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viously served as president of Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond. No doubt Moffett’s tenure at SLU allowed him to get to know the New Orleans region. Others on the committee with local ties include voting members David Guidry of Harvey, Gerald Hebert of Kenner and Renee Lapeyrolerie of New Orleans — all of whom are UL System board members — and UNO faculty representative Neal Maroney. Also encouraging was Moffett’s announcement the committee will hold all its meetings at UNO, starting with the first meeting this fall, and that all meetings will be open to the public. The first meeting will give the UNO community a chance to suggest qualifications desired in its new leader. A UL System announcement noted the committee will first hire a national search firm to attract qualified applicants.

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It’s time for UNO to take its place among the nation’s leading urban universities.

Although lawmakers and Jindal approved UNO’s move to the UL System, the transfer won’t become official until it is OK’d by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, the accrediting body for institutions of higher learning. UL officials hope that approval will come at the association’s December meeting — and that a new UNO president can be chosen next spring. “While it may be unusual to conduct a presidential search while the university’s governance is in transition, it would be a disservice to UNO to delay the process,” Moffett said. We agree. UNO’s success is vital to the region and to the state. That the university reestablished itself after Hurricane Katrina is a testament to the resiliency of its faculty and students. Now it’s time for UNO to take its place among the nation’s leading urban universities. Selecting the right person as UNO’s next president will be the first and most important step in that journey.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

hese are interesting — and challenging — times for the University of New Orleans. During the recent legislative session, Gov. Bobby Jindal tried to merge UNO with nearby Southern University at New Orleans. That idea proved to be politically untenable. Instead, lawmakers passed a measure moving UNO from the LSU System to the University of Louisiana System, which offers the Lakefront campus a more hospitable administrative climate. Meanwhile, UNO is without a chancellor. Former Chancellor Tim Ryan was abruptly terminated last fall, and a nascent search for his replacement by LSU officials was deferred while lawmakers debated UNO’s move to the UL System. Now the search for a new leader at UNO has resumed, but with a brand-new committee. Even more than moving the university to a different management system, the search for a new UNO president (the UL System uses the term “president” rather than “chancellor”) will have an enormous local impact — not just at UNO, but across southeast Louisiana. UNO is a major urban research university and a vital economic engine for the entire metropolitan area. Historians credit the university, which was established in 1958, with creating the metro area’s middle class. In its first half-century, UNO was blessed with outstanding leaders — from founding Chancellor Homer Hitt to the energetic Gregory O’Brien to Ryan. In these difficult economic times, when state budget cuts threaten programs at all public colleges and universities, it is vital the new search committee gets it right. Simply put, UNO needs a leader who not only understands the uniqueness of New Orleans but also the unique challenges and opportunities that await UNO in the coming decade — and how UNO should respond to those challenges and opportunities. The new university president must be able to raise money as well as academic standards; he or she must have scholarly credentials as well as political skills — but the new president must not be part of Louisiana’s inbred political network. In fact, the search for a new UNO president must be national in scope. The 14-member search committee is dominated by members of the UL governing board, but it includes several voting as well as non-voting members from the New Orleans area. That’s a good sign. The local non-voting members include businessman Gary Solomon, a UNO alumnus who briefly chaired the search committee for the LSU System; civic leader Susan Hess, also a UNO grad; UNO Student Government Association president John Mineo; and UL System president Randy Moffett, who pre-

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PONTCHARTRAIN™

NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

HEY BLAKE, MY DAUGHTERS’ GREAT-GRANDFATHER TOLD THEM AN AMAZING TALE CONCERNING THEIR GREAT-AUNT ROSELINA GARAFALO (I’M NOT SURE OF THE SPELLING). SHE WAS THE FIRST FEMALE STREETCAR DRIVER AND THE FIRST FEMALE NOPD OFFICER. CAN YOU VERIFY IF THIS IS TRUE? CHRISTINA CARTER

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

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DEAR CHRISTINA, I’m sorry to tell you there’s no truth to this story. New Orleans’ first “conductorette” was Mary Fischer, hired in 1943. Alice Monahan became the city’s first policewoman in 1915. The story of the women who pioneered these jobs is important. During World War II, men left their jobs to serve in the armed forces, creating a labor shortage in the U.S., and women were encouraged to take those jobs. Beginning in 1943, women went to work for New Orleans Public Service Inc. (NOPSI), which ran the dozens of streetcar and bus lines in the city. NOPSI first recruited women whose husbands or male relatives had worked for the company before entering the military. The women who went to work there used the men’s badges, promising to return them when the war was over. Many women applied for “motorette” and conductorette positions and proudly wore the uniform — a white shirt and blue trousers — of the streetcar operators. More than 200 women from New Orleans and rural areas throughout the South worked on the streetcars in jobs that paid significantly higher wages than some other businesses. The women were responsible for the same duties as men: impromptu maintenance, collecting transit fares, keeping the cars on schedule and (sadly) enforcing racial segregation. By February 1946, all of the women employees had been replaced by returning veterans. Most women left their jobs happily, but others were disappointed to go. It would not be until the mid-1970s that women again worked as streetcar operators. In the early 20th century, the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) hired women as “matrons” to handle children, search female suspects or prisoners, and handle a variety of duties at central lockup. Alice Monahan applied for the position of policewoman and was chosen by a mayoral committee. Her job was to improve conditions at Milneburg, a resort on Lake Pontchartrain. In 1918 Roseada Reynolds was commissioned as New Orleans’ first motion picture inspector (charged with telling the police chief which movies needed to be cenored). By the 1920s, women also were working as clerks and switchboard opera-

tors. Antoinette Reynolds, Roseada’s sister, was hired as a clerk in 1936 and eventually became a desk sergeant. She was commander of the payroll department when she retired in 1967. In 1950, Irene Chetta was the first woman to pass the New Orleans Civil Service exam and become a policewoman. Claire Olsen Reilly was the first woman to attend the city’s police acad-

Mary Fischer became NOPSI’s first streetcar conductorette in 1943. PHOTO COURTESY UNO HISTORY DEPARTMENT

emy, graduating in 1955 as valedictorian of recruit class No. 2. She worked undercover in narcotics and was assigned to work with the Secret Service when President Lyndon B. Johnson and his family visited New Orleans for Mardi Gras. Reilly took the lieutenant’s exam and in 1968 became the first woman promoted to lieutenant. Shortly afterward, Reilly was chosen to be the commander of a new policewomen division comprising all academy-graduated women, many of whom were police officers. In was in 1971 that Carol Hewlett, the first female district commander, convinced Supt. Clarence B. Giarrusso to allow policewomen to wear the same uniform as their male counterparts. Three years later, in 1974, women were assigned to patrol duty. Finally, in 1976, the height requirement for officers of 5 feet 8 inches was eliminated after a lawsuit, and many more women applied to the NOPD.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> CLANCY DUBOS MORE SCUTTLEBUTT < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 15 13 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“President Obama continues to reiterate his commitment to New Orleans, and I am sure that his plans to reduce the deficit while increasing government efficiency will help spur the revitalization of our economy and quality of life.” — Mayor Mitch Landrieu, responding to Obama’s July 25 speech about the Washington budget impasse. “Once again, the President has misled our country by blaming everyone but himself for the debt problem we face. My fellow conservatives and I have listened to the will of the people and worked hard to pass a bill that cuts government spending now, caps spending in the future and demands a balanced budget.” — Rep. Jeff Landry, R-New Iberia, on the budget impasse.

MEET JOHN DOUGH

The Costs of Freedom

Freedom Riders escape from a burning Greyhound bus following a stop in Anniston, Ala., where white protestors stormed the bus and tossed a bomb through a window.

FREEDOM RIDERS RECALL A TUMULTOUS BUS TRIP THAT HELPED AWAKEN THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN THE DEEP SOUTH. BY DY L A N WAT S ON

H

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PHOTO COURTESY MISSISSIPPI PUBLIC BROADCASTING/ CORBIS

make sure the court ruling was enforced by riding buses through Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, ending the tour with a rally in New Orleans. The Freedom Riders group included seven blacks and six whites. Black Riders would sit in the front of the bus, white Riders in the back, and an interracial pair would sit together. A couple of the Riders would sit in a traditional segregated manner, so they could bail out any group members who got arrested. They planned to take two buses, a Greyhound and a Trailways. Group members had completed a four-day nonviolence training in Washington, D.C., where they learned how to passively protect themselves and deal with

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BoUQuets

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

The Greater New Orleans Foundation

has awarded $1.1 million in grants to six nonprofits helping south Louisianans recover from the oil disaster. The groups are the Catholic Charities Diocese of Houma-Thibodaux, the Community Center of St. Bernard, the St. Bernard Battered Women’s Program, Catholic Charities of New Orleans, the Plaquemines Community C.A.R.E. Centers Foundation and Coastal Communities Consulting.

Dave Dixon,

the late businessman known as the “Father of the Superdome” and the man who helped New Orleans land the Saints NFL franchise in 1966, may have a street renamed for him. City Council president Arnie Fielkow plans to file for the renaming at the council’s Aug. 4 meeting. If the council and City Planning Commission agree, a portion of Girod Street near the Superdome will become Dave Dixon Drive.

Community Church Unitarian Universalist (CCUU)

in Lakeview will become the first Energy Starrated place of worship in the country when it completes installation of solar panels in the next few weeks. CCUU members rebuilt the church after Hurricane Katrina with an eye toward making it as green as possible, including rainwater cisterns and high-efficiency appliances. When the solar panels are installed, they will cover 87 percent of CCUU’s roof.

Renee Gill Pratt,

the former New Orleans City Councilmember whose previous trial ended in a hung jury, was found guilty July 25 of one charge of racketeering conspiracy. A federal jury deliberated for more than two hours before issuing its verdict in U.S. District Judge Ivan Lemelle’s courtroom. Gill Pratt was found to have conspired with the Jefferson political family to divert state monies. She will be sentenced Oct. 26.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

ank Thomas walked up the steps of the Greyhound bus on a sunny May 4, 1961. As he surveyed its drab, blue-gray interior, the lanky 19-year-old African-American student from Howard University never imagined he soon would come close to meeting his end on its floor. He was part of the Freedom Rides organized by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) to test the 1960 Supreme Court decision Boynton v. Virginia, which made racial segregation illegal in interstate bus stations, restaurants, bathrooms and on buses. CORE planned to

Political watchers were eagerly sifting through the latest filings with the state Ethics Administration last week, hoping to glean advance peeks at candidates’ financial strength on the eve of qualifying. The state ethics office requires candidates for statewide offices to file quarterly financial reports, and the latest round was due July 2. Qualifying is Sept. 6-8. The reports offer strong hints as to who’s in and who’s out. • The lieutenant governor’s race looks to be a well-financed scrap, with Republican incumbent Jay Dardenne raising more than $450,000 in just a few months. Challenger Billy Nungesser, also a Republican, pulled down nearly $287,000. Their cash-on-hand totals are reversed, however, with Dardenne at $524,000 while Nungesser has just over $1 million. Nungesser is already out working the state. In the past two weeks, he’s done

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

potential physical altercations. But Thomas says he wasn’t prepared for the violence they encountered.

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The Freedom riders’ FirsT sTop was richmond, Va. some white onlookers at the bus station jeered at the riders, but nothing else happened. The group stopped in six cities before arriving in Charlotte, N.C., where black riders walked into the white waiting room and milled around the station without incident. it was an uneventful stop — until Charles person decided to get his shoes shined. “You’re sitting on a bus, you’re getting on and off the bus, and your shoes get scuffed up a lot,” person says. “as i was exiting the restroom, i saw the shoeshine man there. i asked him, you know, ‘Can i get a shoeshine’? he said, well, he couldn’t shine my shoes, and if i persisted i would be arrested.” Getting a shoeshine wasn’t one of Core’s planned tests, so person dropped the matter, but Joe perkins, another Freedom rider, demanded a shoeshine. Charlotte police officers arrested him. Things turned violent when the bus stopped in winnsboro, s.C., and black riders John Lewis and albert Bigelow walked into the white waiting room. “They were accosted by several white toughs,” person recalls. “They were punched and they were roughed up pretty good. Before it got too bad, the local authorities came in and stopped it.” a short time later, Thomas sat down at a whites-only lunch counter at the bus station and was arrested. when he arrived at the police station, Thomas says officers led him handcuffed from their car straight to a jail cell without booking him. “as i remember, back at the time, the fact that they didn’t fingerprint me, i thought that was weird,” he says. police also didn’t take a mug shot or ask him for any personal information. There is no record Thomas ever was detained at the winnsboro police department. That night, Thomas says, police opened his cell and announced they were going to take him for a ride. “where am i going?” Thomas asked. he says one of the officers replied, “we’re going to take you to the bus station so you can leave.” The officers put Thomas in a patrol car and headed toward the bus station. when Thomas saw the station in the distance, he knew something was wrong. “i could see it — all the lights in the station were out,” Thomas recalls. “a large crowd of white men were there around the bus station. it looked as though they’d been having a good time, been drinking, and i could see a few


THE GREYHOuNd LEFT AN HOuR AHEAd of the Trailways bus. After several hours, an Anniston city limits sign came into view. The streets downtown were empty, but as the Greyhound turned down a road leading to the bus station, the Riders could see a mob of men, many of them Klansmen, surrounding the terminal. “As the bus pulled into the station, they all surrounded the bus, yelling and screaming,” Thomas says. “I remember the bus driver getting off the bus and saying, ‘Look fellas, all I did was drive y’all here.’” Before he left, the driver locked the door from the inside. Thomas says a throng of white men began beating on the bus and trying to get inside. After a while, a different driver unlocked the driver’s-side door and attempted to move the bus. “As he tried to pull out, there were men in front of

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the bus,” Thomas says. “Several of them sat down in front of the bus, and as [the vehicle] lurched towards them, I guess that’s when they moved to let the bus come past them.” The Freedom Riders soon had to contend with another problem. “Three or four pickup trucks were in front of the bus and would not let it pass, and a long caravan of cars were behind the bus,” Thomas says. The bus was sandwiched between the two groups, and soon it slowed down. Thomas says he later learned the tires of the bus had been slashed. “The bus driver had to pull the bus over to the shoulder of the road,” Thomas says. “Strangely convenient, because at the point that the bus pulled over, a crowd of people had gathered. They had just come from church.” The crowd began beating the bus with sticks, rocks and bats. “One guy with, (what) looked like a heavy rock, threw it up against the window, and I was sitting next to the window, and the window cracked, but it didn’t shatter,” Thomas says. Then someone threw a Thermite bomb through a broken window, setting the bus on fire. “I remember thinking, ‘I’m going to die,” Thomas says. “And if I get off this bus, the crowd outside’s going to beat me to death. And if I stay here, and I breathe this stuff, maybe it’ll put me to sleep, and that’s how I’ll die.’” Thomas decided he wasn’t going to die lying on the floor of the bus gasping for air. “When the smoke gets in your lungs, involuntary reactions take over,” he says. “You fight for air.” Thomas got up and slammed his shoulder against the door to get it open, but several men had wedged themselves against the outside of the door to prevent it from opening. That could have been the end, but

Freedom Riders John Lewis (left), now a U.S. Congressman from Georgia, and Jim Zwerg are splattered with blood after being attacked and beaten in Montgomery, Ala., in May 1961. (Zwerg is checking his teeth for damage.) Photo Courtesy MississiPPi PubliC broadCasting/ Corbis

the bus’ fuel tank exploded, causing the crowd outside to run away. The Freedom Riders escaped the bus, Thomas says, but were attacked by several men, including one who hit him with a baseball bat. Thomas says he spotted a state trooper who was doing nothing to stop the attacks and ran to him for protection: “I got behind him and, in the process of doing that, I put my hands on him and, you know, pushed him in front of me.” Thomas says he was terrified to see the trooper pull out his gun. But instead of pointing the gun at Thomas, the officer fired into the air and said to the crowd, “OK, OK. You’ve had your fun.” The crowd calmed down. The incident wasn’t over. When an ambulace showed up, its drivers refused to take African-American victims to a hospital. Conversely, white Riders didn’t want to leave their black counterparts at the scene and refused to board the whitesonly ambulance. The state trooper finally ordered ambulance drivers to take all the Riders to a hospital. When they arrived, they found the hospital had separate emergency rooms for whites and African-Americans. To make matters worse, a mob had gathered. The white emergency room refused to treat the blacks, and the white Riders refused to be treated if their black peers were not. The stalemate was broken after an official

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

sticks and everything they had in their hands.” Half a block from the bus station, the officers stopped the car and told him to get out, Thomas says. “Well, it looks like the station is closed. When will the next bus come?” he remembers asking. “I can’t get out here. It looks pretty dangerous.” When he refused to leave the safety of the police car, Thomas says the officer in the passenger’s seat turned around, a glint from his pistol visible, and said, “Nigger, get out of this car.” “If I didn’t get out of the car, I figured he was going to shoot me, so I did,” Thomas says. “As soon as I got out of the car, the police took off. “Of course the crowd started running toward me, and I was a pretty athletic fellow at that particular time. You know, I knew I could probably outrun them, so I started to run.” He sprinted away from the mob, running down one street then another. After a few minutes, an African-American man in a car pulled up beside Thomas and said, “Son, get in and get down on the floor.” Thomas accepted the invitation. “I was expecting to hear gunshots through the rear window at any minute,” Thomas says. The man drove him to Benedict College in Columbia, S.C., the next stop for the Freedom Riders’ bus. That bus already had left when Thomas arrived in Columbia, so he took a different bus from Columbia to Sumter, S.C., to catch up with his group. Three stops later, in Atlanta, the Freedom Riders met Martin Luther King Jr. and his father at their church, Ebenezer Baptist, where the Kings and their staff warned the Riders that Alabama and Mississippi would be different than the other states they had visited. “We were told that (Anniston, Ala.,) was a hotbed of Klan activity, and so it was not going to be a pleasant stop,” Thomas says. “We were aware of that.”

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after they boarded the plane, the pilot announced he had received a bomb threat and ordered all passengers off the plane. The Riders then decided to fly directly to New Orleans, and — after a bomb threat to the second plane — the group finally made it out of Alabama. The STudeNT NONViOleNT COORdiNating Committee (SNCC), led by diane Nash, didn’t want the Freedom Ride to end on such a dismal note. SNCC recruited new Riders from Tennessee State university and Fisk university to pick up where the first Riders left off. hank Thomas was in New York when he heard that new Riders were continuing the movement. he decided to join them, as did John lewis, another original Freedom Rider. under pressure from the Kennedy administration, Gov. Patterson provided a convoy of National Guardsmen armed with fixed bayonets to escort the bus from Birmingham to Montgomery on May 24, 1961. At the Mississippi state line, the guardsmen handed off escort duties to

page 9

the Mississippi National Guard and the state police for the remainder of the ride to Jackson. “i don’t remember a large crowd of people at [Jackson], (but) as soon we entered the bus station, we were arrested,” Thomas says. “And they had the paddy wagons and everything all lined up, so Mississippi was somewhat determined that they weren’t going to repeat what happened in Alabama.” At his arraignment, Thomas says Jackson Municipal Judge James Spencer asked how he pleaded to the charge of “breach of peace.” Before Thomas could answer, the judge said, “don’t waste my time. You’re guilty.” “That was my taste of Mississippi justice,” Thomas says. Things got worse during booking at the police station when Thomas answered a white desk sergeant’s question with “No” instead of “No, sir,” as blacks were expected to do. “That’s when they descended on me,” Thomas says, recalling several officers punching him. Thomas spent a week in the hinds County jail before being

Where are they now?

Charles Person — The youngest of the original 13 Freedom Riders, Person was 18 and a freshman at Morehouse College in Atlanta when he boarded the bus in Washington, d.C. After serving 20 years in the u.S. Marine Corps, Persons taught in Atlanta’s public schools until his retirement. he still lives in Atlanta. John Lewis — lewis, who was 21 during the Freedom Ride, was elected to the u.S. house of Representatives in 1980 and still represents Georgia in this position. Hank Thomas — The Jacksonville, Fla. native was 19 when he became a Freedom Rider. he served in the military in Vietnam in 1965 and 1966. he now lives in Stone Mountain, Ga., and is the owner of four Marriott hotels and two Mcdonald’s restaurants. transported to the State Penitentiary at Parchman, Miss. during his 35 days at Parchman, Thomas was placed in solitary confinement twice. Neither the authorities nor violent protestors could stop Thomas and other African-Americans from exercising their rights, and the Freedom Ride inspired many blacks in the rural South to get

involved in the Civil Rights Movement at the grassroots level. “[The Freedom Ride] renewed my determination,” Thomas says. “They made me more determined than ever to fight for equal rights in this country.”

takes place. The issue is not with the conflicts themselves, which have existed for decades, but whether they are identified, addressed and managed.” For example, in lafayette 35 percent of inspectors were recused; in lake Charles, 30 percent. inspectors’ relationships with offshore companies extended to informal lunches, hunting and fishing trips and football games, the report said. Although it pointed out signs of dysfunction within the state’s regulatory agencies, Ross said the report is a sign the “system is working.” “As an industry we certainly support the recusals of individuals that have relationships with companies previously that may somewhere down the line end up regulating those companies,” Ross said. “There’s a similar protocol in a lot of other industries, a lot of other sectors, where individuals have to sit on the sidelines because of the ethical nature of a previous job and what they do currently.” — Alex Woodward

gawea dollar — except perhaps as “grandchildren gifts.” even less known is the “presidential dollar” series, inspired by the u.S. Mint’s state quarters series. in 2007, the Mint began releasing a new presidential dollar every three months in hopes of stimulating interest from collectors and the public. The series is up to Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president, but consumers have been indifferent about the coins. Nevertheless, a government mandate requires they continue to be minted. A June investigation by National Public Radio found that more than 1 billion of the coins are sitting in Federal Reserve vaults in dallas even as more are minted each year. On July 20, Vitter and Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., introduced Senate Bill 1385, which would halt the minting of dollar coins. “even though many in Congress, including myself, hoped that dollar coins would eventually save taxpayers money, it’s turned out to be one of those unnecessary and, quite frankly, wasteful programs that we should eliminate,” Vitter said in a statement. Numismatists may grumble if the presidential series isn’t completed, but Vitter and deMint’s bill is likely to find public support. Vitter’s office supplied figures from the u.S. Government Accountability Office and the Federal Reserve estimating it would cost $3 million to move the presidential dollars and another $1.4 million to build a facility to house the newly minted ones. — Allman

This article originally appeared in the Jackson Free Press.

MORE scuttlEbutt over the last three months and has more than $8.8 million in his campaign war chest. — Kevin Allman

Oil in the Family

louisiana’s strong ties to the oil industry were exposed to the nation last week when the Associated Press uncovered documents showing just how cozy a relationship the state has with the industry it regulates. The AP found one of every five employees involved with offshore inspections in the Gulf of Mexico were recused from duties because of potential interactions with a friend or family member. it raises the question: Where else would an agency turn to find employees familiar with the industry? Matt Ross, communications director for the louisiana Oil & Gas Association, told Gambit there are little or no alternatives to recruiting from within the same stock. No institutions can provide the same onthe-ground experience and familiarity that offshore workers bring to regulatory agencies. “usually their experience comes from being on the ground and being a part of the industry and understanding proper protocols the industry does in the private sector,” Ross said. Michael Bromwich, director of the Bureau of Ocean energy Management, Regulation and enforcement (or BOeMRe, formerly the Minerals Management Service), told the AP those conflicts of interest exist “because of close-knit communities in which much offshore activity

WhO’S minDinG the mint?

if you have a Millard Fillmore dollar coin, hang on to it. if Sen. David Vitter has his way, it’ll be a collector’s item. What — you didn’t know the u.S. Mint had produced a dollar coin to honor our 13th president? That, Vitter says, is exactly the problem. unlike Canadians and europeans, Americans have never taken to large-denomination coins — whether it’s an eisenhower dollar (minted in the 1970s), Susan B. Anthony dollar (1979-1981) or gold Saca-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

everything from slamming BP at a meeting of business professionals in lafayette to sitting in a dunk tank at Zephyr Field for a charity event organized by New Orleans Saints safety Darren Sharper. • Anh “Joseph” Cao, the former GOP congressman who lost his seat to u.S. Rep. Cedric Richmond last year, filed papers announcing the formation of a committee for his run for state attorney general against incumbent Buddy Caldwell, who switched from democrat to Republican earlier this year. Also mentioned as possible challengers to Caldwell: louisiana Senate president Joel Chaisson, d-destrehan; and u.S. Rep. Jeff Landry, the Tea Party-backed GOP freshman who lost his base to redistricting earlier this year. • Caroline Fayard, the New Orleans democrat who showed strength in last year’s race for lieutenant governor — then delivered an infamous speech at a March meeting of the Washington Parish democratic Party, where she said, “i hate Republicans” — filed for an unspecified statewide office. in May, Fayard announced her intention to run for Secretary of State and said a formal declaration would come soon, but her most recent filing left her intentions unstated. • Tara Hollis, the “conservative democrat” long shot challenging Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal, looks like an even longer shot when you see the numbers. hollis raised only $3,335 in the last seven-and-ahalf months and has less than $1,000 on hand. in contrast, Jindal raised $335,000

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POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

A Very Good Heart here used to be an axiom in local advertising circles that if you did political ads you didn’t take on commercial clients, and vice-versa. The two worlds were considered absolutely incompatible. That changed with Robert Berning, who came to New Orleans decades ago to hone his craft as a filmmaker and ultimately became a cutting-edge ad man who mastered both political and commercial image making. Berning, who died July 24 of a heart attack at the age of 64, produced a body of work that was as much art as advertising. His clients included District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro, Clerk of Civil Court Dale Atkins, auto dealer Ronnie Lamarque, the McIlhenny Company and many others. “Robert was always in total control of the set,” recalled friend and political consultant Bill Schultz, who worked with Berning on many campaigns. “He always used to say that there was only one director — him. He was a perfectionist. He also was a true image-maker. He could put his finger on the pulse of a candidate quicker and better than anyone else I knew.”

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Cannizzaro echoed Schultz’s assessment. “I remember in one of the first spots that he did for me, he took shots of me tying my tie in the morning,” the DA said. “I have been tying my tie since I was a schoolboy, but that day he made me tie it at least 30 times. He wanted to make the shot perfect.” That attention to detail set Berning’s work apart. His company won numerous local, regional and national awards. His ads had a richness about them, whether they showed Lamarque dancing and singing about the Saints or touted a candidate for public office. “Robert always believed in what he was doing and in the candidates he worked for,” Cannizzaro said. “He was never about race or party. He honestly thought each of his candidates was the best person for the job, and he inevitably became his clients’ friend.” Days after Berning’s death, Lamarque placed large ads in The Times-Picayune saluting him — not as a political genius, but as a friend. He was a man of great passions outside of work, too. He lived life to the fullest,

throwing himself headlong into each new interest, whether it was boating (he had a big boat), red wine (he drank only big reds), cars (he drove a Hummer and a Jaguar), or military history. One of his delights was taking his eldest grandchild, Robert Berning IV, to the World War II Museum. Cannizzaro also recalled that Berning was “brutally honest.” “I once asked Robert if he thought I could do voiceovers on TV,” the DA said with a laugh. “He pulled his eyeglasses down to the end of his nose and looked at me over them and said, ‘Leon, don’t give up your day job.’” Perhaps the only pursuit he never quite mastered was arguing with friends, particularly Schultz and attorney Franz Zibilich. The three of them played a continuing game of one-upmanship that always found Berning on the short end — mostly because he was too kindhearted to go for the jugular, unlike his two pals. “It’s ironic that Robert died of a bad heart,” Schultz noted in eulogizing his friend, “because he had a very good heart.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

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JEff DOrSOn, DIrEcTOr Of THE HumAnE SOcIETy Of LOuISIAnA (HSL), SAyS THE STATE HAS a “surplus of horses.” Staton says it’s more of an “overabundance.” Anyone with $25 can buy a horse at a barn sale, Dorson says. “They’re almost giving them away. … Shodding, teeth, worming, overall health maintenance, health care, vaccinations, feed — you’re looking at $2,000, $3,000, $4,000 per year,” he says. “People buy a horse for $50, put it out to pasture and call it a day. It becomes a yard decoration.” The biggest hurdle is ignorance, Staton says. many horse owners don’t know the kind of investment required when they buy a horse. “They think if they put them out to pasture and leave them, they’re going to be fine, that that’s all they need,” she says. “Animals get really thin when they are out to pasture. A lot of the pasture we have on the West Bank is weeds and dirt — it’s not a lot of good-quality grass, and people aren’t supplementing with hay.” They also aren’t providing adequate veterinary care. In June, a palomino named Thunder was found cramped in a Waggaman barn without hay and covered with flies. under parish care, the horse gained 100 pounds and last month found a new home. Allison Barca, a veterinarian of more than 20 years who works closely with the parish on horse abuse, says she frequently sees cases like Thunder’s — “flat-out starvation and lack of health care,” she says. many horses she treats have overgrown hooves, which make standing too painpage19

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

ou won’t see them on Highway 90 as you drive past fast food chains and gas stations. But beyond the tree line and around a few corners are horses grazing in green spaces and small barns. Some belong to well-tended stables and loving homes. Others are lame and left to starve with their hooves deep in mud and filth. Since July 2010, the Jefferson Parish Animal Shelter (JPAS) has responded to dozens of horse neglect cases on the West Bank, where many makeshift stables are in disrepair, and horses are unattended, underfed and in dire need of medical attention. In the last year, the parish seized 12 adult horses and two foals, including five horses in June 2011 alone. One of the horses was euthanized after a colic outbreak and one of the foals died, but the parish successfully adopted out eight other horses and one foal. Two other seized horses are still in its possession. In addition, hundreds of other potential cruelty and neglect cases have been pursued. Kim Staton, who the parish hired as a JPAS consultant and animal cruelty investigator, and animal control officers have dedicated themselves to the cases, but Staton says they are dealing with a “bigger problem than we ever imagined.” The parish has spent several hundred hours on cruelty cases and Staton hasn’t been involved with any cases on the East Bank of Jefferson Parish at all — stable inspections there begin this week. “We don’t want these issues to be ignored,” Staton says. “We have a real serious problem in Jefferson Parish.”

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Promise is now a healthy weight, but Barca says Promise’s story isn’t new.  “There has always been a problem in our area where people tend to own  more horses than they can afford to keep,” she says. “That’s it in a nutshell.  … I’ve been seeing this a long time, and I’ve been spinning my wheels a  bit because there just isn’t anything the various municipalities seem to do  about it.”     Following several seizures this year, the Jefferson Parish Council requested JPAS and code enforcement officers conduct barn sweeps. They inspected 18 barns and found only building code violations for inadequate housing  for the animals, says Loren Marino, chief administrative assistant to Parish  President John Young.     “At that time we didn’t find any additional horses in bad shape or stables  that needed to be shut down,” Marino says. “The stables did receive code  enforcement violations, and they’re now proceeding on their normal course.  There’s another sweep that’ll be scheduled soon. We really haven’t found  any additional outrageous incidents.”     But Staton says the parish is only beginning to scratch the surface: “This  is a potential catastrophe.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

HorSe negLeCT ISn’T SPeCIFIC To JeFFerSon PArISH. DorSon SAYS IT’S  even more problematic in rural areas around the state. In June, the HSL and  the Lafourche Parish Sheriff’s office rescued two horses found tied to a tree  without food or water. The horse’s owner, oris Lee, now faces three animal  cruelty charges, and animal rescuer Pamela Brown has adopted the horses.     In 2007, the Louisiana Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals  (LA/SPCA) seized 31 starving, dehydrated horses from Dave Williams’  property in Algiers. Another two horses were found dead from starvation. Williams was charged with 33 counts of aggravated cruelty, but in  november 2009 was convicted instead of 10 counts of simple cruelty and  was given a six-month suspended sentence, 40 hours of community service  and a $600 fine. The LA/SPCA spent more than $200,000 rehabilitating the  animals and finding them a new home, a figure not budgeted in the organization’s tight $3 million annual budget to serve the entire new orleans area  that year.     HSL receives five to eight calls a month about horse abuse and neglect  cases. To help parishes with the costs of seizing and caring for the animals,  HSL is opening a chapter to handle cruelty investigations concerning large  animals. “Most shelters and sheriff’s offices don’t have the resources to care  for impounded large animals, so we’ve got to carry the cost of the trailer,  the hitch — it gets compounded very quickly,” Dorson says.

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PoTenTIAL CrueLTY-CASe CALLS MADe To JPAS Are SenT To DISPATCH,  which forwards tips to JPAS officers; cruelty investigations are their highest  priorities. officers visit the property where the animal is living, try to contact the animal’s owners and obtain search warrants — unless the animals  are “literally dying,” Staton says. Properties can be difficult to find — some  have dozens of barns with different owners for each stable, or horse, while  others are empty lots with little to no shelter. officers follow up with frequent monitoring and perform “courtesy stops.”      JPAS has investigated hundreds of horse cases in which the parish didn’t  seize the animals but instead worked with the owners. “Most people are  receptive to changes — most won’t argue with that,” Staton says. “We try  to respond to calls when people have concerns about these animals. We go  out and try to assess the animal the best we can, try to talk to the owners,  explain the legal requirements in terms of care and housing, and try to work  diligently with people to give them the opportunity (to take better care of  their horses).”     But the last thing the parish wants to do, Staton says, is seize a horse —  an expensive, time-consuming process. Fourteen may not seem like many  horses, but the cost and time spent to get to the point of seizing an animal  exhausts JPAS’s resources, Staton says. not only does the parish have to provide medical care for the horses, it doesn’t have room to shelter them. The  parish currently rents space at a private West Bank stable, but the owner  declined Gambit’s request to visit.     “What (the parish) needs ... is a nice, clean, secure location where we can  bring these animals while they’re being rehabilitated, and more publicity to  get these animals adopted out,” Barca says. MerYLL Bergeron oWnS TWo reSCueD HorSeS SHe STABLeS In BeLLe  Chasse. From the bed of her husband’s truck, she has taken dozens of  photos of barns and horses on the West Bank and sent them to Marino’s 

office and to JPAS. (“I have no fear,” she says.) Bergeron also has appeared at  Jefferson Parish Council meetings armed with photos to show council members, calling attention to what she says is an “epidemic” of abuse.     Marino disagrees.     “Do I think there is an epidemic or a pandemic? no,” Marino says.  “This is something new. Attention had not previously been paid to this.”  Futhermore, she says, the sweeps seem to be helping. “once we do the proactive sweeps — we truly compiled a list of every stable we can find — we  just didn’t find anything come up.”     JPAS interim director Diane guichard says the parish is handling the problem, but calling it an epidemic is a stretch. “It’s always a serious issue when  you have someone saying there are unsanitary and unsafe conditions,” she  says. “That’s always serious. But we are out there.”     Staton has trained an animal cruelty officer to fill her shoes when she  leaves this month, and other shelter employees have received additional  training for larger animals, including horses. (“It’s not just cats and dogs — 

“What they need more in this world is a nice, clean, secure location where we can bring these animals while they’re being rehabilitated, and more publicity to get these animals adopted out.” — Allison Barca, veterinarian

Veterinarian Allison Barca works with the Jefferson Parish Animal Shelter to provide health care to seized horses. Photo by Cheryl Gerber

it’s all kinds of animals,” Staton says. “We have to be pretty versatile.”)     “now that the word is out there, that we’re proactively looking for  instances of horse cruelty at horse stables, people are … on guard,” Marino  says. “The same thing was probably out there last year, but nobody was  uncovering it. We’re out there, and we’re trying to actively root out these  problems and go out and look for them. The most egregious people have  been addressed. It’s not to say it won’t pop up again.” More THAn HALF THe AnIMALS AT JPAS Are reLInquISHeD BY THeIr  owners — they simply can’t afford to keep them. “Dogs, cats are now a  20-year commitment,” Staton says. “Horses are more like 40 years.”     But adoption fees are inexpensive. Fees for horses begin at $10. “We’re  more concerned with their environment,” Staton says. “We look at where  the animals will be kept. The parish typically won’t let the animals be  adopted to inexperienced horse owners. … (They look for) someone who has  a passion for horses … and make sure they can manage.     “They’re sweet animals that just need to be taken care of.”


sHTo P aLK

BY MISSY WILKINSON

SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Room With a Vieux f not quite the cruelest month, August is definitely the hottest and most stifling for many New Orleanians. Hurricane season is in full swing; tourism slows to a trickle, and the kickoff to Mardi Gras is still five months away. On the plus side, it’s a prime time for locals to get reacquainted with facets of the city they may overlook during more hectic months. “There’s a reason the Vieux Carre has 10 million visitors a year,” says Alfred Groos, president and general manager of Royal Sonesta Hotel New Orleans (300 Bourbon St., 586-0300; www.royalsonestano.com). “If you haven’t had your vacation fix somewhere, why not experience your own city and do something you wouldn’t normally do? You’ll rediscover the wonder of the city you live in that you don’t see on an ongoing basis.” Encompassing an entire city block, the Royal Sonesta is an aggregate of all things New Orleans. Guests can sip iced coffee from PJ’s Coffee Cafe, take in Trixie Minx’s burlesque act at Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, or slurp down raw oysters at Desire Bistro & Oyster Bar — without ever leaving the premises (or the air conditioning). A new restaurant by chefs John Folse and Rick Tramonto is now being built and is scheduled to open in early 2012. “Restaurant R’evolution will feature New Orleans specialties prepared in a very contemporary fashion,” Groos says. Royal Sonesta Hotel New Orleans A graduate of Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration, Groos wanted the hotel president and general manager to reflect the authentic New Orleans experience. Formerly a brewery for Regal Beer, the Alfred Groos takes pride in the Royal Sonesta opened in 1969, four years after the French Quarter was designated a historic hotel’s verdant courtyard. landmark. “We came along when tourism was creeping into the fabric of the French Quarter,” says Groos, whose first job was at the Royal Sonesta in 1977. “People were attracted to its history, and everything we have done is based on honoring the traditions and essential parts of the city.” Groos hopes locals will take time to get reacquainted with these essential parts, and to help, he has rolled out a cornucopia of room specials and packages. “It’s a great time of the year, because the rates are a little friendlier,” says hotel spokeswoman Roberta Grove. “Satchmo SummerFest is coming up and Dirty Linen Night, so it’s a wonderful opportunity to have a vacation before the kids go back to school.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

IT’S ALL ABOUT

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> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> < <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE > >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO < <<<<<<<<<< << 27 35 44 48 51 59 > >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> < <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE > >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> < <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> < <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > AUG < <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <AVI BUFFALO WITH NIK FREITAS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> PHOTO BY EYDIE MCCONNELL

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Generic Art Solutions’ Matt Vis and Tony Campbell, aka the Art Cops, inspect their exhibit at New Orleans Museum of Art.

Copping an Artitude WHITE LINEN NIGHT FEATURES NEW ART OPENINGS AND PERFORMANCE ART. BY EMILY JENSEN

M

20th-century masters. Arthur Roger Gallery presents Louisiana landscape painter Elemore Morgan Jr. Heriard-Cimino Gallery opens a show of Audra Kohout’s box assemblages. Stella Jones Gallery’s “20th Century African-American Icons” includes 25 pieces by Elizabeth Catlett, Richard Dempsey, Hughie Lee-Smith and Jacob Lawrence. “These are African-American masters whose careers really flourished in the middle portion of the 20th century,” Jones says. “Two of the pieces were the last Hughie Lee-Smith did before his death.” The Ogden Museum of Southern Art opens four exhibitions with roots in Mississippi. Photographer Birney Imes’ Whispering Pines chronicles the slow decline of a popular rural bar over three decades. Another photography collection features works by William Eggleston, Walker Evans, Eudora Welty, Clarence John Laughlin and many others. Other shows feature paintings, sculpture and pottery by Mississippi artists. The CAC presents two ongoing shows, including a sound installation titled “Drip: The Music of Water of New Orleans.” Created by John Kleinschmidt and Andy Sternad, its audio component is activated by the voices and movements of spectators. At the White Linen after-party (9 p.m. to 11 p.m.), there will be food and drinks for sale and DJ Matty will spin Louisiana swamp pop and New Orleans soul tunes.

DEX ROMWEBER

AUG

04

Last October, the former Flat Duo Jets guitarist shook the poor Circle Bar to its studs (one theory why the venue has been closed for renovations all year). His suffocating surf-rock gets only slightly more breathing room at Siberia, which would be wise to batten down the hatches. July release Is That You in the Blue? (Bloodshot) marks Romweber’s second album with sister/ drummer Sara. 10 p.m. Thursday. Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855

ART

AUG

05

The purchase of an exquisitely expensive, highly conceptual modern painting stirs up the friendship of three art fans in Yasmina Reza’s Tony Awardwinning Art. A rotating cast of NOLA Project actors fills the comedy’s three roles at performances at the New Orleans Museum of Art through the end of August. Tickets $16 general admission, $8 NOMA members/students. 8 p.m. Fridays, 3 p.m. Sundays, through Aug. 28. NOMA, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org

BILLY OCEAN

AUG

05

Give Leslie Sebastian Charles a saxophone, a synthesizer, some backup singers and a cliched couplet, and he’ll give you ’80s magic (“When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Get Going”). Now 61, silverdreadlocked and namedropped by everyone from disco-aping indie-rockers to Big Boi, the Caribbean king is doubling down with two shows at Boomtown. Tickets $25. 7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m. Friday. Boomtown Casino, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

att Vis and Tony Campbell, the duo behind Generic Art Solutions (G.A.S.) and Good Children Gallery, are familiar faces at White Linen Night. They have walked the beat as the Art Cops, issuing tickets for artsy pretention — they also escorted art fans through the 9th Ward in a former squad car to view Prospect.1 installations. Purveyors of both art and performance art interventions, they have a show at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery during White Linen, and they will stir up both a protest and counterprotest in front — enlisting protestors to hold signs proclaiming, “I’m for it” and “I’m against it.” The Art Cops will provide crowd control. G.A.S.’s Anarcadia exhibit features large-scale, billboard-style works that point to the struggle to maintain momentum in movements for change. “When we’re faced with a situation beyond our control, we’re either excited or fearful,” Vis says. “You have to get something in your head to keep you motivated.” The show and spectacle are part of the bustling street scene of White Linen, which will fill Julia Street and the surrounding Warehouse District with art fans, food and drink booths and live music by Alex McMurray’s Old-Timey Revue, Ingrid Lucia and the National World War II Museum’s Victory Belles. Gallery openings are from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and there’s an after-party at the Contemporary Arts Center. Shows opening on White Linen Night run the gamut from new works by contemporary artists to

Snatched up by Sub Pop off a single disc of demos, Avigdor ZahnerIsenberg makes like a teenaged Daniel Johnston taking up with the Danielson Famile on Avi Buffalo, his skewed 2010 debut. SoCal singer/songwriter Nik Freitas (Broken Bells, Conor Oberst) opens. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Thursday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

25


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

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The 53 official releases by the Brooklyn indie imprint Woodsist range from lo-fi but pop-minded rockers like Kurt Vile and Nodzzz to the flashlight-lit witch trials of Pocahaunted and whatever you want to call what Excepter does. Naturally, they also include the labelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s namesake, Woods, whose branching oeuvre reads like a glossary of Woodsistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cassette-taped, outre-folk origins â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at the same time stretching those original parameters like the walls of a womb. Working at an album-a-year pace since 2007, Woods singer/songwriter Jeremy Earl has consigned Woodsistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weirder experiments to those artists he signs (often collaborators and tour mates). Following his own path led to the clearing At Echo Lake, as lush and lucid a collection of folksy pop songs as was issued in 2010. Indeed, replace Earlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s astronomical falsetto with an earthbound tenor and Woods becomes the East Coast Shins, his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suffering Seasonâ&#x20AC;? the new â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Slangâ&#x20AC;?: a painfully pretty ditty primed to be miscast in advertising jingles and coming-of-age romances. But this band, like its label, is too blessedly unpracticed to let that happen. After one of At Echo Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s catchiest numbers, someone asks Earl, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is that a song?â&#x20AC;? The answer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is now.â&#x20AC;? Sun and Shade, Woodsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fifth LP and Woodsistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 53rd release, arrived in June. White Fence and Native America open. Tickets $8. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Noah Bonaparte Pais

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DAVENPORT LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Fitzpatrick & Antonio Gambrill, 9:30 THE EMBERS â&#x20AC;&#x153;ORIGINALâ&#x20AC;? BOURBON HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Curtis Binder, 6

THE FAMOUS DOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Willie Lockett & the All-Purpose Blues Band, 4; Big Al Carson, 8:30 HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 100 Monkeys, 8

THE INN ON BOURBON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S I CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Amanda Shaw, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8

JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Colin Lake, 6; Captain Leo, 9 KRAZY KORNER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLACKSMITH SHOP â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9:30 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kid Chocolate Quartet feat. Davell Crawford, 3 THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Those Peaches, 5; Influencia de Jazz, 7; Gris Gris, Captain Green, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Trio, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Andre Bouvierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Royal

Bohemians, 6; Smoky Greenwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Jam, 9:30

OAK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Billy Iuso, 9

OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blues Frenzy, 8

ONE EYED JACKS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Avi Buffalo, Nik Freitas, 10

PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thursdays at Twilight feat. Paul Soniat, 6 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Survivors Brass Band feat. Jeffrey Hills, 8

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PAGE 31

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

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Woods with White Fence and Native America 10 p.m. Saturday Blue Nile, 532 Frenchmen St., second floor, 948-2583; www.bluenilelive.com

29


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

MUSIC

PAGE 29 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Amanda Walker, 7

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Curley Taylor, 8:30 ROYAL PALM — Philip Melancon Jr., 6:30

SIBERIA — Dexter Romweber Duo, Jonesbirds, Room 101, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Davell Crawford feat. Kid Chocolate, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 THREE MUSES — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Davis Rogan, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Mark Barrett, 5; Debi & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Late As Usual, 9 VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Friday 5 BANKS STREET BAR — J Monque’d, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BMC — El DeOrazio & Friends, 3; Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Mark Pentone & Smoky Greenwell Trio, 9; Dana Abbott Band, 10 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Billy Ocean, 8 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — J. the Savage, 8 CARROLLTON STATION — Anniversary Party feat. Coldshot, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Hooch Riders, 3; The Great In-Between, 6; Woodenhead, Twangorama, 8

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Paul Sanchez, 8 CLEVER WINE BAR — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8

THE CYPRESS — Say! Don’t Play, Chase McCloud, Power Blvd., 6:30 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark & the Pentones, 4 THE HOOKAH — BASSIK, 9

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sia, Oh Land, Ximena Sarinana, 8

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — George Porter Jr., 8

SIBERIA — Grave Ritual, Hellgoat, Shadow of the Destroyer, Demonic Destruction, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Trio, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 STUDIO A AT THE STEAK KNIFE — Jessie McBride & the Next Generation, 7 THREE MUSES — Raphael Bas, 6:30; Glen David Andrews, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Tom McDermott, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

TIPITINA’S — IKO All-Stars feat. Billy Iuso, Reggie Scanlan, CR Gruver, Sam Hotchkiss, Michael Fouquier, 10

JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Jay B Elston Band, 5; Debi & the Deacons, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 1; T’Canaille, 9

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Big Feets Band, 5; Late As Usual, 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Joe Krown, 7

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Dwight Breland, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Bonerama, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Alex Bosworth, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30 MUDLARK THEATRE — Hyena, Proud Father, 8 OAK — Amanda Walker, 6; Andrew Duhon, 10

OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Thomas Johnson & the People, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — DJ Q, Nola Fam, Luckylou, Nicky Da B, 10 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Steve Pistorius, 8

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Glasgow, 10

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Bayou Savages, 9:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Top Cats, 9:30

SHAMROCK BAR — Groovy 7, 9

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Saturday 6 12 BAR — Chapter: SOUL, 10

ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m. BANKS STREET BAR — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8 BAYOU PARK BAR — Adam Crochet & I Tell You What, 10 BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 10

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Marianne & the Republic, 9 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Joe Krown, 8

CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7 CAFE PRYTANIA — Otis, 10

CARROLLTON STATION — 61 South, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — NOLA Treblemakers, 6; Americanos, 9:30

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Mia Borders, 9 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

PAGE 33

SUNDAY OCTOBER 2, 2011 Mahalia Jackson Theatre 801 N. RampaRt StReet, New ORleaNS, la

7pM • All AgES

TickeTs also aT all TickeTmasTer ouTleTs, The mahalia Jackson Box office, or By calling 1-800-745-3000

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

BAYOU PARK BAR — Pocket Aces Brass Band, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Wendell Brunious, 10

31


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

MUSIC

PAGE 31 D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Little Freddie King, 11

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — George French Band feat. Ellen Smith, 10

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FINE ARTS CENTER — On the Corner Hip-Hop, Art & Soul Series feat. Lyrikill, Dappa, Rantz, Black Star Bangas Band and others, 9 FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & the All-Purpose Blues Band, 1; Mark & the Pentones, 4; Big Al Carson, 8:30 GREEN ROOM — 4 Mag Nitrous, Slow the Knife, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — The Silent Game, Marathon, 10 THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Cyril Neville, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Carl LeBlanc, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, 12 a.m. JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9

THE MAISON — Ben Hunter, 5; Magnitude, 7; One Mind Brass Band, 10; Big Fun Brass Band, 12 a.m. MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kristina Morales, 4; Cindy Scott, 7; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 10:30; Mumbles, 12:30 a.m.

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 OAK — Kristin Diable, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — The Lynn Drury Band & guests, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Dash Rip Rock, Green Demons, The Help, 10 PRESERVATION HALL — Gregg Stafford’s Jazz Hounds, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Lil Red & Big Bad, 10

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. T’Canaille, 2; Wise Guys, 9:30

RUSTY NAIL — N’awlins Johnnys, 10 SIBERIA — Suzi Trash, New Madrid, Sci-Fi Zeros, Secret Society In Smaller Lies, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Dr. Michael White & the Liberty Jazz Band, 8 & 10

THREE MUSES — Miss Sophie Lee, 6 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

TOOLOULA’S — Black Magnolia, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Jimmy Thibodeaux, 1; T’Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debi & the Deacons, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late As Usual, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 7 ATCHAFALAYA — Sam & Boone, 11 a.m. BISTREAUX — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

BMC — Alex Bosworth, 1; Dana Abbott Band, 7; Andy J. Forest, 10 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Captain “Chiggy Chiggy” Charles, 7

BOURBON LIVE — Chicken on the Bone, 8 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.

CAFE RANI — Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m.

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Liberation Through Education benefit feat. Terrina & Bayou Blue & Rock Z, 9

COLUMNS HOTEL — Vincent Marini, 11 a.m.

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark & the Pentones, 4; Cori Walters & the Universe Jazz Band, 8:30

HOMEDALE INN — Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.; Underoath, Times of Grace, Stray From the Path, Letlive, 5:30 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s AllStars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Ched Reeves, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m.

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Lacy Blackledge, 9

MADIGAN’S — Anderson/Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON — Dave Easley Trio, 5; The Session, 7; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 10; Youth Sounds, King Rey (upstairs), 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom McDermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Ricardo Crespo, 4:30; Javier Olondo & Asheson, 8 MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Sunday Swing feat. New Orleans Moonshiners, 2 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1 OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-A-Holics, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — The 726 Jazz Band, 8

RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m.; Catherine Anderson, 2

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Deacon John & the Ivories, 4

ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m. SIBERIA — Toxic Holocaust, Holy Grail, Krum Bums, Toxic Rott, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — New Orleans Musicians Assistance Foundation Benefit, 7 SOUTHPORT HALL — Pelican Palooza feat. Molly Ringwalds, 5 Finger Discount, Weathered, Topcats, 1

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales, 6; Pat Casey, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Mary Flynn Thomas & Prohibition Blues, 10 a.m.

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, 11 a.m. THREE MUSES — Zazou City, 7

TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Marc Stone, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debi & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late As Usual, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6

Monday 8 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8 BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 10 BISTREAUX — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Blues Jam, 9:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — The Vincedent at Chickie’s, 6 D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7 FUNKY PIRATE — Cori Walters & the Universe Jazz Band, 8 GREEN ROOM — Peripheral, 7; Todd Lemoine’s Acoustapunk Show, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Band, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Ched Reeves, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Marc Stone, 4:30; Jason Bishop, 9 THE MAISON — Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT — Courtyard Kings, 7 NOWE MIASTO — Ghastly City Sleep, False, Thou, 6 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Rickie Monie, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 5; The Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Damien Louviere, 1; Big Feets Band, 5; Rhythm & Rain, 9

classical/ concerts DUTCH ALLEY — Near French Market, on North Peters Street — Sun: Summer Twilight Romance Series presents Harmoniemusik, 7 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329

Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www. trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Eddie Russo, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Love Act, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; The Davis Rogan Band, 10

33


FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING BAD TEACHER (R) — Cameron Diaz plays a foul-mouthed, gold-digging seventh-grade teacher. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

A BETTER LIFE (PG-13) — A

gardener in Los Angeles goes extra lengths to give his son opportunities he never had. Chalmette Movies CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13) — Chris

Evans stars in the origin story of the Marvel Comics hero. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 CARS 2 (PG-13) — The Pixar

COWBOYS AND ALIENS (PG13) — A desolate city in 1873

is attacked by marauders from the sky. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE (PG-13) —

A recently divorced 40-something (Steve Carrell) gets back into the dating game with the help of a young Lothario in the romantic comedy. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS (PG13) — Two friends enter into

a relationship that is solely about sex, but soon complications arise. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

series culminates in an epic showdown with Lord Voldemort. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — The film tells the story

of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX

HORRIBLE BOSSES (PG-13) — A group of friends devise a convoluted plan to get rid of their intolerable bosses. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 L’AMOUR FOU (NR) — The

documentary takes an intimate look into the private life of late fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent. Prytania

THE LEDGE (R) — After a man discovers his wife has been cheating on him with their neighbor, the man gives her lover a choice: he either takes his own life, or someone else dies. Chalmette Movies MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG) —

In the Woody Allen film, a screenwriter and aspiring novelist (Owen Wilson) finds himself travelling back in time to the Jazz Age while touring Paris at night. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place THE SMURFS (PG) — After getting chased out of their village, CGI Smurfs end up in New York and must find a way back home. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13) — A mysterious

event from the past threatens to bring war to Earth in the third installment of Michael Bay’s giant robot franchise. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE TREE OF LIFE (PG-13) —

Terrence Malick’s film, Palme d’Or winner at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, follows a man through his innocent childhood to his disillusioned adult years. Canal Place UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX WINNIE THE POOH (G) — Pooh and his friends Tigger, Rabbit,

Piglet, Kanga, Roo and Eeyore reuinite for an all-new story. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 ZOOKEEPER (PG-13) — Zoo animals break their silence to help their kind caretaker (Kevin James) get a girlfriend. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY THE CHANGE-UP (R) — Best

friends Ryan Reynolds and Jason Bateman are envious of each other’s opposite lifestyles, and after a drunken night out they somehow swap bodies.

RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) — The origin

story of the franchise takes place in modern-day San Francisco, where a geneticist’s engineering begets intelligent apes.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

GOOD NEIGHBORS (NR) —

Apartment tenants must figure out who they can trust when a serial killer on the loose in their small Montreal neighborhood. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Friday, then nightly through Aug. 11, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net MILDRED PIERCE (NR) — Joan Crawford stars in the 1945 film noir about a struggling mother and her ungrateful daughter. Admission $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and Aug. 3, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com NEW ORLEANS FOOD & FARM NETWORK SUMMER MOVIE SERIES — The center screens

The Garden for its series of food-related films that are followed by discussions. Free admission. 7 p.m. Thursday, New Orleans Food & Farm Network, 4840 Banks St., 8642009; www.noffn.org

THE TRIP (NR)— Playing themselves, comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon drive each other crazy during a tour

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

sequel finds its characters competing in an international race. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) — The Harry Potter

35


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of England’s best restaurants. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace

20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

Director Jacob Tierney sets his quirky and slow-building thriller Good Neighbors in Quebec in 1995, as a second referendum is about to decide whether the province’s French-speaking separatists can push for independence from Canada. The vote might have gone differently if the French-speaking population knew what this little enclave of English-speakers was up to. In the dead of winter, chummy neighbors Louise (Emily Hampshire) and wheelchair-bound Spencer (Scott Speedman) meet their building’s newest tenant, Victor (Jay Baruchel). Louise is sweet but plain and splits her time between working in a Chinese restaurant and doting over her cats. The attractive and charming Spencer seems only vaguely resentful of being left crippled by a car crash. And Victor is an earnest but slightly patronizing do-gooder. Everyone is on edge because there is a serial killer on the loose and an abrasively drunk and lonely French-speaking neighbor who spends her days yelling at her husband, neighbors and walls. The trio warm to each other’s company, and Spencer and Victor develop a rivalry for Louise’s companionship. But something more toxic is brewing, and whether Tierney is too heavy-handed or wants to let the audience in on a secret early, it’s far too easy to guess Spencer doesn’t spend all of his time rolling around his apartment caring for his collection of exotic fish. With its thin walls, the apartment building allows for few secrets, and some of the developments seem inevitable, for example when Louise’s cats turn up dead. But as the trio’s passions spill out, the action gets ever more sinister and unpredictable and no one is as nice or sweet as they seem. Hollywood probably would have taken the noirish ending a step further, but the endgame doesn’t lack for dramatic turns and tension. Moviegoers may remember Baruchel, Hampshire and some of the rest of the cast from Tierney’s clever comedy The Trotsky (2009), in which a wonky high school student imagines himself destined to lead a global workers’ revolution based on a few coincidental dates and names and he battles school administrators with Marxist dogma. Good Neighbors also is a refreshingly offbeat and at times funny work, but it goes to much darker places. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

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ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

WHITE LINEN NIGHT ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Julie

Breaux; glass by Ginger Kelly; jewelry by Belle Bijoux; collages by Mike Kilgore; all through August. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. ARTHUR ROGER @ 434. 434 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “Focus Group,”

ceramics by W. Steve Rucker. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “Works from the Estate,” paintings and drawings by Elemore Morgan, Jr. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Julie

Breaux; glass by Ginger Kelly; jewelry by Belle Bijoux; collages by Mike Kilgore; all through August. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Jump ‘N’ Jive,” oil paintings by Perry Morgan III, through Sept. 29. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “Bending the Curve,”

44

acrylic on panel by Michael Kessler, through Sept. 25. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Oil paintings by George Schmidt. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Perchance to

Dream,” box assemblages by Audra Kohout, through August. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com —

“From Dreams Come ...” paintings by Oscar Quesada, through August. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “Anarcadia,” works by Ge-

neric Arts Solutions; “Closer to Nothingness,” work by Stephen Collier; both through Aug. 27. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — Paintings by

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET Billy Solitario, through Sept. 24. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. ]

813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

review

M. FRANCIS GALLERY. 604 S. Julia St., 875-4888; www. mfrancisgallery.com — Paintings

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

and mixed media by Myesha Francis. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — “Minimal Glam,” mixed-media by Mallory Page. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — Works by Peter

Mars, through Friday.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — Acrylic and oil on linen by Matthew Abbott. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org —“A

Technological Terrarium,” mechanical, kinetic, electronic and biological sculpture, through Sept. 12. “Self-Taught, Outsider and Visionary Art from the Collection of Alexa Kleinbard & Jim Roche”; “Spotlight on Mississippi,” paintings, drawings and sculpture by Mississippi artists; “Mississippi Photographs: 1860s-Present”; all through Sept. 18. “Mississippi Mud: The Potters of Mississippi”; “Looking to Learn,” works by New Orleans Center for Creative Arts visual art students; both through September. “Whispering Pines,” photographs by Birtney Imes, through Oct. 16. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — Paintings by Eric Abrecht, through August. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “20th Century

African-American Icons,” works by Elizabeth Catlett, Richard Dempsey, Hughie Lee Smith and Jacob Lawrence. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — “Jamali: Mystical

Expressionism,” tempera on cork by Jamali. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

Off Center

Brooke Pickett’s paintings are big — as large as 10 feet tall — yet for all that, they are not heroic or any other one thing. They have all sorts of things happening at once. Like a dream journey through a familiar landscape where ordinary shapes and forms take on a strange hallucinatory life of their own, they are simultaneously intriguing and unsettling. Painted in big, gloopy swatches of saturated pomegranate, avocado, blueberry, goldenrod and rust, objects that are typically homey — things that may have started out as table lamps, stools, bits of rubbish or maybe ladders — mutate into strange visual tone poems taut with suspense and an incipient sense of wonder. In this Contemporary Arts Center expo, we see this in Sorrow Floats, where a glowing lampshade becomes a beacon in a turbid sea of subconscious intrigue. Part of it has to do with those rich, psychically fraught colors applied in loose brush strokes that can seem very loose compared to Robert Gordy’s tightly delineated canvases upstairs at the CAC. But Pickett’s compositions are otherwise somewhat tight once you get used to the surprising exuberance of pigments that seem to revel in their own woozy plasticity. In Mississippi Goddam (pictured), green and brown patches evoke the leafy farms and forests of the South, but vertical bars and ruptured reds suggest trouble, maybe even oppression, lurking beneath the lush arboreal facade. Closing in Against the Weather is more claustrophobic, a wavy, netlike mesh of pale, pulsating blobs that evoke the work of Philip Guston, as noted in Kathy Rodriguez’s long, thoughtful review on NolaDefender.com. But, ultimately, I think of the “center cannot hold” in the title, a line popularized in William Butler Yeats’ poem The Second Coming, but later associated with Joan Didion, whose writing was always really about her thought processes, which she somehow made fascinating regardless of her subject. So too are Pickett’s paintings fraught with their own inner processes, and it is to her credit that they inspire empathy with their silent visual soliloquies. — D. Eric Bookhardt

T H R U The Center Cannot Hold: Paintings and Drawings SEPT by Brooke Pickett Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3805; www.cacno.org

25

OPENING CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE. 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com —

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “Summer Blues ... and

“Fascinate Me: A Culinary & Sculptural Extravaganza,” culinary sculpture by Maurice’s French Pastries, ice-carving by Dawson, chocolate sculpture by Cloud Candi and 3-D designs by The Bikery, through September. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 —

“The Elegant Image,” figural bronzes from the Indianan Subcontinent from the collection of

Works by artists from the St. Charles Art Guild and West Bank Art Guild. Artists reception 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Other Appropriations,” paintings by P. Sart, through Aug. 27. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org —

Siddharth K. Bhansali, through Oct. 23. Opening Friday. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “Draw-

ing the Line,” a juried exhibition featuring Hannah Chalew, Alyssa Dennis, Hayley Gaberlavage and others, through Aug. 27. Opening receptin 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. ST. JOE LOFTS ARTISTS COMMUNITY. 923 Constance St., 982-5638; www.stjoelofts.com — “Night in White,” a group

show featuring resident artists, ongoing. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERIES A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Exhibi-

tion of gallery artists featuring Louviere + Vanessa, Sebastiao Salgado, Joshua Mann Pailet and Herman Leonard, through September.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United

We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery. com — “Music Street Mosa-

ics,” an installation of mosaic works salvaged from an artist’s condemned house, through Aug. 10.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.


ART

LISTINGS

stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com —

“Peel Sessions: First Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by

YA/YA artists, ongoing.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s

the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — “Architectural

Treasures of New Orleans,” works by Marlena Stevenson, through Aug. 15.

Scan to view the art of making an absinthe cocktail

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — Work

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 9430010 — Oil landscapes of the

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www.dosjefescigarbar.com — Works by Mario Ortiz, ongoing.

MONUMENTAL. Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.press-street.com —

Antenna seeks proposals for imaginative reinterpretations of 19th- and early 20th-century New Orleans monuments for a show in February 2012. Submissions deadline is Nov. 15, and there is a $15 entry fee. Email courtney@courtneyegan.net for details.

SPARE SPACES ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 5962667 — “Youth,” sculpture by Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing.

SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media paint-

ings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses. com — Portraits by Zack Smith,

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge. net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing.

MUSEUMS

Photography by Roy Barloga, ongoing.

INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 624-7903 — Paintings by Annie

Strack, ongoing.

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA senior

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

DESCOURS. Architects, designers and artists are invited to submit proposals from the free public architecture and art presentation hosted Dec. 2-11. Visit www.descours.us or www. aianeworleans.org for details. Submission deadline is Aug. 19.

photographs by Jocelyn Marquis, through September.

Horstman Roberts, ongoing.

ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — “Southern

CALL FOR ARTISTS

Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

ROYAL BLEND CAFE. 621 Royal St., 523-2716 — Black-and-white

HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www. hazelnutneworleans.com —

DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollantiques.com — Works by Sandra

guild and alumni, ongoing.

Pop Surrealism,” works by Charles Bennett, Jeff Bertrand, Dustin Dirt and Brandt Hardin, through Aug. 16.

by local artists, ongoing.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing.

A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

46

BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA youth artists, ongoing.

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing. LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 4541144 — Fused-glass works by Paulette Lizano, ongoing. MARIGNY PHO. 2483 Burgundy St., 267-5869 — Selections from

“B Movie Double Feature,” photographs and ceramic collectors’ plates by Heather Weathers, Wednesdays-Sundays. Through Sunday.

MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book of Kells,

Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing.

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com —

“The Unconventional Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www.myspace. com/mojoco — Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing. NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobia-nola. com — Works by Tanner, ongoing.

ongoing.

AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “The Center Cannot Hold,” paintings and drawings by Brooke Pickett, through Sept. 25. “Drip: The Music of Water in New Orleans,” sound installation by John Kleinschmidt and Andy Sternad, through Sept. 25. “Patterns and Prototypes: Early Paintings by Tina Girouard and Robert Gordy,” curated by Dan Cameron, through Sept. 25. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gacc-nola. com — Museum exhibits depict

the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The Golden

Legend in the New World: Art of the Spanish Colonial Viceroyalties,” paintings from the New Orleans Museum of Art collection, through Aug. 14.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-


bestofneworleans.com ART 5488; www.longuevue.com — “Magic Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Before During After,” photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, through Sept. 25. “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items, ongoing. LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 3102149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias.org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org — “Absinthe Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www. noaam.com — “Dancing String Bean,”

paintings and drawings by Eugene Martin, through Aug. 27. “A Gumbo of Colors: Works by New Orleans Quilt Artists”, through Aug. 27. “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” 18th- and 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection, through Oct. 29. “Restore the Oaks: Art Under the Overpass in Treme,” paintings by artists of the murals under the 1-10 overpass, through Oct. 29.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org — “Read My Pins: The Madeleine

NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits about 19th-century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing. OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 5686990; lsm.crt.state.la.us/site/mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through March 31. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Acadian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; all ongoing. “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; both ongoing. TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November.

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Albright Collection,” more than 200 pins from Albright’s personal collection, through Aug. 14. “Thalassa,” a 20-foot-tall suspended sculpture by Swoon, through Sept. 25. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

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Wednesday-Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. RENT: THE SCHOOL EDITION.

Southern Rep Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com — Students from the Southern Rep musical theater camps present the age-appropriate version of Jonathan Larson’s rock musical. Tickets start at $5. 7 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

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of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org — The NOLA Project performs Yasmina Reza’s comedy about friends coming to terms with an outrageously priced painting one of them has purchased. Visit www.noma.eventbrite. com for reservations. Tickets $8 NOMA members and university students, $16 general admission. 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday, through Aug. 28. BROTHER. Elm Theatre, 220 Julia St., 218-0055; www. elmtheatre.org — In Lisa Ebersole’s play, race and class tensions arise after a stranger joins a boozy, latenight birthday celebration. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday. THE GLASS MENDACITY.

Deutsches Haus, 1023 Ridgewood St., 522-8014; www. deutscheshaus.org — John “Spud” McConnell, Becky Allen, Mo Brennan McConnell and others star in the staged reading of the Tennessee Williams parody. Tickets $15. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, through Aug. 17.

HUGGING THE SHOULDER.

Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — A man kidnaps his war veteran brother to wean him off his deadly drug habit in Jerrod Bogard’s play performed by the Crescent Theatre Collective. Call 298-8676 or visit www.noctc.org for reservations. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, through Aug. 20.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM. Lupin Theatre,

Velocity Sports Performance 4115 S.Carrollton Ave. • 504-861-5000 • velocitysp.com/neworleans

Tulane University, 865-5106; www.tulane.edu — The All Things Shakespeare student company performs the comedy where young lovers, a band of amateur actors, fairies and other mythical creatures cross paths. The performance is part of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane. Call the box office or email box@ tulane.edu for reservations. Tickets $13. 7:30 p.m.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

FREAKSHEAUX TO GEAUX: MIDSUMMER MAYHEM.

AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — The circus-style variety show features sideshow, fire performance, clowning, dancing and live music by the Dimestore Troubadours. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

NAOMI MILLER: FROM KLEZMER TO BROADWAY (AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN). Jewish Community

Center, 5342 St. Charles Ave., 388-0511; www.nojcc.org — The performer recounts her journey from the shtetls of Eastern Europe to Broadway through music and comedy. Reservations are required by Wednesday. Call 897-0143 or email rachel@nojcc.org for details. Tickets $25 general admission, $45 per couple (includes dinner). 6 p.m. Sunday. SPOOKY LESTRANGE & HER BILLION DOLLAR BABY DOLLS.

Bayou Park Bar, 542 S. Jefferson Davis Pkwy., ; www. myspace.com/bayouparkbar — The burlesque troupe performs. 9 p.m. Thursday.

AUDITIONS CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community

College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

JPAS THEATRE KIDS! COMPETITION TEAM. Teatro Wego, 177

Sala Ave., Westwego, 8852000; www.jpas.org — JPAS seeks singers and dancers in grades 2-12 to compete at the 2012 iTheatrics Musical Theatre Festival. Auditions are by appointment only. Call 885-2000 ext. 202 for details. Saturday.

OPERA OPERA ON TAP. The Inn on

Bourbon, 541 Bourbon St., 5247611; www.innonbourbon.com — Opera singers interpret Louis Armstrong songs in honor of the Satchmo Strut Fest. Free admission. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

CALL FOR THEATER RUBY PRIZE. Southern Rep

will award a $10,000 award, a 10-day writer’s retreat, development workshops and readings at Southern Rep New Play Bacchanal to a female playwright of color. Visit www.southernrep. com for details. Submission deadline is Sept. 15.

COMEDY BROWN IMPROV COMEDY. 12

Bar, 608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola.com — The improv comedy troupe performs. 8 p.m. Friday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX.

Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Free admission. 10 p.m. Friday.

COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La

Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 7 p.m. Saturday.


bestofneworleans.com STAGE

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS/GOD’S BEEN DRINKING.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show with vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors is followed by the improvised comedy program. Admission $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty

Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday. SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. SNACK TIME WITH THE ANVIL COMPANY. La Nuit Comedy The-

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Car-

rollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

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49


LISTINGS

New Orleans Ballet Association

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

EVENTS

NOBA

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 2 TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Thursday 4 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 6 JAPAN FOR KIDS. Latter

EVENTS Tuesday 2 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE . Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans. org for details. 7:30 p.m. GEEK SQUAD SUMMER ACADEMY. Kingsley House, 1600

Constance St., 523-6221; www. kingsleyhouse.org — Best Buy’s community outreach event

PHOTO BY ZACK SMITH

It’s time to say happy birthday to Louis Armstrong, who scholars believe was born on Aug. 4. The 11th annual Satchmo SummerFest (Aug. 4-7) kicks off Thursday and there are parties, a Frenchmen Street club strut, scholarly presentations, films and two days of free live music (noon to 8 p.m.) on two stages at the Old U.S. Mint (400 Esplanade Ave.). Saturday’s musical lineup includes Shamarr Allen (pictured) & the Underdawgs, the Jason Marsalis Quartet, the Soul Rebels and Treme brass bands and traditional jazz by Lars Edegran’s Ragtime Orchestra, Clive Wilson’s New Orleans Serenaders. Tom McDermott and Kevin Clark play music from early in Armstrong’s career. On Sunday, catch Kermit Ruffins and the Barbecue Swingers, Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, Glen David Andrews, the Preservation Hall All-Stars, the New Birth Brass Band and others. Other festivities include a centennial birthday party for trumpeter Lionel Ferbos. Between musical sets there are dance lessons for jazz, swing and blues by groups including Dancing Man 504, NOLA Jitterbugs and Dance Quarter. The children’s crafts area features a second-line umbrella creation station and coconut decorating. There will be a jazz Mass on Sunday at St. Augustine Church (1210 Gov. Nicholls St.), followed by a second-line parade to the festival. Satchmo SummerFest’s seminars feature scholarly presentations. Ricky Riccardi discusses his new book What a Wonderful World: The Magic of Louis Armstrong’s Later Years, and he presents rare film footage of Armstrong performances and interviews. Keynote speaker Richard Havers will play clips from the comprehensive box set of Armstrong recordings being officially released at the festival by Universal Music Group/Verve. For a full list of speakers and events, visit the website. Free admission to most events. — Lora Ghawaly

AUG

4-7

Satchmo SummerFest Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., and other downtown locations, 522-5730; www.fqfi.org

Dance

2011-12 Mark Morris Dance Group

October 22 – Mahalia Jackson Theater

Jacoby & Pronk Contemporary Dance Artists November 11 & 12 – Lupin Hall, NOCCA Co-presented with The NOCCA Institute

Shen Wei Dance Arts

January 21 – Mahalia Jackson Theater

Stephen Petronio Company March 2 & 3 – Lupin Hall, NOCCA Co-presented with The NOCCA Institute

Complexions Contemporary Ballet April 21 – Mahalia Jackson Theater

The Joffrey Ballet

May 12 – Mahalia Jackson Theater

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SIP & SOCIAL . Ralph’s on the

Park, 900 City Park Ave., 4881000; www.ralphsonthepark. com — Proceeds from a speciality cocktail benefit New Orleans Police and Justice Foundation for Fight Crime

With a Fork, a Louisiana Restaurant Association initiative. Email carole@nopjf.org for details. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. STAGE DOOR IDOL . Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen. org — Contestants perform World War II-era hits for a panel of celebrity judges in the singing competition. Call 528-1944 ext. 267 for details.

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Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The New Orleans Chapter of the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program Alumni Association hosts the program for children featuring storytelling, origami-making, a presentation on Japan and other activities. Free admission. 11 a.m. Saturday.

Sunny Side of the Street

photos: Marty Sohl, Nan Melville, Zhen Qian, Sarah Silver, Karsten Staiger, Herbert Migdoll

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

51


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52

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EVENTS

LISTINGS

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Wednesday 3

uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

ASANTE FOUNDATION AWARDS. Mahalia Jackson

NEW ORLEANS PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB MEETING .

Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater. com — Kermit Ruffins and the Barbecue Swingers host and perform at the event showcasing and honoring local poets, musicians and artists. Email hong@asanteusa.org or visit www.asanteusa.com for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www. infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

LGBT YOUTH PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT Community

Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www.lgbtccno. org — The center provides a support group for 18- to 24-year-olds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. Email programs@lgbtccno.org for details. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

MODEL GREEN HOUSE . Global

Green Holy Cross Project, 409 Andry St., ; www.globalgreen. org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which

Harahan Senior Center, 100 Elodie St., 737-3810 — Milton Dureau, commander of laboratory services for the Jefferson Parish Crime Lab, discusses the use of computers in law enforcement. Email president@nopc.org or visit www.nopc.org for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

RHEA LANA’S OF NEW ORLEANS CHILDREN’S CONSIGNMENT EVENT. University Of New

Orleans, Human Performance Center, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, 280-6683 — The semi-annual sale features upscale clothing for boys and girls, shoes, maternity wear, toys, play sets, furniture, strollers and more. Email erica@rhealana. com or visit www.neworleans. rhealana.com for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott. com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Thursday 4 CELEBRATE RECOVERY. Victory

Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The group addresses addictions and other emotional issues through a spiritual perspective. Call 733-5005 for details. 6:30 p.m.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

DRINKING LIBERALLY NEW ORLEANS. Pravda, 1113 Decatur

St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Progressives meet to share ideas and drink. 7 p.m.

FIRST THURSDAYS WARGAMES. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum hosts WWII board and miniatures gaming for players at all levels. Pre-registration is required; a minimum number of gamers must register for the meeting to be held. Call 528-1944 ext. 333 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

LIFE HURTS, GOD HEALS. Victory Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The support group focuses on teens and young adults with addictions, hang ups and emotional pain. Call 733-5005 for details. 7 p.m. NEW ORLEANS ANTIQUES FORUM . Historic New Orleans

Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “French at Heart: Continental Influence in the Gulf South” is the theme for the forum, which includes panels featuring local and national experts discussing decorative arts, social activities and opportunities to visit antiques shops in the city. Call 523-4662 or visit www.hnoc.org/antiques. htm for the schedule and other details. Admission starts at $100. Thursday-Sunday.

SATCHMO SUMMERFEST. Old

U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state.la.us/ site/mintex.htm — The festival celebrates Louis Satchmo’s birthday with jazz music, seminars and New Orleans cuisine. Visit www.satchmosummerfest.com for the schedule and other details. Free admission. Noon to 8 p.m. Thursday-Sunday.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. TOASTS & TIKI-TAILS. NO

Fleas Market, 7611 Maple St., 324-4727; www.nofleasmarketnola.com — The boutique welcomes friendly, leashed pets for its end-of-summer sale which features a costume contest, drinks, and snacks for humans and dogs. Call 3685191 ext. 154 or visit www.laspca.org for details. Admission $5. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WORLD WAR II DISCUSSION GROUP. East Bank Regional

Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — National World War II Museum registrar Toni Kiser discusses the role of dogs in


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PAGE 53

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

review Groove Is in the Heart

Groove Interrupted is and isn’t a Hurricane Katrina book. The storm’s occasion and massive destruction following the levee failures provide the framework for the collection of profiles by The Times-Picayune’s chief music writer of the last 15 years, Keith Spera. The ordeal is referenced in the title, introduction and throughout chapters focusing on musicians ranging from Fats Domino to metal rocker Phil Anselmo to rapper Mystikal to onetime-Big Star vocalist Alex Chilton, who lived below the radar in New Orleans for years. But the book also delves into each subject’s own journey, personal tragedies and triumphs. The colorful and defiant Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown was suffering from lung cancer when the storm arrived. Anselmo suffered the loss of bandmate “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott in late 2004 and fought to reclaim his life from chronic back pain and pills in the years bracketing Katrina. Mystikal spent those years behind bars for sexual battery and returned to performing after his release in 2010. With some material culled from years of reporting for the Picayune, including the paper’s Pulitzer Prize-winning work during the flooding and aftermath in 2005, the book fills in details and dispels myths generated during the hectic evacuation period, particularly about Fats Domino’s rescue and bumpy homecoming. The long chapter about Quint Davis both traces his career to his first meeting with George Wein and looks at the perception of New Orleans’ music scene and vitality as a whole via the highly scrutinized and sometimes cathartic 2006 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. There’s also reporting on various musical projects and benefits inspired by the storm, including Allen Toussaint and Elvis Costello’s The River in Reverse album and tour. The book is marked by Spera’s upbeat and comfortable prose, and he never loses his eye for detail or the facts as he assembles a broad survey of how New Orleans has affected its musicians and how they helped the city recover its cultural groove after the storm. — Will Coviello

AUG

2 5 7

Groove Interrupted St. Martin’s Press Keith Spera discusses Groove Interrupted 6 p.m. Tuesday Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323; www.octaviabooks.com 5 p.m. Friday Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266; wwwdardendistrictbookshop.com Noon Sunday Satchmo SummerFest, Maison in the Marigny, 508 Frenchmen St.; www.fqfi.org

Sunday 7 BACK TO SCHOOL RALLY.

Walter Cohen High School, 3520 Dryades St. — The nonprofit Love Impact Inc. gives away free school supplies, backpacks, uniforms and health screenings to children. Email greglawson@loveimpact.org or visit www.loveimpact.org for details. Free admission. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New Orleans

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

LOCKS OF LOVE CUT-A-THON . Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-8000 — The nonprofit that gives hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children suffering from long-term medical hair loss provides haircuts for $15 at the event. Call 491-0342 or email lboudreaux3@cox.net for details. Noon to 5 p.m. MARDI GRAS INDIAN HALL OF FAME MEMORIAL, INDUCTION & AWARDS CEREMONY. Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — The annual program highlights the role of Mardi Gras Indians and those who support the tradition. Call 214-6630 or visit www.mardigrasindianhalloffame.org for details. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

PELICANPALOOZA . Southport Hall, 200 Monticello Ave., 8352903 — The Molly Ringwalds, 5 Finger Discount, Weathered, and the Topcats perform at the concert benefiting Camp Pelican, a camp for children

with pulmonary disorders. The event also features raffles and silent auctions. Admission $15. Noon. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SUNDAY SWING WITH THE NEW ORLEANS MOONSHINERS.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — Professional swing dancers provide coaching for dancers of all levels while local musicians play World War II era hits. Call 5281944 ext. 359 for details. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. dance lessons, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. live music. Free admission.

AFTER 4PM EVERY DAY Choose Kid-Friendly Entrées like: Chicken Tenders • Daily Special Shrimp Entrée • Fried Fish • Roast Beef Small Chopped Beef • 2 Fried Chicken Legs • 2 Corn Dogs • And More Each Kids Entrée comes with: 2 Sides • Kids Drink • Dessert (Jello, Pudding or Cupcake) Dine-in only. Limit one 99¢ Kids Meal per adult meal purchase. Limited time offer. Available for kids 12 and under.

Visit us at piccadilly.com for a list of locations in the New Orleans area.

any meal kids $1 off Free meal $5.99 or more

*

Monday 8 TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial PAGE 57

Lunch or Dinner

any day of the week Must present coupon to receive offer. Valid only at participating locations. Not redeemable for cash or gift cards. No photocopies or facsimiles accepted. One coupon per guest, per check. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Tax and gratuity not included. Good for one-time use only. OFFER EXPIRES 8/31/11.

PICC11-224 B Gambit v1.indd 1

With meal purchase of $5.99 or more

*Available for kids 12 and under. Dine-in only. Must present coupon to receive offer. Valid only at participating locations. Not redeemable for cash or gift cards. No photocopies or facsimiles accepted. One coupon per guest, per check. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Good for one-time use only. OFFER EXPIRES 8/31/11.

7/20/11 12:11 PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

the various steps involved in making a cookbook, from writing recipes to publishing. Admission $25 members, $30 non-members. 2 p.m.

99¢

55


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS PAGE 53

review Groove Is in the Heart

Groove Interrupted is and isn’t a Hurricane Katrina book. The storm’s occasion and massive destruction following the levee failures provide the framework for the collection of profiles by The Times-Picayune’s chief music writer of the last 15 years, Keith Spera. The ordeal is referenced in the title, introduction and throughout chapters focusing on musicians ranging from Fats Domino to metal rocker Phil Anselmo to rapper Mystikal to onetime-Big Star vocalist Alex Chilton, who lived below the radar in New Orleans for years. But the book also delves into each subject’s own journey, personal tragedies and triumphs. The colorful and defiant Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown was suffering from lung cancer when the storm arrived. Anselmo suffered the loss of bandmate “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott in late 2004 and fought to reclaim his life from chronic back pain and pills in the years bracketing Katrina. Mystikal spent those years behind bars for sexual battery and returned to performing after his release in 2010. With some material culled from years of reporting for the Picayune, including the paper’s Pulitzer Prize-winning work during the flooding and aftermath in 2005, the book fills in details and dispels myths generated during the hectic evacuation period, particularly about Fats Domino’s rescue and bumpy homecoming. The long chapter about Quint Davis both traces his career to his first meeting with George Wein and looks at the perception of New Orleans’ music scene and vitality as a whole via the highly scrutinized and sometimes cathartic 2006 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. There’s also reporting on various musical projects and benefits inspired by the storm, including Allen Toussaint and Elvis Costello’s The River in Reverse album and tour. The book is marked by Spera’s upbeat and comfortable prose, and he never loses his eye for detail or the facts as he assembles a broad survey of how New Orleans has affected its musicians and how they helped the city recover its cultural groove after the storm. — Will Coviello

AUG

2 5 7

Groove Interrupted St. Martin’s Press Keith Spera discusses Groove Interrupted 6 p.m. Tuesday Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323; www.octaviabooks.com 5 p.m. Friday Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266; wwwdardendistrictbookshop.com Noon Sunday Satchmo SummerFest, Maison in the Marigny, 508 Frenchmen St.; www.fqfi.org

Sunday 7 BACK TO SCHOOL RALLY.

Walter Cohen High School, 3520 Dryades St. — The nonprofit Love Impact Inc. gives away free school supplies, backpacks, uniforms and health screenings to children. Email greglawson@loveimpact.org or visit www.loveimpact.org for details. Free admission. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New Orleans

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

LOCKS OF LOVE CUT-A-THON . Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-8000 — The nonprofit that gives hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children suffering from long-term medical hair loss provides haircuts for $15 at the event. Call 491-0342 or email lboudreaux3@cox.net for details. Noon to 5 p.m. MARDI GRAS INDIAN HALL OF FAME MEMORIAL, INDUCTION & AWARDS CEREMONY. Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — The annual program highlights the role of Mardi Gras Indians and those who support the tradition. Call 214-6630 or visit www.mardigrasindianhalloffame.org for details. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

PELICANPALOOZA . Southport

Hall, 200 Monticello Ave., 8352903 — The Molly Ringwalds, 5 Finger Discount, Weathered, and the Topcats perform at the concert benefiting Camp Pelican, a camp for children

with pulmonary disorders. The event also features raffles and silent auctions. Admission $15. Noon. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SUNDAY SWING WITH THE NEW ORLEANS MOONSHINERS.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — Professional swing dancers provide coaching for dancers of all levels while local musicians play World War II era hits. Call 5281944 ext. 359 for details. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. dance lessons, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. live music. Free admission.

Monday 8 TOASTMASTERS MEETING .

Milton H. Latter Memorial PAGE 57

AFTER 4PM EVERY DAY Choose Kid-Friendly Entrées like: Chicken Tenders • Daily Special Shrimp Entrée • Fried Fish • Roast Beef Small Chopped Beef • 2 Fried Chicken Legs • 2 Corn Dogs • And More Each Kids Entrée comes with: 2 Sides • Kids Drink • Dessert (Jello, Pudding or Cupcake) Dine-in only. Limit one 99¢ Kids Meal per adult meal purchase. Limited time offer. Available for kids 12 and under.

Visit us at piccadilly.com for a list of locations in the New Orleans area.

any meal kids $1 off Free meal $5.99 or more

*

Lunch or Dinner

any day of the week Must present coupon to receive offer. Valid only at participating locations. Not redeemable for cash or gift cards. No photocopies or facsimiles accepted. One coupon per guest, per check. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Tax and gratuity not included. Good for one-time use only. OFFER EXPIRES 8/31/11.

PICC11-224 B Gambit v1.indd 1

With meal purchase of $5.99 or more

*Available for kids 12 and under. Dine-in only. Must present coupon to receive offer. Valid only at participating locations. Not redeemable for cash or gift cards. No photocopies or facsimiles accepted. One coupon per guest, per check. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Good for one-time use only. OFFER EXPIRES 8/31/11.

7/20/11 12:11 PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

the various steps involved in making a cookbook, from writing recipes to publishing. Admission $25 members, $30 non-members. 2 p.m.

99¢

55


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS PAGE 55

Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www. notoast234.freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

SPORTS NEW ORLEANS ZEPHYRS.

Zephyr Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www.zephyrsbaseball. com — The Zephyrs play the Albuquerque Isotopes. 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. THE LAGNIAPPE CLASSIC DOG SHOW. Pontchartrain Center,

4545 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 465-9985; www.pontchartraincenter.com — Dogs vie for ribbons, trophies and prizes based on how they meet establish standards for their breeds at the event that also includes junior showmanship competitions and vendors selling dog-related merchandise. Email lagniappeclassic@ ymail.com for details. Free admission. 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday-Sunday.

CAREGIVER STRESS MANAGEMENT CRUISE GIVEAWAY. Home Instead

Senior Care awards a free five-day cruise to a family caregiver. Those interested in nominating someone should submit a brief story explaining why the nominated individual deserves to win. Call 455-4911 or visit www. homeinstead.com/339 for details. Submission deadline is Aug. 31.

GROW GENTILLY SMALL BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION .

The competition awards winners a cash prize plus technical and professional assistance to enhance their businesses. Visit www.cybergrants.com/capitalone/growgentilly for details. Application deadline is Monday.

PROJECT HOMECOMING . The

faith-based nonprofit seeks homes to rebuild that suffered damage of 50 percent or more from Hurricane Katrina. Call 942-0444, ext. 244 for details.

VERIZON FOUNDATION LITERACY GRANTS. The foun-

dation awards nonprofits $50,000 in grants to support

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. Call Brian Opert at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email bopert@casaneworleans.org for details. HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS.

Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details.

WORDS AMANDA EYRE WARD. Maple

Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The author discusses and reads from Close Your Eyes. 6 p.m. Saturday.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at

the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

ED & SUSAN POOLE . East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The authors sign Hollywood on the Bayou and discuss Louisiana film history. 7 p.m. Tuesday. FIRST TUESDAY BOOK CLUB.

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The group discusses Karen White’s The Beach Trees. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

KEITH SPERA . Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from Groove Interrupted: Loss, Renewal and The Music of New Orleans. The event also features a performance by Allen Toussaint. 6 p.m. Tuesday. Spera also appears at Garden District Book Shop (The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266) with Jeremy Davenport 6 p.m. Friday.

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

Chef John Besh

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. PAMELA EWEN . Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Dancing on Glass. 5:30 p.m. Thursday. PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturday. POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. RICKY RICCARDI . Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author discusses and signs What a Wonderful World: The Magic of Louis Armstrong’s Later Years. 7 p.m. Saturday. SATCHMO CLUB STRUT BOOK SIGNINGS. Faubourg Marigny

Art & Books, 600 Frenchmen St., 947-3700; www.fabonfrenchmen.com — John Swenson signs New Atlantis: Musicians Battle for the Survival of New Orleans and Ricki Riccardi signs What a Wonderful World: The Magic of Louis Armstrong’s Later Years. 7 p.m. Friday.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spokenword, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail. com for details.

The National WWII Museum is delighted to bring back an iconic American institution, The Soda Shop! It’s the hot new spot for cool treats! House-made ice creams and milkshakes in dazzling flavors by Chef John Besh! Bananas Foster Sector Candy Bar Crunch Creamy Valrhona Triple Chocolate Creole Cream Cheese Red Velvet Coffee Toffee Goo, and more!

Old-fashioned fountain sodas in Nectar, Melon, Pineapple and seasonal flavors! Snazzy sandwiches from the Bad Mamma Jamma to Joe Dobie Chicken, White Bean Hummus to Pimento Cheese Grilled with Country Ham, and more! Signature soups, elegant coffees and other treats. Breakfast too! “Build-a-Biscuit” with such delectable toppings as Poche’s Andouille, La Provence Mangalitsa Sausage Patties, organic eggs and artisan cheeses.

Open every day, from 7 am to 7pm! Magazine St. at Andrew Higgins Drive | 504-528-1944 | www.nationalww2museum.org WW2-00000_SodaShop_Gambit_HalfPgVert.indd 1

7/18/11 8:47 PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

literacy programs. Visit www. verizonfoundation.org for details. Application deadline is Sept. 1.

Get the Scoop!

57


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >VIVA LAKEVIEW < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <In Lakeview, the Spanish restaurant Madrid closed, and its > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >address was quickly converted into a second location for the < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Mexican restaurant El Gato Negro (300 Harrison Ave., 4880107; www.elgatonegronola.com). This new El Gato Negro has the same menu as its French Quarter counterpart (81 French Market Place, 525-9752), with tacos and burritos alongside WHAT more ambitious seafood and meat entrees. There’s also a bar GW Fins with an extensive margarita and mojito selection. It’s the second Mexican restaurant to open on Harrison in recent months, WHERE preceded by the Velvet Cactus (917 Harrison Ave., 301-2083; 808 Bienville St., 581-3467; www.thevelvetcactus.com). www.gwfins.com

am

B

WHEN

Dinner nightly HOW MUCH

Expensive

RESERVATIONS

Recommended

WHAT WORKS

A vast array of fresh fish

SUMMER SAVINGS

Each summer, as the dip in tourism and convention business arrives, so too does the citywide COOLinary New Orleans restaurant promotion. A wide variety of participating restaurants across town offer two- or three-course lunch menus for $20 or less and three-course dinner menus for $35 or less. The program is in effect through the end of August. Find details at www.nomcvb.com.

five 5 IN

Five Places for Carpaccio

WHAT DOESN'T

More nonseafood appetizers would add variety

A MANO

CHECK, PLEASE

www.amanonola.com

An upscale oasis for creative, high-quality seafood

870 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 208-9280 House-cured, grass-fed beef is dressed with grana cheese.

DEL PORTO RESTAURANT Chefs Tenney Flynn and Michael Nelson work with fresh fish at GW Fins.

501 E. BOSTON ST., COVINGTON, (985) 875-1006 www.delportoristorante.com

Light-as-air slices of beef are topped with Parmesan shavings.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

DOMENICA

Topping the Scales

A FINE FRENCH QUARTER RESTAURANT BREAKS THE MOLD WITH GULF SEAFOOD. BY IAN MCNULTY

O

one way to plan your dinner is to scan Facebook for photos of chef du cuisine Michael Nelson posing with fish that could be trophies mounted on lodge walls. A Facebook update might also reveal when Nelson will next prepare an excellent innovation he calls “scalibut” — a halibut steak fused with a golden-seared cap of scallops. While entrees constantly change, appetizers rarely do. Practically all of them star seafood, with highlights like crab pot stickers in vivid green pools of pea shoot butter and whisperingly tender lobster dumplings. Smoked oysters doused with sputtering butter are also fantastic, but don’t look for them until Louisiana oysters pick up again in the fall. The large, intelligently assembled wine list is filled with moderately priced whites and many Pinot Noirs that pair beautifully with fish. Dozens of wines are available by the glass. While service is polished and personable enough one-on-one, it can take quite some time for waiters to orbit back to your table from the expanses of this large restaurant. The open, spacious setting is nice, especially when viewed from a padded booth as deep and cloistered as a theater box, though the design feels a bit dated. This dining room could be in any city where old warehouse spaces have been repurposed as swank restaurants. But what really matters is on the plate, and GW Fins could not be just anywhere. This is a New Orleans original that manages to break the local mold while giving a better measure of the depth and quality of our local seafood abundance.

www.domenicarestaurant.com

Razor-thin disks of octopus are salty, tender and sprinkled with citrus.

LEONARDO TRATTORIA

709 ST. CHARLES AVE., 558-8986 www.leonardonola.com

Swordfish carpaccio is dressed with lots of lemon.

RISTORANTE DA PIERO

401 WILLIAMS BLVD., KENNER, 469-8585 www.ristorantedapiero.net

A generous plate of carpaccio is piled with spicy arugula and sliced mushrooms.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 Aquinas Pinot Noir NAPA VALLEY, CALIFORNIA / $12-$17 RETAIL

Fruit for this bottling was sourced primarily from Napa’s eastern Carneros region and blended with small percentages of Yountville and Monterey grapes. The medium-bodied wine offers scents of red and black cherries, spice, vanilla, earthy nuances, light pepper and soft tannins. Enjoy it with grilled pork chops, duck confit, coq au vin, tuna and sun-dried tomatoes. Buy it at: Lakeview Grocery, Breaux Mart in Uptown and Metairie, Robert Fresh Markets, Whole Foods Market in Uptown, Langenstein’s in Metairie, Budget Saver in Marrero and The Wine Market and Habanos in Slidell. Drink it at: Commander’s Palace, LePhare, Lucy’s Retired Surfers Bar & Restaurant, Mojo Lounge, Harbor Bar & Grill, Keith Young’s Steakhouse and Obelisk Wine Bar and Art Gallery. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

ne of the thrills of sport fishing in the Gulf is the potential for a delicious surprise any time something takes your bait. The diversity of fish out there is vast, and you never know just what you will reel in. That’s a little like dining at GW Fins, a first-class seafood restaurant where the menu changes significantly each day, based on what chef Tenney Flynn secures from his array of dockside sources. It’s not simply a matter of swapping such familiar fare as trout meuniere for catfish amandine. Rather, the selections — and his kitchen’s smart preparations — are as varied as grilled escolar with a light pineapple and basil glaze, meaty redfish crusted with pumpkin seeds, or glistening disks of wahoo, seared but still raw on the inside, topped with wasabi. In this way, the whole menu functions as a daily specials list, and there might be a dozen such entrees on any given night. Flynn and his business partner Gary Wollerman (the “GW” behind the deceptively chainesque restaurant name) have been at this for 10 years now. Both previously held corporate positions at Ruth’s Chris Steak House, and their idea was to create an upscale restaurant as focused on fine seafood as Ruth’s Chris is on steak. They turned heads immediately by serving fish few other New Orleans restaurants stocked, and this is still a good place to look for such rare treats as Dover sole or whole roasted bronzini. But most of the fish here have far shorter journeys. They often arrive whole, ready to be butchered in-house, and

123 BARONNE ST., 648-6020

59


OUT2EAT

Happy Birthday Julia!

full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

This iconic woman, TV personality and cookbook author, who taught us how to cook French, was welcomed and celebrated at Bayona in 1992.

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, panfried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

Please join us evenings August 15-20 for

A Week of Julia Child-Inspired Dishes

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Prepared by our celebrated woman in the kitchen

Chef Susan Spicer 3 course menu $45

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

430 Dauphine • 504.525.4455 • www.bayona.com

BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

“Since 1969”

Crescent City Brewhouse (527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com) offers five house-brewed beers and an ecelectic menu.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

PhOTO BY CheRYL GeRBeR

66

COUPON

roses $ .49

6

stock colors

DZN

EXPIRES 9/4/11

CASH & CARRY ONLY NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER COUPONS. COUPON MUST BE PRESENT AT TIME OF PURCHASE.

Like us on Facebook for a chance to win a Black & Gold Football signed by the 2010 Saints players! Sweepstakes end August 31, 2011

METAIRIE

Sun. Credit cards. $$$

PINTS & POBOYS

Choose a 3-inch Poboy & a Pint of Beer • $8

plus tax

Every Night • 7-10pm Choices include: Fried Green Tomato & Remoulade, Overstuffed Shrimp, Root Beer & Glazed Ham & Cheese, Pattons Hot Sausage, Certified Angus Roast Beef, or French Fry, Roast Beef & Cheddar Poboy

Come Try Our Weekly Throwback Cocktail!

750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716

EXTENDED HOURS!

COVINGTON

3454 Magazine St. NOLA 504-899-3374

1027 VILLAGE WALK (985) 809-9101 VISIT US ON

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

Mon-Sat 11am-10pm

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur

St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411

Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like vealand spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD &

STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 301-9570 — Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. The alligator pear and crabmeat salad combines avocado and crabmeat over tomatoes, red onions and greens in balsamic glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$


SWEET STUFF

OUT2EAT

Now Serving

delicious house specialties free delivery 5pm–9:30pm *

*($15

HOT CHOCOLATE

minimum)

catering available

pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

865-1428 · 704 s. carrollton mon–sat 11am–10pm · sun noon–10pm www.chinaorchidneworleans.com

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Cast a vote for BFC under “Best Sweet Shop”

Featured on: DINERS, DRIVE-INS & DIVES

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

REVOLUTION at the Green Goddess! There’s a revolutionary air sweeping the world. Whether from farm to table, or by shaking shoes at corrupt dictators, people are dedicated to making peaceful changes. The Green Goddess salutes all these revolutionaries! Together, we share the dreams, blood, sweat, and fierce determination to make it happen, NOW!

CHARCOAL BROILED HAMBURGERS

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GAMBLING PROBLEMS? CALL 1-800-522-4700

500 CITY PARK AVE • 486-2559 2008 CLEARVIEW PKWY • 889-2837

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4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-

7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy. com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 520-

68

8530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson

Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd.,

241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001

N. Broad St., 821-3271; www. crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY —

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles

Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135

N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

Classifieds

70

Find Happy Place inin Findyour your Happy Place Gambit’s classifieds... Gambit’s classifieds... Scan Me! Scan Me!

Rentals Real Estate Rentals Real Estate Jobs Jobs ServicesServices Autos Mind, Body, Spirit Autos Mind, Body, Spirit EventsEvents SpecialsSpecials & More & More classadv@gambitweekly.com 504-483-3100 www.bestofneworleans.com classadv@gambitweekly.com 504-483-3100 www.bestofneworleans.com


CLASSIFIEDS King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

DOMESTIC AUTOS ‘09 CHEVY AVEO $9,995 504-368-5640

‘10 CHEVROLET HHR $11,995 504-368-5640

‘10 FORD FOCUS SES

$11,995 504-368-5640

Real Estate Rentals &

Employment

NOLA

REWARD- LOST

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

‘05 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT

ALLEY CAT

LOW MILES $24,995 504-368-5640

‘10 HYUNDAI SONATA $16,995 504-368-5640

Power seat. Several to choose from $16,995 504-368-5640

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

‘09 VW TIGUAN

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Introductory price 1 hr

$50

90 min. avail • Swedish & Deep Tissue

5 min from Elmwood

Hours: 10am-7:30pm Mon - Sat

Alicia LA Lic# 520

16 yrs exp. Non-Sexual call

504-317-4142

MISHKA

Beautiful long hair Russian Blue mix 5 yr old sweetie ,spayed vacs ,504 462-1968

BASHFUL

Tigger

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

Albino large m puppy, all shots current & will b fixed. energetic, & a cuddler ! contact Traci tbkestler@cox.net 504975-5971 Very sweet male 2 yr pld golden brown tabby. shots ,tested ,neutered. 504 462-1968

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

Weekly Tails

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

Body Work Extraordinaire

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

BYWATER BODYWORKS

LICENSED MASSAGE

terrier mix 5 m/old F pup. shots up to date. Nds Rabies. Playful, sweet, enjoys human & canine friends. contact Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Sweet Terrier Mix Puppy

CHATTY CAT NOTICE

AWD $16,995 Call 504-368-5640

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

Little Asia

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136 DSH/MAIN COON MX. Gray/Black Tabby w/ white chest, feet. Appx. 1year old, Vet Ck/Neut./litter trained/ Rescue. Very sweet and gentle but a little shy (504) 460-0136. Wt. 11 lbs.

‘11 TOYOTA CAMRY LE

$16,995 504-368-5640

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

PET ADOPTIONS

08 HONDA S-2000

VANS

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

Princess Leila

$7,500 504-812-5975

MARKETPLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

White Terrier Mix w/brown hair on ears & right eye. Wearing blue collar. Found at Palmer Park (S. Carrollton & S.Caiborne) on 7/20. Call Helena, 861-3082.

IMPORTED AUTOS

Relax Today Advertise in

FOUND DOG

Big Block SS. Red with white stripes. Price $5700. Use email for pictures. cher74me@msn.com Call 337-366-8243.

‘09 VW ROUTAN

Itty Bitty Inky

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

MERCHANDISE APPLIANCES

JOSIE Kennel #A12950924

18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Almond Color. $35. Call 943-7699.

ELECTRIC RANGE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $35. Call 943-7699

ART/POSTERS VINTAGE N.O. JAZZFEST POSTERS

Dating back to 1980, Still in protective tubes, Will sell as collection or by year. 704-681-4914.

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122

MARVA Kennel #A13273191

Josie is a 9-month-old, spayed, Lab mix. She’s been at the shelter since APRIL, has a beautiful chocolate brown coat, is crate trained, enjoys treats and loves to play with new friends. To meet Josie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. Marva is a 4-month-old, spayed, Siamese mix with beautiful markings and a personality to match. She’s just one of SEVERAL kittens available for adoption. To meet Marva or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

Amy is 38 lbs. very swt & playful! likes to play w/ other dogs. house broken. Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Kit Kit

LOST/FOUND PETS

1970 CHEVY CHEVELLE

$22,995 Call 504-368-5640

Grm Shepherd mx

Gorgeous 7 yr old male Siamese extremely sweet and loving ,neutered shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

PETS

‘10 PONTIAC VIBE

‘09 SUBARU FORESTER

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Kirin

$11,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

Elijah

71


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS TREE MEDICS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

ADOPTIONS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

ANNOUNCEMENTS AAAA** Donation.

Donate Your Car, Boat or Real Estate. IRS Tax Deductible. Free Pick-Up/Tow. Any Model/Condition. Help Under Privileged Children Outreach Center 1-800-419-7474

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS MERCY ACADEMY CLASS OF 1971

FOR INFO CONTACT: MercyReunion1971@yahoo.com

SERVICES

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

$25 OFF Trimming $50 OFF Tree Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru August Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

JEFFERSON FEED

Pet & Garden Center GREEN GRASS - REAL FAST The Only Certified Grade A St. Augustine Sod For New Orleans Conditions. Save with our Do-It-Yourself Lawn Maintenance Program. 733-8572.

PEST CONTROL ELIMINATE BED BUGS!

Can’t sleep? Something BUGGING You? Eliminate bed bugs with HEAT. Allergen free, discreet, 100% GUARANTEED. Pure Green Systems, 504-315-0572, 504-315-0561, 504388-5154. info@PGSnow.com

TERMINIX

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

POOL SERVICES MAGNOLIA POOLS

Specializing in Saltwater Systerms Service, Maintenance, Repair 504-270-7307 www.magnoliapools.org

REMODELING/RENOVATION PRO GLAZE REFINISHING

ELECTRICAL

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

TRINITY ELECTRIC

72

If you’ve had a major renovation, added major appliances, your home is 10+ yrs old or you are buying/selling a home, call today. $69.95 HOME INSPECTION. (504) 305-1222

HANDYMAN HARRY’S HOUSE HELPERS * Small Jobs *Repairs *Carpentry *Painting *Install AND MORE! Insured & Priced-Right Harry’s Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown * 504-896-1500 Metairie * 504-896-1550

INSULATION AUDUBON SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

Save up to 50% on ac/heat bills; live in a more comfortable home; Improve sound control, reduce your carbon footprint. Roland (Rusty) Cutrer Jr, Owner 504-432-7359 www.audubonsprayfoam.com

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

“Re-glaze your TUB like NEW again! * Tubs *Tile *Sink Enclosure * Counter Tops *Marble * Fiberglass 504-347-4005

EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT EARN $75-$200 HOUR

(Now 25% Off), Media Makeup & Airbrush Training. For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. 1 wk class &. Portfolio. AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310-3640665 Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

AUDITIONS ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS

Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations.

DRIVERS/DELIVERY DRIVERS:

Long term Local & out/back loads! Free medical, dental w/more benefits avail. CDL-A w/Hazmat, Tanker and TWIC. 1 yr. TT Exp. Req. 1-888-380-5516

MISCELLANEOUS $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com

VOLUNTEER

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe FRENCH QUARTER

RIVER RIDGE

GENTILLY 9012 Rosecrest Lane

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $228K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

835 Royal St. 374.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Call (504) 915-3220

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 9012 ROSECREST LANE REDUCED PRICE!

Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2BD, 2BA, hdwd flrs, appl incl, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open bkyd & shed. 5 min from St. Matthews & St. Rita. REDUCED! $169,000.

KENNER 16 BISTINEAU CT Woodlake South

4 BR, 3 BA, lg bonus rm. Master suite with firepl, jacuzzi, separate shower & 4 closets. French doors in Master & den lead to extra lg patio. $200,000. Pat Arnold, Latter & Blum, 504-9153184. parnold@latterblum.com

CAROL JAMBON, JR. LATTER & BLUM

Metairie Office’s Top Producer in 2010. Under contract: 800 Rue Burgundy, 711 Ridgewood, 1113 Athania, 3213 39th St., 532 Metairie Lawn, 3217 41st. St., 337 Edinburg, 124 Duplessis St. Call Carol to buy or sell your home today! 512-5487

OLD METAIRIE 200 BEVERLY DR.

4/4.5 Spacious foyer, lg liv rm, den, gourmet kit, bkfst rm, 1 BR w/ full ba down, master & 2 add’l br w/full baths on 2nd flr. Hdwd flrs, firepl. $825K. Karen Prieur, RE/MAX, 504-250-8000. www.karenprieur.com

242 MULBERRY

Beaut home on premier st. 4/3 + 3 half ba. Massive limestone firepl. Formal liv & din. Gourmet kit, fam rm. Large salt water heated pool. $1,650,000. Karen Prieur, RE/MAX, 504-250-8000. www.karenprieur.com

METAIRIE TOWERS 401 Metairie Rd

1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, renovated with new appliances and AC’s. $118,000. Call 504-275-5700

REAL REA AL ESTATE AUCTION AL 32+ 3 2+ P 2+ Properties roperties

METAIRIE

August Augu A Au ug u gust g ust 18th 18th • 6 PM PM AAuuct Auction ctio tio i n location: looca catti tion tion on::

PParkview arrkkview TTerrace errrace iinn CCity ity PPark ark (Old (Oldd Casino Casino ino building) buuiild ildding ing) Homes, Hom Ho mes, es, DDuplexes, upleexees, Commercial Comm mercial Vacant Land Land & Vacant

4505 LAPLACE ST. $179,900

MOTIVATED SELLERS! 2/3 Very spac w/lg greatrm & open kit. Each BR has own bath + 3rd bath w/shwr in laun rm. Conv. loc off W. Esplanade by East Jeff Hosp. http://www.papiliostour. com/archives/2773. Delery Comarda Realtors, 504875-355

25 PProperties 25 ropertiees SSelling ellinng ttoo tthe he highest highest bidder biddder regardless regarrdleess ooff pprice riice Bid att AAuction Bi Bid uctitition uc on or or Online OOnnliline Onl linee

Sperry Spe errrry Van Ness

To Advertise in

504 468-6800

A C C E L E R AT E D M A R K E T I N G

®

AUCTION & REALTY CO.

w w w.gilmoreauc tion.com

Terms: 10% Buyer’s Premium. 10% down auction day. Close in 30 days. As is, where is. David E. Gilmore, CCIM, CAI, AARE LA LIC#447 Francis Braud, Broker

345 E. LIVINGSTON PL

Exquisite 3-story, new irrigation & lighting sytms, lovely pool. Spanish cedar shutters. Lg master suite & bath. Elevator. Ofc has coffee bar. $1,130,000. Janet Favrot, Coldwell Banker TEC REALTORS. 504-615-0813

837 OLD METAIRIE PL

3 BR, 3 BA Twnhme, travertine flrs, renov kit w/ granite, spacious floorplan. Quiet neighborhood with easy access to downtown. $265,000. Susan Saia, REMAX, 504-957-7504; saia@bellsouth. net. www.susansaia.com To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

REAL ESTATE

332 PAPWORTH AVE-$175,000

Needs just a little TLC! Front porch w/ swing. LR has wd frs. 2 ind. BR, DR w/ closet coudbe 3rd BR. sun poch in rear has w/d hkkups. Big kit w/island. Lg yd w/rear yard access. Unfin. garage in rear. http://www.papiliostour.com/ archives/2809. Delery Comarda Realtors, 504-875-3555

EAST NEW ORLEANS

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 1161 ROBERT E. LEE BLVD

Luxury home in Lake Vista near the lakefront. Over 4000 sq ft. 4 BR, 4.5 BA. Custom kit Lovely pool. $775,000. G.L. Schroeder Realtor, Contractor. Ofc 504.241.1000. Cell 504.722.2928. schroederbuild@yahoo.com

NEED HELP? Advertise in

LOOK NO FURTHER! - $175K

7516 Ebbtide Dr. 3/2, Mstr w/jac tub & dbl vanities, wbfp, hdwd flrs, ss appl, vltd ceils, granite, custom closets, fnced yd, 2 car garage, tiled patio, auto sprinkler 504-421-4841.

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

The Historic House, Luxury Home and Second Home Specialist Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

455 Phillip Street, $ 239,000

817 Amelia Street, $239,900

Was gutted to the studs in 2004/05 and underwent a high quality renovation. 3 independent bedrooms, 2 full baths, master with whirlpool plus nice walk-in closet, off street parking in a great close to town location.

Rustic charm on this unique home fashioned from joining two separate cottages. Great flowing floor plan and with a second front door that’s great for working from home. Off street parking.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

4BR, 2.5 2 story. Heart pine & brk floors. Lg master suite w/ 2 lg walk-in closets. Delightful front porch. Corner lot, steps to the lake. $424K. Jenny Matherne, J. Louis Matherne & Assoc. 504-885-8478.

Call (504) 483-3100

4BD/4BA Fabulous for entertaining! Renov’t kit., Mstr down, M-I-L suite dnstrs. Add’l 18’x17.5’ room - could be Media, office, etc. Loads of storage! Huge w/i closets. Encl. porch off upstairs bdrm. Much more! Call Sandy Ward, ReMax, 504-259-2616

Sperr r y Van Ness Gilmore Auction

3817 N. Arnoult Road

REAL ESTATE

1249 PAPWORTH - $399,500

Reduced! Asking $169,000

5542 Charlotte Dr. $96,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

73


CLASSIFIEDS COMMERCIAL RENTALS CBD OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 127 Carondelet Street Beautiful space available in downtown New Orleans. Office space includes private offices as well as cubicle space. Also includes conference room, kitchen, copy room, private restrooms, and shared reception area. 3510 sq. ft. $15psf. Lease today! Contact Josh Gertler, Basis Brokerage 504.261.8048 josh@basis-development.com

3020 VETERANS BLVD

3000 sg ft for lease off Causeway Blvd. 1 story in small strip mall. A/C, Heat and Water included in lease. Call Rick, 504-486-8951. Kirschman Realty, LLC.

CBD OFFICES FOR RENT

Individual or groups with administrative space & copier, fax, phone, computer & furniture, if needed. $500 per office per month. For information email: sybil.alexander5@gmail.com. Also please call Hayden Wren at Corporate Realty, 504/581-5005 for an update on listing effort in progress.

METAIRIE

Perfect Corporate Rental

Furn 1 & 2 BR modern apts. Everything incl. Assigned parking. Wi-fi internet, cable, util. 1 BR, $1200/mo. 2 BR, $1500/mo. = From $40/day! 1 mo. is shortest term. 2325 & 2200 Pasadena Ave 504-491-1591

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

METAIRIE TOWERS

1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable included, parking. 24 hr Concierge Service, $970/mo 914-882-1212.

STUDIO APT.

Recently renov’t. Utilities incl. Internet & cable, hdwd flrs. Small pet considered. $625 + dep. Call 251-1946

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR 3626 Upperline

Upr dplx, 3 br, 1.5 ba, wd flrs, cei fans, furn kit, w/d, off st pkg. Nice area. $1200/mo. Louis, 874-3195.

2805 Wytchwood Dr.

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151

4608 FAIRFIELD ST.

3 Br, 2.5 Ba. Approx 1800 sq ft. Lg fenced yard. Small pet OK $1200/mo plus deposits.. 504-442-0618

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4228 ORLEANS AVE.

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1275/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep, No Pets.. Call 225-8026554/ email dicklea@cox.net

DOWNTOWN 1327 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1100 mo. 432-7955.

MID CITY 3122 PALMYRA STREET

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $650/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

3234-B Banks St.

1b/1b Upper Rr apt. Renov. Ceil fans/ new carp. all new appl. balcony, cen a/h. Util Incl. $890/m+ dep. 504908-7334

4322 HAMILTON

2BR/1BA lower, 1000 + sf, hdwd flrs, furn kit, w/d, porch, fen yd, off st pkg, no smokers, pet negot. $900/mo + dep. 488-2969

4511 CANAL ST

1 efficiency $800; One 1 bdrm. $850. On red streetcar line. Both include water. Call 504-782-6564

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573.

4 LG BR/3 FULL BA 4916 DANNEEL - UPPER

Over 2500’, 2 sunrms, lg lr/dr, wd flrs, hi ceils, ca, ac unit, all appls: w/d, fridge, lg clst, f’nd bkyd, o/s pkg, gtd. & grded Close to St Chrls & Newman. $1900/mo. 813-8186 . Prefer profs.

1508 CARONDELET ST- 2 APTS Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $800/mo. Util incl. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1100 Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-2396566. mballier@yahoo.com

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

2 Eff apts. Lower $650 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

1730 NAPOLEON AVENUE

1 br apt, living rm, furn kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, a/c units. Util incl. 1 blk St Charles. No pets. 251-2564

4917 S MIRO ST

2 BR, 1 BA, pool, cen a/h. $885 mo, water incl. Furn kit, w/d. Safe neighborhood. Call 452-2319 or 821-5567

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

REAL ESTATE

579 S CARROLLTON

By St. Charles, Large Studio. $800/mo utilities paid. 504-913-6999, 504-259-6999

7823 PEARL

Close to Carrollton & St. Charles. 2 BR1A Cottage. Fenced, w&d. $1000 & dep. Call 504-891-7584, lve messge.

GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO

Adorable gated condo. 1 bd/1ba. O/S pkng, stainless appliances & granite. Garden District Patrol. $900 including utilities. Call (504) 432-1034.

RAISED COTTAGE UPPER

Deluxe furn 2 Br, w/10x12 luxury ba, cent. air, wd & tile floors, ceil fans, mini blinds, yd, screen prch, w/d, 5300 Freret at Valmont. $1200-$1400/mo incl. gas/wtr 504-899-3668

4129 VENDOME PLACE

Beautifully renovated spacious home. 3/4 br, 3 BA, kit w/ ss appl. w/d, cen a/h, lg yard, small gar. $2500/mo. $1500 dep. 504-621-9337

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

2 BR, Newly renov shotgun style $895/mo Also: Rms by week, private bath. $175/wk all util incl. 504-2020381, 738-2492.

MISSISSIPPI RENTALS BAY ST. LOUIS, OLD TOWN

Charming Main St. Lse 1/2 Dbl hi ceil, hdwd flrs, 2/1.5, full kit, w/d, cov’d rear deck, ca & h, $1000/mo. incl wtr & lawn care. 228-466-4686

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

75


CHOOSE YOUR (DE)VICE MONTY WILLIAMS ON THE HORNETS PAGE 9

KING BRITT-ISH INVASION PAGE 91

BEST

OF NEW ORLEANS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

G A M B I T > V O L U M E 3 2 > N U M B E R 4 > J A N U A R Y 2 5 > 2 011

.COM

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4 WAYS TO GET YOUR GAMBIT PRINT | WEB | MOBILE | IPAD


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS BETWEEN JEFFERSON & OCTAVIA

BAYOU ST. JOHN SALE PENDING

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aUGUst 02 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 73

78

5419 LASALLE

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

ELEGANT UPTOWN HOME. Nestled between Jefferson & Octavia on a quiet block , this newly renovated home features a spacious living area with high ceilings & lots of natural light. Expansive eat-in kitchen overlooks deck & gorgeous courtyrd surrounded by garden. Living rm opens to large porch. Master bdrm suite opens onto large balcony has closet & storage space galore! Attached sitting/dressing room has additional closets. 3BR/3BA, 3,050 sq. ft. Must see!! $595,000

(504) 895-4663

1216 NORTH LOPEZ BAYOU ST JOHN 4 PLEX on huge lot. Well maintained. Owner’s unit has open flr plan, crown molding & whirlpool. Hdwd flrs throughout. Totally renov in 2007. Re-wired, plumbing, roof, drywall, & cen A/C throughout. Living rm opens onto patio & pool. Enjoy this tranquil setting from porch or huge balc. Pool house has storage & guest accommodations with 2 full baths. 4153 sq. ft. plus 576 Sq ft pool house. $595,000.



Gambit- August 2, 2011