., Gospel Tent Clyde Lawrence directs this 50-plusmember high school choir.

Dukes of Dixieland

11:20 a.m., Economy Hall Tent The Dukes of Dixieland incorporate pop, rock and country influences into its traditional jazz repertoire.

Fi Yi Yi & the Mandingo Warriors

11:20 a.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage Big Chief Victor Harris leads this group of Mardi Gras Indians from the 9th Ward. The tribe’s suits reflect Western African costuming styles.

funk. The group released The Big Awesome in 2008.

Ovi-G & the Froggies

Sasha Masakowski

11:20 a.m., Lagniappe Stage This family band plays a mix of tropical and soca music.

CRITIC’S PICK

Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue

11:25 a.m., Gentilly Stage Singer Vanessa Niemann leads Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue in a mix of throwback country and Western swing classics. The band released its second album Set Two in 2010.

BRW

11:25 a.m., Congo Square Stage Billy Kennedy, Rohillion Guidry and Wayne Guidry sing old-school and contemporary R&B as well as a few disco and soul tunes.

Pastor Terry Gullage and the Greater Mt. Calvary Voices of Redemption Choir

12:05 p.m., Gospel Tent Pastor Terry Gullage leads his gospel choir in traditional and contemporary gospel songs.

Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes

12:20 p.m., Acura Stage The classically trained musicians in Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes play barroom-ready jazzy rock and

12:20 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent Jazz vocalist Sasha Masakowski won the Big Easy Award in 2010 for Best Emerging Artist. She released the album Wishes in March.

CRITIC’S PICK Little Freddie King Blues Band

12:20 p.m., Blues Tent Guitarist Little Freddie King is known for dapper dress and gutbucket blues. He released Gotta Walk With Da King in 2010.

CRITIC’S PICK Cedric Watson & Bijou Creole

12:25 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage Cedric Watson sings and plays fiddle and accordion, and his band plays a mix of zydeco and traditional Creole music.

The Help

12:25 p.m., Lagniappe Stage This rock quartet blends rock, pop, punk, funk, blues and jazz.

Linnzi Zaorski

12:30 p.m., Economy Hall Tent Jazz vocalist Linnzi Zaorski echoes Billie Holiday’s vocal style. She released Naughty Sweetie this April.

CRITIC’S PICK Kirk Joseph’s Backyard Groove 12:35 p.m., Congo Square Stage Former Dirty Dozen sousaphonist Kirk Joseph combines jazz, funk and soul in this horn-heavy ensemble.

Kumbuka African Dance & Drum Collective

12:35 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage Ausettua Amor Amenkum leads this troupe combining African dance and percussion.

Eagle & Hawk

12:50 p.m., Gentilly Stage This Canadian group plays a progressive style of rock grounded in roots music. The band released Sirensong in 2008.

Joseph S. Clark Senior High School Gospel Choir 12:55 p.m., Gospel Tent

Brice Winston

1:25 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent Saxophonist Brice Winston has toured and recorded with Terence Blanchard for years. The composer teaches at the newly formed Tucson Jazz Institute.

Charmaine Neville Band

1:30 p.m., Blues Tent A member of one of New Orleans’ prominent musical families, Charmaine Neville sings R&B, jazz and blues.

Flatbed Honeymoon

1:35 p.m., Lagniappe Stage Two songwriting LSU professors founded the group in the early 2000s. It plays country and Americana and recently released the album The Traveler.

CRITIC’S PICK Lucinda Williams

1:40 p.m., Acura Stage Grammy-winning guitarist and vocalist Lucinda Williams blends rock, folk, blues and country sounds. She released Williams Blessed in March.

Lino Patruno and Franco Nero, Forever Blues

1:45 p.m., Economy Hall Tent This Italian duo pays tribute to Louis Armstrong. Lino Patruno is one of Italy’s most accomplished jazz musicians. He is joined by trumpeter and actor Franco Nero.

CRITIC’S PICK Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys

1:45 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage Accordionist Steve Riley and fiddler David Greely were drawn to Cajun music during its revival in the late 1970s and ’80s and developed a contemporary sound. The Grammynominated band released Grand Isle this year.


Jazz Fest

THURSDAY/// MAY 5

Heavenly Melodies Gospel Singers

1:45 p.m., Gospel Tent This family-based all-female group sings traditional gospel.

Chief Iron Horse & the Black Seminoles Mardi Gras Indians

1:50 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage Cyril “Big Chief Iron Horse” Green leads the Black Seminoles Mardi Gras Indians.

ArcAde Fire

Joseph Zigaboo Modeliste

b y noA h bonA pA r t e pA i s

2:05 p.m., Congo Square Stage Percussionist Joseph “Zigaboo” Modeliste is known for his work with The Meters and adapting second-line and polyrhythms into a rock/ funk band format.

The New Orleans Bingo! Show

2:15 p.m., Gentilly Stage The Bingo! Show crafts multimedia stage performances around a jazz band and cabaret show orchestrated by ringleader Clint Maedgen. Costumes, games and a vaudevillian sensibility complete the act.

CRITIC’S PICK

Christian Scott

2:40 p.m., WWOZ Tent Nephew to Donald Harrison, Christian Scott started playing music at a young age and attended both the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts and the Berklee College of Music. The trumpeter was nominated for a Grammy for his Miles Davis-influenced 2006 album Rewind That. He released Yesterday You Said Tomorrow in 2010.

Lyle Henderson & Emmanu-EL

2:40 p.m., Gospel Tent Lyle Henderson began singing at age 5 at The Church of the Living God, where he is a minister. The tenor sings traditional and contemporary gospel.

CRITIC’S PICK

2:45 p.m., Blues Tent A master of blues harmonica, Charlie Musselwhite has recorded more than 30 albums in his four-decade career. In 2010 he released The Well and was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame.

John Rankin

2:55 p.m., Lagniappe Stage Typically performing solo on acoustic guitar and harmonica, John Rankin plays a range of styles including blues, jazz and classical guitar. He released Last in April First in May in 2008.

CRITIC’S PICK

Paulin Brothers Brass Band

3 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage The late Ernest “Doc” Paulin founded this traditional brass band. His six sons carry on the legacy.

The Original Royal Players Brass Band

3:05 p.m., Economy Hall Tent This traditional New Orleans brass band released the album In Their Footsteps in 2008.

Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers

n June 11, 2004, the words “Arcade Fire” meant little to anyone without a pocketful of quarters. Funeral, the band’s combustible Merge Records debut, was more than three months from catching flame. The majority of Crescent City concertgoers who went that night to the French Quarter’s newest music venue, the month-old One Eyed Jacks, did so to see another Canadian act, the now-extinct headliner Unicorns. Anyone else who should have cared was six blocks away at the House of Blues for the not-yet Garden State-d Shins. Seven years later, the Montreal-based Arcade Fire would conquer the Grammys, rain glowing beach balls down on thousands at California’s Coachella Music Festival and claim a prominent performance slot at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. It’s more than a little amusing to picture today’s Arcade Fire playing the early slot in front of a few dozen clock-watchers on Toulouse Street. Just seven months after its first visit here, the band returned to much greater fanfare, selling out the House of Blues main stage in January 2005 after Funeral’s mass reception made its original destination, the Parish, into an unused waiting room. Neon Bible, its solemn, Springsteenish 2007 tome, elevated Arcade Fire from Internet sensation to U2-in-training. And everyone knows what happened in 2010: lights, cameras, traction. When Kris Kristofferson and Barbra Streisand called the band’s name in February as the Grammy

winner for Album of the Year, spouses/singers Win Butler and Regine Chassagne were still gasping for air. They had finished performing “Month of May,” The Suburbs’ Act 2 aggressor, just moments before. “2009, 2010, want to make a record how I felt then,” Butler barked, engulfed by a crisscrossing phalanx of camera-mounted BMX bikers. More than a new-testament Neon Bible, the 16-song suite is a spiritual sequel to Funeral: the warm, inclusive production; the recurring motifs of parents and children, neighborhoods and friends; the doubling-back track list sequenced for specific emotional response. “In the suburbs, I/ I learned to drive,” Butler opens, picking up where piercing Funeral closer “In the Backseat” left off (“I’ve been learning to drive/ My whole life”). Its dizzying finish — Butler’s staccato-piano prickler “We Used to Wait,” Chassagne’s shimmering, Debbie Harry-indebted “Sprawl II (Mountains Beyond Mountains),” a brief Bell Orchestral reprisal — lingers long after the spinning stops.

ArCADe Fire FRIDAY, MAY 6 5:35 P.M. ACURA stAge

3:10 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage Son of zydeco legend Rockin’ Dopsie Sr. and a former member of his family band, Dwayne is PAGE 39

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

Charlie Musselwhite

O

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Jazz Fest

THURSDAY/// MAY 5

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an accomplished accordionist who leads his own group. The band infuses blues, soul and funk into its sound and released the album Up in Flames in 2009.

Galactic

3:25 p.m., Acura Stage The groundbreaking New Orleans outfit blends hip-hop, funk and jazz. The diverse 2010 album Ya-Ka-May features collaborations with bounce artists like Big Freedia and Cheeky Blakk and institutions Allen Toussaint and Irma Thomas.

funk. The band released the seven-song EP Evolucion in 2010.

Michelle Shocked

4:35 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage A self-proclaimed “sophisticated hillbilly,” the guitarist and singer/songwriter has released 13 albums since 1986. Her latest, 2009’s Soul of My Soul, is a no-frills roots rocker inspired by political folk music.

Lisa Knowles & the Brown Sisters

O. Perry Walker Charter High School Gospel Choir

4:45 p.m., Gospel Tent Memphis singer Lisa Knowles joined the Brown Sisters at age 9 and became the group’s lead singer at 12. The group fuses jazz, blues, rock and country into its gospel foundation.

Djakout #1

Wilco

3:35 p.m., Gosepl Tent Joseph Knox directs this large high school choir in a mix of spirituals and contemporary and traditional gospel. 3:35 p.m., Congo Square Stage Formerly Djakout Mizik, this Haitian “compas” band performs Haitiain pop inspired by jazz and African and Creole influences. The group has performed in Haiti for a decade, and it released PWOFITE in 2010.

Amanda Shaw & the Cute Guys

3:40 p.m., Gentilly Stage The New Orleans Cajun fiddler gives traditional Cajun music a pop makeover. Touring nationally and internationally since she was 8 years old, Shaw released Good Southern Girl in 2010, featuring a rendition of Sam Cooke’s “That’s It I Quit” and 13 fiddle-heavy pop stompers.

Delfeayo Marsalis’ Uptown Orchestra 4:10 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent The New Orleans jazz trombonist, composer and producer’s 2011 release Sweet Thunder: Duke and Shak reimagines Duke Ellington’s 1957 Shakespearean suite “Such Sweet Thunder.”

4:10 p.m., Blues Tent The tribute to the late James Booker — the beloved, eyepatch-wearing New Orleans soul and R&B piano genius — features pianists David Reis, Joshua Paxton, Tom McDermott, Joe Krown and Tom Worrell.

Mark Braud

4:20 p.m., Economy Hall Tent Jazz trumpeter Mark Braud has lent his brass to Eddie Bo, brass bands and dozens of other artists. He currently plays with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band and Harry Connick Jr. and leads his own band, performing traditional and contemporary New Orleans jazz.

Paul Eason

4:20 p.m., Lagniappe Stage The Texas singer/songwriter and guitarist expands his country repertoire with pianist Taylor Davis, bassist Daniel Rhodes, drummer Luke Richards, steel guitarist Glenn Shankle and fiddler Paul Brunner. The band released The Mountains of Nuevo Leon in 2008.

Locos por Juana

4:25 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage The bilingual Latin band formed in Miami in 2000 and performs an energetic fusion of Latin styles influenced by Jamaican reggae and dub, Caribbean swing and

5:20 p.m., Acura Stage Formed in 1994 by members of the altcountry outfit Uncle Tupelo, the Chicago band, led by tempestuous singer/songwriter Jeff Tweedy, has produced seven albums and earned two Grammy Awards for its fifth, 2004’s A Ghost Is Born. Its latest, 2009’s Wilco (The Album), expands the band’s Americana and neo-folk catalog.

Cyndi Lauper

5:25 p.m., Gentilly Stage The pop diva’s ’80s chart toppers “Girls Just Want to Have Fun,” and “Time After Time” kicked off a 25-year career, which counts multiple Grammy and Emmy wins and 11 studio LPs. Her latest is Memphis Blues, a collection of soul and blues covers featuring guests like B.B. King, Jonny Lang and Allen Toussaint.

CRITIC’S PICK

Maceo Parker with special guest Pee Wee Ellis

5:30 p.m., Congo Square Stage North Carolina horn player Maceo Parker blends vintage funk and soul with jazz and hip-hop. Parker has collaborated and performed with artists like Ray Charles, De La Soul and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Sax man Pee Wee Ellis joins this performance.

Stefan Harris & Blackout

5:40 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent The contemporary jazz composer, vibraphone player and three-time Grammy Award nominee also teaches at New York University. The band incorporates hip-hop with modern jazz on the acclaimed 2009 album Urbanus.

Banu Gibson & the Allstars featuring Bob Havens and Randy Reinhart

5:45 p.m., Peoples Health and Economy Tent Vocalist Banu Gibson lends an updated voice to classics by George Gershwin, Duke Ellington and Irving Berlin, among others. Her 2009 album Banu Gibson Sings More Johnny Mercer pays homage to the jazz singer and composer. Big band leader Bob Havens and cornetist Randy Reinhart join this performance.

Ruthie Foster

5:50 p.m., Blues Tent Beginning her musical career at age 14 as a soloist in her church choir, the blues singersongwriter later sang with the U.S. Navy and released six albums. In her 2009 release The Truth According to Ruthie Foster, she blends Southern blues, rock, gospel, jazz and country. PAGE 43

E S . S A L A D S H C I W . D N A P I Z Z A S A . P A S T A C A L Z O N E . F O C A C C I

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

James Booker Piano Tribute feat. David Reis, Joshua Paxton, Tom McDermott, Joe Krown and Tom Worrell

CRITIC’S PICK

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FRIDAY/// MAY 6

PAGE 41

CRITIC’S PICK Stooges Brass Band

5:55 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage Founded in 1995, the Stooges Brass Band spikes traditional and contemporary brass band and second-line music with hip-hop, which is featured on its debut album It’s About Time.

McDonogh 35 High School Choir

Gospel

5:55 p.m., Gospel Tent McDonogh 35 boasts the city’s first public school gospel choir.

Spencer Bohren

5:55 p.m., Lagniappe Stage The folk and blues troubadour and roots music authority plays guitar, lap steel guitar, banjo and mandolin. His 2008 live album Live at the Tube captures Bohren over two nights in Germany.

The Iguanas

6 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage Founded in 1989, the bilingual Tex-Mex New Orleans roots rockers mix swamp pop, R&B and Latin rhythms. The band’s latest is the acclaimed 2008 album If You Should Ever Fall on Hard Times.

Friday, May 6 PARADES 12:20 p.m. Ninth Ward Hunters and Young Cherokee Mardi Gras Indians

2:45 p.m. Scene Boosters and Old N Nu Style Fellas Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs with New Wave Brass Band 4 p.m. New Orleans Indian Rhythm Section and Young Magnolias Mardi Gras Indians

NATIVE AMERICAN POW WOW — LA. FOLK LIFE VILLAGE Noon, 2:25 p.m. and 5:25 p.m. The Boyz

HAITI PAVILION 1 p.m. Vodou Ceremony with RAM Drummers 3:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Vodou Drumming

PERFORMANCES

11:05 a.m., Congo Square Stage Students perform big band and modern jazz standards.

Dillard University Jazz Ensemble 11:15 a.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent

Andy J. Forest NOtown Band

11:15 a.m., Blues Tent In his three-decade career, this harmonicablowing bluesman has performed alongside B.B. King, Canned Heat and Robert Cray, among others. He joined Washboard Chaz for the soundtrack to the 2009 Werner Herzog film Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans.

Joseph Torregano

11:15 a.m., Economy Hall Tent This jazz clarinetist and New Orleans native has performed with artists ranging from Paul McCartney to Harry Connick Jr. and played for two presidents and Queen Elizabeth.

Jambalaya Cajun Band

11:15 a.m., Fais Do-Do Stage Brothers Terry and Tony Huval founded this traditional Cajun band in 1977. Longtime Cajun fiddler Merlin Fontenot joins this performance.

Wimberly Family Gospel Singers 11:15 a.m., Gospel Tent

We Landed on the Moon!

11:20 a.m., Acura Stage The Baton Rouge power-pop quintet followed up its 2009 sophomore release These Little Wars with the 2010 firecracker This Will Be One For the Books, packing a big voice (singer Melissa Eccles) and bigger hooks.

Michael Skinkus and Moyuba

11:20 a.m., Lagniappe Stage The New Orleans percussionist accompanies Athens, Ga.-based Moyuba, a drum ensemble fusing jazz and spiritual chants with Afro-Caribbean rhythms.

Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues with Al “Carnival Time” Johnson 11:30 a.m., Gentilly Stage The New Orleans R&B legend joins the versatile pop-rock outfit led by Bobby Cure, a fixture in the New Orleans music scene since the 1970s.

Red Hawk Mardi Gras Indians

11:30 a.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage Big Chief Nathan Burke leads this Indian gang that formed in 2003. The group performs traditional Indian chants and songs.

CRITIC’S PICK

Kourtney Heart

12:05 p.m., Congo Square The New Orleans teen and Jive recording artist’s modern R&B and pop debut Eye Kee Day is highlighted by the 2010 radio hit “My Boy,” featuring the late Magnolia Shorty.

CRITIC’S PICK

The Electrifying Crown Seekers

12:05 p.m., Gospel Tent Founded in 1965, the Marrero country, blues and rock ’n’ roll gospel group released No Time To Lose in 2004. PAGE 44

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

1:40 p.m. Original 4 and Original Big 7 Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs with The Original Pinettes Brass Band

Delgado Community College Jazz Ensemble

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Jazz Fest

FRIDAY/// MAY 6

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Joe Hall & the Louisiana Cane Cutters

12:20 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage The young Cajun and Creole music ensemble from Arnaudville, La., preserves traditional Cajun and Creole folk tunes, led by Hall’s accordion.

James Rivers Movement

12:25 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent Saxophone, flute, harmonics, bagpipes — multiinstrumentalist James Rivers is a master jazz and blues performer, who’s been playing since the late 1960s. This outfit blends R&B, progressive jazz and rock.

Guitar Slim Jr.

12:25 p.m., Blues Tent The late Stevie Ray Vaughn leaned on this New Orleans bluesman throughout his career, but their dueling guitars and attitudes didn’t meet on a record before Vaughan’s death in 1990. Slim’s 2010 album Brought Up the Hardway showcases his fret-firing, funk-tinged blues and R&B.

Jamil Sharif

1:35 p.m., Blues Tent The heavyweight Bourbon Street personality takes his R&B outfit from the Funky Pirate to the Fair Grounds.

A Centennial Celebration for Lionel Ferbos

1:40 p.m., Economy Hall Tent Bestowed with the “World’s Oldest Active Jazz Musician” title, Lionel Ferbos celebrates his 100th birthday in July. He has performed traditional New Orleans jazz and Dixieland for more than 80 years, and he’s one of the few performers to play the Jazz Fest each year since its beginning in 1970.

Yvette Landry

Ingrid Lucia

Golden Sioux Mardi Gras Indians

12:35 p.m., Acura Stage The seven-piece, hip-hop-inspired brass band dropped No Place Like Home in 2009, blending funk rhythms and traditional brass band chants. The band joins the HBO Treme tour this summer with Rebirth Brass Band and Kermit Ruffins, among others.

The Original Pinettes Brass Band

12:35 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage Snare drummer Christie Jourdain leads the allwomen brass band.

Edie Brickell

1 p.m., Gentilly Stage Following the singer/songwriter’s stint with now-defunct Texas jam band The New Bohemians (best known for the alt-folk 1988 single “What I Am”), Edie Brickell embarked on a stripped-down solo career. She debuted The Gadabouts in January.

Bester Singers and Dynamic Smooth Family Gospel Singers

1:05 p.m., Gospel Tent Slidell’s Bester Singers join Mandeville’s Dynamic Smooth Family, led by Rev. Cynthia Plummer.

Gina Brown & Anutha Level

1:20 p.m., Congo Square Stage Gina Brown started her career as a radio announcer in Mobile, Ala. Her career spans hiphop and R&B in the Motown tradition.

Bruce Daigrepont Cajun Band

1:30 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage The Cajun accordionist has been performing since 1980 and is a regular at Tipitina’s, where he hosts a fais do-do Cajun dance party every Sunday. His sets offer a broad range of Louisiana music, from swamp pop and zydeco to deep blues and traditional Cajun folk.

David Torkanowsky’s Fleur Debris feat. George Porter Jr. 1:35 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent

sonny

CRITIC’S PICK

1:40 p.m., Lagniappe Stage The honky-tonk singer/songwriter released her solo debut Should Have Known last year. The Breaux Bridge, La., player’s twang formerly performed alongside the Pine Leaf Boys, Red Stick Ramblers, and many other Louisiana musicians.

Soul Rebels Brass Band

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

Big Al Carson Blues Band

12:25 p.m., Economy Hall Tent A consummate scholar-musician, trumpeter Jamil Sharif not only serves as a Hollywood music consultant but also is a performer wellversed in traditional New Orleans jazz. 12:25 p.m., Lagniappe Stage Ingrid Lucia’s swing revival features her low-key gypsy jazz band and Billie Holidayesque pipes.

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The pianist (and WWOZ DJ) joins the revered former Meters bassist for this explosive jazz ensemble performance.

1:45 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

Connie & Dwight with the St. RaymondSt. Leo the Great Choir 2 p.m., Gospel Tent Dwight and Connie Fitch lead the New Orleans choir.

Bonerama

2:05 p.m., Acura Stage Trombone-heavy Bonerama thrusts New Orleans brass and funk into an offbeat metallic rock ’n’ roll hybrid, led by bandleader Craig Klein. The band released the EP Hard Times in 2009 and in 2010 snagged the Big Easy Award for Best Rock Band.

Buckwheat Zydeco

2:25 p.m., Gentilly Stage Stanley Dural began as a sideman to 1970s R&B players and for more than 30 years has fronted one of the most recognizable zydeco bands in the country. 2009’s Lay Your Burden Down earned a Best Cajun and Zydeco Grammy, and he joined the children’s music fray in 2010 with Bayou Boogie.

CRITIC’S PICK

Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers

2:35 p.m., Congo Square Stage The omnipresent trumpeter, Basin Street Records artist and Treme star released Livin’ a Treme Life in 2010, followed by Have a Crazy Cool Christmas. His Barbecue Swingers perform traditional New Orleans jazz.

Leah Chase

2:45 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent The New Orleans jazz vocalist (and daughter of chef Leah Chase) performs New Orleans jazz, inherited from her trumpeter father Dooky’s musical drive.

Luther Kent

2:50 p.m., Blues Tent The New Orleans native blues singer — and onetime vocalist for Blood, Sweat and Tears — digs into legendary soul singer Bobby Bland’s repertoire on 2008’s Bobby Bland Songbook, arranged

rollins By RoGER HAHn

he last time saxophonist Sonny Rollins played Jazz Fest, closing out the Jazz Tent in 1995, his performance resulted in a milestone. Russ Cole, a veteran sound engineer and longtime production manager for British guitarist/songwriter Richard Thompson, remembered it this way: “Easily one of the greatest sets I have ever witnessed. Wildly ecstatic playing and an incredible audience. I thought I might spontaneously combust while I was dancing!” Rollins remembered that day fondly when I spoke with him recently at his retreat in upstate New York. He chose “St. Thomas” to close the set, and the song’s calypso vibe, based on a folk tune from his family’s native West Indies, seemed to connect with the Caribbean spirit that’s part of New Orleans. “It was like I was getting in touch with my ancestors,” Rollins says. “And then I was getting that back from the audience.” One of the most lauded jazz musicians of the modern era, Rollins’ career dates back to the dawn of bebop, when he came of age playing beside greats like Charlie Parker, Art Blakey, Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk. In March, he was awarded the National Medal of the Arts at a ceremony at the White House. Many critics have categorized Rollins’ standing in the history of jazz based on his recordings. In the course of the 1950s and ’60s, he made dozens of groundbreaking albums, many now classics in the jazz canon. But since then, his primary focus has been on live performance and expanding the jazz palette to include easygoing rhythms and popular tunes, taking a more laid-back approach to jazz orthodoxy and commercial success. Rollins’ deepest musical roots go back to a sound that has a lot in common with New Orleans’

T

Photo by John Abbott

music. When he was very young, his grandmother took him to storefront Sanctified churches in Harlem to hear gospel music. And he first played professionally in a dance band, idolizing Louis Jordan, a purveyor of early rhythm and blues whose popular jump-jazz anthem “Saturday Night Fish Fry” is set in New Orleans. Rollins recently performed at a benefit for a hospital in upstate New York. “This one lady got up, and she just started dancing like crazy,” he says. “Then everybody got up and started dancing. It just made me feel so good, because that’s how I grew up, playing for dances. In fact, whenever somebody comes up to me and says, ‘Sonny, I really don’t like jazz that much, but I really like you’ — well, that just makes me feel so great.”

sonnY rollins SUNday, May 8 5:40 P.M. WWOZ JaZZ TENT

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1:30 p.m. Trouble Nation and Mohawk Hunters Mardi Gras Indians 2:50 p.m. Cherokee Hunters and Wild Red Flame Mardi Gras Indians 4:10 p.m. Haitian Rara Parade featuring RAM 5:25 p.m. Westbank Steppers, Valley of Silent Men and Pigeon Town Steppers Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs with Kin Folk Brass Band

NATIVE AMERICAN POW WOW — LA. FOLK LIFE VILLAGE 12:10 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 3:55 p.m. The Boyz

HAITI PAVILION Noon Vodou Ceremony with RAM Drummers 4:40 p.m. RAM

PERFORMANCES Juilliard Jazz Ensemble

11:10 a.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent This internationally touring jazz ensemble of Juilliard students has a repertoire including modern jazz and early New Orleans jazz, plus original student compositions.

Brother Tyrone & the Mindbenders

11:15 a.m., Congo Square Stage Local soul singer Brother Tyrone, aka Tyrone Pollard, sang old-school R&B in barrooms to little fanfare for much of his career. He gained wider recognition for his 2008 album, Mindbender. 11:15 a.m., Economy Hall Tent Formed from the ashes of the mighty Jazz Vipers, the New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings is known for acoustic renditions of obscure and popular early jazz tunes.

The City of Love Music & Worship Arts Choir 11:15 a.m., Gospel Tent

Vivaz!

11:20 a.m., Acura Stage Comprising players from Latin American countries including Puerto Rico, Nicaragua, Bolivia and Dominican Republic, this dual guitar, dual trombone Latin band is led by founder Javier Gutierrez.

R. Scully’s Rough 7

11:20 a.m., Gentilly Stage The former frontman of the Morning 40 Federation’s open-chord singer/songwriter rock comes decorated with raw lead guitar by noise artist Rob Cambre and maniacal piano by Ratty Scurvics, among other outthere local musicians.

Jeffery Broussard & the Creole Cowboys

11:20 a.m., Fais Do-Do Stage

Black Feathers Mardi Gras Indians 11:20 a.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage Big Chief Lionel Delpit leads this 15-yearold, 25-member Mardi Gras Indian crew, which uses only tambourines for its Indian rhythms.

Troy Turner

11:25 a.m., Blues Tent A native of Baton Rouge, Troy Turner crafted his own style of Southern soul blues.

CRITIC’S PICK

Smithfield Fair

11:25 a.m., Lagniappe Stage Since 1973, this Louisiana group has released 18 all-acoustic albums before focusing on traditional Scottish songs and originals written in traditional folk styles.

Veal Brothers

12:05 p.m., Gospel Tent Four brothers from Mississippi form this modern eight-piece, guitar-led gospel group.

Sharon Martin

12:15 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent Singer, actress and “mistress of coal soul,” Sharon Martin is an accomplished New Orleans vocalist. Her live show combines music, dance and spoken-word.

The Pfister Sisters

12:20 p.m., Economy Hall Tent Since 1979, the Pfister Sisters have celebrated New Orleans’ swing-era sounds with faithful recreations of the jazz harmony singing of the Boswell Sisters, with a side dish of Andrews Sisters’ tunes.

CRITIC’S PICK

Marcia Ball

12:30 p.m., Acura Stage For more than three decades, this pianoplaying Austin, Texas-based pianist/vocalist has mixed Southern boogie, R&B, blues and ballads to craft a rootsy cross between New Orleans and Lone Star State sounds.

The Jon Batiste Band

12:30 p.m., Congo Square Stage A pianist from a renowned New Orleans musical family, Jon Batiste is a graduate of the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts who went on to study at the Juilliard School in New York. He focuses on modern, progressive jazz.

D.L. Menard & the Louisiana Aces

12:30 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage In his five-decade career playing traditional Cajun and Cajun-inflected country music, guitarist D.L. Menard became known as the Cajun Hank Williams. He’s also a Grammy winner and a member of the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

AsheSon

12:30 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage With members hailing from Cuba, Puerto Rico and Guatemala, AsheSon touches on an array of Latin musical styles and AfroCuban beats.

Shamarr Allen & the Underdawgs PAGE 53

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings

After learning to play every instrument needed for a zydeco band, former Zydeco Force bandleader/singer Jeffery Broussard settled on fiddle and accordion to lead this outfit.

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DE EW M EN DR LICI O U $ I IT AL 2 M NK US L D A SP FO EMS E O AY RG CI D EV AR ALS & ER IT YD A AY S

Jazz Fest

LUPE

FIASCO B Y NOA H BONA PA R T E PA I S

L

asers, by their very nature, move at the speed of light. Appropriating the word highlights one of many confounding ironies surrounding Lupe Fiasco’s third album, Lasers (1st & 15th/Atlantic), which was completed in late 2009 but just arrived in March. In 2008, the Chicago-born MC — Wasalu Muhammad Jaco — was at the top of his game. His 2006 bow Food & Liquor and 2007 follow-up The Cool struck a rare rap balance of heart-pounding yin and chestthumping yang. A burgeoning mogul with his own vanity label (Atlantic offshoot 1st and 15th Entertainment) and fashion/graphic design firm (Righteous Kung-Fu) in 2008, Fiasco was eyeing an exit. His final album, he announced, would be a triple-disc opus titled LupE.N.D., released in three parts starting in summer 2009. A contract squabble led Fiasco to change plans, but nothing came out until fans portested online and outside Atlantic’s Manhattan offices in October 2010. The “finished”

Ernie Vincent & Top Notes

12:35 p.m., Blues Tent This wah-wah-heavy New Orleans funk and blues guitarist has been on the national scene since the mid 1960s, churning out hits such as “Things are Better” and “Dap Walk” and collaborating with the likes of Ernie K-Doe, Eddie Bo, Jessie Hill and Solomon Burke, among others.

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product is a break from Fiasco’s previously rock-solid output. The ordeal seemed to sap the creativity from the rapper, who admitted to Complex magazine, “I love and hate this album.” Food & Liquor II: The Great American Rap Album is expected by the end of 2011.

Herlin Riley

1:20 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent The Dirty Dozen Brass Band’s Roger Lewis leads this jazz ensemble of five baritone saxophones. plus a drummer and pianist.

The Sammy Rimington International Band

1:30 p.m., Economy Hall Tent Celebrating 50 years as a musician, Britishborn Sammy Rimington plays New Orleans revival jazz in the style of the 1920s.

Geno Delafose & French Rockin’ Boogie

Archdiocese of New Orleans Gospel Choir

Wanda Rouzan’s New Orleans R&B Revue

Baritone Bliss feat. Roger Lewis, Tony Dagradi, Tim Green, Calvin Johnson, Dan Oestricher, Mari Watanabe and

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12:55 p.m., Gospel Tent This 100-member inter-generational gospel choir features members from 20 New Orleans Catholic choirs.

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1:40 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage Creole cowboy Geno Delafose operates the Double D Ranch outside of Eunice, La., when not touring the country playing squeezebox, recreating Creole standards, old-fashioned waltzes, two-steps, blues and soul tunes.

12:35 p.m., Lagniappe Stage With a flair for improvisation, guitarist John Lawrence plays traditional flamenco music on acoustic guitar, accompanied by wild, complex dancing.

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CRITIC’S PICK 1:45 p.m., Blues Tent R&B singer Wanda Rouzan holds the distinction of being one of New Orleans’ first female grand marshals to lead a secondline parade. With A Taste of New Orleans, Rouzan trots out hits by greats such as Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Etta James, Irma Thomas and Mahalia Jackson. PAGE 54

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 03 > 2011

12:35 p.m., Gentilly Stage This former member of Rebirth Brass Band (among other revered groups) has toured with Willie Nelson and recorded with R.E.M. The trumpeter puts an aggressive modern spin on jazz, rock, funk and hip-hop music with his band the Underdawgs.

MOTHER’S DAY - MAY 8TH

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SATURDAY/// MAY 7

Jazz Fest PAGE 53

Bill Kirchen

1:45 p.m., Lagniappe Stage A wicked guitarist known as “Titan of the Telecaster,” Bill Kirchen specializes in all things Americana: truck-driving music, country, rockabilly and more. Kirchen has recorded with famous fans from Commander Cody to Elvis Costello to Nick Lowe and others.

The Revealers

1:50 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage Formed in 1996, the Revealers play R&B-influenced, pop-infused rootsrock reggae with New Orleans flavor.

Tonia Scott & Anointed Voices

1:50 p.m., Gospel Tent This gospel choir, under the direction of Tonia Monique Scott, has been featured in major movies including Ray, The Last Holiday and The Skeleton Key.

CRITIC’S PICK

Voice of the Wetlands All-Stars

1:55 p.m., Acura Stage This group of musicians from various Louisiana musical genres formed to raise awareness and funds for the restoration of Louisiana wetlands. Members include Tab Benoit, Anders Osborne, George Porter Jr., Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Johnny Vidacovich, Waylon Thibodeaux and “Jumpin’” Johnny Sansone.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

MyNameIsJohnMichael

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1:55 p.m., Gentilly Stage With not one New Orleans signifier to its name save an occasional trumpet line, the guitar-driven MyNameIsJohnMichael plays upbeat multiinstrumental indie rock. Leader John Michael Rouchell came to local prominence upon writing, recording and releasing one song a week for a year in 2009, and the band asked fans to vote on which songs would be included on the group’s self-released debut album, The People That Come and Go.

RAM

2 p.m., Congo Square Stage This “mizik rasin” band from Port-auPrince, Haiti, is led by controversial founder, songwriter and lead vocalist

Richard A. Morse (RAM), who once survived an assassination attempt during a Brazilian Carnival performance, and who describes his group’s music as “Vodou rock ’n’ roots.” The group combines instruments such as rara horns and petwo drums to create a rare form of rock ’n’ roll with lyrics in French and English.

Khris Royal & Dark Matter

2:30 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent A product of both the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts and the Berklee College of Music, saxophonist Khris Royal adds electronic elements to his progressive combination of funk and jazz.

Franklin Avenue Baptist Church Choir

2:40 p.m., Gospel Tent Part of a chain of churches extending to Baton Rouge and Houston, this 2,000-seat church in the Gentilly neighborhood took on 9 feet of water after Hurricane Katrina, but came back stronger than ever, thanks in part to its celebrated choir.

CRITIC’S PICK

Tribute to Walter Payton and Albert “June” Gardner

2:50 p.m., Economy Hall Tent Trumpeter Leroy Jones leads this tribute to drummer Albert Gardner and bassist Walter Payton. The ensemble features Germaine Bazzle, Lucien Barbarin, Craig Klein, David Torkanowsky, Thaddeus Richard and others.

James Andrews & the Crescent City Allstars

2:55 p.m., Blues Tent A product of the Treme neighborhood and a musical family, James Andrews brings a large ensemble together for vocal-driven funk that recalls the sounds of jazz, New Orleans’ second-line sounds, Mardi Gras Indian chants and gospel.

Jesse Winchester

2:55 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage Son of the South Jesse Winchester blends folk, blues and country in songs like “Yankee Lady,” “The Brand New Tennessee Waltz,” and

THE NEW ORLEANS

KLEZMER ALL-STARS by DAV I D K U N I A N

I

t’s the energy in the group that still appeals to me,” says Jonathan Freilich, guitarist and cofounder of the New Orleans Klez-mer All-Stars. The band celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, and its Jazz Fest set features a crowded reunion of current and former members. From modest beginnings at the longgone Kaldi’s Coffeehouse on Decatur Street and bring-your-own-stir-fry nights at Lucky’s Lounge on St. Charles Avenue, the New Orleans Klezmer All-Stars grew to become one of the most intense and innovative klezmer bands on the planet. Perhaps that’s because it’s one of the only bands to fuse celebratory Eastern European Jewish folk music with a New Orleans attitude and funky vibe. Audiences get wild and weird in the best of ways. The Klezmers played my wedding, and it will play my funeral. The Jazz Fest show features many original members, including accordionist Glenn Hartman, saxophonist Ben Ellman of Galactic, bassist Arthur Kastler, violinists Dave Riebeck and Rick Perles, original drummer Mean Willie Green, who is more familiar to many for his work with the Neville Brothers, and percussionists who subsequently replaced him, Stanton Moore of Galactic and Kevin O’Day. “It’s going to be a big party,” Freilich says. And well it should be — 20 years is a long time for a band, especially one with such strong personalities. Back when it started, “We admired bands like the Rolling Stones and the Grateful Dead who were bands for years,” Freilich says.

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“We figured that this was music old men could do and make the young girls shake it,” he adds. And the young girls do, along with old women and young men, too. It’s music for all ages. My 93-year-old grandmother did a turn with the hora when she heard what the Klezmer All Stars were throwing down. “We’ve been thrown together in intense situations, so there is this closeness between us. There are intimate bonds between us,” Freilich says. “We played balls out for years. Now we’re diversifying the repertoire. But people still like it. The audience is still into it and we’re still into it. It’s still vital. There is still potential in it. It still has creativity.”

ThE NEw ORLEANS KLEZMER ALL-STARS FrIday, May 6, 5:45 p.M. LagnIappe Stage

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cAterIng AvAILABLe

etween country singer Willie Nelson’s clean-cut 1962 debut … And Then I Wrote and 2009’s traditional Country Music stretches a legendary five-decade career as an outlaw, an activist and a highwayman. Armed with his unmistakable tender growl and beat-toshreds guitar “Trigger” (named after Roy Rogers’ horse), Nelson and country comrades Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson broke from Nashville gloss and rhinestones in the early 1970s. Landmark albums Shotgun Willie and Red Headed Stranger shot Nelson to American hero status, and the dozens of albums that followed dip into gospel, jazz and pop standards (1978’s Stardust). Nelson’s conspiracy theories, politics and marijuana use grab headlines, but in March, Nelson collaborated with Wynton Marsalis and Norah Jones for Here We

“Mississippi, You’re on My Mind,” Winchester moved to Canada during the Vietnam War, but he still managed to gain famous fans and has recorded with everyone from Elvis Costello to Jimmy Buffett.

CRITIC’S PICK DAILY Hot BreAkfAst

fresH PAstrIes

Kora Konnection feat. Morikeba Kouyate and Thierno Dioubate

3 p.m., Lagniappe Stage A melodic African jazz ensemble, Kora Konnection features 12-string kora player and African storytelling griot Morikeba Kouyate, a native of Senegal and current New Orleans resident. Besides traditional African players, the group features New Orleans saxophonist Tim Green, bassist James Singleton and others.

Kirk Joseph’s Tuba Tuba

3:10 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage Kirk Joseph revolutionized the sousaphone, bringing it to the forefront during his time with the Dirty Dozen Brass Band. Tuba Tuba is a group of notable tuba players blending modern jazz, funk, blues and rock ’n’ roll.

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue

3:25 p.m., Gentilly Stage As seen on the HBO series Treme, New Hours: Mon-Sat 7am-6pm • Sun 7am-3pm

Go Again, which cracks into Ray Charles’ songbook and spans jazz, country and blues for a purely American experience.

WILLIE NELSON FRIDAY, MAY 6 5:45 P.M. gentIllY stAge

Orleans’ current hottest musical export, Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews (who plays more trumpet than trombone these days), injects rock, hip-hop, funk and soul into his modern, horn-driven New Orleans party sound.

CRITIC’S PICK Allen Toussaint

3:35 p.m., Acura Stage The first name in New Orleans music, this legendary piano player, songwriter and record producer has crafted hits such as “Workin’ In the Coal Mine,” “Southern Nights” and “Mother-In-Law.” More recently, he collaborated with Elvis Costello on the Grammy-winning album The River In Reverse, and in 2009 he released The Bright Mississippi.

CRITIC’S PICK Minister Jai Reed

3:35 p.m., Gospel Tent New Orleans pastor Jai Reed grew up singing R&B, pop, jazz, rock and gospel in groups such as Endurance and Nu-Beginnings. His more recent music — which as been featured in Tyler Perry movies — is decidedly modern. He just released a self-titled album. PAGE 65


10.833"

9.625"

WHERE GREAT TASTE COMES TO JAZZ FEST APRIL 29–MAY 8, 2011

©2011 MILLER BREWING CO., MILWAUKEE, WI © 2011 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and Foundation. All Rights Reserved.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

THE OFFICIAL BEER

57


58

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

2011

JAZZFEST


Wilco

5:20pm-7pm

Galactic

3:25pm-4:40pm

Lucinda Williams

1:40pm-2:55pm

Dirty Notes

Johnny Sketch & the

12:20pm-1:10pm

The Dirty South Afro- Beat Arkestra

Gov’t Majik-

11:10am-Noon

Cyndi Lauper

5:25pm-6:55pm

Amanda Shaw & the Cute Guys

3:40pm-4:40pm

The New Orleans Bingo! Show

2:15pm-3:15pm

Eagle & Hawk

12:50pm-1:50pm

Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue

11:25am-12:25pm

Gentilly Stage

Pee Wee Ellis

with special guest

Maceo Parker

5:30pm-7pm

Djakout #1 of Haiti

3:35pm-4:50pm

Joseph “Zigaboo” Modeliste

2:05pm-3:05pm

Kirk Joseph’s Backyard Groove

12:35pm-1:35pm

BRW

11:25am-12:15pm

Congo Square Stage

& Blackout

Stefon Harris

5:40pm-7pm

Delfeayo Marsalis’ Uptown Orchestra

4:10pm-5:10pm

Christian Scott

2:40pm-3:40pm

Brice Winston

1:25pm-2:15pm

Sasha Masakowski

12:20pm-1:05pm

Loyola University Jazz Ensemble

11:15am-Noon

WWOZ Jazz Tent

Ruthie Foster

5:50pm-7pm

David Reis Joshua Paxton, Tom McDermott, Joe Krown and Tom Worrell

featuring

James Booker Piano Tribute

4:10pm-5:20pm

Charlie Musselwhite

2:45pm-3:45pm

Charmaine Neville Band

1:30pm-2:20pm

Little Freddie King Blues Band

12:20pm-1:10pm

Robert “Bilbo” Walker’s Blues Revue

11:15am-Noon

Blues Tent

PARADES: 1:45 pm — Cheyenne and 7th Ward Creole Hunters 2:45 pm — VIP Ladies Social Aid & Pleasure Club with Young Fellaz Brass Band 3:05 pm — Peoples Health Economy Hall, Men of Class Social Aid & Pleasure Club 4 pm — Roots of Music Marching Crusaders Band 5:20 pm — Ladies of Unity and Bon Temp Roulez Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs with Tornado Brass Band

7:00pm

6:30pm

6:00pm

5:30pm

5:00pm

4:30pm

4:00pm

3:30pm

3:00pm

2:30pm

2:00pm

1:30pm

1:00pm

12:30pm

12:00pm

11:30am

Acura Stage

THURSDAY, MAY 5

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

59

5:55pm-7pm

Locos por Juana

4:25pm-5:25pm

Paulin Brothers Brass Band

3:00pm-3:55pm

Mardi Gras Indians

Chief Iron Horse & the Black Seminoles

1:50pm-2:35pm

African Dance & Drum Collective

Kumbuka

12:35pm-1:30pm

& the Mandingo Warriors Mardi Gras Indians

Fi Yi Yi

11:20am-12:05pm

Jazz & Heritage Tent

Stooges The Brass Band Iguanas

6pm-7pm

Michelle Shocked

4:35pm-5:35pm

& the Zydeco Hellraisers

Dwayne Dopsie

3:10pm-4:10pm

Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys

1:45pm-2:45pm

Cedric Watson & Bijou Creole

12:25pm-1:20pm

Belton Richard & the Musical Aces

11:10am-Noon

Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

NATIVE AMERICAN POW WOW: Folklife Stage in the Folklife Village Noon, 2:45 pm and 5:35 pm — The Boyz

Bob Havens & Randy Reinhart

featuring

Banu Gibson & the Allstars

5:45pm-7pm

Mark Braud

4:20pm-5:20pm

The Original Royal players Brass Band

3:05pm-4pm

Lino Patruno and Franco Nero, Forever Blues from Italy

1:45pm-2:45pm

Linnzi Zaorski

12:30pm-1:20pm

Dukes of Dixieland

11:20am-12:05pm

Peoples Health Economy Hall Tent

Spencer Bohren

5:55pm-6:55pm

Paul Eason

4:20pm-5:30pm

John Rankin

2:55pm-3:55pm

Flatbed Honeymoon

1:35pm-2:35pm

The Help

12:25pm-1:15pm

Ovi-G & the Froggies

11:20am-12:05pm

Lagniappe Tent

RAM Drummers of Haiti

5:15pm-6pm

Renard Pouché Lake Forest Charter Jazz Ensemble

Interviewer: Rick Coleman

4pm-4:45pm

Interviewer: Tom Morgan

Sasha & Steve Masakowski

3pm-3:45pm

Interviewer: Steve Armbruster

Robert “Bilbo” Walker

2pm-2:45pm

Allison Miner Music Heritage Stage

4pm-4:45pm

Donald Lewis

2:45pm-3:30pm

Performing Arts Showcase II feat. Woodmere and Craig Drummers & Dancers

1:30pm-2:15pm

Adams Middle School Players

12:30pm-1pm

Clearwood Jr. High School Chorale

11:30am-Noon

Chouest Family Kids Tent

HAITI PAVILLION: 1 pm — Vodou Ceremony with RAM Drummers 3:05 pm and 4 pm — Vodou Drumming

McDonogh 35 High School Gospel Choir

5:55pm-6:40pm

Lisa Knowles & the Brown Sisters

4:45am-5:45pm

O. Perry Walker Charter High School Gospel Choir

3:35am-4:20pm

Lyle Henderson & Emmanu-EL

2:40am-3:25pm

Heavenly Melodies Gospel Singers

1:45am-2:30pm

Joesph S. Clark Sr. High School Gospel Choir

12:55am-1:35pm

Pastor Terry Gullage and the Greater Mt. Calvary Voices of Redemption Choir

12:05am-12:45pm

“Singing Mustangs” Gospel Choir

Eleanor McMain

11:15am-11:55am

Gospel Tent


3:50pm - 5:05pm

Buckwheat Zydeco

2:25pm - 3:15pm

Arcade Fire

5:35pm - 7pm

12:20pm-1:10pm

Jambalaya Cajun Band

11:15am-Noon

Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

Mardi Gras Indians

Red Hawk

11:30am-12:15pm

Jazz & Heritage Tent The Wimberly Family Gospel Singers

11:15am-11:55am

Gospel Tent

& Anutha Level

5:45pm - 7pm

Mingus Lupe Big Band Fiasco

Willie Nelson

5:35pm-6:55pm

Jazz Jam

Blodie’s

4pm - 5:05pm

Leah Chase

2:45pm-3:35pm

5:45pm - 7pm

Big Sam’s Funky Nation

4:05pm - 5:05pm

Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers

2:35pm - 3:35pm

George Porter Jr.

featuring

David Torkanowsky’s Fleur Debris

1:35pm-2:25pm

James Rivers Movement

12:25pm-1:15pm

2:50pm-3:45pm

A Centennial Celebration for Lionel Ferbos with The Palm Court Jazz Band

1:40pm-2:30pm

Jamil Sharif

Gregg Allman

5:40pm-7pm

Eric Lindell

4:15pm-5:05pm

2:55pm-3:45pm

Mardi Gras Indians

Golden Sioux

1:45pm-2:30pm

The Original Pinettes Brass Band

Nathan & the Zydeco Cha Chas

5:50pm-7pm

The SteelDrivers

4:20pm-5:25pm

Djakout #1 of Haiti

5:40pm-7pm

Forgotten Souls

4:10pm-5pm

Roddie Romero Ivoire Spectacle & the Hub featuring City Allstars Seguenon Kone

2:50pm-3:50pm

Bruce Daigrepont Cajun Band

1:30pm-2:25pm

Joe Hall & the Louisiana Cane Cutters

12:35pm-1:25pm

NATIVE AMERICAN POW WOW: Folklife Stage in the Folklife Village Noon, 2:25pm and 5:25 pm — The Boyz

Dr. Michael White and Nik Payton

w/ special guests

Bob Wilber & the Crescent City Cats

5:40pm-7pm

Topsy Chapman & Solid Harmony

4:10pm-5:10pm

Luther Kent Tim Laughlin

2:50pm-3:50pm

Big Al Carson Blues Band

1:35pm-2:25pm

Guitar Slim Jr.

12:25pm-1:15pm

& the

with guest

John Boutté

The New Orleans Klezmer Allstars 20th Anniversary

5:45pm-7pm

Alex McMurray

4:20pm-5:20pm

Stanton Moore Trio

2:55pm-3:55pm

Yvette Landry

1:40pm-2:30pm

Ingrid Lucia

12:25pm-1:15pm

Michael Skinkus & Moyuba

11:20am-12:05pm

Lagniappe Tent

& the

Honky Tonk Revue

Gal Holiday

5:15pm-6pm

Metropelican Opera

4pm-4:45pm

Rose Ann St. Romain

3pm-3:45pm

3 Generations

Topsy Chapman’s

1:45pm-2:30pm

12:45pm-1:15pm

Harriet Ross Tubman ACSA Elem. School Choral Group

KIDsmART Circus Arts & ISL

11:30am-12:15pm

Chouest Family Kids Tent

HAITI PAVILLION: 1pm — Vodou Ceremony with RAM Drummers 3:30pm and 4:30 pm — Vodou Drumming

Irma Thomas’ Tribute to Mahalia Jackson’s 100th Birthday

5:40pm-6:40pm

Sensational Six

Kevin Thompson

4:30pm-5:15pm

Golden Voices Community Choir

3:40pm-4:20pm

Rev. Jermaine Landrum & Abundant Praise Revival Choir

2:50pm-3:30pm

Connie & Dwight with the St. Raymond/St. Leo the Great Choir

2pm-2:40pm

Bester Singers and Dynamic Smooth Family Gospel Singers

1:05pm-1:50pm

The Electrifying Crown Seekers

Joseph Torregano

11:15am-12:05pm

Peoples Health Economy Hall Tent

Kourtney Heart 12:25pm-1:15pm

Andy J. Forest NOtown Band

11:15am-12:05pm

Blues Tent

12:05pm-12:55pm

Dillard University Jazz Ensemble

11:15am-Noon

WWOZ Jazz Tent

12:05pm - 12:55pm

Delgado Community College Jazz Ensemble

11:05am - 11:45am

Congo Square Stage

1:20pm - 2:10pm Edie Brickell Gina Brown

1pm - 2pm

Better than Jamey Ezra Johnson

3:40pm - 4:50pm

Bonerama

2:05pm - 3:05pm

Soul Rebels Brass Band

12:35pm - 1:35pm

Al “ Carnival Time” Johnson

Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues w/ guest

11:30am - 12:30pm

Gentilly Stage

PARADES: 12:20 pm — Ninth Ward Hunters and Young Cherokee Mardi Gras Indians 1:40 pm — Original 4 and Original Big 7 Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs with The Original Pinettes Brass Band 2:45 pm — Scene Boosters and Old N Nu Style Fellas Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs with New Wave Brass Band 4 pm — New Orleans Indian Rhythm Section and Young Magnolias Mardi Gras Indians

7:00pm

6:30pm

6:00pm

5:30pm

5:00pm

4:30pm

4:00pm

3:30pm

3:00pm

2:30pm

2:00pm

1:30pm

1:00pm

12:30pm

12:00pm

We Landed on the Moon!

11:20am - 12:10 pm

Acura Stage

FRIDAY, MAY 6

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

11:30am

60 Interviewer:

Interviewer: Joyce Jackson

Tribute to Mahalia Jackson’s 100th Birthday with Pam Morris and Sister Naomi Washington

4:30pm-5:15pm

Ben Sandmel

South Louisiana Country Interviewer:

Yvette Landry & Richard Comeaux

3:30pm-4:15pm

Bruce Raeburn

Interviewer:

Bob Wilber with Dr. Michael White & Nik Payton

2:30pm-3:15pm

Ashley Kahn

James Andrews

1:30pm-2:15pm

Allison Miner Music Heritage Stage


Vivaz!

2:30pm

Jimmy Buffett & the Coral Reefer Band

5:25pm-7pm

Allen Toussaint

The Strokes

5:20pm-7pm

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue

3:25pm-4:40pm

MyNameIs JohnMichael

1:55pm-2:55pm

Underdawgs

& the

Julliard Jazz Ensemble

Brother Tyrone & the Mindbenders

Ms. Lauryn Hill

5:25pm-6:50pm

DJ Soul Sister

4:55pm-5:15pm

Mystikal

3:40pm-4:40pm

RAM of Haiti

2pm-3:10pm

The Jon Batiste Band

12:30pm-1:20pm

11:10am-Noon

11:15am-12:05pm

Fourplay

5:30pm-7pm

Th e Nicholas Payton SeXXXtet

3:45pm-5pm

Khris Royal & Dark Matter

2:30pm-3:20pm

Baritone Bliss

1:20pm-2:05pm

Sharon Martin

12:15pm-1pm

WWOZ Jazz Tent

Congo Square Stage

Bobby “Blue” Bland

5:55pm-7pm

Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters

4:15pm-5:15pm

the Crescent City Allstars

James Andrews &

2:55pm-3:45pm

Wanda Rouzan’s New Orleans Revue

1:45pm-2:35pm

Ernie Vincent & Top Notes

12:35pm-1:25pm

Troy Turner

11:25am-12:15pm

Blues Tent

PARADES: 12:20 pm — Undefeated Divas and New Generation Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs with Baby Boyz Brass Band 1:30 pm — Trouble Nation and Mohawk Hunters Mardi Gras Indians 2:50 pm — Cherokee Hunters and Wild Red Flame Mardi Gras Indians 4:10 pm — Haitian Rara Parade featuring RAM 5:25 pm — Westbank Steppers, Valley of Silent Men and Pigeon Town Steppers Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs with Kin Folk Brass Band

7:00pm

6:30pm

6:00pm

5:30pm

5:00pm

4:30pm

4:00pm

3:30pm 3:35pm-4:40pm

Voice of the Wetlands All-Stars

3:00pm

1:55pm-3pm

Marcia Ball Shamarr Allen

12:35pm-1:30pm

R. Scully’s Rough 7

12:30pm-1:25pm

11:20am-12:10pm

11:20am-12:05pm

2:00pm

1:30pm

1:00pm

12:30pm

12:00pm

11:30am

Gentilly Stage

Acura Stage

SATURDAY, MAY 7

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

61

C.J. Chenier & the Red Hot Louisiana Band

Aaron

5:50pm-7pm

Watson Memorial Teaching Ministries

4:30pm-5:15pm

Minister Jai Reed

3:35pm-4:20pm

Franklin Avenue Baptist Church Choir

2:40pm-3:25pm

Tonia Scott & Anointed Voices

1:50pm-2:30pm

Archdiocese of New Orleans Gospel Choir

12:55pm-1:40pm

Veal Brothers

12:05pm-12:45pm

The City of Love Music & Worship Arts Choir

11:15am-11:55pm

Gospel Tent

Jeff & Vida

5:45pm-6:55pm

Paul Sanchez & the Rolling Road Show

4:15pm-5:20pm

Morikeba Kouyate of Senegal and Thierno Dioubate of Guinea

featuring

Kora Konnection

3pm-3:50pm

Bill Kirchen

1:45pm-2:35pm

Flamenco Ensemble

John Lawrence & Ven Pa’ Ca

12:35pm-1:20pm

Smithfield Fair

11:25am-12:15pm

Lagniappe Tent

N’Fungola Sibo West African Dance Company

5:15pm-6pm

Jonno & Cajun Experience

4pm-4:45pm

Hobgoblin Hill Puppets

2:45pm-3:30pm

Double Dutch Jumpers

1:45pm-2:30pm

Ashe Cultural Arts Center Kuumba Institute

12:45pm-1:15pm

Stephen Foster’s Foster Family Program

11:30am-12:15pm

Chouest Family Kids Tent

HAITI PAVILLION: Noon — Vodou Ceremony with RAM Drummers 4:40 pm — RAM

New Birth Neville’s Brass Gospel Band Experience

6pm-7pm

101 Runners

4:30pm-5:35pm

Kirk Joseph’s Tuba Tuba

3:10pm-4pm

The Revealers

1:50pm-2:45pm

AsheSon

12:30pm-1:25pm

Mardi Gras Indians

Black Feathers

11:20am-12:05pm

Jazz & Heritage Tent

NATIVE AMERICAN POW WOW: Folklife Stage in the LA Folklife Village 12:10 pm, 2:30 pm and 3:55 pm — The Boyz

Ruby Wilson

5:50pm-7pm

5:55pm-7pm

BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet

Dr. Michael White & the Original Liberty Jazz Band featuring Thais Clark

4:25pm-5:25pm

Jesse Winchester

2:55pm-3:55pm

Geno Delafose & French Rockin’ Boogie

1:40pm-2:30pm

D.L. Menard & the Louisiana Aces

12:30pm-1:20pm

Jeffery Broussard & the Creole Cowboys

11:20am-12:10pm

Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

4:20pm-5:20pm

A Tribute to Walter Payton and Albert “June” Gardner

2:50pm-3:50pm

The Sammy Rimington International Band

1:30pm-2:25pm

The Pfister Sisters

12:20pm-1:10pm

New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings

11:15am-Noon

Peoples Health Economy Hall Tent

Nick Spitzer

Interviewer:

Rock ’N’ Twang Bill Kirchen

4pm-4:45pm

Kalamu ya Salaam

Interviewer:

Sonny Rollins

3pm-3:45pm

Interviewer: Steve Hochman

Nine Lives Dan Baum, Coleman deKay, & Paul Sanchez

2pm-2:45pm

Interviewer: Keith Spera

Mystikal

1pm-1:45pm

Tom Piazza

Interviewer:

Jesse Winchester

Noon-12:45pm

Allison Miner Music Heritage Stage


Anders Osborne

The Neville Brothers

5:40pm - 7pm

Kid Rock

3:30pm - 5:00pm

Cowboy Mouth

with Friends

The Radiators’ farewell

5:30pm - 7pm

Michael Franti & Spearhead

3:20pm - 4:45pm

Papa Grows Funk

1:50pm - 2:45pm

Playing for Change

1:45pm - 2:45pm

12:30pm - 1:25pm

Frankie Beverly

featuring

Maze

5pm - 7pm

DJ Captain Charles

4:35pm - 4:50pm

Rebirth Brass Band

3:15pm - 4:25pm

Tabou Combo of Haiti

1:40pm - 2:50pm

Sonny Rollins

5:40pm-7pm

& the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra

Irvin Mayfield

3:55pm - 5:10pm

Ellis Marsalis

2:35pm-3:25pm

Tribute to Clyde Kerr Jr.

1:25pm-2:15pm

presents the

Next Generation

Dee - 1

12:15pm-1pm

Jazzy Jags

SUBR

11:15am-Noon

Jesse McBride

Rumba Buena

Tommy Malone & the Mystik Drone

12:30pm - 1:20pm

11:15am - 12:05am

11:15am - 12:05pm

WWOZ Jazz Tent

12:25pm - 1:10pm

Congo Square Stage

Gentilly Stage

& The Family Band

Robert Randolph

5:20pm-7pm

Sonny Landreth

3:30pm-4:35pm

Henry Butler

2pm-3pm

Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band

12:45pm-1:35pm

Mem Shannon & the Membership

11:25am-12:25pm

Blues Tent

12:25pm-1:15pm Noon-12:45pm

Mardi Gras Indians

Black Eagles

& the Lawtell Playboys

11:15am-Noon

Goldman Thibodeaux

Jazz & Heritage Tent

11:15am-12:05pm

Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

2:55pm-3:50pm

Bamboula 2000

Zydeco Twisters

& the

Rockin’ Dopsie Jr.

6pm-7pm

Chris Thile

featuring

Punch Brother

4:20pm-5:35pm

RAM of Haiti

5:45pm-7pm

& the Wild Magnolias

Big Chief Bo Dollis

4:15pm-5:05pm

Bluerunners TBC Reunion Brass Band

2:50pm-3:50pm

Feufollet

1:45pm-2:35pm

NATIVE AMERICAN POW WOW: Folklife Stage in the Folklife Village 12:05 pm, 2:35 pm and 3:50 pm — The Boyz

Original Tuxedo Jazz Band

Bob French & the

6pm-7pm

Preservation Hall Jazz Band

4:35pm-5:35pm

New Orleans Storyville Jazz Band

& the

George French

3:10pm-4:10pm

Gregg Stafford’s Jazz Hounds

1:45pm-2:45pm

1:35pm-2:25pm

Lost Bayou Treme Pinstripe Brass Band Ramblers Brass Band

12:25pm-1:20pm

Louisiana Repertory Jazz Ensemble

11:15am-12:05pm

Peoples Health Economy Hall Tent

PARADES: 12:20 pm — Lady Rollers, Nine Times Ladies and Original C.T.C. Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs with Da Souljas Brass Band 12:25 pm — Peoples Health Economy Hall — Secondline Jammers Social Aid & Pleasure Club 1:25 pm — Wild Tchoupitoulas and Wild Apaches Mardi Gras Indians 2:25 pm — Haitian Rara parade with RAM 4:15 pm — Original Lady Buckjumpers and Prince of Wales Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs with TBC Brass Band 5:10 pm — Apache Hunters and Buffalo Hunters Mardi Gras Indians

7:00pm

6:30pm

6:00pm

5:30pm

5:00pm

4:30pm

4:00pm

3:30pm

3:00pm

2:30pm

2:00pm

1:30pm

1:00pm

12:30pm

12:00pm

Russell Batiste Jr. & Friends featuring Jason Neville

11:20am - 12:10 pm

Acura Stage

SUNDAY, MAY 8

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

11:30am

62 Interviewer:

Bobby Lounge

6pm-7pm

Robin & the Bluebirds

N’kafu

Traditional African Dance Company

5:15pm-6pm

HAITI PAVILLION: Noon — Vodou Ceremony with RAM Drummers 2:50 pm — RAM

Glen David Andrews

5:55pm-6:55pm

Leo Jackson & the Melody Clouds

4:55pm-5:40pm

Fisk Jubilee Singers

Isabeau: LA Ballads David Greely, Marce Lacouture & Anna Laura Edmiston Interviewer: Bill deTurk

5pm-5:45pm

David Kunian

Interviewer:

4pm-4:45pm

Benny Jones & Lionel Batiste

Dave Margulies

Interviewer:

Members of

The Radiators

3pm-3:45pm

Maurice Martinez

Monk Boudreaux

2pm-2:45pm

Interviewer: Grant Morris

RAM of Haiti

1pm-1:45pm

Allison Miner Music Heritage Stage

4pm-4:45pm

Jazztories Puppet Theater

2:45pm-3:30pm

Erik McAllister & NOCCA Mime Theater Troupe

1:45pm-2:30pm

Johnette Downing

12:45pm-1:30pm

KIDsmART Student Showcase

11:30am-12:15pm

Chouest Family Kids Tent

Sunpie Barnes with Louisiana Creole Music 4:35pm-5:35pm

Generationals

3:10pm-4:10pm

Poor Clares

& the

Betsy McGovern

1:50pm-2:45pm

Julio y Cesar

12:40pm-1:30pm

Heritage School of Music Band

11:30am-12:20pm

Lagniappe Tent

4pm-4:45pm

Jonté Landrum Thomas

3pm-3:45pm

Arthur Clayton & Purposely Anointed

2pm-2:50pm

Mount Hermon Baptist Church Mazz Choir

12:55pm-1:45pm

William Willoughby

Noon-12:45pm

Zulu Male Ensemble

11:15am-11:50am

Gospel Tent


Jazz Fest

/// T w e n T y e l e v e n

n e w Or l e a n s Ja z z & H e r i Tage F e sT i va l

In f o r m a t io n New OrleaNs Jazz & Heritage Festival 11 a.m.-7 p.m. | May 5-8 Fair grounds race Course, 1751 gentilly Blvd. www.nojazzfest.com

TICKETS

TRANSPORTATION

The official new Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival Congo square poster by Kenneth scott Jr. commemorates the 30th anniversary of the death of grand marshal Matthew “Fats” Houston, who was the subject of the 1976 Jazz Fest poster, a poster art4now characterizes as the most valued of any before or since its publication. Houston was a maintenance worker at Tulane University’s athletics department and on the side fronted the eureka, Olympia and young Tuxedo brass bands. He is credited with crafting the definitive grand marshal persona.

• There are taxi stands at Stallings Playground (1600 block of Gentilly Boulevard) and Fortier Park (3200 block of Esplanade Avenue). • Gray Line operates continuous round-trip transportation to the festival from the Sheraton Hotel (500 Canal St.), Gray Line Lighthouse (Toulouse Street at the Mississippi River) and City Park (Marconi Meadows) from 10:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. for $17 from downtown, $14 from City Park. A one-way ticket from the festival to downtown is $10. For more information call 569-1401 or (800) 535-7786 or visit www.graylineneworleans.com. JAZZ FEST PERMITS • Small bags and backpacks (17x12x10 inches) and 12-pack soft coolers

JAZZ FEST PROHIBITS • Large or hard coolers and thermoses • Wagons and carts • Pets • Glass • Personal tents • Metal poles • Shade canopies, or beach- or polestyle umbrellas • Athletic games • Large chairs with rockers, foot rests, side tables, etc. • Bicycles or other wheeled personal transport devices (e.g. skateboards) • Video and audio recording equipment • Unauthorized vending • Weapons, illicit drugs and other contraband • Outside beverages except factorysealed water (up to 1 liter) • Inserting stakes, poles or any other objects into the ground, or use of ropes, cords, tape, etc. to reserve space • Setting up chairs and ground tarps in dense audience areas ON THE GROUNDS • Jazz Fest is cash only. ATMs are available on the grounds. • Jazz Fest is handicapped accessible. Call 410-6104 for information. • There are two medical tents on festival grounds. One is near the edge of the track between the Gentilly and Fais Do-Do stages. The other is on the edge of the track near the Acura display tent.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

• Single day tickets cost $45 in advance, $60 at the gate. • Child’s ticket $5 (available at the gate only; ages 2-10; adult must be present with child). • Tickets are available at all Ticketmaster outlets, online at www.ticketmaster.com, and by calling (800) 745-3000. Tickets can be purchased in person at the New Orleans Arena Box Office (1501 Girod St.). All Jazz Fest tickets are subject to additional service fees and handling charges. • VIP ticket information is available at www.nojazzfest.com. • Re-entry to the Fair Grounds is allowed only with WWOZ Brass Pass, Foundation Gala Pass or Big Chief VIP Pass.

• Single, collapsible chairs • Wheelchairs and medical scooters • Children’s strollers • Blankets not exceeding 6x8 feet • Factory-sealed water (up to 1 liter)

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SATURDAY/// MAY 7

PAGE 56

CRITIC’S PICK

Mystikal

3:40 p.m., Congo Square Stage Rapper Mystikal, aka Michael Lawrence Tyler, was recently released from jail for a sexual battery conviction, but his ridiculously twisted and original flow is still fresh. He surely will bring his bag of hits including “Shake Ya Ass” and “Bouncin’ Back.”

CRITIC’S PICK

The Nicholas Payton SeXXXtet

3:45 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent Grammy-winning local trumpeter Nicholas Payton (son of mind-bending bassist Walter Payton) leads this six-piece combo that incorporates world music and other eclectic elements into modern jazz.

Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters

4:15 p.m., Blues Tent This throaty local singer and virtuoso of guitar grime has mixed together R&B, funk and blues since the 1970s. He is also known for his 20-year role as sideman for the late legendary Louisiana vocalist Johnny Adams.

Paul Sanchez & the Rolling Road Show

4:15 p.m., Lagniappe Stage After 16 years in local stalwart rock band Cowboy Mouth, guitarist Paul Sanchez struck out on his own as a troubadour. In his Rolling Road Show band, each member (including sousaphonist Matt Perrine and trombonist Craig Klein) contributes original songs.

Dr. Michael White & the Original Liberty Jazz Band feat. Thais Clark

4:20 p.m., Economy Hall Tent New Orleans clarinetist Michael White plays traditional jazz and brass band music. He is accompanied by versatile vocalist Thais Clark, who is best known for interpreting 1920s blues.

BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet

4:25 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage Since 1975, brothers Michael Doucet (fiddle, vocals) and David Doucet (guitar, vocals) have relied on acoustic instruments only to “Cajunize” jazz, Caribbean music, Tex-Mex and other genres, alongside more classic Cajun compositions. The group won a Grammy before the Cajun/zydeco category was created then subsequently dropped.

CRITIC’S PICK

101 Runners

4:30 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage Begun as a Mardi Gras Indian tribute band in 2007, the Runners attracted some real Indians and now feature Indian vocalists and an array of R&B and funk musicians.

Watson Memorial Teaching Ministries

4:30 p.m., Gospel Tent This mass choir combines members from choirs from around New Orleans.

DJ Soul Sister

4:55 p.m., Congo Square Stage The “queen of rare groove,” Soul Sister is a popular local DJ who spins only vinyl, spe-

CRITIC’S PICK The Strokes

5:20 p.m., Gentilly Stage This band of attractive New York socialites showed it also has aptitude for classic pop-rock songwriting on 2001’s Is This It. Subsequent albums haven’t reached the same heights, but early hits like “Last Nite” still thrill audiences.

Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band

5:25 p.m., Acura Stage Even without hit videos or substantial airplay outside of a handful of hits in the late 1970s (“Cheeseburger in Paradise,” “Margaritaville”), Jimmy Buffett’s projection of the Floridian, daytime drinking, perpetually lounging beach bum lifestyle has created a gigantic following that involves a sound and a lifestyle — not unlike the Grateful Dead, but for more of a weekend-warrior fanbase.

CRITIC’S PICK Ms. Lauryn Hill

5:25 p.m., Congo Square Stage Lauryn Hill has gone more than 13 years without a new release, but the rapper, singer and former Fugee (whose ex-partner Wyclef Jean also performs at Jazz Fest) will certainly have longtime fans fainting and crying at this rare performance. One can only expect Hill’s signature hip-hop reinterpretation of “Killing Me Softly,” as well as cuts from the hip-hop soul classic The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill.

Fourplay

5:30 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent Now in their 20th year together, brothers Steve Lombardi, drummer Nick Lombardi and company stretch out smooth modern jazz jams flavored with funk, soul and pop.

Jeff & Vida

5:45 p.m., Lagniappe Stage The duo Jeff Burke (mandolin/vocals) and Vida Wakeman (guitar/vocals) made a postHurricane Katrina move from New Orleans to Nashville, Tenn. — which makes a lot of sense, since bluegrass runs through their alternative hybrid of country, folk, honkytonk, rockabilly and rock ’n’ roll.

Ruby Wilson

5:50 p.m., Economy Hall Tent A Memphis-based singer of Delta blues, Ruby Wilson — the goddaughter of B.B. King — also flirts with soul, pop, R&B, Dixieland jazz and gospel.

CRITIC’S PICK Aaron Neville’s Gospel Experience

5:50 p.m., Gospel Tent The cotton-voiced, falsetto balladeer of New Orleans has always sung gospel and this year released I Know I’ve Been Changed, which includes covers of many gospel classics.

Bobby “Blue” Bland

5:55 p.m., Blues Tent A legendary Tennessee guitarist and member of both the Blues and Rock and Roll Halls of Fame, Bobby “Blue” Bland innovated soulblues, mixing gospel with blues and R&B. He leads a horn-driven big band. PAGE 67

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CRITIC’S PICK

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SUNDAY/// MAY 8

Jazz Fest PAGE 65

C.J. Chenier & the Red Hot Louisiana Band

5:55 p.m., Fais Do-Do Stage The accordion-playing son of the “King of Zydeco” Clifton Chenier, this Port Arthur, Texas, native has taken over his father’s band and legacy.

New Birth Brass Band

6 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage New Birth fuses hip-hop, Mardi Gras Indian chants and funk into its brass band music.

Sunday, May 8 PARADES 12:20 p.m. Lady Rollers, Nine Times Ladies, and Original CTC Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs with Da Souljas Brass Band 12:25 p.m. Secondline Jammers Social Aid and Pleasure Club (in Economy Hall Tent) 1:25 p.m. Wild Tchoupitoulas and Wild Apaches Mardi Gras Indians 2:25 p.m. Haitian Rara parade with RAM 4:15 p.m. Original Lady Buckjumpers and Prince of Wales Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs with TBC Brass Band

Percussionist Johnny Marcia leads this Latin band that focuses on salsa and meringue.

SUBR Jazzy Jags

11:15 a.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent The Southern University Jazzy Jags play modern jazz.

Louisiana Repertory Jazz Ensemble

11:15 a.m., Fais Do-Do Stage Accordionist Goldman Thibodaux plays a mix of zydeco and Creole music.

Black Eagles Mardi Gras Indians 11:15 a.m., Jazz and Heritage Stage Big Chief Roddy Lewis leads this Uptown tribe of Mardi Gras Indians.

Zulu Male Ensemble

11:15 a.m., Gospel Tent Part of the century-old Zulu Social Aid & Pleasure Club, this ensemble sings traditional gospel.

Russell Batiste Jr. & Friends feat. Jason Neville

11:20 a.m., Acura Stage Playing drums since age 4, the Funky Meters drummer and son of legendary funk musician David Batiste is joined by Aaron Neville’s son Jason in this rock, funk and R&B band.

Mem Shannon & the Membership

11:25 a.m., Blues Tent Former cab driver Mem Shannon leads this blues-funk band on guitar.

William Willoughby

2:50 p.m. RAM

PERFORMANCES Tommy Malone & the Mystik Drone

11:15 a.m., Gentilly Stage Tommy Malone, lead singer and guitarist for the mellow-rocking subdudes, plays a louder, more forceful blend of rock and blues in this setup.

Rumba Buena

11:15 a.m., Congo Square Stage

11:30 a.m., Lagniappe Stage The Heritage School of Music offers free afterschool training for teenagers. Jazz saxophonist Edward “Kidd” Jordan leads the ensemble.

Noon, Gospel Tent William Willoughby sings traditional and contemporary gospel music.

Jesse McBride presents the Next Generation

12:15 p.m., WWOZ Jazz Tent Jazz violinist Jesse McBride formed the Next Generation to preserve the music of recent New Orleans jazz composers. The band also mixes in other New Orleans sounds including funk and R&B.

Dee-1

12:25 p.m., Congo Square Stage Nicknamed “One Man Army,” the New Orleans rapper and former schoolteacher released David & Goliath in 2009. He co-authored a jazz and hip-hop fusion anthem with Shamarr Allen praising the New Orleans Saints.

Treme Brass Band

12:25 p.m., Economy Hall Tent The Treme Brass Band plays a mix of traditional and contemporary brass

I

n July 2001, Virgin Records released the seventh entry in its Now That’s What I Call Music series. The compilation featured 10 guitar-less girl and boy bands or pre-tween-pop singers at the peak of pop madness and knuckle-dragging Neanderthals ushering in the dawn of nu-metal. At the same time, New York’s The Strokes released the debut album Is This It, a powerful wake-up call of raw rock ’n’ roll. Taking cues from Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground, post-punk and forgotten Nuggets gems, the Strokes dismissed “retro” contemporaries and forced a sea change in pop music. Is This It wasn’t a question. It just was it — a decade-defining release. For 2011’s Angles, the band’s fourth LP and first release since 2006’s First Impressions of Earth, the band regrouped after a more than two-year hiatus, during which its members launched or revisited various solo efforts. singer and principal songwriter Julian Casablancas released his acclaimed new wave-dense Phrazes For the Young in 2009; guitarist Albert Hammond Jr. dropped two solo LPs; drummer Fabrizio Moretti formed Little Joy; and bassist Nikolai Fraiture released an album under Nickle Eye, an earnest Kinks- and Neil Young-influenced folk outfit. Band members also hit their thirties — marriages, divorces, children, rehab. Fraiture says the Strokes of 2011 is a virtually different band. “We all kind of grew up and have different things going on in our lives, so I think that was one part of the stalling of getting back together,” Fraiture says. “Now we’re finally revisiting ourselves as new people, as a new band, and the music. … We didn’t want to redo what we’re doing until now and rehash the

same thing.” (The album’s opening line — on the snotty porn-funk number “Machu Picchu” — Casablancas sneers, “Putting your patience to the test.”) Angles features the familiar sounding singles “Under Cover of Darkness” and “Gratisfaction,” which wouldn’t sound out of place on Is This It or the futurerock of Room On Fire. But it also hits on the strange with its cocksure glam-rock guitars and the stuttering pop operatics of “Metabolism” and the Fraiture-penned “You’re So Right.” “I was hoping to bring back a rock song,” Fraiture says, with a laugh. “… I’m glad I can try a bunch of different things and I can also have the side project. … I can get out all the things I need to get out in certain areas and not have to boggle down people with them.” Angles is The Strokes at its most precise — and sober. There are the chugging, down-stroke slaps from dueling guitarists Hammond and Valensi, Fraiture’s precision-controlled, velvet-hammer bass lines, and Casablancas’s boozy (now melodic) growl. “Once we sent him the songs and he sang on them, I remember that being the pivotal point for me where I knew everyone was really serious about it,” Fraiture says. “It’s like dominoes. Once somebody gets excited, someone else gets excited, and it’s kind of contagious, until it comes kind of undeniable.”

the strokes Saturday, may 7 5:20 P.m. gentIlly Stage

PAGE 69

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

Native American Pow Wow — LA. Folk Life Village

Noon Voudou Ceremony with RAM Drummers

by a l e x woodwa r d

Goldman Thibodeaux and the Lawtell Playboys

Heritage School of Music Band

HAITI PAVILION

strokes

11:15 a.m., Economy Hall Tent Clarinetist Fred Starr leads this traditional jazz ensemble.

5:10 p.m. Apache Hunters and Buffalo Hunters Mardi Gras Indians

12:05 p.m., 2:35 p.m. and 3:50 p.m. The Boyz

the

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SUNDAY/// MAY 8

PAGE 69

Ever-dapper

LITTLE FREDDIE KING

plays gut-bucket blues. 12:20 P.M. THURSDAY, MAY 5, BLUES TENT PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

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George French and the New Orleans Storyville Jazz Band

Michael Franti & Spearhead

3 p.m., Economy Hall Tent George French was trained as a traditional jazz and R&B vocalist and later learned to play bass guitar. This band plays traditional jazz.

CRITIC’S PICK

Generationals

3:10 p.m., Lagniappe Stage Rising from the ashes of Baton Rouge-based The Eames Era, the Generationals of New Orleans sing about love and fighting while playing soft, indie folk rock.

CRITIC’S PICK

Rebirth Brass Band

3:15 p.m., Congo Square Stage

3:20 p.m., Gentilly Stage Michael Franti and Spearhead play a blend of hip-hop, funk, reggae and rock. The band climbed the Billboard charts in 2008 with “All Rebel Rockers,” its sixth studio album, and the single “Say Hey (I Love You)” reached No. 18.

Visually noteworthy master artists from all over

Kid Rock

3:30 p.m., Acura Stage Kid Rock burst onto the music scene in the early 1990s with a rap/rock hybrid and bad boy persona. He’s since won five Grammys and topped the charts in the U.S. and abroad. Born Free, released in November 2010, is steeped in mellower Southern rock styles.

Sonny Landreth

3:30 p.m., Blues Tent Sonny Landreth plays a distinctly bluesy style of slide guitar. Before focusing on his PAGE 73

Monday-Thursday 11am-7pm Friday – Sunday 1pm-10pm

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Kermit Ruffins and Phil Frazier formed the Rebirth Brass Band in the 1980s while they were in high school. The lineup has evolved over the years, but Frazier’s sousaphone still anchors the band and keeps it at the forefront of contemporary New Orleans brass bands.

3:05 p.m., Gospel Tent Jonté Landrum Thomas is the granddaughter of Rev. Lois Dejean, the former lead singer for the Johnson Extension, and grew up singing gospel. In 2010, she was a top-20 finalist on BET’s Sunday Best.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

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MUSIC: QUINTRON’S PARTY PAGE 77 ART: HYPOTHETICAL DEVELOPMENTS PAGE 93 CUISINE: MIMI’S OF RIVER RIDGE PAGE 101

SOUNDS

FINE

THE WINNERS — AND THE PICTURES — FROM THE 2011 BIG EASY MUSIC AWARDS PAGE

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>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 78 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Quintron and Miss Pussycat Record Release Party 6 P.M.-8:30 P.M. FRIDAY, MAY 6 NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART, 1 COLLINS DIBOLL CIRCLE, 6584100; WWW.NOMA.ORG Q&P with King Louie's Miss ing Monuments, Vockah Redu, Glitter Chariot and DJ Pasta 10 P.M. FRIDAY STUDIO 3, 3610 TOULOUSE ST., 482-6933; WWW.STUDIO3INC.COM

Noble Sauvage QUINTRON AND MISS PUSSYCAT’S SUCRE DU SAUVAGE. BY NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS

N

PHOTO COURTESY NOMA

down, there’s a swooshing sound and kids scream every time,” Quintron says. “I started messing around with mixing and made it sound like a Beatles concert way in the background. There’s a lot of water from the various fountains. I was recording with this handheld stereo recorder and flipping it around to mess with the phase and the imaging. I did that a lot, creating pans by actually moving the recorder around.” The split personalities meet on “Spirit Hair,” a sprightly nod to Pussycat’s episodic puppet show that’s braided with a whistle solo — by NOMA communications director Grace Wilson. “She was walking through the halls whistling, as she does a lot,” Quintron says. “I said, ‘Grace can whistle!’ I think we scheduled it for an hour later. She came in and whistled along to the song two or three times; I cut it up with a sampler and chose the parts that I thought were hooks. It really makes the song. That’s the transition to the kind of strangeness. It seemed like the perfect way to get there.” “The ambient stuff is special because it’s a portrait of City Park and NOMA,” Pussycat says. “The show was amazing and it’s great that we got to do our thing. But the museum itself is what’s so amazing. It’s the most beautiful park in the world as far as I’m concerned. Quintron and I just were there last week, just laying around in the grass, drinking daiquiris. The tree with the chimes, the huge chimes, and check out the ducks! To go back to these places with the sounds on the album — I’d do that every day.”

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M AY

THE JON 04 SPENCER BLUES EXPLOSION WITH JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD

The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion hasn’t recorded since 2004’s Damage sessions — the flailing blues/ rock blasphemers’ thoughtto-be swan song — but it’s still releasing new records. Last year, the band broke into its own vault, dispensing massive retrospective Dirty Shirt Rock ’n’ Roll: The First Ten Years and a six-pack of expanded reissues. Tennessee thrasher JEFF the Brotherhood opens. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Wednesday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

M AY

05

FEMI KUTI AND POSITIVE FORCE

Although Femi Kuti sought to distinguish his music from his father’s, Fela Kuti, he’s followed a similar career — both in being outspoken politically in his native Nigeria and fusing Afrobeats and jazzy Afropop with other sounds. A former Motown artist, he’s worked with Mos Def, Common and many other American hip-hop artists. Gypsyphonic Disko opens. Tickets $29.50. 9 p.m. Thursday. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

M AY

06 A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM

The Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden in New Orleans City Park is the perfect setting for the NOLA Project’s dusktime performances of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Shakespeare’s whimsical comedy about lovers, fairies, actors and magic. Tickets $10, $8 seniors/students, $6 children, free for NOMA members and students from many local universities (must show student ID). 7 p.m. Friday; through May 27. Besthoff Sculpture Garden, City Park, 658-4100; www.noma.org

M AY

08 JELLO BIAFRA & THE NEW ORLEANS RAUNCH AND SOUL ALL STARS

An unlikely lineup of weird New Orleanians pays tribute to classic New Orleans R&B. Former Dead Kennedys frontman Jello Biafra (pictured) is joined by Down’s Pepper Keenan, Cowboy Mouth’s Fred LeBlanc and members of Dash Rip Rock, Egg Yolk Jubilee, Morning 40 Federation, Supagroup and Mojo Nixon. Tickets $15 in advance, $20 at the door. 9:30 p.m. Sunday. 12 Bar, 608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

ot long into Quintron’s three-month internship at the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA), he mastered a fundamental skill of the American nine-to-fiver: looking busy. “The challenge of writing in front of people was almost unconquerable,” the 9th Ward musician says of Parallel Universe, his 2010 live-recording exhibition/ residency with partner Miss Pussycat. “We finally started working a lot at night and on off-days, and I would just do busy work during the days. But by being forced to do busy work during the days in public, I paid a lot more attention to detail. … By that last week, when I was living in the park and finishing the record, I was really sad to see it end.” Quintron punched his last NOMA time card May 2, 2010. Nearly a year to the day later, he and Miss P return to their onetime workplace for the unveiling of Sucre du Sauvage (Goner), the 14-track fruit of their labor. The album is a tale of two sides: Side A, the expectedly maniacal, roller-rink party-starter, in which Quintron recasts Jerry Lee Lewis as an off-therails organ grinder (see “Face Down in the Gutter”); and Side B, the unexpectedly meditative, almost poetic set of park-life soundscapes, captured in his final days living in a tent among the wildlife (ducks and children, mostly). City Park was fertile ground for the audio alchemist, who mixed in everything from the Singing Tree (“Bells”) to the Live Oak Ladybug Roller Coaster (“New Years Night”). “If you stand right where it goes upside-

Quintron created Sucre du Sauvage while in residence at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

FILM

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Sounds Fine A glittery night for new orleAns musiciAns.

By Ke vin Allm An azz and electronica. Rap and gospel. Harmonica and heavy metal. At the 2011 Big Easy Music Awards ceremony, held April 25 at Harrah’s New Orleans, every genre and sub-genre of Louisiana music was represented as Gambit and the Big Easy Foundation saluted the city’s best of the best. Many of the nominated artists performed as well. John Boutte received the Entertainer of the Year award, and jammed with honorary music awards chairman Kermit Ruffins. The Radiators received the Lifetime Achievement Award (the band is hanging it up next month after more than 30 years). Joseph “Smokey” Johnson took the Music Heritage Award for his contributions to New Orleans music from the 1950s to the 1990s, while attorney Chip Forstall (who often uses New Orleans musicians in his TV ads) received the Business Recognition Award. Mayor Mitch Landrieu presented Treme creators David Simon and Eric Overmyer with the Ambassadors of New Orleans Music Award. The other winners:

J

BEST MALE PERFORMER Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews BEST FEMALE PERFORMER Meschiya Lake BEST ALBUM OF 2010 Galactic, Ya-Ka-May

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

Best R&B winner Dr. John gets a hug from Gambit publisher Margo DuBos and chairman/political columnist Clancy DuBos.

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Photo By Jose l. gArciA

BEST TRADITIONAL JAZZ Kermit Ruffins BEST CONTEMPORARY JAZZ Terence Blanchard BEST TRADITIONAL BRASS BAND Treme Brass Band BEST CONTEMPORARY BRASS BAND Stooges Brass Band BEST GOSPEL CHOIR First Emanuel Baptist Church BEST GOSPEL GROUP/INDIVIDUAL Aaron Neville BEST FUNK BAND Galactic BEST R&B Dr. John

Best Traditional Jazz winner Kermit Ruffins shares a moment with Gloria Powers of the Big Easy Awards, her daughter Jessica Bride (far left) and John Boutte, who won Entertainer of the Year. Photo By Jose l. gArciA

BEST RAP/HIP HOP Curren$y BEST BLUES Little Freddie King

BEST HARD ROCK/HEAVY METAL Goatwhore BEST ROCK The Radiators BEST ROOTS ROCK Honey Island Swamp Band BEST COUNTRY/FOLK Hurray for the Riff Raff BEST ZYDECO Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band BEST CAJUN Feufollet BEST LATIN Los Po-Boy-Citos BEST WORLD/REGGAE Panorama Jazz Band BEST MIXED BAG Matt Perrine and Sunflower City BEST EMERGING BAND Revivalists BEST DJ/ELECTRONICA Gypsyphonic Disko


MUSIC

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

VOTED

Live Music Nightly

Jazz Fest - Second Weekend!! THUR 5/5

FRI 5/6 SAT 5/7 SUN 5/8 MON 5/9

Pfister Sisters • 6-8pm Maurice Brown • 8-11pm

-No Cover

Zagat Rated

WED 5/4

MAY 4

CHIP WILSON & MARK McGRAIN DRINKO DE MAYO!! BROWN CHICKEN BROWN COW STRING BAND JUSTIN MURPHY & BETH PATTERSON DAMIEN LOUVIERE HURRICANE REFUGEES SPEED THE MULE FOOT & FRIENDS RITES OF PASSAGE KIM CARSON

9PM

5PM 9PM 5PM 9PM 5PM 9PM 9PM 9PM

331 Decatur St. • 527-5954 www.kerryirishpub.com

MAY 5 Luke Winslow King • 7-10pm Washboard Rodeo • 10pm-1am

MAY 6 Debbie Davis & Paul Sanchez • 7-10pm Glen David Andrews • 10pm-1am

MAY 7 Ingrid Lucia • 6-9pm Frenchmen St Jug Band • 10pm-1am

MAY 8 Palmetto Bug Stompers • 7-11pm

MAY 9 Hot Club of New Orleans • 7-10pm

536 Frenchmen St.

504-298-TRIO

www.thethreemuses.com

4:00-Till for Dinner Closed Tuesday

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

84

MON 5/2

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 5/3

Rebirth Brass Band

WED Ivan Neville, George Porter Jr., 5/4 Johnny V & June Yamagishi THU 5/5

The Trio

feat. Johnny V., George Porter Jr. + Special Guests

FRI Marcia Ball + Jacob Fred Gets Horny w/Steven Bernstein, 5/6 Mark Southerland & Guests SAT Jon Cleary & the Absolute Gentlemen 5/7 Monster + Vinyl SUN SUN 5/8 3/13

Joe KrownTrio Trio Joe Krown

w/Walter “Wolfman” feat. Russell Batiste &Washington Walter & RussellWashington Batiste Wolfman

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 3 12 BAR — Groovin’ for the Gulf Benefit feat. Neospectric, Kirk Joseph & friends, Eric Bolivar, Papa Mali, 1 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — NOLA Treblemakers, 10 BMC — Dana Abbott Band, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9 CARROLLTON STATION — Pigeon Town, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Nervous Duane, 7; Garika, Clinton Wells, 11

D.B.A. — New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 9; Johnny Vidacovich Trio feat. Robert Walter & Billy Martin, 10; Spyboy, 1 a.m. EUCLID RECORDS — Rotary Downs, 4

Showcasing Local Music

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

HI-HO LOUNGE — Skerik’s Sauce Fest, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — Seether, My Darkest Days, Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — WWOZ Hope for Haitian Children Foundation Benefit feat. Treme Brass Band, Koudjay, 7:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski & Musical Playground CD release, 8

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — John Autin, noon; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 1; Galactic, 2; Billy Iuso, 3; James Andrews CD release, 4; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 5; Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, 6 THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Helen Gillet, Gravity A, Beautiful Bells (upstairs), 10; Otra, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

ONE EYED JACKS — Dragon Smoke, 9

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — James Andrews CD release feat. Troy Sawyer, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Amanda Shaw, Glen David Andrews, 8:30 RUSTY NAIL — Daze Between Festival feat. Country

Platinum Blonde Anyone who listened to the Smith Westerns’ self-titled 2009 debut could recognize the shining nuggets of 24-karat pop lurking behind the LP’s murky curtain of overdriven, basement-born distortion. The sonic Fort Knox that is Dye It Blonde (Fat Possum), the Chicago trio’s generous January follow-up, was less foreseeable, if only slightly. With a hand from Midas-maker producer Chris Coady (Beach House, TV on the Radio, Gang Gang Dance), vocals go from snide and hiding to unabashed, lungs-wrung harmonizing; guitars that were content to jingle-jangle on “The Glam Goddess” and “Boys Are Fine” are given an acetone bath and amplified into steroidal, exploding-heart rainbows in stereo, finding pots of gold at the end of every bending fill and solo on tone-setting opener “Weekend” and top single “Imagine Pt. 3.” That the album sounds so great is gravy for the band’s fans, who would have lapped up another helping of garaged rock recidivism no matter how impenetrable things got. But to fresh ears — or those fatigued from the auditory equivalent of carbon monoxide poisoning — it’s a breath of fresh air. Brass Bed and Bass Drum of Death open. Tickets $8. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

M AY

05

Smith Westerns 8 p.m. Thursday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

Fried, Jenn Howard & Crazy McGee, Lubriphonic, San Fransisco Free for All, Guitarmaggedon, 4

SIBERIA — Zydepunks, By & By String Band, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charles Neville, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

Wednesday 4 12 BAR — Groovin’ for the Gulf Benefit feat. Branch y Paz, Monophonics, Andrew Duhon, Soul Project, Jameson Family, 1; Brass-aholics, 8:30 BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — PYMP, 10 BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

BMC — Geb Rault Band, 6; Blues4Sale, 8:30; Colin Brown Band, 11

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Battle of the Bands, 8 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Peter Cho Trio, 7 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CARROLLTON STATION — The Walrus, 10 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Grand Baton, midnight

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6 CLAIRE’S OL’ TOONS — H.G. Breland Band CD release, 8

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Billy Iuso & the Restless Natives, 9 HI-HO LOUNGE — Locos Par Juana, Pimps of Joytime, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Gregg Allman, Devon Allman’s Honeytribe, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Red Baraat, Grand Baton, 9


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Megalomaniacs Ball featuring Garage a Trois & Marco Benevento, Illuminasti Trio feat. James Singleton, Steven Bernstein and others, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Spy Boy, 11

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kermit Ruffins, Irvin Mayfield, Dr. Michael White, Rebirth Brass Band, noon; Garage A Trois, 3; Ivan Nevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dumpstaphunk, 4; Joe Krown Trio feat. Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington & Russell Batiste, 5; Tab Benoit, 6

THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; Roosevelt Collier All Star Band, 9; Pat Casey & the New Sound (penthouse), 9 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Griffin Sample & JD Haenni, 6; 19th Street Red, 9:30 MOJO STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Radomir Luza, 7; Pat Flory, 9

ONE EYED JACKS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, JEFF the Brotherhood, 9

PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 726 Jazz Band feat. William Smith, 8 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kermit Ruffins, 8:30

SIBERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dirty Lungs, Growlers, Dead People, 8; Blackbelt, Chinese Dry Wall Band, DJ Michael Aaron & his 78â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 11

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Piano Summit feat. Marcia Ball, Tom McDermott & Joe Krown, 8 & 10

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Victory Belles, noon TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Liâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Band oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Gold, Creole String Beans, 9 TRUCK FARM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chazfest feat. New Orleans Klezmer All-Stars, King James & the Special Men, Narcissy, Schatzy and others, noon

WEDNESDAY AT THE SQUARE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marcia Ball, Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 5 ZADDIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cindy Chen & Mike Sklar, 8

Thursday 5 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Iguanas, Brian Stoltz & the I-12 Allstars, 10

BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9 BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Toubab Krewe,

BOOMTOWN CASINO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Boot Hill, 8

CARROLLTON STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John â&#x20AC;&#x153;Papaâ&#x20AC;? Gros & the Days End Band feat. Robert MachĂŠ, Jellybean Alexander & Peter Harris, Jimmy Robinson, 10 CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Domenic, 7; Geb Rault, 11

CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam and Boone, 6 CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Royal Family Ball feat. Soulive, Lettuce, Ivan Nevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dumpstaphunk and others, 9

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jon Cleary, 7; Honey Island Swamp Band, 10; Cedric Burnside Project, 1 a.m. HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stooges Brass Band, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Femi Kuti & the Positive Force, Gypsyphonic Disko, 9

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF â&#x20AC;&#x201D; JoJo Hermann & His Mardi Gras Band feat. George Porter Jr., Marcia Ball, Irma Thomas and others, 9 LE PETIT THEATRE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Southern Troubadours Feat. Tab Benoit, Anders Osborne, Grayson Capps, Devon Allman, 10

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lynn Drury, 7; Marcia Ball, 8; Amanda Shaw, 9 THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Those Peaches, 6; Jam Trak feat. Duwayne Burnside, McTuff, Charlie Wooten and others (upstairs), 9; Earphunk, 10; Good Enough for Good Times, midnight

Alabama, Jim Lauderdale & Gal Holiday, Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 9; Karl Densonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tiny Universe, Ivan Neville, Terence Higgins and others, 2 a.m.

Friday 6 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Duwayne Burnside, Billy Iuso and others, 7; Henry Butler & Doug Winbish, 10; Jeff Coffin Muâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tet feat. Futureman, midnight

BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Egg Yolk Jubilee, 10 BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brandon Foret Band, 8:30

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gene Ween, John Michael Rouchell, 10; Big Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Funky Nation, 2 a.m.

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Soul Project, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOOMTOWN CASINO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Oak Alley, 9

BROOKS SEAHORSE SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Po Boyz, 6 CARROLLTON STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dash Rip Rock, The Help feat. Barbara Menendez, 10 CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hooch Riders, 4; Stephanie Nilles, 7; Gal Holiday, 11 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6

MONKEY HILL BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sansone, Krown & Fohl, 10

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Grayson Capps, 8; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11; Debauche, 2 a.m.

OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Eric Lindell, 10 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Birth Brass Band feat. Tanio Hingle, 8

DOMINO SOUND RECORD SHACK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship?, 7

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown Trio, 10

SATURN BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alex McMurray, 9

HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lucinda Williams, CC Adcock, Cedric Watson, 9

SIBERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Murder Junkies, Pallbearers, Before I Hang, Split Lips, 9

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Allen Toussaint, 9 & 11 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blind Boys of

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CHOCOLATE! (And maybe sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll share!)

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF (THE DEN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Good Enough For Good Times, Orgone, Eric McFadden Trio, and others, 9 PAGE 86

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THE HOOKAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; DJ Quickie Mart & guests, 9

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Annual Bayou Rendezvous feat. Papa Grows Funk with special guests Roosevelt Collier, Rebirth Brass Band and others, 9

BraSS BanD

23 Pool TaBles

HERMES BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Luke WinslowKing, 9:30 & 11

PRIME EXAMPLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Delfeayo Marsalis, Jason Marsalis, Maurice Brown, 8 & 10

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CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rusko, Doorly and others, 9

HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Honey Island Swamp Band, 10; Pimps of Joytime, 1:30 a.m.

RIVERSHACK TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bill Davis, 7

BanD of BrotherS

VAUGHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

CLUB 7140 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Michael Ward, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lauren Rose Dubus-Wieczor, 8; Mark Fernandez, 9; Mario Ortiz, 10

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TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FRENCH QUARTER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cyril Nevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nevillution feat. Charles Neville, Jason Neville, Damien Neville, Omari Neville, Gaynielle Neville, James Andrews and others, Brass-A-Holics, 10:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Trio, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 4; Otra, 7:30; Javier Olondo, 11

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lynn Drury Band, 11 a.m.; Ramblinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Letters, 6; Cha Wa, 9:30; Cha-Wa Mardi Gras Indians, 9:30

MUSIC

85


MUSIC

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

PAGE 85 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — CR Gruver, 7; Alex McMurray, 10; Grayson Capps, 1 a.m.

LE PETIT THEATRE — Aaron Neville, 10; Nicholas Payton SeXXXtet, DJ Soul Sister, 1 a.m. THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Some Like it Hot!, 7; Brassa-holics, 10; DJ Logic & Steve Molitz (upstairs), 11; Los Hombres Calientes, midnight; Captain Green, 2 a.m.

MONKEY HILL BAR — Mike Zito, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Agent 86, 8; Nola County, 9; Blushin’ Roulettes, 10; Devil Killing Moth, 11

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART — Quintron CD release, 5:30 OLD POINT BAR — Thomas Johnson & the People, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Black Joe Lewis & the Honeybears, Stooges Brass Band, DJ Aquarium Drunkard, 8; Bear Creek All-Stars feat. Ivan Neville, Eric Krasno, Skerik, Alan Evans & Kirk Joseph, 10

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Parallels, Kindest Lines, 10; Mimosa, Ginz, NastyNasty, 2 a.m. RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Superchargers, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Eric Lindell, Sonny Landreth, Bonerama, 8:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

SCOTTISH RITE TEMPLE — Anders Osborne feat. Bill Kreutzmann, Paul Barrere & Fred Tackett of Little Feat, Carl Dufrene, Billy Iuso and others, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, 10

86

SIBERIA — Rusty Lazer Birthday Bash & Big Freedia CD release feat. Katey Red, Nicky Da B, Fly Boy Reno, J-Dawg, Blockburnaz and others SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 9 & 11

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9

STUDIO 3 — Quintron CD release feat. Miss Pussycat, King Louie’s Missing Monuments, Vockah Redu, Glitter Chariot, DJ Pasta, 10 TIPITINA’S — The Radiators, 9; Greyboy Allstars, 2 a.m.

TIPITINA’S FRENCH QUARTER — Tab Benoit’s Swampland Jam feat. Devon Allman, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Johnny Sansone, Waylon Thibodeaux and others, 10; Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 2 a.m. YELLOW MOON BAR — Michael James & His Lonesome, 9

Saturday 7 12 BAR — Ryan Montbleau, 10; Steve Molitz’s Big Everything feat. Josh Clark, Steve Adams and others, 11:30

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Zydepunks, Slow Danger & the G-String Orchestra, 10:30

BACCHANAL — Gypsy Swing Club, 7 BANKS STREET BAR — Juice, 10

BAYOU PARK BAR — Unnaturals, Rotten Core, 10 BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Punch Brothers feat. Chris Thile, Luke Winslow-King, 10; Wimbash feat. Doug Wimbish & Corey Glover, Khris Royal & Dark Matter and others (upstairs), 10; Orgone, 2 a.m.

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Louisiana Hellbenders, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Philip Manuel Quartet, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Burgundy, 9

BROOKS SEAHORSE SALOON — Po Boyz, 6 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 7

CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

CARROLLTON STATION — Susan Cowsill Band’s Covered in Vinyl feat. Bob Cowsill, John Cowsill, Vicki Peterson, Syd Straw and others, 10 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Rok Boms, 7; R. Scully’s Rough 7, 12:30 a.m.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER — Wolfgang Gartner, Felix Cartal and others, 9

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 7; New Orleans Klezmer All-Stars, 10; Eric Lindell, 1 a.m. DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Wendell Brunious, 10

DRAGON’S DEN — Grassroots Hip-Hop Showcase feat. Truth Universal and others, 11 EUCLID RECORDS — Nazi Dust, Rough Sleep, 6 HERMES BAR — Ingrid Lucia, 9:30 & 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — McTuff feat. Skerik, 1:30 a.m.

HOUSE OF BLUES — Ani DiFranco, Hurray for the Riff Raff, 9; New Mastersounds & guests, 2 a.m.

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Jeff Coffin & His Mu’tet, Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey, 9:30; Marco Benevento, George Porter Jr., Adam Deitch & Brian Stoltz, 2 a.m. HOWLIN’ WOLF — A Night in Treme feat. The Treme Allstars, Rebirth Brass Band feat. Big Sam Williams, Treme Brass Band, Preservation Hall Jazz Band and others, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE PETIT THEATRE — Paul Barrere & Fred Tackett, 10

THE MAISON — Josh Reppell, 5; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 7; Naughty Professor, 10; JeanEric (upstairs), 11; Shamarr Allen & the Underdawgs, mid-

night; Mannie Fresh (upstairs), midnight

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Jon Cleary, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — The Mumbles, 11:30 a.m.; Kristina Morales, 4; African Brass Band, 7:30; Charley & the Soulbillyswampboogie, 11 MONKEY HILL BAR — Luther Kent & Trickbag, 10 OAK — Brad Webb Trio, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Gal Holiday, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Garage a Trois, Prophylactics, 8 PRIME EXAMPLE — Nicholas Payton, 8 & 10

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Paper Diamond, Break Science, Michal Menert, 2 a.m. RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Pig Pen & the Porkchops, 10 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Voice of the Wetlands Allstars, Kermit Ruffins, Big Sam’s Funky Nation, 8:30

SIBERIA — Suplecs, Dixie Witch, 9; Johnny Vidacovich Trio feat. Karl Denson & Marco Benevento, 2 a.m. SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Bill Frisell Quartet feat. Ron Miles, Tony Scherr & Kenny Wollesen, 9 & 11

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Davis Rogan Band, 10 STUDIO 3 — Ballzack, Caddywhompus, Hurray for the Riff Raff, Empress Hotel, Sun Hotel, DJ Yrs Truly, 8:30

TIPITINA’S — Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Soul Rebels Brass Band, Leo Nocentelli, 9; Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, 2 a.m. TIPITINA’S FRENCH QUARTER — Gene Ween feat. Alex McMurray, 10; George Porter Jr. & the Runnin’ Pardners, 2 a.m.

Sunday 8 12 BAR — Jello Biaffre & the New Orleans Raunch & Soul Allstars feat. members of Down, Cowboy Mouth, Supagroup and others, 10

BANKS STREET BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9 BLUE NILE — Funky Butt Revisited feat. Big Sam Williams, Doug Wimbish, Marco Benevento and others, 10

BMC — Nola Music Series, 1; Alex Bosworth, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9:30; Frogs Gone Fishin’, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 7 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Captain “Chiggy Chiggy” Charles, 7 CARROLLTON STATION — The Iguanas feat. Spencer Bohren, 10 CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Damn

Frontier, T-Bone Stone, 7

CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & Loren Murrell, 7 D.B.A. — John Mooney & Bluesiana, 7; Stanton Moore Trio feat. Robert Walter & Scott Metzger, 10; Garage a Trois, 1 a.m.

DOMINO SOUND RECORD SHACK — Pinettes Brass Band, 7 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Chuck Chaplin Trio, 10 HOMEDALE INN — Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.; Steel Pulse, 9; New Mastersounds & guests, 2 a.m. HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Lost Bayou Ramblers, Feufollet, Brother Dege, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Dr. John & the Lower 911, Zigaboo’s Funk Revue, George Porter Jr. and His Runnin’ Pardners, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Sunday Brass, 9

MADIGAN’S — Anderson/Easley Project, 9 THE MAISON — Larry Scala Trio, 11 a.m.; Dave Easley Trio, 5; Magnitude, 7; Billy Iuso & the Restless Natives, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Honey Island Swamp Band, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom Mcdermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 5; Javier Olondo, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Humane Society Benefit Open Mic Competition

NOIZEFEST GROUNDS — NOizeFest feat. Bonoloids, MC Tracheotomy, Helen Gillet & Mark Southerland and others, noon OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1 OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Eric Lindell, 9 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-a-holics, 8 THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Bob Greene, 8

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Brett Dennen, MyNameIsJohnMichael, 9:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Tab Benoit, Sonny Landreth, Randy Jackson, 8:30

SIBERIA — Guitar Lightning Lee & His Thunder Band, Clockwork Elvis, 9; Nicky Glaspie & B.O.C. Allstars, 1 a.m. SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO —

Astral Project, 9 & 11

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & the Grinders, 6; Pat Casey, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Mary Flynn Thomas & Prohibition Blues, 10 a.m. TIPITINA’S — Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk feat. Skerik, Orgone, DJ Fndomnti, 10

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Marc Stone, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late as Usual, 9

Monday 9 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

COFFEEHOUSE — Uke Joint, 7; Kathryn Wood, 9; Jonathan Tankel, 9; Kurtis Brown Connection, 11

OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 6:30

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Maynard Chatters, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Joe Krown Trio feat. Walter “Wolfman” Washington & Russell Batiste, 8:30 SIBERIA — Lions of Tsavo, Solid Giant, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

THREE MUSES — Hot Club of New Orleans, 7

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 9

ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 5; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 9

BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Damien Louviere, 1; Big Feets, 5; Rhythm & Rain, 9

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jon Cleary

D.B.A. — Paul Sanchez & others, 7; Glen David Andrews, 11

classical/ concerts

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Chad Reeves, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Marc Stone, 4:30; Jason Bishop, 9

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Wilson & Moore, noon; Spencer Bohren, 1; Drew Young Band, 2; Davis, 3; Paul Sanchez, 4; Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Band, 5; Panorama Jazz Band, 6

THE MAISON — James Copeland Group, 5; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT — Courtyard Kings, 7 MY BAR — Danny T, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND

LE PETIT THEATRE — 616 St. Peter

St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre.com — Wed: “Nine Lives: A Musical Adaptation” Concert, 7 & 10

LOUIS J. ROUSSEL PERFORMANCE HALL — Loyola University New

Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www.montage. loyno.edu — Tue: Loyola Jazz Band concert, 7:30

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS —

1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www. mahaliajacksontheater.com — Sat: Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestra Mother’s Day Concert feat. Ellis Marsalis, 7

NORWEGIAN SEAMEN’S CHURCH — 1772 Prytania St., 525-5570 — Fri: Lars Edegran’s Trolian String Band, Thu., May 5, 7; Tricia Boutte & Paul Longstreth, 6

TEMPLE SINAI — 6227 St. Charles Ave. — Wed: University of Michigan Men’s Glee Club, 7 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Royal Harp Concert feat. Claire Jones & Melissa Stockstill, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS —

Homer L. Hitt Alumni Center, 2000 Lakeshore Drive — Wed: Jazz at the Sandbar presents Davell Crawford, 7:30

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


FILM

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING AFRICAN CATS (G) — The

Disney film captures the real-life love, humor and determination of the majestic jungle cats of the savanna. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 ARTHUR (PG-13) — Russell

Brand stars in the remake of the 1981 comedy about a lovable, but irresponsible, playboy who must decide between love or money. AMC Palace 20, Grand

ATLAS SHRUGGED: PART 1 (PG-13) — The film is the lat-

est adaptation of the Ayn Rand novel about a decaying America where all the leading artists, businesspeople and thinkers are mysteriously gone. Canal Place BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

BURY THE HATCHET (NR) —

88

TRISTAR PICTURES PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH STAGE 6 FILMS A T.D. JAKES/OUR STORIES FILMS PRODUCTION “JUMPING THE BROOM” MEAGAN GOOD TASHA SMITH JULIE BOWEN ROMEO MILLER DERAY DAVIS VALARIE PETTIFORD PRODUCED MUSIC BY T.D. JAKES TRACEY E. EDMONDS CURTIS WALLACE ELIZABETH HUNTER GLENDON PALMER BY EDWARD SHEARMUR STORY SCREENPLAY DIRECTED BY ELIZABETH HUNTER BY ELIZABETH HUNTER AND ARLENE GIBBS BY SALIM AKIL

STARTS FRIDAY, MAY 6

check locAl lISTIngS FoR TheATeRS AnD ShowTIMeS

Aaron Walker directs the documentary on Mardi Gras Indian culture in New Orleans. Chalmette Movies

THE CONSPIRATOR (PG-13) —

Robert Redford directs the story about Mary Surrat’s role in the Lincoln assassination. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX DYLAN DOG: DEAD OF NIGHT (PG-13) — A world-famous pri-

vate investigator must stop a war from ensuing among his werewolf, vampire and zombie clients living undercover in the backstreets of New Orleans. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9

FAST FIVE (PG-13) — Vin Diesel

Call 522-9897

www.theoriginalleakspecialist.com Good thru 11/1/11

and Dwayne Johnson star in the latest installment of the Fast and the Furious franchise. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 GRAND CANYON: RIVER AT RISK (NR) — Robert Redford

narrates a 15-day river-rafting

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

trip that highlights the beauty of the Colorado River. Entergy IMAX HANNA (PG-13) — A girl raised by her ex-CIA agent father to be an assassin is sent on a mission that causes her to question her existence. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Grand HOP (PG) — A slacker acci-

to her hometown — and so does the Ghostface Killer. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 SOUL SURFER (PG) — The film is based on the true story of Bethany Hamilton, the teen surfer who lost her arm in a shark attack. AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

dentally hits the teenage son of the Easter Bunny with his car, and then takes him in while he recovers. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Jake Gyllenhaal stars as a soldier who becomes part of a government experiment to thwart a bombing. AMC Palace 20

HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (PG) — In the animated

WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) — Reese Witherspoon stars

sequel, a group of storybook characters fight to give goodnatured endings to classic fairytales. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

INSIDIOUS (PG-13) — A family

begins to experience inexplicable phenomena after their son falls into a coma. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MADEA’S BIG HAPPY FAMILY (PG-13) — Director and star

THE SOURCE CODE (PG-13) —

in the adaptation of Sara Gruen’s best-selling novel. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Hollywood 14, Grand, Prytania

WIN WIN (R) — A lawyer (Paul Giamatti) who volunteers as a high school wrestling coach finds himself in a complicated situation after some questionable business dealings. Canal Place

OPENING FRIDAY

Tyler Perry returns as the tough and eccentric Madea. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

ALABAMA MOON (PG) — An

OF GODS AND MEN (PG-13) — The French film is the true

Worlds collide when two African-American families from disparate socioeconomic backgrounds get together for a wedding in Martha’s Vineyard.

story of a group of Trappist monks who stand up for their beliefs when confronted by Islamic fundamentalists. Canal Place

PROM (PG) — A group of

teenagers get ready for their prom in the Disney comedy. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 RAMMBOCK (R) — A heart-

broken man returns to Berlin to win back his ex-girlfriend, only to find the city infested with zombies. AMC Palace 20

RIO 3-D (G) — A macaw

who never learned to fly (voiced by Jesse Eisenberg) and his female counterpart get caught up in a perilous adventure. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

SCREAM 4 (R) — In the return of the slasher franchise, Sidney Prescott goes back

11-year-old boy raised in the Alabama wilderness must learn how to make a home in the modern world in the film shot in Louisiana.

JUMPING THE BROOM (NR) —

THOR (PG) — Chris Hemsworth

plays the powerful but arrogant Marvel Comics hero who is cast down to Earth to live among humans.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

MARNIE (NR) — Tippi Hedren and Sean Connery star in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1964 thriller about a woman with some serious psychological problems. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and May 11, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com PAGE 90


LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

ART

Start Your

Future Today

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by

Cheryl Finfrock, jewelry by Shea Yetta, neon and acrylic sculptures by Anne Ashley and photographs by Laura Cox, through May. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com —

“Between Two Thoughts,” abstract ink and watercolor drawings by Robert Lansden, through May 28. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE. 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Works by Tami Curtis-Ellis,

James Garcia, Robert Ellis, Penny Lane, Steve Zeller and Eric Glatwin. Artists’ reception 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “In My End is My Begin-

ning,” hand-sculpted clay vessels by Eileen O’Donnell, through June 2. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Conversation,” paintings, prints and drawings by Jill Moser, through June 2. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

group exhibition of paintings featuring Terry Kenney, through May. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “May I have a Revolution

Please,” works by Dan Tague, through June 1. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “I Can Fly: Song-

birds & Singers, On a Wing and a Prayer,” paintings and prints by Jon Langford; “Long Live the Living,” paintings by Leslie Staub; both through May 28. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Glass spring flowers by Teri Walker; hand-blown drams and quaichs by Dave Lindsley and Stephen Kraft; hand-pulled prints by Melissa Clark and Tish Douzart; ll through May. Opening Saturday.

All of us have seen the signs. They depict bold, soaring new structures soon to rise from desolate sites. Most never happen. Among the more notorious recent examples was the shining Buck Rogers facade of the Trump condo tower that eventually vanished like a mirage. Some cratered in the real estate crash, but others were pipe dreams from the start, the entrepreneurial equivalents of poetic license. They did, however, inspire a new civic enterprise, the Hypothetical Development Organization, which takes development to the next level by designing projects everyone knows will never happen. That eliminates the awful ritual of raising people’s hopes only to dash them. Instead, these apocryphal projects serve an uplifting purpose by existing only in the imagination, which actually is all professional real estate developers give us anyway — only their visionary exercises are hobbled by having to appeal to financial backers and bean counters without a poetic bone in their bodies. Unfettered by fiscal gravitas, these hypothetical developments exist on the more ethereal level of thought that appeals to, or even challenges, our collective urban imagination. So here a ghostly CBD building becomes a glossy, mirrored glass-clad Museum of The Self where a familiar sculptural “thumbs up” icon on the facade inspires passing Facebook users to instantly “like” what they see. A theatrical facade on lower Magazine Street serves as a Loitering Center in counterpoint to “no loitering” zones around town. There is even a Theater of Escape (pictured) offering to transport travelers to imaginary realms via certifiably nonexistent technologies. Such services aren’t cheap, but consumers can cash in their karma at Karmalot, which looks like a futuristic storefront from hell. Unlike most ordinary buildings, hypothetical developments arise from the inner landscape of poets and dreamers who meander aimlessly on foot or bicycle, or gaze sagely through the windows of streetcars at structures only they can see. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU M AY

07

Hypothetical Developments: Renderings of Improbable Architecture

Register now for the Summer Session at Our Lady of Holy Cross College.

Classes start June 6th. Bachelor’s degrees in:

Biology Allied Health Business Administration Counseling and Behavioral Sciences Education Nursing General Studies Apply online or call 504-398-2175 for more information. Programs designed with you in mind and heart. Nationally accredited by NCATE & CACREP

Du Mois Gallery, 4921 Freret St., 818-6032; www.hypotheticaldevelopment.com

STUDIO 831. 532 Royal St., 3044392; www.studio831royal.com — “ARTstravaganza,” works by

Greg Creason, Tracy Jarmon, Aaron Reichert and others, through Monday. Opening Thursday.

GALLERIES A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “Counterfeit,” works by

Louviere + Vanessa, through June.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Works by

Tony Benjamin and R. Tucker Fitz-Hugh Jr., through May 12. AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 —

Works by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

AIA NEW ORLEANS CENTER FOR DESIGN. 1000 St. Charles Ave., 525-8320; www.aianeworleans. org — “Disappearing New

Orleans,” a satellite exhibition from the American Institute PAGE 93

A minist ministryy of the M Marianites ri nit off H Holy l C Cross

www.olhcc.edu

4123 Woodland Dr., New Orleans, LA 70131

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “The American Sector,” a

Imagination Moves

91


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com PAGE 91

of Architects, Saturday through May 13. ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — Abstracts and

portraits of musicians by Gary Patterson and Marion Barnes, through May 23. “The Art of Dr. Seuss: Rare Editions Collections,” prints and sculpture by Dr. Seuss, through May.

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — “How

To Build A Forest,” installation/performance by Shawn Hall, PearlDamour and others, through Sunday. ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. ASYLUM. 608 Julia St., 525-4633 — “Horses,” works by Joshua

Walsh, through May.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Lost

Little Girls Art Show,” paintings and drawings by Lillian Butler, through Saturday.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery. com — “I Love You, Good-

night,” folk tales written and illustrated by Cameo Olson, through May 11.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective.com — “Shoot for the Wall,”

photographs by Zack Smith, through May.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “Ghost Fleet,” sculpture and works on paper by Raine Bedsole, through May 22.

showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the Blue

Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “Petrichor,” oil paintings

by Erica Lambertson Philippe, through Saturday.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Things I Couldn’t Find,”

mixed-media sculpture by Adam Farrington, through Thursday.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — Hypothetical archi-

tectural renderings of underused buildings by Hypothetical Development Organization, through Saturday.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing. FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www.fairfolksandagoat.com — “Foot-a-

Night,” installation by Hannah Chalew, ongoing.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Photo-

graphs by Andrea Ferguson and Jonathan Traviesa; images and costumes by Cameron Michel and Vashti Windish; both through Sunday.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale. com — “Introspection,” mixed

media on canvas by Sean Self, through Thursday.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings

by George Schmidt, ongoing.

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com — “Brighter Than a Thousand Suns,” installation by Lala Rascic, through Sunday. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary. com — “Impact,” works by Bernd Haussmann; “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory; both ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HENRY HOOD GALLERY. 325 E. Lockwood St., Covington, (985) 789-1832 — “Air, Earth & Water,”

works by Susan Jones; “New Ceramics,” works by Dennis Sipiorski; both through Friday.

HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave. — “The Bride’s Deadly

Sins,” works by Cynthia Scott, through Sunday.

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, 615 City Park Ave., 671-6363; www.dcc.edu — Delgado Fine

Arts Student Exhibit, through May 29.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style

art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

JAZZ & HERITAGE GALLERY. 1205 N. Rampart St., 558-6100; www. jazzandheritage.org — Creative

Allies Art Contest & Exhibition, through May 18.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“Halcyon Days,” paintings by Justin Forbes, through Sunday. “May I have a Revolution Please,” works by Dan Tague, through June 1.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “New Orleans

is Alive,” acrylics by Marlena Stevenson, through July.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, ongoing. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “Deep Blues Outsider Menagerie,” a group exhibition of music-inspired works, through May 28. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www. newmanschool.org — Sculpture

by Sally Heller, through May.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS

COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Kathleen Grumich, Vitrice

McMurry, Deborah Morrissey, Cathy DeYoung and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multi-

media works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown glass

works, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell, (985) 6464375 — “Salad Days,” a juried

student art exhibition, through June 10.

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www. sttammanyart.org — “Hanging

by a Thread: Contemporary Fiber Artists of Louisiana,” through May 14.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing. TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Intri-

cate Terrain,” works by Maysey Craddock, through June 22. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — MFA Exhibi-

tions: Paintings and drawings by Regina Scully, installations by Holis Hannan, through Sunday.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — Works by Sarah

Stiehl, through May 15.

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — Paintings

by Jacob Manguno and Luc Didier, through Saturday.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-3222 — “Richmond Barthe: Builder

of Pictures,” an exhibition highlighting the life and career of the Harlem Renaissance sculptor, through June.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Then & Now,” works by 14 artists who have exhibited at the center, curated by Dan Cameron, through June 12. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum

features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Before During After,”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

ART

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New Orleans Ballet Association

NOBA Presents

ART

LISTINGS

photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays; “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items; both ongoing. LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 3102149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias.org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org — “Absinthe Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

Corella Ballet Castilla y león a rtistiC D ireCtor a ngel C orella May 14, 8 p.M. | Mahalia Jackson Theater

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www. noaam.com — “Dancing String Bean,”

To ballet fans all over the world, Angel Corella is the Spanish-born superstar of American Ballet Theatre known for his technical precision, bravura dancing and intoxicating charisma. This extraordinary dancer adds artistic director to his title with the debut of his new company, Corella Ballet Castilla y León. Founded in 2008 as Spain’s only classical ballet company, Corella, along with his stunning company of 40, brings a stylish program for a New Orleans debut! “C orella B allet … CreateD an intoxiCating wave that announCeD the Company has arriveD !” –L o s A n g e L e s T i m e s

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Different Strokes for Different

Join BRAVO for an elegant and glamorous Spanish soiree!

A Esp añ a

Con Am or

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

In celebration of the highly anticipated debut of Corella Ballet, NOBA and BRAVO (Ballet Resource And Volunteer Organization) will hold the annual gala, featuring delicious cuisine by Café Adelaide Executive Chef Chris Lusk, wines, music, dancing, and live and silent auctions. On May 11, Benefactors will join the special guest of honor at the exclusive Benefactor Dinner at the Windsor Court Hotel. For more inFormation anD tiCkets, Call noBa at 504.522.0996 or visit noBaDanCe.Com Betty S. and James A Noe Jr. Foundation

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94

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Folks: Glass Works from Harter, Jastremski and Sawyer Gifts,” through May 15. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits on 19th-century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

With Special Honorary Guest angel Corella May 13 ~ Gallier Hall

Presented by

paintings and drawings by Eugene Martin; “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” 18th- and 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection; both through May 28.

Artist accommodations sponsored by

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — “Art & Jazz: Preservation Hall at 50,”

“New Orleans Craft & Design”; “One World, Two Artists,” works by John Alexander and Walter Anderson; “Juke Joint,” photographs by Birney Imes; all through July 24. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. Patrick F. Taylor Library, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Elemental” and

“New Orleans Architecture Now,” satellite exhibitions from the American Institute of Architects, through May 13. OLD URSULINE CONVENT. 1100 Chartres St., 529-3040 — “France in America,” photo-

graphs by Arielle de la Tour d’Auvergne, through June.

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Acadian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the South’s sugar industry; all ongoing. TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER BURN, K-DOE, BURN! AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Ernie K-Doe hit “Mother-in-Law,” the theater hosts a production of the play to benefit the New Orleans Musicians Clinic. 8 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and May 13-15. DANCING WITH THE MOM.

Cutting Edge Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www. cuttingedgeproductions.org — Rose Marie Sand’s play follows four friends from 1965 to the present. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through May 21, 2 p.m. May 15.

DEBAUCHERY. Le Chat Noir, 715

St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Mark Routhier directs Pat Bourgeois’ soap opera. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

HAIRSPRAY. Slidell Little

Theatre, 2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 641-0324; www. slidelllittletheatre.org — A plump teen gets her dream of dancing on a popular 1962 TV show. Tickets $19 general admission, $14 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through May 15.

HAY FEVER. University of New

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM. Sydney and Walda

Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The NOLA Project presents an outdoor production of the Shakespeare play. Call 6584100 or visit www.noma.org/ nolaproject for reservations. Tickets $10 general admission, $8 students and seniors, $6 children. 7 p.m. Friday through May 27. ON THE AIR. Stage Door

Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Bob Edes Jr., Gary Rucker and others star in

the musical that pays tribute to the heyday of radio. Call 528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org for details. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday through June 26. ORANGE FLOWER WATER. Elm

Theatre, 220 Julia St., 218-0055; www.elmtheatre.org — Two friends begin an adulterous affair with disastrous consequences in Craig Wright’s drama. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday through May 14.

TITUS ANDRONICUS. The Old Ironworks, 612 Piety St., 9084741 — In the Neutral Ground Ensemble’s performance of the Shakespeare tragedy, all eight cast members portray the title role. Visit www. neutralgroundensemble.org for details. Free admission. Preview performance 8 p.m. Thursday, then 8 p.m. FridaySunday and May 12-14. WOMEN WHO KILL. Shad-

owbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www. theshadowboxtheatre.com — The American Theatre Project presents China Clark’s play. Call 957-9283 for reservations. Tickets $15 general admission, $17.50 reserved seating. General admission is half price with proof of Jazz Fest ticket purchase. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday.

FAMILY PLAY/WRITE CHILDREN’S PLAYWRITING FESTIVAL.

Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — Local actors stage plays written by fifth-seventh graders who participated in Goat in the Road Productions’ 10-week playwriting program. Visit www.goatintheroadproductions.org for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday. SLOW BURN BURLESQUE. Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge. net — The burlesque troupe presents “The Big Sleazy.” Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Saturday.

AUDITIONS RIVER REGION BALLET JUNIOR COMPANY. Images Dance

Studio, 105-A River Point Drive, Destrehan — The company seeks dancers ages 10 and older for the apprentice program. Call 884-0355 or visit www. rrpa.org for details. There is a $10 audition fee. 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sat., May 7.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS NEW ORLEANS FRINGE FESTIVAL. The annual theater

festival, held Nov. 16-20, seeks submissions between 30 and 60 minutes in categories ranging from cabaret to puppetry. Visit www.nofringe.org for details. There is a $25 application fee. Submission deadline is July 1.

COMEDY BROWN HQ. Pip’s Bar, 5252 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 456-9234 — The audience can participate in the show performed by the improv comedy troupe. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com/BrownHQ for details. Tickets are free for those who perform, $5 general admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday.

DON’T FORGET ABOUT MOM! GIFT CERTIFICATES FOR MOTHER’S DAY

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

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Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’

Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform followed by an open mic. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy The-

ater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Fridays.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday.

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Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio host Stevie G and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday.

PERMANENT DAMAGE STANDUP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 9484003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

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LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday.

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Orleans, Performing Arts Center, Robert E. Nims Theatre, 280-7468; www.uno.edu — In Noel Coward’s farce, chaos ensues when members of an eccentric family each invite a weekend guest to their English country house. Call 280-7469 or visit www.theatre.uno.edu for reservations. Tickets $8 seniors and UNO students, staff, faculty and alumni, $12 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

STAGE

95


EVENTS

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 3 KINDER GARDEN: CREEP, CRAWL & FLY. Longue Vue House and

Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of gardens through age-appropriate activities. Admission $10 members, $12 non-members, $5 each additional adult. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue. com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 5 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

Saturday 7

96

CHILDREN’S BOOK WEEK PARTY.

Alvar Library, 913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — The event features book giveaways, music, food, yoga demonstrations, an animal-themed costume contest, crafts and games. Call for information about other Book Week events. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

GIRL SCOUT BASS FISHING RODEO. Camp Whispering

Pines, 56535 Hwy. 1054, Independence, (985) 878-9598; www.gsle.org — The daylong fishing event features morning and afternoon/evening competitions with one-hour fishing sessions from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call 733-8220 or email kshipp@ gsle.org for details.

MASTER GARDENERS.

Hollygrove Market & Farm, 8301 Olive St., 483-7037; www. hollygrovemarket.com — Master Gardeners of Greater New Orleans teaches young gardeners to plant, paint, identify good and bad bugs and feed the chickens. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

MOTHER’S DAY CRAFT. Bogue

Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-

BE THERE DO THAT 7312 — The park ranger leads the activity. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. SIBSHOPS NOLA . Audubon Zoo,

6500 Magazine St., 581-4629; www.auduboninstitute.org — The group provides support, information and recreation opportunities for children ages 8-13 who have siblings with disabilities. Call 943-0343 or email sibshopsnola@yahoo.com for details. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 3 COMMANDER’S PALACE JAPAN BENEFIT. Commander’s Palace,

1403 Washington Ave., 8998221; www.commanderspalace. com — Restaurant executive chef Tory McPhail prepares a special dinner to benefit the NOLA Japan Quake Fund. Reservations are required. Call 899-8221 for details. Admission $200. 6:30 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE . Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m. DOWNTOWN LUNCHTIME SPIRITUALITY SERIES.

Immaculate Conception Jesuit Church, 130 Baronne St., 5291477; www.jesuitchurch.net — Fr. Vien The Nguyen discusses “Doing Justice as Spirituality.” Visit www.loyno.edu/lplc/ downtown for details. Free admission. 12:30 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS WORKSHOP SERIES: STANTON MOORE & JOHNNY VIDACOVICH . Blue Nile,

532 Frenchmen St., 948-2583; www.bluenilelive.com — The musicians present an intimate workshop discussing the history of New Orleans drumming and the student/teacher relationship. Admission $15. 4 p.m.

SCHOLARSHIP STRATEGIES WORKSHOP. East Bank Regional

Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The workshop for high school students and their parents discusses strategies for getting scholarships. Visit www.careerthink. org for details. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. “TREME” FILMING . The HBO

series seeks extras to re-create a 2007 outdoor music festival for the show. The event features live music by Wanda Rouzan, Donald Harrison and Treme cast members, as well as free festival food and raffles and giveaways. Check-in is

death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

preview

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

In Sync Up Island Records founder Chris Blackwell, who signed Bob Marley and U2, is among the entertainment industry moguls speaking at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation’s fourth annual Sync Up conference. A networking and educational event, Sync Up offers musicians, band managers and others a chance to meet talent buyers, agents, managers and supervisors and learn about the business side of entertainment. New Orleans rapper Truth Universal was able to make connections and book a show at the Houston International Festival after attending Sync Up two years ago. “I go [to Sync Up] every year,” he says. “As an independent artist (I) don’t usually get to meet folks, give them product and material, and be in touch with them and maintain connections. It’s rare.” This year’s conference focuses on the international music festival circuits, how to license music for film, TV and videogames, and how to use new technologies to promote and sell music. Speakers include Thomas Gayno of Google Creative Labs, who will discuss music promotion through multimedia platforms; PJ Bloom, the music supervisor of Glee, who will discuss licensing music for film and TV; and new media guru Bryan Calhoun (pictured), SoundExchange Vice President of New Media and External Affairs, who will deliver the keynote address. The conference takes place at the New Orleans Museum of Art, Thursday through Saturday, May 5-7. Admission is free, but advanced registration is required. Visit www.jazzandheritage.org/sync-up for more information and to register. — Marguerite Lucas

M AY

5 —7

Sync Up 8 p.m. Thursday; 9 a.m.-1: p.m. FridaySaturday New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, City Park; www.jazzandheritage. org/sync-up

at City Park under the 610 Overpass at Zachary Taylor Drive. Call 940-7364 for details. 8 a.m.

Wednesday 4 BROWN LINEN NIGHT. Mount

Carmel Academy, 7027 Milne Blvd., 288-7630; www.mtcarmelcubs.org — The high school hosts an “art walk” with silent auctions of student work and entertainment by the school’s performance groups. Call 288-7626 ext. 228 or asmith@ mcacubs.org for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9

a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost & Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter. org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible Scripture. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the

louisianamusicfactory.com — Cast members from the HBO show sign copies of DVDs from the series’ first season. 11 a.m.

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

LGBT YOUTH PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT Community

Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www.lgbtccno.org — The center provides a support group for 18- to 24-yearolds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. Email programs@lgbtccno.org for details. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

MODEL GREEN HOUSE . Global

Green Holy Cross Project, 409 Andry St.; www.globalgreen. org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

NEW ORLEANS PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB MEETING .

Harahan Senior Center, 100 Elodie St., 737-3810 — Photographer Richard Vallon discusses two photo editing programs: Google’s Picasa and Adobe Photoshop Elements. Visit www.nopc.org for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS ROSE SOCIETY MEETING . Whitney Bank

Training Room, 1441 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-6364; www.whitneybank.com — The meeting topic is “Blooms From Bush to Vase.” Call 368-6885 for details. 7:30 p.m. SPRING FLING BUSINESS MIXER .

Stephens Financial Services, 3528 Holiday Drive — The Algiers Economic Development Foundation hosts the event. Call 362-6436 or visit www. algierseconomic.com for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. “TREME” DVD SIGNING .

Louisiana Music Factory, 210 Decatur St., 586-1094; www.

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Thursday 5 CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

DRINKING LIBERALLY NEW ORLEANS. Pravda, 1113 Decatur

St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Progressives meet to share ideas and drink. 7 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

OLD MANDEVILLE HOME TOUR . Old Mandeville, vari-

ous locations — The theme of the Old Mandeville Historic Association’s event is “Shotguns and Sidehalls,” and the tour features eight houses. Admission $12 (can be purchased starting noon before the event). 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

PARENTS OF TROUBLED ADULTS MEETING . Jewish Family

Service, 3330 West Esplanade, Suite 600, Metairie, 831-8475; www.jfsneworleans.org — The bi-monthly meeting offers support to parents whose adult children suffer from depression, mental illness, addiction disorders and other difficulties. Call 831-8475 or 828-6334 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. WARGAMES. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum hosts WWII board and miniatures gaming for gamers at all levels. Pre-registration is required. A minimum number of gamers must register for


LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

the meeting to be held. Call 528-1944 ext. 333 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. First Thursday of every month.

Friday 6 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets at 6:15 p.m. Fridays. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details.

EASTSIDE ART MARKET. Eastside Studios, 107 S. Orange St., Hammond, (985) 542-7113 or (985) 543-0403 — Eastside Studios holds a juried art market for professional artists on the first Friday of each month. Artists pay a $15 application fee and, if accepted, a $20 booth fee. 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. FRIENDS OF THE SLIDELL LIBRARY USED BOOK SALE .

St. Tammany Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The sale features a variety of magazines and paperback, hardcover and children’s books. Email fsl70458@yahoo.com for details. Members-only sale 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, general admission 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, North

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Admission to the gardens is free with a coupon from Better Homes and Gardens in celebration of the national event. Visit www. nationalpublicgardensday. org for the coupon and other details. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

ORAL CANCER SCREENINGS.

Interim LSU Public Hospital, 2021 Perdido St. — LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans conducts free oral cancer screenings from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 568-4785 for details.

SYNC UP CONFERENCE . New

Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — Entertainment industry leaders speak at the fourth annual conference. This year’s speakers include Glee music superviser PJ Bloom, national talent buyer Larry Vallon, digital marketing guru Bryan Calhoun, rapper Mystikal and others. Reservations are required. Visit www.jazzandheritage.org for the full schedule and other details. 9 a.m. to

noon. Through Saturday. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

ZOO-TO-DO. Audubon Zoo,

6500 Magazine St., 581-4629; www.auduboninstitute. org — The zoo’s fundraising event features music by The Four Tops, premium cocktails, cuisine from local restaurants, a silent auction and a luxury car raffle. Tickets start at $85. Patron admission 7 p.m., general admission 8 p.m. to midnight.

Saturday 7 ARNO CAT ADOPTION EVENT.

PETCO, 3500 Williams Blvd., 469-1880; www.petco.com — Animal Rescue New Orleans volunteers facilitate pet adoptions. Visit www.animalrescueneworleans.org for details. Noon to 4 p.m.

ART AT THE MARKET. Griffith

Park, 333 Erlanger St., Slidell — The Slidell Art League hosts a monthly art market at the Camellia City Farmers Market. Visit www.slidellartleague. info for details. 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

CAUSEWAY POLICE CHARITABLE FOUNDATION LUAU.

Pontchartrain Yacht Club, 1501 Lakeshore Drive, Mandeville — The event features music by Harvey Jesus & Fire, food, wine and beer. Call 455-8846 for details. Admission $100. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. E-WASTE AND PAINT DROP-OFF.

Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119 — Whole Foods and the Green Project offer a monthly electronic waste and paint recycling event. Visit www.greenproject.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . J. Singleton School,

1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. FRERET MARKET. Freret

Market, corner of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue, 6382589; www.freretmarket. org — The market offers food,

arts, live music and crafts from local exhibitors on the first Saturday of each month. Noon to 5 p.m. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

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Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. SATYRICON IN BLOOM . Napoleon’s Itch, 734 Bourbon St., 371-5450; www.napoleonsitch.com — The Mystic Krewe of Satyricon hosts a Mother’s Day bake sale auction that features Becky Allen as the celebrity auctioneer. Call 525-4498 for details. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. SHOTGUN SEMINARS. Antenna PAGE 99

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NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

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MARCH TO THE MARSH .

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — The program explores the habitats, biodiversity and ecological impact of native plant species. Call 293-4276 or email hschackai@longuevue. com for details. Admission $8 members, $10 nonmembers. 9 a.m and 10 a.m.

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JANE’S WALK . Sucre, 3025 Magazine St., 520-8311; www. shopsucre.com — The national event celebrates urbanist Jane Jacobs with walks exploring neighborhoods. The Irish Channel walk spotlights the culture, architecture, religion, history, education and other aspects of the area. The walk starts at Sucre and ends at Tracey’s (2604 Magazine St.). Call 453-6690 for details. 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.

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Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org — Writer Lindsay Hunter, playwright Jessica Kinnison and New Orleans Review editor Michael Lee speak at Press Street’s free writing seminar. The event also features free drinks. 8 p.m.

Sunday 8 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New Orleans

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

SPORTS BOYS HOPE GIRLS HOPE GOLF TOURNAMENT. English Turn

Country Club, 3201 Parc Fontaine St., 392-6590 — The annual event supports the nonprofit. Visit www.boyshopegirlshope.org for details. Admission starts at $200. 8 a.m. Monday.

NEW ORLEANS ZEPHYRS.

WORLD SERIES OF POKER . Harrah’s Casino, 1 Canal St., 533-6000; www.harrahs.com — The tournament includes 11 events, with buy-ins ranging from $175 to $10,000 for the No-Limit Hold ’Em championship event. Visit www.wsop. com for the full schedule and other details. Monday, then daily through May 22.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS MOM OF THE YEAR ESSAY COMPETITION . The natural

skin-care product Sénica holds the essay contest. Visit www.senicanaturals.com for details. Submission deadline is Thursday.

NEW ORLEANS REGIONAL LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE . The

nine-month program seeks

signs Brothers, Rivals, Victors: Eisenhower, Patton, Bradley and the Partnership that Drove the Allied Conquest in Europe. 5 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. presentation and book signing. Tuesday.

WORDS

JULIE SMITH . Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs young-adult book Cursebusters. 5 p.m. Thursday.

17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — Andrei Codrescu and Dave Brinks read. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at

the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

EVE ABRAMS & THOMAS W. JACOBSEN . Maple Street Book

Shop, 7523 Maple St., 8664916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The authors sign and read from Preservation Hall and Traditional New Orleans Jazz: Conversations with the Men Who Make the Music, respectively. 6 p.m. Thursday.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

FIRST TUESDAY BOOK CLUB.

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The group discusses Alan Bradley’s In the Weed That Strings the Hangman’s Bag. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

FREDDI WILLIAMS EVANS.

Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from Congo Square: African Roots in New Orleans. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

G. LEIGHTON CIRAVOLO.

McDonoghville Cemetery, 520 Hancock St., Gretna — The author discusses The Legacy of John McDonogh. 9:45 a.m. Friday. JAY MAZZA . Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 8664916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author reads from, discusses and signs I Got the Fish in the Head: A Radiators Retrospective. 6 p.m. Wednesday. JONATHAN W. JORDAN. Stage

Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — The author discusses and

LAWRENCE J. COHEN. Octavia

Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from The Art of Roughhousing: Good Old-Fashioned Horseplay And Why Every Kid Needs It. 6 p.m. Monday.

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Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturday.

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Patrice Fisher and ARPA Harp with Central, South & North America blending of music

MAY 5

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday.

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UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and openmic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121 — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail.com for details.

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Thursdays at Twilight

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar. com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday.

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CALL FOR WRITERS SWAMP LILY REVIEW. The online

journal of Louisiana literature and arts accepts submissions for its fall issue. The journal publishes poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, art and photography. Email swamplilyreview@gmail.com or visit www. swamplily.com for details.

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Zephyr Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www.zephyrsbaseball. com — The Zephyrs play the Memphis Redbirds at 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, 11:30 a.m. Wednesday. Visit www. zephyrsbaseball.com for details.

business, civic and publicsector leaders for its 2011-2012 class. Call 527-6922 or visit www.gnoinc.org/norli for details. Application deadline is Friday.

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am

B

EMPANADAS ON WHEELS

Empanada Intifada (www.empanadaintifada.com) is a new food truck making the rounds of fundraisers, events and nightspots. Empanadas are the specialty, and the mobile kitchen makes chicken adobo and traditional beef and egg meat pies, as well as versions filled with squash and cheddar or black beans and bananas.

five 5 IN

Five Out-of-Town Dining Alternatives

MIDDENDORF’S RESTAURANT

30160 HWY. 51 S., AKERS, (985) 386-6666 www.middendorfsrestaurant.com

The famous destination for catfish has a waterfront deck.

Extreme Makeover A CHEF REINVIGORATES A CREOLE-ITALIAN STANDBY. BY IAN MCNULTY

B

house party and the pungent exoticism of an Asian grocery shopping spree. It’s understandable if Mimi’s staff appears a bit breathless after reciting the night’s specials. Many of the dishes require extensive elucidation and still elicit questions from the mostly curious, sometimes rapturous and occasionally baffled guests. In the seven months since his arrival, Vazquez has tempered his initial menus with a few more accessible dishes. Diners can still start with a Caesar salad, but that might mean squandering the chance for an appetizer of steamer clams in thick, spicy, smoky tomato broth imbued with pork jowls, or house-made pappardelle bundled around snails in New Orleansstyle Bordelaise. There’s veal piccata now, but also a veal rack interspersed with ravioli filled with buttery, assertive taleggio cheese and slabs of grilled king mushrooms, all laid over bright streaks of salsa verde. Various terrines — all chunky, laden with nuts and fruit, a Vazquez specialty from way back — rotate onto the menu. There’s cheesecake, but also a sugardusted dark chocolate waffle with housemade ice cream. A gratis plate of truffles and toffee arrives after dessert and before the check — a final, superfluous but fully welcome reminder that this new Mimi’s aims high. With crowds in town for Jazz Fest, it pays to know about a few offbeat places that are out of the way. Mimi’s is not only out of the way, but when everything is clicking here it can deliver meals that are out of this world.

MOSCA’S RESTAURANT

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

7742 HWY. 23, BELLE CHASSE, 393-7303 www.salvosseafood.com

4137 HWY. 90 W., AVONDALE, 436-8950 www.moscasrestaurant.com

Get garlicky Italian food on family-style platters.

SALVO’S SEAFOOD

The boiled seafood specialist offers all-you-caneat deals.

WHAT

Mimi’s of River Ridge WHERE

10160 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-6464; www. mimisriverridge.com WHEN

Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun.

SPAHR’S SEAFOOD

3682 HWY. 90 E., DES ALLEMANDS, (985) 758-1602 www.spahrsseafood.com

Enjoy Cajun flavor in the catfish capital, Des Allemands.

WAYNE JACOB’S SMOKEHOUSE

769 W. FIFTH ST., LAPLACE, (985) 652-9990

The smokehouse’s cafe serves weekend dinner and Sunday brunch.

HOW MUCH

Expensive

RESERVATIONS

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

Recommended

WHAT WORKS

Fresh pasta and charcuterie, Asian specials

WHAT DOESN'T

Don’t expect the old Mimi’s

CHECK, PLEASE

Ambitious, adventurous cuisine at a oncepredictable family eatery

2009 Borsao Garnacha ARAGON, SPAIN / $7-$8 RETAIL

This easy-drinking red wine from Aragon’s Campo de Borja subregion, it is a blend of 85 percent Garnacha (Grenache) and 25 percent Tempranillo. It offers aromas of spicy red and black fruit, black pepper and sweet spice. On the palate, taste layers of juicy plum, dried cherry, blackberry and cassis with a slightly brambly character and hints of cocoa and leather. Drink it with chorizo or merguez sausages, burgers, grilled vegetables, paella and dishes with romesco sauce. Buy it at: Terranova Brothers Superette, Whole Foods Uptown, Sidney’s Wine Cellar, Habanos, some Rouses and Fresh Market in Mandeville. Drink it at: Le Meritage, Galvez Restaurant, Mimi’s in the Marigny, Cure and Milan Lounge. Lounge — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

uzz that something new was afoot out at Mimi’s of River Ridge led us to this erstwhile CreoleItalian restaurant, so we weren’t too surprised to find thick-cut strips of calamari served with chimichurri and anchovy dip. Instead, it was an entree special that raised eyebrows at our table. It was bo ssam, a Korean specialty of raw oysters nestled in crisp lettuce cups topped with pork belly, served with sticky rice and garnished with sour red pepper sauce. Combining the cool, briny squish of the oysters and the rugged, salty crunch of the fatty pork was unusual but also intuitive. Serving the Far Eastern oddity at Mimi’s, however, was downright revolutionary. In business for more than 30 years and run since 2001 by chef David Whitmore, Mimi’s has been a reliable if unremarkable moderately priced Italian restaurant, a place where the occasional crawfish cheesecake was the exception and veal Parmesan was the norm. In late fall, however, Whitmore partnered with Peter Vazquez, the former chef/owner of Marisol, which never reopened after Hurricane Katrina. Today, Whitmore runs the restaurant and Vazquez is in charge of the kitchen. It still looks like the same old Mimi’s — an outdated but comfortable dining room with drop ceilings tucked into a strip mall. On the plate, however, this is a completely different restaurant. Fans of Vazquez’s edgy, boldly flavorful style will recognize his imprint here. He combines the precision of a French cooking school, the lustiness of a Mediterranean

Chef Peter Vazquez (seated) with proprietors David Whitmore and An Vu at Mimi’s of River Ridge.

101


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www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE —

7801 Panola St., 314-1810 — Specialties

< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < include crabcakes Benedict — two > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > > > crabcakes and poached eggs topped Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

Mother's Day

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877; www.terrazu.net — Located in the lobby of Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves sandwiches like the Brie cheese press with turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. The Terrazu shrimp salad combines boiled shrimp, hearts of palm, tomato and avocado with tarragon vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

MAY 8TH

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 3611402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

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$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE!

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

METAIRIE 750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716 COVINGTON 1027 VILLAGE WALK (985) 809-9101 VISIT US ON

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave.,

865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans. com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

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American Pie Diner offers diner fare around the clock (2244 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 468-2187).

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Hara-

han, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pit-cooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River

Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita

Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked

102

with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne

Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Panseared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905

Canal St., 488-7357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish poboys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road.,

Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112;

Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette St.,

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N.

Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried PAGE 105


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

CHOOSE YOUR (DE)VICE

104

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Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com page 102 alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-

4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans Me-

morial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $ MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601 Maga-

zine St., 899-4260; www.pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia St.,

304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola. com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132

Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl. com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 5251486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters

St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSY NAIL — 1100 Con-

stance St., 722-3168; www.therustynail. biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GRO-

CERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $ MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer

Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-5171;

www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Dai-

sy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

ghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH

KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-3644

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave., 522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $ FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St., 8950900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and corianderspiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro. com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-6666; www.

schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C

Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-

2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, 455-2266

— This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spa-

TONY

MANDINA’S

RESTAURANT

1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010; www. tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave.,

488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-

9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253;

www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St.,

943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 2673263; www.wasabinola.com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-

0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 2677485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 03 > 2011

5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www.

105


OUT2EAT dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park

Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark. com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph and the Niman Ranch New York strip. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-

3570 — Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitou-

las St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as appetizers and salads. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St.,

587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickorysmoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Maga-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

zine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www.juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Frank-

lin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, po-boys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity. com — The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-0841;

6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys are available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria

Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe. com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napo-

leon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www. rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www. nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

0077 — Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-

TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE — 755

Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-

8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St.,

310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

106

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola. com — Dine on seafood in platters and po-boys or highlighted in dishes such crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, poboys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-1414; 817

W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Ham-

mond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave.,

525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add

or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-

1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Maga-

zine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-

2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575 Conven-

tion Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave.,

943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas

St., 613-2350; www.lacotebrasserie. com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-

1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit

cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548; www.

bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE — Harrah’s

Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal

St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road,

836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St.,

899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine, including spring rolls and pho soup. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N. Carroll-

ton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhat-

tan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.phonola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 West-

bank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, spring rolls and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $


Voted in top 3 RealtoRs

in new oRleans

504-891-6400

730 St. Philip

The Historic House, Luxury Home and Second Home Specialist

$1,345,000

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

Unit C

L. BRYAN FRANCHER

251-6400

Magnificent French Quarter Creole townhouse with over 3,000 sqft of living space. This exquisite 2nd floor condo features gracious living and dining rooms with Venetian plaster walls and gold-leaf, stacked crown molding and 2 gas fireplaces. The chef’s kitchen has a large, honed black granite island, top-of-the-line appliances, and a large walk-in Butler’s pantry. The fabulous Master suite is truly special with an extra-large, custom built-in closet and marble bathroom. This splendid property offers 3 bedrooms and 3.5 baths. It is truly a one-of-a-kind designer showplace! Parking, too!

LESLIE PERRIN

722-5820

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

www.FrancherPerrin.com

108

941 St. Ann $730,000

Gorgeous Victorian home in the French Quarter or a corner lot with gated PARKING for 2! 2/2, 1551 sq. ft. Beautiful, MUST SEE!

farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

900 St . Peters St. L3. Condo $519,000

MY SPECIALIZATION IS YOU! Personal & Customized Services. Historic Homes Specialist & Luxury Homes Trust Someone Who Knows The Market…

1125 Cadiz $489,500

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

Beautiful! 2 bdrms, 2 ba, parking, all amenities.

Patti Faulder

Absolutely Charming!

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

504.905.7473 8601 Leake Ave • New Orleans pattifaulder@gmail.com www.pattifaulder.com

Properties For Lease and For Sale

Full Service Property Management Over 30 years of selling properties & filling vacancies!

504-736-0544

www . mauriceguillot . com


CHARLOTTE DORION WHEN DEMANDING EXCELLENCE, CHOOSE THE SPECIALIST!

Cell: 237-8615 • Office: 861-7575 | charrealty@nocoxmail.com

Residential and Commercial Appraiser. Locally owned and operated by Carol Mix-Severan for over 13 years. Ms. Severan is a Master Residential Appraiser. She can help you get a city permit for renovation, Pre & Post Katrina appraisals, removal of PMI insurance, second mortgage, buying, selling, bankruptcy, divorce, for estate purposes. Whatever your appraisal needs may be. Severan Consulting Service can provide you with an accurate property appraisal that reflects a fair market value. Call Severan Consulting Service at 504-341-2441.

$739,000

342 HOMESTEAD AVE., OLD METAIRIE Fab 4-5 br w/2 master suites, 4.5 ba, 2 dens, lots of closet space, versatile floor plan. Guest house, FQ style ctyd in rear yard, hot tub, garage. Bevlo gas lanterns, beaut ornate wrought iron surrounding house, 12 x 125 extra lot behind house.

Stephen Ehlinger Realtor

®

504-650-6770 Cell 504-866-2785 Office 504-865-1574 Fax sehlinger@latterblum.com

7934 MAPLE STREET / NEW ORLEANS, LA 70118

Carol Mix-Severan, MRA, R1132 Downtown New Orleans Condos and Homes Relocating? Thinking of Selling?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

Get a FREE Comparative Market Analysis and Hire the Agent Who Specializes in Downtown New Orleans!

110

ANNE BECK, Realtor Call or Text 504-812-4702 REMAX Real Estate Partners 4141 Veterans Blvd, Suite 100 • Metairie, LA 70002

www.new-orleans-condos.com

Clara Paletou gri, abr

Challenging times and changing market conditions require expert knowledge and genuine integrity.

For quality representation whether buying, selling or investing you need only make one call . . . 504-858-5837

504-891-6400

Because you deserve the very best!

LoweR GARden dIStRICt ReHAB oppoRtunIty At GReAt pRICe! Located steps to Magazine Street Shopping, resturants and transit. Double with 3 bedroom in the front and 2 bedrooms in the rear. Priced to sell at $ 79,900.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in new orleans, LA 70130


TEAM PEPPER • 504-782-0000

ANNA PEPPER Phone: 504.782.0000

Apepper2@bellsouth.net teampepper.kwrealty.com

455-0100

Each office independently owned & operated

4133 Palmyra

229 Cotton Bayou Lane, Kenner Gorgeous home w/ gourmet kitchen. Balcony overlooking Den w/ Fireplace. Hardwood Flooring, Custom Crown Molding, Master down w/whirl pool tub & separate shower. 3 BR’s up. Too many amenities to name. A must see!

2726 Prytania, #3 New Orleans Location. Location. Location. Charming Garden District Condo. Original Hardwood Floors, 12 ft. Ceilings, Granite Kitchen & Bath. Private Entrance to Lush Courtyard. Only 200K!

844 Provision Court Gramercy Priced Right @ ONLY $115,000. Lovely Corner Condo in Excellent Condition. 2 bedroom/2.5 bath with Community Pool. Convenient location near Plants in St. James Parish!

6612 Canal Blvd.

Mid City, 2,100 sq ft., 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath singlestory home on oversized double lot across from Jesuit. Call Jean-Paul 504-818-6032

Mediterranean style living in Lakeview. Entertainer’s dream: Sliding glass doors behind spacious living room opens to pool & patio. 4 bedroom/ 3 bath. Renovation completed in 2007. $355,000

Jean-Paul Villere 504-818-6032

Sean Gerowin 504-669-0342 4921 Freret • 504-818-6032

.

2340 Dauphine Street New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605

824 Burgundy, Unit #1 - $299,000 Double parlors of a grand house Very high ceilings Mantels Nice kitchen & pool. 902 sq ft. David Smith 504.495.2387 Ernesto Caldeira 504.450.8991

4721 Magazine Street Lovely commercial space on trendy Magazine Street. Historic Building with hardwood floors, charming rooms, landscaping and plenty of off-street parking! Dorian M. Bennett 504.236.7688 Have A Smart Phone?

1400 Gov. Nicholls

Totally renovated 6-plex in clean well maintained DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688

Neighborhood condition in Treme. Continue to rent this property dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com out and have revenue for income or live in one Expertise unit free and rent the others out! - International Dorian M. Bennett 504.236.7688 Influence

Please call, email or visit dbsir.com for more information on our inventory of extraordinary properties for sale.

Add Us!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

829B Dumaine - $410,000 Two unit condominium. Contemporary 2 story dependency 2BR2BA opening on to pool. 810 sq ft. David Smith 504.495.2387 Ernesto Caldeira 504.450.8991

1228 Bourbon B - $399,000 Entire 2nd floor of main house. Large 1BR 1½ BA. Dining room and balcony on Bourbon. 1250 sq ft. David Smith 504.495.2387 Ernesto Caldeira 504.450.8991

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688 dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com

111


JOBsearch rEstAurAnt/HotEl/BAr

Become Part of The #1 Ranked Best Hotel in New Orleans

Bookkeeper

Work easily and earn weekly payment; This firm specializes in managing the bookkeeping, accounting, tax, and financial matters for entertainment industry performers and executives, and other high net worth individuals. This position is responsible for maintaining the accounting records of the company and the integrity of all financial and operational data. It’s easy work for you. Its fun and you will be glad to work. Send your inquiry/resumes to: mr.avan.smith@gmail.com

• Food & Beverage • Housekeeping • Facilities • Culinary

For Professional or Management Career Opportunities please visit The Roosevelt online at: www.hiltonfamily.jobs

AgEnts & sAlEs MAKE 1K- 4K WEEKLY

HEAltH/FitnEss

EOE/AA Drug Free Workplace

Upscale Wine Bar & Restaurant Now Hiring: HOST BARTENDER WAITSTAFF email resume to jetcondon@gmail.com

CERTIFIED PERSONAL TRAINER

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

with a positive, happy outlook at our Upscale Studio. Experience a plus.

112

email resume to info@x-trainers.com

FArm lABor TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

McKnight Ranch, Odessa, TX, has 1 position for livestock. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.65/ hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 6/15/11 - 4/15/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX308687.

SALESPERSON PT/FT

Hampton Inn & Suites Convention Center. 7am-3pm & 3pm-11pm Apply in person, 1201 Convention Center Blvd.

Accounting/BookkEEping

Elevated Marketing Strategies is an internet marketing and advertising company based in Arizona. CURRENTLY SEEKING CLEAN, ENERGENIC, MOTIVATED, SELF CONFIDENT INDIVIDUALS WHO WISH TO MAKE $2K TO 5K PER WEEK. OUR CLIENTS ARE BIG SPENDERS WHO NEED HIGHLY PROFESSIONAL ONE ON ONE COACHING AND SUPPORT - YOU MUST HAVE SALES BACKGROUND AND BE ABLE TO CLOSE BIG DEALS. CALL 912-409-3349 or 480-406-5059

rEtAil

FRONT DESK AGENT

Needed for small yarn shop in Fr Qtr. Some knowledge of Knitting & Needlepoint helpful but not req’d. Please call for details betw 11am-6pm, 5224451.. Ask for Stacy.

VoluntEEr

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

[

NORD Foundation Seeking

Chief Development Officer

[

The New Orleans Recreation Development Foundation is a non-profit organization that financially supports the budget of the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission, which aims to provide access to quality recreational opportunities for all citizens of New Orleans, regardless of age. To do this, we’re building a staff of passionate and creative people to join our mission. The New Orleans Recreation Development Foundation seeks a seasoned development professional to be the strategic leader, visionary, and key architect to drive all fundraising efforts, including major individual, corporate, and foundation support. Working closely with the Foundation members, Commission, and CEO, you will pursue and cultivate high-potential major gifts. Minimum 5 years fundraising leadership experience.

miscEllAnEous $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

For more information and full job description visit http://www.nola.gov/Job-Opportunities. Please submit applications by May 31, 2011

Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

SERVERS/HOSTESSES Lucy’s Retired Surfers Bar & Restaurant New Orleans is looking for some energetic, fun, professional and dedicated servers/hostesses for morning and evening shifts. Hourly rate & gratuity. If you want to work in a fun high volume atmosphere, please come by Lucy’s at 701 Tchoupitoulas Street between the hours of 2pm and 4pm, Monday through Thursday ONLY. Our staff is high energy with great personality and brings the Surf culture to the concrete jungle of the warehouse environment. If you feel that you can enhance the Lucy’s world then come over and apply and talk to our management team. Shifts for the mornings start between 9am and 10am and end between 2pm and 4pm. Evening shifts start between 4pm and 6pm and may last as late as 2am. We don’t require set shifts but you must be available more than 3 days a week for either morning or evening shifts. Come work in the Surf Culture, bring the joy of a laid back but consistent environment to your friends and ours. — Please no phone calls —

Professional training in mixology and casino dealing

EmploymEnt Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

Dealingschool.com • 1-800-BARTEND


CLASSIFIEDS Abandoned Dog Needs Home

Young Rottie/Aussie girl is looking for a new home. She is about 40 lbs, super sweet and housebroken. Please email for more info.

AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS

ALLEY CAT

05 FORD TAURUS SE

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

4 dr, fully loaded, in excellent condition. Looks and drives lie new. Only $3888. Call 247-8862.

IMPORTED AUTOS

BASHFUL

DSH/MAIN COON MX. Gray/Black Tabby w/ white chest, feet. Appx. 1year old, Vet Ck/Neut./litter trained/ Rescue. Very sweet and gentle but a little shy (504) 460-0136. Wt. 11 lbs.

‘02 MERCEDES C230 Kompressor $7,995 504-368-5640

‘08 HONDA CIVIC

CHATTY CAT

4 Door, $16,995 504-368-5640

‘08 VW JETTA SE Leather, sunroof $14,995 504-368-5640

‘09 MAZDA 3 $14,995 504-368-5640

‘09 SUBARU IMPREZA $14,995 504-368-5640

Swedish & Deep Tissue Theraputic Massage

SPECIAL

60 MIN

90 & 120 min. Available 5 min from Elmwood

Hours: 10am-7:30pm Fri - Sat

Alicia

2010 HYUNDAI IMPREZA $11,995 504-368-5640

LA Lic# 520

16 yrs exp. Non-sexual

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

call (504)575-9171

‘04 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER $10,995 504-368-5640

‘06 HONDA PILOT EXL $15,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘07 JEEP WRANGLER $15,995 Call 504-368-5640

VANS ‘06 HONDA ODYSSEY $11,995 Call 504-368-5640

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

A Touch of

Aloha

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Waxing Services Available evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com La Lic #2983 • Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

Itty Bitty Inky

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

Kirin

Gorgeous 7 yr old male Siamese extremely sweet and loving ,neutered shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Kit Kit

SW/DT or Gen Relaxation. Safe, priv & quiet location. Awesome work. $60/hr & $95/1.5hr. 8am-9pm. 504-2311774. LA#509

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

NICK, BEAGLE/TERRIER MIX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

MASSAGE BY JAMIE

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

MERCHANDISE ART/POSTERS 1989 JF CACHET

Prof. Longhair. $100. (504) 330-6501

2004 AARON NEVILLE CACHET

50# Sweetheart. Young, loves everything and everyone. VetCk/Vacs/ Neut./Hsbkn/microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136.

Princess Leila

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 SFS Cat Adoptions has a large variety of sweet beautiful rescues that need good indoor homes-Siamese , Russian blues, etc all cats are spayed /neutered and vacs. 504 462-1968

BABY ITEMS Stroller

Joovy Caboose Tandem for 2 babiesRed-Like New $80. 832-1689

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

PETS

PET ADOPTIONS KOJAK

large cuddly orange Morris the cat look a like. Neutered ,shots rescue 504 462-1968

UP IN SMOKE

Tobacco, pipes, hookahs, vaporizers & more! 11am - 7pm daily Come visit us at our new location! 2101 MAGAZINE STREET (504) 899-0005 www.upinsmokeneworleans.com

LEGAL NOTICES BID NOTICE

BID NOTICE The CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY YOUTH AGAINST DRUGS FOUNDATION is seeking bids for REPLACEMENT HOUSING. Work includes construction of a 1,074 sf building at 3211 N. Robertson St and a 1,855 sf building at 1540 Piety St and associated sitework. A mandatory pre-bid conference will be held on May 19, 2011 at 3211 N Robertson St, NOLA. Bid deadline: May 26, 2011 at 4:00pm. Sealed bids to be submitted to CCYADF and delivered to Julien Engineering, 3520 Gen. DeGaulle Dr, Suite 1045, NOLA, 70114. Bid documents available at New Orleans Reproduction, 824 Union St, NOLA ph 504.522.4271 upon receipt of non-refundable payment. Instructions detailed in bid documents.

Residential & Commerical AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING Light/General Housekeeping Heavy Duty Cleaning Holiday Cleaning Supplies Provided Fully Insured & Bonded Locally owned & service NOLA area for over 19 years. (504) 250-0884 (504) 286-5868

FLOORS/CARPET/TILE GROUT WORKS, LLC

HANDYMAN HARRY’S HOUSE HELPERS * Small Jobs *Repairs *Carpentry *Painting *Install AND MORE! Insured & Priced-Right Harry’s Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown * 504-896-1500 Metairie * 504-896-1550

LOST/FOUND PETS GREY CAT LOST MID-CITY

SHINY GREY TABBY WITH PURPLE COLLAR, LAST SEEN ON THE CORNER OF SAINT ANN ST. AND ORLEANS RIGHT NEXT TO CITY PARK. NAMED SAILOR. VERY FRIENDLY, SMART, AND LOVED! IF FOUND OR IF YOU HAVE ANY INFO PLEASE CALL (504)444-8557 OR (337)281-8797. PLEASE HELP BRING SAILOR HOME!!

ANNOUNCEMENTS

To Advertise in

Call (504) 483-3100

ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

MISC. HOME SERVICES CONTAINER TRASH REMOVAL Self Contained & Stationary Compactors. Rentals, Sales, Service. Roll Off Containers (15, 20, 30, 40 Cu. Yds.) Fully Insured. Construction, Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Maritime. Free Quotes, Same Day Service, No Delivery Fee. RELIABLE DISPOSAL CO. INC. 835-1696

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

Inspector Gizmo is a 2 ½ yearold, neutered, Collie mix. He’s HOUSETRAINED, knows how to sit, fetch and give his paw. To meet Inspector Gizmo or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

AIR COND/HEATING GULF STATES AIR

Service & Sales 3 TON A/C Condenser & Installed $1399 5 Year Warranty Service Calls only $49.50 Gulf States Air (504) 464-1267

INSpEcTor GIzmo Kennel #A12689927

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

CLEANING/JANITORIAL CRISTINA’S CLEANING SERVICE

Let me help you with your Cleaning Needs including After Construction Cleaning Residential & Commerical Licensed & Bonded 232-5554 or 831-0606

ADOPTIONS

EMPLOYMENT

TREE MEDICS

$50 OFF Trimming & Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru May Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

Weekly Tails

SERVICES

ADOPTING YOUR NEWBORN

is our greatest dream. Endless love, joy & security await. Desiree & Dave, 1-888-503-2129. Expenses paid. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

PLUMBING

Tile Grout Cleaning, Color Sealing, Grout repair, Shower Restoration, Natural Stone Care, Tile Replacement, Recaulking. Commercial & Residential. Free Estimates. Jay Broadwell, 504-309-2509. www.grout-works.com

SUPERIOR AIRE INC

$100. Call (504) 330-6501.

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278 Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-7172577. www.amazinghands.us

3 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136 Local non profit no kill animal rescue +adoption org needs volunteers to sell chocolates or place in their business to raise $ to help the animals .Please call 504 888-1338.

RELAX RELAX RELAX

BYWATER BODYWORKS

STRESS? PAIN?

Elijah

GRAND OPENING MONDAY APRIL 25TH 4636 W. ESPLANADE Grand Opening Special 20-50% OFF selected items!

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE

LAKEVIEW CLEANING SERVICE

PETS

TANGLES Kennel #A12493804

Tangles is a 1-year-old, neutered, DSH with unusual brown tabby coloring. He’s an AMAZING cat who loves kids, dogs, cats and especially snuggling. To meet Tangles or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

NOTICE

$50

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

ANNOUNCEMENTS SUZETTE’S IS MOVING!

113


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 9012 ROSECREST LANE

1,420sq. ft, lot 62x120. Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors throughout, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 minutes from St. Matthews & St. Rita. REDUCED! $184,000.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. REDUCED PRICE! $149,900. Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

OLD METAIRIE LOT IN OLD METAIRIE

Ready to build on. House down & lot filled twice. 73 X 73. Great location. Reduced to $100,000. 504-669-3810

METAIRIE TOWERS 401 Metairie Rd

1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, renovated with new appliances and AC’s. $118,000. Call 504-275-5700

VACANT LOT - METAIRIE HEIGHTS

50 x 120. Ready to build $120,000 (504) 451-8118

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call 483-3100

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/ double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

LOTS/ACREAGE BIG BEAUTIFUL AZ LAND $99/mo. $0 down, $0 interest, Golf Course, Nat’l Parks. 1 hour from Tucson Int’l Airport. Guaranteed Financing, No Credit Checks. Pre-recorded msg. 800-631-8164 code 4057 www. sunsiteslandrush.com

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 740 N RAMPART

1350 sq ft, zone VCC-2, across from Armstrong Arch, corner of St Ann. $1750. Contact: 504-908-5210

BIG OFFICE SPACE ON CANAL 4220 Canal Street - Ground Floor On Streetcar Line 1,800 Sq. Ft. Large Central Room, three Separate Offices, Great for Group Practice or Studio $1,575/Mo + Utilities peggy.leblanc@ live.com, 488-6401

KENNER 3BR/2.5BA TOWNHOUSE

O/S prkng, wtr paid, all kit appls, priv yard, conv. location, cable ready, Pets ok. $1000/mo. 504-913-4803.

METAIRIE LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

227 CODIFER BLVD

Old Met 2 br lower duplex. Lg fenced yd, off st pkg, small pet OK. Walk to everything! $1100. 504-908-6751

ALGIERS POINT

CBD 339 CARODELET LUXURY 1 BDRM APTS

Newly renovated 1850’s bldg on CBD st car line. 600-1000 sq ft. $1200-$2000/mo. 18 Units. Catalyst Development L.L.C. Owner/Agent. . 504-648-7899

FRENCH QUARTER

1 bedroom, 1 bath, balcony with view of Mississippi & Fr Qtr. $1000/mo w/ dep. Call 504-909-2104.

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4014 ORLEANS AVE 1 BR

Hi ceil, wd flrs, w/d on site, cent air, walk to Park or Bayou. On Canal St Car line. $775/mo. 713/204-5342

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, $1150/mo. 432-7955.

BROADMOOR STUDIO

Furn lr & kit, c-a/h, incls appls, pd wtr & cable, w/d, fncd yd nr Xavier Univ. $600/mo. 504/319-3727

BYWATER 1023 PIETY ST

2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

BYWATER STUDIO

Located between Chartres and Royal, furn. including linens, kit ware, tv, cable, wi-fi, bottled water, the works - $850/mo free laundry on site Call Gloria 504-948-0323 .

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

RENTALS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

APARTMENTS

114

with

Issue Date May 31th Ad deadline May 25th

Washers and Dryers • Gated • Home Office Spaces Pet Friendly • 24/7 Emergency Maintenance 24/7 Online Resident Services Features vary by community.

Issue Date June 14th Ad deadline June 3rd


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe GARDEN DISTRICT

BAY ST. LOUIS

SLIDELL

WAGGAMAN

HARAHAN

BAYOU LIBERTY AREA

1539 ANNUNCIATION

3 bdrm, 2 ba, den, 1950 sq ft. Kitchen includes appliances. Crnr lot, patio. $249k

Ann de Montluzin Farmer de Montluzin Investments 504-895-1493 • 504-430-8737 www.demontluzinrealtors.com

Elegant Contemporary, 2 MASTER SUITES, 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, 2 Wood Burning Fireplaces, 4,000 Sq. Ft. Rear Yard. Wide Gate Street Access. Park Like Setting. $299,500.

Bay St. Louis Cottage 847 Sq Ft 1 Bedroom/1 Bath

New Construction / 50 X 100 Lot Will Consider All Offers.

$59,900

Call Susan @ Property Bay Coast 504 231-2445

REAL ESTATE

Call Property New Orleans Susan (504) 231-2445 or Greg (985) 640-7221

HARAHAN

55 Richelle Street 3BD/2BA Additional Large Lot $135,000 Prudential Gardner Kathy Hunter 985-688-5873

823 S. Clearview #323

Open Tues, 5/3 -11am - 1 pm

2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, freshly renovated. $127,500

Ann de Montluzin Farmer de Montluzin Investments 504-895-1493 • 504-430-8737

RIVER RIDGE 9012 Rosecrest Lane

GENTILLY

Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

SINGLE FAMILY HM

Across from Pontchartrain Golf Course! 4 BR/2 BA, CA&H. Built In electric. No smokers. Avail now! $1500/mo + deposit. Call 504-491-9834

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

1 BR $695/mo. 2 BR, $900/mo (2 BR includes utilities), hardwood/carpet floors. . 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE TOWNHSE- 6604 BELLAIRE

2 story, 3 BR upstairs, 2 half BA, 1 full BA. Formal dining. Washer, dryer, backyard. $1600. 504-301-7239

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

MID CITY 3122 PALMYRA STREET

COMPLETELY REMODELED

4340 S. Carrollton 1 BR,1 BA, new appl, w/water $825. 3222 Napoleon 2 Rms Avail, $600 w/utils. No Pets + Deposit • 504-376-4676

2 stories 1200sf, off St Charles, gated, secured, brick patio, LR, cathedral ceils, w/view, hdwd flrs, 2 tiled ba, br & stdy. Furn kit, wd, 1 yr lse. Dep req. $1500. 1831 Marengo St. 891-1263

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT

4 Bdrm home in Park-like setting! Close to the River! Wood Floors! Large Rooms! Garage and Carport! Garage currently used as a game room. $279,500. Donna Chandler • Re/Max Affiliates C: 504-669-4677 • O: 504-838-7649 Licensed in Louisiana, USA

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

2 Eff apts. Lower $625 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

2 UPTOWN APARTMENTS

2 BR & 3 BR. hdwd floors, cent a/c, Lusher School District, University area. $950 - $1300. Chris - 861-7528

NEAR UNIVERSITIES

Reduced! $184,000

Call (504) 915-3220 2218 GENERAL PERSHING

3 br, 1 ba apt, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, cble & wtr incl. Close to univ & stcar. Cat only. $1156/mo. Must make LESS than $33,000/year. Call Cindy, 236-3278.

2368 CHIPPEWA

1BR/1BA, tile flr, side entrance, pets negotiable. $600/mo + deposit. Owner on premises. Avail now! 228-8687.

1 Blk to St. Charles

3/1.5 Dublin near streetcar. Lv, furn kit, w/d hkp, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, scrn porch. $1000 + deposit. Owner/Agent, 442-2813.

6317 S. PRIEUR

GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO

2011 GEN PERSHING 2 APARTMENTS

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611 Adorable gated condo. 1 bdrm/1bath. O/S pkng, stainless appliances & granite. Garden District Patrol. $1100. Call (504) 432-1034.

1014 WASHINGTON AVE

Completely renov 2 br, 2 ba, cen a/h, wood flrs, w/d hkps, new appls, lg rear yard. $1395/mo. O/A, 891-3180.

3 BR, $1800; 1BR, $1100. Close to Univ, med & law schools. The best apts you’ll see. Beautifuln’ghborhd. Cent a/h, hdwd flrs. Water pd. Avail 6/1. No smoke no pets. Paula 504-9523131

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569 1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $675/mo w/wtr pd. No pets. (504) 858-2162.

S. FRONT NR. CHILDREN’S HOSP

Newly renov cottage. 1BR, lr, kit, w/d hkups. $750 + dep. No sec 8, no pets. New Owner Special: $100 off 1st mo. rent. 504-891-1889, 473-0821

GRT LOCATIONS!

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew - O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up 2833 MAGAZINE 1BR/1BA Mod kit, o/s pkng, pool, coin op laun, $800/mo 2100 BARONNE 2BR/1.5 ba, hdwd flrs, w&d hkups, Newly renov. $850/mo 891-2420

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 2707 ST. THOMAS

2 BDRM Camelback double. CA&H, all wd flrs. $675 per month + deposit. Call (504) 416-5923.

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

HOUSEMATE - METAIRIE

Renovated, spacious. 1800 sq ft. Medium size BR. Wireless internet & Direct TV in den and util incl. $500. No pets, no smokers. 377-8768

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804 1408 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" $1200 1726 St. Charles 1br/1ba Apartment Over Pralines $800 912 Harding Dr. 1br/1ba "Bayou Efficiency" $675

readers need

a new home to RENT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $700/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

CHARMING CARRIAGE HSE

You can help them find one.

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Real Estate” Section call 504.483.3100.

115


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS IRISH CHANNEL OASIS SALE pENDING

• 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 113

118

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

2911 CHIppEwA • $350,000 TWO FOR ONE - 2 HOmEs ON ONE LaRgE LOT MAIN HOUSE is a Caribbean style home with a secluded, tropical garden. It has 2 or 3 BR’s and 2 BA., Spacious updated kitchen w SS Appliances, Balcony overlooking garden, High ceilings, Pine Floors throughout 1750 sq ft.

GUEST / RENTAL COTTAGE ( 2907 Chippewa ) 2 BR w large living room, large fully furnished kitchen, wide veranda facing lush garden beds, private parking behind automatic gate. 1107 sq. ft..

Come experience this unique, enchanting property. Call me for an appointment. 504-913-2872

(504) 895-4663


Issue Date May 31th Ad deadline May 25th

O U R M I SS I O N . . . The Multifamily Council is the resource and advocate for developers, owners and managers of apartments and condominiums in Greater New Orleans and the state of Louisiana.

M FC C H A I R A N D BOA R D M E M B E R S Chair- Tammy Schindler; Vice Chair- Peter Young Associate Chair- Brent Couture Associate Vice Chair- Kimberly Rooney Membership Committee Chair- Carolyn Couto Legislative Committee Chair- Joshua Bruno Executive Committee- Charlie Fontenelle

BEECHGROVE & CLAIBORNE HOMES Tammy Schindler 504- 373-5581 804 Sherry Lane Westwego, LA 70094 Managed by NDC Real Estate Management

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT GROUP

& METRO WIDE APARTMENTS 304-HOUSE (4687) www.BrunoInc.com

Issue Date June 14th Ad deadline June 3rd

PARTNERSHIP IN PROTECTION Commercial Services 137 Canvasback Drive, St. Rose, LA 70087

(504) 486-5846

SOUTH COAST SOLAR Dependable - Renewable - Energy www.southcoastsolar.com

(504) 529-7869 Contact: Jerry Hymel

INTERESTED IN JOINING THE COUNCIL?

CONTACT: KATHY D. BARTHELEMY, COUNCIL DIRECTOR (504) 837-2700 OR KATHY@HOME-BUILDERS.ORG WWW.MFCNO.COM Affiliated with

H O M E B U I L D E R S A S S O C I AT I O N O F G R E AT E R N E W O R L E A N S 2424 N Arnoult Rd â&#x20AC;˘ Metairie, LA 70001

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 03 > 2011

5403 POWELL STREET

New Orleans, LA 70123-2306 (504) 731-8777 www.fd-cf.com

119


2011 Honda CBR250R 77 MPG - only $3999 MSRP.

Metropolitain - 114* MPG

Elite 110 - 106* MPG

Ruckus - 114* MPG

PCX - 110* MPG

Announcing the arrival of the all-new Honda CBR250R. A fuel-sipping, fun mode of transportation. See all the new 2011 models including the full line of Honda scooters at Honda of New Orleans today.

2428 Williams Blvd. Kenner, LA

(504) 466-3654

HondaofNoLa.com honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAW AND READ THE OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. *Honda’s fuel economy estimates are based on EPA exhaust emission measurement test procedures and are intended for comparison purposes only. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you ride, how you maintain your vehicle, weather, road conditions, tire pressure, installation of accessories, cargo, rider and passenger weight, and other factors. Operating your vehicle with a modified engine, emission control system or noise control system may be illegalFor rider training information or to locate a rider training course near you, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at 1-800-446- 9227. CBR® is a registered trademark of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. (04/11)


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