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GET THE LOOK: HOME

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FASHION

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BEAUT Y

A GAMBIT PUB LIC ATION | DECEMBER

BOOK REVIEW:

ONCE UPON A

2015

RAINBOWHUED HAIR

BAR CART

ESSENTIALS

PILLOW

UPTOWN

SPLENDOR SARAH OTT’S ANTIQUES-FILLED ABODE


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HOME•FASHION•BEAUTY

content s

CUE • DECEMBER 2015

35 CUE Tips

Pillow talk with designer & author Rebecca Vizard

41 Lusterphile Hair colors to dye for

12

NEW & COOL

Luxurious leather

15 Built in Style

Bar carts let the good times roll

29 Top it off

Stay cozy in these stylish hats and scarves

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31

STREET STYLE

CUE Kids

Pajama party

ON THE COVER: Sarah Ott and Mila in the master bedroom. Sarah reworked the bedroom’s focal point by removing the bed’s previous cornice and altering the silhouette of the existing tufted headboard. Bed linens from Restoration Hardware. PHOTO BY EUGENIA UHL

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Severn Avenue’s must-stop shops

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SARAH OTT

Inside the local fashion designer’s home

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE

8 Editor’s Letter 43 Resources


Beautiful Gifts for Every Budget

We Buy Vintage & Estate Jewelry • 4529 Magazine 891–1333 • MagpieVintageJewelry.etsy.com

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HAVE FUN

WITH A DATE

OR ENJOY THE NIGHT WITH A

GROUP OF FRIENDS.

4308 MAGAZINE ST • 894-9797 TUE-SUN LUNCH & DINNER • INSIDENIRVANA.COM WTC15603

I SHOULD HAVE FINISHED WRITING THIS EDITOR’S LETTER HOURS AGO, but instead I’m cruising Craigslist for vintage bar carts. (Flip to page 15 to read Eleonore Fisher’s excellent article about the home accessory du jour.) Favored by hostesses-with-the-mostests and lushes alike, bar carts are especially relevant as we move into holiday entertaining season. But all that is beside the point, sort of. The point is, I need a bar cart if I am ever going to be as classy as I want to be. Rivers Spencer told Fisher that when she comes home from work, she pulls out her Lucite bar cart and mixes herself a Manhattan. How cool is that? When I come home I pull a bottle of three-buck chuck from a sticky pantry shelf. “Living well is an art,” Spencer told Fisher. I’m inclined to agree, and it’s an art I could brush up on. When fashion magazine writers describe their publications as inspirational, it rubs me the wrong way, because “inspirational” usually means “full of stuff you can’t afford.” But I do feel truly inspired by this issue of CUE. Maybe I’ll ask for blue hair instead of red

ON

CUE EDITORIAL

ad ver t ising adminis t rator

Kandace Power Graves

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the next time I go to the salon (p. 41); maybe I’ll check out Rebecca Vizard’s book signing (p. 35) or maybe I’ll drink my cheap red from a proper wine glass instead of a mason jar or plastic Mardi Gras cup. But right now, I’m going back to hunting for that bar cart.

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new & cool

HIDE

SHOPPING

to seek

Luxurious, lounge-worthy leather pieces for staying in or stepping out

BY ELEONORE FISHER

What should shoppers be aware of when buying leather furniture? There are many different grades of leather, but fullgrain hide is the best investment. It will last 25 to 35 years. Anything else will last about three to four years and then begin peeling. Companies have learned to shave off leather, and the strength of the leather is in the top of the grain. Without it, the leather starts to peel. It’s like blistering.

MUST-HAVE MINI

BB Dakota Emerick leather skirt, $120 at Elle Boutique.

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EASY LIVING

Claremore chaise, $729.99 at Ashley Furniture Homestore.

BUTTONED UP

Vintage leather jacket with faux fur, $95 at Miss Claudia’s Vintage Clothing & Costumes.

Can leather’s lifespan be lengthened? No. There are leather conditioners, but the only way to extend the life of leather is to make sure it’s covered in fullgrain hide.

MIRROR, MIRROR

Large round mirror by Jacques Adnet, $1,399 at Design Within Reach.


SHOPPING

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PLAY IT COOL

BB Dakota Harper leather drape jacket, $326 at Elle Boutique. C LO T H E S, SH O E S & A C C E SSO RI E S FO R

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Dolce Vita “Oriana” sandals, $159 at Elle Boutique.

How often should leather furniture be cleaned? Wipe down leather with a damp cloth once a month.

PULL UP A CHAIR

“Gatsby” easy chair in cobblestone, $1,199 at La-Z-Boy Furniture. Gallery.

- Leather care and tips by Mark Benson, owner of Benson’s Upholstery DE C EM BER. 2 0 1 5 <<<

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Flip-top bar, $1,399 at La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries

GET THE PARTY

rolling Bar carts bring vintage glamour to the home. BY ELEONORE FISHER

BAR CARTS HAVE LONG SIGNALED OLD-FASHIONED SOPHISTICATION, recalling the cocktail party craze of the 1950s and ’60s. Call it the Don Draper effect: rolling liquor cabinets are back in style. “People love them. There are several on the market that look great,” says Rivers Spencer, interior designer and owner of Rivers Spencer Interiors.

“The vintage ones with big wheels are really popular. ... I have one in the store now with chrome and brass. It has a wine rack and that mid-century vintage feel.” Bar carts offer a range of capabilities, making them ideal for anyone without a home bar or for the host who wants to move the party from room to room. “They bring functionality,” Spencer says. “They don’t take up too much room because they’re visually open.” Bar carts can be used as kitchen islands, end tables or as a place to serve meals outside. “They’re a nice addition to the home,” says Spencer, who uses a Lucite bar cart to show off her collection of vintage decanters. Personal touches keep the cart in line with a room’s decor. “I like to put out cocktail books at the bottom,” Spencer says. “A bud vase and a bowl full of nuts are good touches.” As far as liquor goes, Angela Haber, bartender at Vaughan’s Pub in the New Orleans Athletic Club, suggests stocking vodka, gin, rum and bourbon, as well as fresh juice and Coca-Cola or Sprite for mixers. “There are others, but those are the major ones when you’re having someone over,” Haber says. “For making cocktails, have tonic water, soda water, bitters and dry vermouth,

Cocktail shaker, $54 at Arhaus

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Hand-embroidered “Buzzed” cocktail napkin by August Morgan, $32 for four at Hazelnut

New Orleans toile ice bucket, $84 at Hazelnut

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because it’s inexpensive and a must for a well-stocked bar. A good shaker and a strainer too.” Sarah Lisotta, manager at Martin Wine Cellar, recommends Peychaud and Angostura bitters for specialty cocktails. “The list only grows from there, depending on how much you want to delve into the cocktail culture,” she says. “Specialized syrups, shrubs and multiple flavors of bitters are big these days, as are multiple brands of premium spirits and esoteric liqueurs.” Glassware depends on the drinks that will be served. Spencer suggests keeping highball and Champagne glasses on hand. Less is more: fewer glasses give the cart a sophisticated, uncluttered look and keep bartending simple. For hosts offering a variety of drinks, martini glasses, stemware for wine and Champagne, and handsome double rocks glasses are viable options, Haber says.

“You can put both a mixed drink and a rocks drink [in it],” Haber says. “You can do a variety of things with a double rocks glass.” Old Fashioneds or Sazeracs are appropriate cocktails for festive gatherings. “Those are traditional classics,” Haber says. “I love to make them for the holidays.” For warmer days, Haber recommends sangria. “A white sangria is special and versatile in warmer weather,” she says. “In New Orleans, it can be made six months out of the year.” Haber recommends homemade hors d’oeuvres such as handstuffed olives and croutons with tapenade. “Hand-stuffed olives are a huge hit with an intimate crowd,” Haber says. “You can make several dozen in a flash and it goes a long way.” Both snacks complement a bar cart’s laid-back elegance. “Doesn’t everyone fix themselves a drink at the end of the day?” Spencer asks. “Living well is an art.”


HOME

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ESSENTIAL COCKTAIL PARTY RECIPES HAND-STUFFED OLIVES Combine 1/4 cup blue cheese or feta with 1/4 cup anchovies and stuff into pitted Queen olives. OLD FASHIONED Add two generous shakes of Angostura bitters and two shakes of Peychaud’s bitters to a rocks glass. Add an orange wedge and muddle. Pour one tablespoon of simple syrup and two ounces of your favorite bourbon or Scotch into the glass. Stir and fill with ice.

SAZERAC Pour one drop of anise liqueur, such as Herbsaint or Pernod, into a lightly chilled rocks glass, then pour it out. Fill shaker with ice one third of the way and pour in two ounces of rye whiskey. Add a tablespoon of simple syrup and two generous shakes of Peychaud’s bitters. Shake lightly and strain into the glass. Garnish with a lemon twist and one ice cube.

CROUTONS WITH HOMEMADE TAPENADE Cut baguettes into inch-thick slices and lightly toast. Spread with unsalted butter and tapenade (capers, anchovies and olives, chopped and mixed with olive oil).

Lisbon bar cart, $1,248 at Rivers Spencer

Crystal decanter, $145 at Arhaus

25% discount with the mention of this ad in store. Online shoppers use code CUE25 7808 M A P LE S T R EE T WWW.SARAHOTT.COM DE C EM BER. 2 0 1 5 <<<

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SOME THINGS OLD, SOME THINGS NEW

Designer Sarah Ott puts a modern twist on timeless antiques. BY LEE CUTRONE | PHOTOS BY EUGENIA UHL

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A fig leaf-patterned fabric covers the window seat in the solarium.


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AS NEWLYWEDS DECORATING THEIR FIRST HOME, Sarah and Spencer Ott discovered a shared passion for antiques. The couple enjoyed the hunt so much they became antiques dealers. Their home incorporates trumeau mirrors, beaded chandeliers, opulent silk draperies and plaster ceiling medallions, mostly acquired during that time and all convened with the trained eyes of people in the trade. “We were so fortunate when we first began decorating our first home to also begin our first business, Rue Toulouse Antiques,” Sarah says. “From that we inherited our love for Old World European furnishings. A majority of our home is filled with these pieces.” As a designer, Sarah puts her own spin on mixing old and new pieces. “Too much of one thing can get boring and seem tired,” she says. “I slowly began injecting more mid-century and modern pieces with clean lines to freshen things up. The house looks and lives better with something old and new.” Over the last decade, the Otts have gone from selling antiques to running Sarah Ott New Orleans (www. sarahott.com), a retail business that began with a scarf Sarah designed for an Academy of the Sacred Heart fundraiser. It was so well-received PAGE 24

NOLA or Nowhere black trucker-style hat by Sarah Ott. A painted French dining table seats eight in the dining room. Slipcovers and drapery by Katie Koch, brass and Lucite sconces from Circa Lighting, chandelier from Tara Shaw.

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The Otts added the arch that frames the kitchen like a casement opening when they enlarged and renovated the space. Custom concrete tops the large central island. Acrylic bar stools from CB2.

NOLA Strings women’s T-shirt, Vivre NOLA kid’s T-shirt and gold vermeil “ROAR” necklace by Sarah Ott.

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that she designed scarves for other schools. When a friend suggested she sell her scarves at the Preservation Resource Center’s Holiday Home Tour market, she expanded her designs to include streetcars, iron fences and a black-andgold “Who Dat” motif. Today, her New Orleans-inspired merchandise line includes T-shirts, caps, pillows, purses and jewelry. “My design inspiration comes from living and appreciating even the little things that I love about this city, from its delicious food [and] its magical moss that glistens in the sun after a > > > D EC EMBER.2 0 15


HOME

feat u re

A pillow covered with Sarah’s digitally printed oyster fabric personalizes an antique Italian daybed in the living room. Antique painted chest from Tara Shaw, terra cotta cache pot from Katie Koch Home, Lucite lamp from Source Interiors.

steamy summer rain shower, to the love we all have for the colors black and gold,” Sarah says. “Mixing that with my love of fashion ... I was able to grow my business and have fun doing it.” As the Otts built their business and raised their family (they have three children: Ella, 13, Everett, 10, and Merritt, 8), they took their home through various stages of renovation. In 2005, when they purchased the 1920s Georgian-style residence (with a 1960s addition) near Audubon Park, they gutted the kitchen and master bath, restored the hardwood floors, painted and added a closet/dressing room for Sarah. They also gutted three areas at the rear of the home, changing the existing flat roofline to mimic the rest of the house and turning the rustic brickand-beam interior into an office for Spencer. Several years later, they added a pool and patio to a neglected concrete-covered yard and made the garage into a showroom for Sarah’s business, which since has moved to a storefront on Maple Street. Three years ago, they remodeled an upstairs bath for the kids, added an outdoor kitchen and re-landscaped. Sarah says freshening the decor has been an ongoing endeavor and a creative outlet that complements her design work. “I guess you could say my design inspiration at home overlaps my design inspiration at work,” Sarah says. “I like to start with something classic — at home, an antique; at work, a New Orleans motif like PAGE 26

Place d’Armes modal scarf

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Sarah added a window seat and mid-century modern pieces — a Saarinen table and chairs — to the kitchen’s breakfast nook.

the Superdome. Then I add some clean lines, some great colors and create a balance of something old with a fresh updated look.” Nearly every room has received a new twist intended to lighten the atmosphere and tap into today’s design world. At the front of the house, two wall-mounted antique consoles have been transformed with yellow lacquered tops in place of their original faux bois finish. Pleated panels of peacock-colored linen ikat replaced the old ball-gown drapery from a decade ago. Graphic fabric covers a triple-seat settee, creating a bold counterpoint to its feminine lines. Antique sofas in the living room have been replaced with an inviting pair of upholstered sofas. The powder room, once gray, pops with coral lacquered walls. The breakfast area is home to iconic mid-century modern pieces — a Saarinen tulip table and chairs. The draped bed canopy and delicate chandelier in daughter Merritt’s room juxtapose a modern desk area against a backdrop of patterned wallpaper. Bright yellow benches add a flourish of color to the outdoor kitchen area. Sarah’s own designs bring a new dimension to the Otts’ cache of antiques. A pair of her oyster pillows — made with fabric digitally printed from a photograph — accents an Italian Regency-style daybed in the living room. Contemporary art adds a final layer. “I think years ago I would try to match a piece of furniture with how it was ‘supposed’ to look,” Sarah says. “Now I have more confidence to see there are so many other options out there. I love seeing an antique bench that used to have a silk pinstripe come alive with a more modern geometric design.” 

Lips and stripes coin purse and fold-over leather clutch by Sarah Ott.

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FA SHION

feat u re

HATTRICK Cozy up to fall’s best hats and scarves WRITTEN, STYLED AND MODELED BY ELEONORE FISHER

BEST WESTERN

HEAD START Dorfman Pacific wide-brim hat, $54 at Elle.

Knitted rabbit infinity scarf, $315 at Mimi.

Arctic fedora, $150 at Goorin Bros

Silver fox two-layer wool wrap, $785 at Mimi.

FEDORA-BLE Fedora, $150 at Goorin Bros.

Ombre scarf, $17.95 at Grandmother’s Buttons.

CLOCHE CALL Felt bow cloche, $41.95 at Grandmother’s Buttons.

Butterfly pashmina, $32 at Source Interiors.

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SHOPPING

c ue k id s

The one for me Budding beauty Pink flower romper, $42 at B Kids.

Blue striped onesie, $38 at B Kids.

JAMMIN’OUT BY NICOLE KOSTER

Snuggle up for bedtime stories in cozy pajamas

Who’s your crawdaddy? Crawfish pajama set, $36 at Haase’s.

Earn your stripes Striped set, $38 at Pippen Lane.

I’ll fly away

Blue seersucker PJ set with embroidered airplanes, $21.99 at Swap for Kids.

Toe the line

Booties, $27 at Pippen Lane. DE C EM BER. 2 0 1 5 <<<

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PILLOW TALK

BY CHRIST Y LORIO

Designer Rebecca Vizard discusses her craft in a new book, Once Upon A Pillow.

Vizard sources textiles from markets worldwide. PHOTO COURTESY POINTED LEAF PRESS

Rebecca Vizard will sign copies of Once Upon A Pillow at Hazelnut from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 3. PHOTO COURTESY POINTED LEAF PRESS

REBECCA VIZARD HAS MADE A CAREER OF SELLING LUXURIOUS, HANDCRAFTED PILLOWS, which feature tapestries, ecclesiastical embellishments and textiles that date as far back as the 17th century. This month, she releases her first book, Once Upon A Pillow (Pointed Leaf Press), which offers a beautiful homage to her love affair with textiles as well as a window into her design process. It also invites readers into Locustland, the home she and her husband built on her grandfather’s property in St. Joseph, Louisiana in 1989. Vizard’s writing style is conversational. Originally she planned to hire a ghostwriter, but her publisher persuaded her otherwise. “When my publishing team read my directions to drive [to Locustland], they ganged up on me the first night and said they thought my direc-

tions were so entertaining that I needed to write the book in the same voice,” Vizard says. They also convinced Vizard to scrap her original idea about textiles in flea markets around the world in favor of something closer to home: her estate at Locustland. “They pointed out how much they thought my pillows were influenced by my surroundings, which I was actually not aware of until I saw the photography,” Vizard says. “They taught me something about myself.” Vizard included autobiographical information because of what she’d observed at previous speaking engagements. “The first time I started talking about antique textiles, I saw everyone’s eyes glass over after about 10 minutes of textile talk,” she says. “When I started PAGE 37

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talking about starting my business … everyone perked up. I found if I mixed the two together and made it a little lighter, people would come away remembering the story that went with the textile. It’s like tricking people into learning something they might not have been as interested in originally.” Vizard is internationally known for her work in interior design, but she got her start with children’s clothing in the mid-1980s. Needing a job that let her stay home with her newborn daughter, Vizard spent $75 on plain white baby clothes and fabric paint and crafted embellished, hand-painted clothing to sell to an upscale children’s store. She “accidentally” became an interior designer after decorating her own home; friends brought her their interior decorating conundrums, which turned into paid work. Vizard had trouble finding pillow designs she liked. On most jobs, she spent more time finding the perfect pillow than on the sofas and drapery. While pillow hunting in 1994 for a Manhattan interior design job, she had an epiphany. “I had a fairly modern chair that I wanted to [pair with] an antique textile pillow to soften the lines, and everything I found was extremely expensive with gobs of passementerie,” Vizard says. “I realized after scouring the Big Apple for a year that there was a need for an antique textile pillow with clean lines. I wanted my pillows to be able to go in a modern environment or a traditional setting.” Vizard’s rural home is removed from major design hubs, but even in her small community, she found the contacts she needed to launch her business.

A photo from Once Upon A Pillow showcases Vizard’s handiwork. PHOTO COURTESY POINTED LEAF PRESS

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“I knew how to sew and there are some very talented seamstresses here,” Vizard says. She attributes her success to Gerrie Bremermann, owner of Bremermann Designs, to whom she sold her pillows for the first three years. “When Gerrie used [my pillows] in all of her projects, they started showing up in national magazines,” Vizard says. “She is the one who put me on the map.” In 1999, Neiman Marcus placed an order for Vizard’s pillows. Soon, her designs landed on the cover of magazines including House Beautiful, Elle Decor and Architectural Digest. Each chapter in Once Upon A Pillow is accompanied by beautiful, detailed images of Vizard’s work and focuses on an aspect of Vizard’s life, textiles or the design process. There’s also an extensive glossary of terms Vizard wishes she’d known when she got started. When designing, Vizard feels like the textiles speak to her. “The patina of the metallic threads often dictates what color I want to use for the ground,” she says. “I always lay out the textile and decide where to cut according to the composition. I pay a lot of attention to the negative space and the proportions. Then I decide what size it will be.” After putting so much care into her pillows, Vizard says it can be difficult to part with them. While working on her book she was reunited with some of her old projects. “I had to borrow the pillows on my sofa from a client for this photo in the book,” she says. “My favorite pillows I had there before went to Abu Dhabi. They were actually a little too fancy for my house, but they were amazing.”

Vizard’s pillows combine antique textiles with clean lines. PHOTO COURTESY POINTED LEAF PRESS

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BE AUT Y

lu ster ph i le

Rainbow bright Thinking of taking the Technicolor plunge? Color specialist Kayla Chaisson of Paris Parker answers the FAQ.

Stylist Kayla Chaisson’s hair has been every color of the spectrum, often “all at the same time,” she says. PHOTO COURTESY KAYLA CHAISSON

BY MISSY WILKINSON What are the most popular colors right now? The biggest two are purple and silver in every way: lavender silver, blue silver, white silver. I just did this girl aquamarine — her roots are cobalt, her midshafts are midnight blue and she has sky blue on the tips. It’s like something you’d see on Tumblr. What is the process for going from, say, dark brown to blue? We have a consultation, we go over multiple pictures and I move forward with a test strand. I see how high [the hair] will lift before promising we can create the outcome [the client] is asking for. We decide if it’s doable, and if it’s not, we decide on a medium that will get us a step closer to where we want to be and that is still a beautiful color.

accepted, so people are expressing their fun, funky sides. People are more comfortable being themselves and doing something they have always wanted to do.

Chaisson dyed this client’s hair purple. PHOTO BY KAYLA CHAISSON

Is this a trend for younger people or can anyone wear bright colors? I don’t think there should be a number on any form of self-expression. I have a 50-year-old client who works for a big corporation, and we just put purple peekaboos in her hair. When you have a creative soul, you can pull off anything. How much does it cost? Depending on hair length and desired outcome, the price can get as high as $300, especially if we have to do two processes.

How is this different from using Manic Panic at home? This is permanent hair dye. It could last up to eight weeks depending on the strand and hair texture. The hair color I use is called Aveda Jewels of the Earth. I use a scale and weigh the color in grams at the right proportions to get the exact outcome you want.

What if you want to dip your toe into the water before committing to a whole head of bright color? A peekaboo is a way we can give you something fun that you can hide in your (uncolored) hair. It doesn’t fall on the hairline — it is underneath the hair, so it can be hidden or you can make it more apparent when you part or pull back your hair a certain way.

Why has hair color gotten more outside the box? More famous people are rocking the fashion colors, and they have a big influence on the younger generation. A lot of things are becoming more socially

How should you maintain your hair once you go bright? I suggest any type of color-conserving lines [of shampoo and conditioner]. Doing so will give utmost longevity on the hair color. DE C EM BER. 2 0 1 5 <<<

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Wear your best plaid and join us for a day of racing, drink specials, food trucks, games and fun.

PRESENTS

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12 • NOON – 4PM FAIR GROUNDS RACE COURSE & SLOTS Wear a new plaid look. Donate something worn. We will be collecting clothing donations at the event to benefit the Bloomin' Deals Thrift Shop.

For more information and to RSVP, visit

www.bestofneworleans.com/ponies EVENT PARTNERS 20

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resou rces A LISTING OF THE RETAILERS AND PROFESSIONALS FEATURED IN THIS ISSUE OF CUE.

new & cool

Hazelnut

PAGE 12

(5515 Magazine St., 504-891-2424; www.hazelnutneworleans.com)

Ashley Furniture Homestore

Martin Wine Cellar

(5151-B Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 504-733-8722; www.ashleyfurniturehomestore.com)

Benson’s Upholstery

(3044 Galleria Drive, Metairie, 504-831-5244; www.bensons-upholstery.com)

Design Within Reach

(3138 Magazine St., 504-891-6520; www.dwr.com)

Elle Boutique

(2126 Magazine St., 504522-4929; www.facebook.com/ elle.neworleans)

La-Z-Boy

(3232 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504-837-7500; www. la-z-boy.com)

Miss Claudia’s Vintage Clothing & Costumes

(4204 Magazine St., 504-897-6310; www.missclaudias.com)

built in style

( 714 Elmeer Ave., 504-896-7300; 2895 Highway 190, Mandeville, 985-951-8081; 3827 Baronne St., 504-899-7411; www.martinwinecellar.com)

New Orleans Athletic Club

(222 N. Rampart St., 504-525-2375; www.neworleansathletic club.com)

Rivers Spencer

(3909 Magazine St., 504-609-2436; www.riversspencer.com)

fashion PAGE 29

Elle Boutique

(2126 Magazine St., 504-5224929; www.facebook.com/elle. neworleans)

Goorin Bros.

(709 Royal St., 504-523-4287; 2127 Magazine St., 504-522-1890; www. goorin.com)

Grandmother’s Buttons

PAGE 15

(2105 Magazine St., 504-249-5821; www.grandmothersbuttons.com)

Arhaus

Mimi

(939 Girod St., 504-581-6684; www.arhaus.com)

(5500 Magazine St., 504-2696464; www.miminola.com)

PAGE 44

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resou rces A LISTING OF THE RETAILERS AND PROFESSIONALS FEATURED IN THIS ISSUE OF CUE. PAGE 43

Join us at Winston’s Pub, 531 Metairie Road, every 1st & 3rd Thursday of the month

20% of the bar profits go to Take Paws Rescue. D O G S W E L C O M E D I N T H E B E A U T I F U L PAT I O .

“Since 1969”

COUPON

stock colors

7

.99 bunch

$

of ten

EXPIRES 12/10/15 CASH & CARRY ONLY. NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER COUPONS. COUPON MUST BE PRESENT AT TIME OF PURCHASE.

METAIRIE 750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716 NEW ORLEANS

COVINGTON 1415 N. HWY 190 (985) 809-9101

3115 MAGAZINE · 899-9555 BATON ROUGE

711 JEFFERSON HWY

VISIT US ON

www.SABABIJEWELRY.com

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

Look for CUE’s

JANUARY ISSUE PUBLISH DATE

Dec. 8

AD DEADLINE

Nov. 25 317 BURGUNDY ST, Ste 14 504.581.3490 Tues - Thurs 10:30 - 8 | Fri - Sat 10:30 - 6

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CALL SANDY TO RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE TODAY 504.483.3150

Source Interiors

(2103 Magazine St., 504-561-7558; www.sourcenola.com)

lusterphile PAGE 41

Paris Parker

(citywide; www.parisparker.com)

CUE kids

street style

B Kids

Blink

PAGE 31

(115 Metairie Road, Metairie, 504-301-2954; www.bkidsboutique.com)

Haase’s

(8119 Oak St., 504-866-9944; www.haases.com)

Pippen Lane

(2930 Magazine St., 504-269-0106; www.pippenlane.com)

Swap for Kids

(7722 Maple St., 504-218-5996; www.swapforkids.com)

CUE tips PAGE 35

Hazelnut

(5515 Magazine St., 504-891-2424; www.hazelnutneworleans.com)

PAGE 46

(3620 Severn Ave., Metairie, 504883-8054; www.shopblinkboutique.com)

Cafe Equator

(2920 Severn Ave., Metairie, 504888-4772; www.cafeequator.com)

Foi Boutique

(3334 Severn Ave., Suite 4, Metairie, 504-875-4364; www. facebook.com/foi.metairie)

Maiya

(3000 Severn Ave., Suite A, Metairie, 504-324-8745; www. facebook.com/maiyaboutique)

Rapp’s Luggage

(3256 Severn Ave., Metairie, 504885-6536; www.rapps.com)

St. Charles Vision

(3200 Severn Ave., Suite 102, Metairie, 504-887-2020; www. stcharlesvision.com)


BIG GIFT BOOK M A K I N G G I V I N G

G I F T E A S Y

ISS UE DA TE

NOVEMBER 24, 2015 DEADLINE

NOVEMBER 13, 2015 CALL OR EMAIL YOUR GAMBIT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE PHONE 504.486.5900

or Ad Director Sandy Stein: 504.483.3150 sandys@gambitweekly.com DE C EM BER. 2 0 1 5 <<<

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S T R E E T

S T Y L E

2900-3700 Severn Ave., Metairie TEXT AND PHOTOS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Just beyond Lakeside Shopping Center lies a treasure trove of local boutiques. Foi Boutique

(3334 Severn Ave.) Clothing from distressed boyfriend jeans to poofy fur vests fills this women’s boutique, and there’s a generous section of chic game-day clothes in LSU and New Orleans Saints colors.

Blink

(3620 Severn Ave.) Mothers and daughters shop alongside each other at this trendy, chandelier-lighted boutique, where clothes range from $19 to $100. The store features daily specials and weekly giveaways through November.

17TH ST.

18TH ST.

19TH ST.

St. Charles Vision

SEVERN AVE.

20TH ST.

(3200 Severn Ave., Suite 102) Designer frames meet cutting-edge vision-correcting technology at this doctor-owned eye-care office, which features seven locations in the greater New Orleans area.

Rapp’s Luggage & Gifts

(3256 Severn Ave.) Find gifts, luggage and purses by lines including the local Hadaki brand at this family-owned business, which celebrates its 150th anniversary this year.

21ST ST.

22ND ST.

Maiya

(3000 Severn Ave., Suite A) Faux leather shorts, sequined skater dresses, disco-inspired jumpsuits — if you’re an aspiring Kardashian, make this sun-filled boutique your first stop.

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KENNETH ST.

Cafe Equator

(2920 Severn Ave.) After boutique-hopping, slip into a booth at this dim and modern Thai spot for a curry and a cocktail.


it’s why you shop. Saks Fifth Avenue Allen Edmonds Anthropologie Armani Collezioni BCBGMAXAZRIA Brooks Brothers Donald J Pliner French Connection lululemon athletica Morton’s The Steakhouse Tiffany & Co.

333 Canal Street | 504.522.9200 | Monday-Friday 10-7 | Saturday 10-8 | Sunday 12-7 | www.theshopsatcanalplace.com The Shops at Canal Place

theshopsatcanal

theshopsatcanalplace


CUE, Dec. 2015  

Bar carts; stylish hats and scarves; hair colors to dye for; shopping Severn Avenue; and more

CUE, Dec. 2015  

Bar carts; stylish hats and scarves; hair colors to dye for; shopping Severn Avenue; and more