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WILL JIMMY’S ROCK ON?

PAGE

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REVIEW:

MILKFISH

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35

ANTHONY JESELNIK:

OFFENSIVE COORDINATOR


BULLETIN BOARD CLASSIFIEDS

504-891-6400

consult With the real estate exPerts oF neW orleans

Francher Perrin GrouP Voted toP 3 realtors in the city!

INTERESTED IN GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY?

We’re looking for compassionate & dedicated volunteers to help make a difference! OTHER OppORTUNITIES ARE AVAIlABlE

To Volunteer Call Paige

504-818-2723 ext. 3006 A GREAT PLACE TO DO YOGA WILD LOTUS YOGA - Voted “Best Place to Take a Yoga Class” 10 yrs in a row by Gambit Readers.” New student special: 10 classes for $60. www.wildlotusyoga.com - 899-0047. KIND RELIABLE SITTER 20 Years Exp. In home care. Day/Night. Ref’s. Call 504-535-3257. DWI - Traffic Tickets? Don’t go to court without an attorney! You can afford an attorney. Call Attorney Gene Redmann, 504-834-6430

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

GET A POWERFUL RESUME You Can Get a Better Job! STRATEGIC RESUMES GRANT COOPER, Certified Resume Writer CareerPro N.O. 504-891-7222 Metairie 504-835-7558

2

SPORTS CENTER COLLECTIBLES, LLC Buying Sports Cards & Memorabilia, Autographed Helmets, Jerseys, Balls & Bats Old Programs & Other Collectibles 1402 Gause Blvd., Slidell, LA Call (504) 439-0684.

L. BRYAN FRANCHER

251-6400

620 Conti - French Quarter ...................................... $2,600,000 2228 St Charles Ave. - Gard Dist Centerhall ... SOLD $2,314,000 340 S Diamond St - Warehouse Dist ............ SOLD $1,195,000 730 St. Philip C - French Quarter .................. SOLD $1,140,000 1217 Royal, No. 2 - French Quarter - balcony ........ $1,065,000 924 Burgundy .................................................... SOLD $1,000,000 5111 Pitt - Uptown ..............................................SOLD $760,000 801 St. Joseph No. 17 - Whse Dist ............ SOLD $780,000 4832 Camp - Uptown ................................................ $675,000 4501 & 07 Tchoupitoulas - Comm ... UNDER CONTRACT $650,000 4020 Prytania - Uptown ................................ SOLD $645,000 5005 Laurel - Uptown .................................... SOLD $575,000 2918 Esplanade Ave. ...................................... SOLD $525,000 818 Congress St. - Bywater ......................................... $498,000 2330 Palmer - Uptown ............................... SOLD $475,000 2114-16 Chartres - B&B Lic. ......................... SOLD $440,000 1231 Amelia - Uptown ................. UNDER CONTRACT $445,000 1310 Chartres - French Quarter - Parking .............. $399,000 4313-15 Prytania - Uptown ............................... SOLD $380,000 612 Third - Irish Channel ............................................ $235,000 1205 St. Charles Ave. - Condo ...................................... $125,000

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LESLIE PERRIN

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THIS WEEK IN CLASSIFIEDS: Summer Safety Tips •••••••

•••SUMMER BARGAINS•••

Employment

222 sq in cooking area, hardly used, perfect condition! Sells new for $129.00, will sell for $80.00. (Incl. three 1-lb propane fuel cylinders, FREE)

Picture Perfect Properties

Cabela's Table Top Stainless Steel Grill Cuisinart ice Cream/Yogurt Maker

never used! Sells new for $59.99, will sell for $40.00.

OXO Salad Spinner

large, like new! Sells new for $30.70, will sell for $15.00.

•••••••

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Martha Stewart Swiss Dot Sheers Curtains

NOLA Marketplace

•••GREAT KITCHEN DEALS•••

Home & Garden

like new! Sells new for $78.00, will sell for $45.00.

Mind, Body, Spirit and much more!

Three packs of one each 56" W x 84" L. Never used, still in original sealed packages. Sold new $105.00 ($35.00 each panel), will sell all three for $60.00.

George Forman Lean Mean Fat-Reducing Grilling Machine

Chef’s Choice Diamond Hone Knife Sharpener like new! Sells new for $40.94, will sell for $25.00.

Stainless Steel Rostfrei Inox 7 pc asst kitchen tools

never used! Sells new for $100.00 plus, will sell for $45.00. Include SS wall hanger FREE.

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••••••• •••••••

starting on page 53


3360-MBNOJHendersonGambit_3360-MBNOJHendersonGambit 3/13/13 5:18 PM Page 1

Jim Henderson

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of New Orleans

Tom Benson Owner

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Jamie Moll President

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans

3


CONTENTS

STAFF

Publisher | MARGO DUBOS Administrative Director | MARK KARCHER EDITORIAL Editor | KEVIN ALLMAN Managing Editor | KANDACE POWER GRAVES Political Editor | CLANCY DUBOS Arts & Entertainment Editor | WILL COVIELLO Special Sections Editor | MISSY WILKINSON Staff Writer | ALEX WOODWARD Editorial Assistant | LAUREN LABORDE Contributing Writers

May 28, 2013 + Volume 34

25

+ Number 22

35

JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, MEGAN BRADEN-PERRY, RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, GUS KATTENGELL, KEN KORMAN, BRENDA MAITLAND, NORA MCGUNNIGLE, IAN MCNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK Contributing Photographer | CHERYL GERBER

Intern | KATHLEEN ALLAIN PRODUCTION Production Director | DORA SISON Events Graphic Designer | SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO Web & Classifieds Designer | MARIA BOUÉ Graphic Designers | LINDSAY WEISS, LYN VICKNAIR, PAIGE HINRICHS

Digital Media Graphic Designer | MARK WAGUESPACK Pre-Press Coordinator | KATHRYN BRADY DISPLAY ADVERTISING fax: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com Advertising Director | SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 [sandys@gambitweekly.com] Advertising Administrator | MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140 [micheles@gambitweekly.com] Advertising Coordinator | CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 [christinj@gambitweekly.com] Events Coordinator | BRANDIN DUBOS 483-3152 [brandind@gambitweekly.com] Senior Account Executive | JILL GIEGER 483-3131 [ jillg@gambitweekly.com] Account Executives JEFFREY PIZZO LINDA LACHIN

7 IN SEVEN

483-3142 [lindal@gambitweekly.com] MELISSA JURISICH

483-3139 [melissaj@gambitweekly.com] STACY GAUTREAU

483-3143 [stacyg@gambitweekly.com ] SHANNON HINTON KERN

483-3144 [shannonk@gambitweekly.com] KRISTIN HARTENSTEIN

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

ON THE COVER

Faith No More................................................. 18 A small-town Louisiana man goes from fundamentalist preacher to atheist — at a cost

483-3145 [jeffp@gambitweekly.com]

4

PULLOUT

483-3141 [kristinh@gambitweekly.com] MARKETING Marketing Director | JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER Intern | VICTORIA CARRIERE CLASSIFIEDS 483-3100 | fax: 483-3153 classadv@gambitweekly.com Classified Advertising Director | RENETTA PERRY 483-3122 [renettap@gambitweekly.com] Senior Account Executive | CARRIE MICKEY LACY 483-3121 [carriem@gambitweekly.com] BUSINESS Billing Inquiries 483-3135 Controller | GARY DIGIOVANNI Assistant Controller | MAUREEN TREGRE Credit Officer | MJ AVILES OPERATIONS & EVENTS Operations & Events Director | LAURA CARROLL Operations & Events Assistant | RACHEL BARRIOS

Seven Things to Do This Week ................ 5 Back to the Beach, The Features, Mobb Deep and more

NEWS + VIEWS

News ...................................................................... 7 Jimmy’s Music Club struggles to reopen ..... 7 Giving blood for the victims of the Mother’s Day shootings..................................................... 11 Bouquets + Brickbats ................................... 7 Heroes and zeroes C’est What?........................................................ 7 Gambit’s Web poll Commentary .................................................... 12 ’Tis the season — hurricane season Jeremy Alford .................................................. 13 Howdy Doody time in Baton Rouge Blake Pontchartrain..................................... 14 Who’s minding the Mint?

8131 Hampson Street • 866-9666 Monday-Sataurday 10-6

Clancy DuBos is on vacation.

SHOPPING + STYLE

WED .....................................................PULLOUT What’s new in gowns; planning an elopement; resource guide and more What’s in Store...............................................23 Marion Cage

EAT + DRINK

Review ................................................................25 Milkfish Fork + Center ..................................................25 All the news that’s fit to eat 5 in Five .............................................................27 Five singular lobster dishes 3-Course Interview .....................................27 Cassandra Snyder of Culinary Bike Tours

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

A + E News .......................................................35 Comedian and Tulane alum Anthony Jeselnik brings his dark humor to town

Music ...................................................................36 PREVIEW: The Men with Lovie Dovies Film.......................................................................40 REVIEW: The Iceman Art .........................................................................43 REVIEW: LAPopSexTVArtShow Stage ...................................................................46 REVIEW: Next to Normal Events .................................................................49 PREVIEW: New Orleans Oyster Festival Crossword + Sudoku ..................................62

CLASSIFIEDS Summer Safety ..............................................53 Employment + Job Guru ............................54 Mind + Body + Spirit ..................................55 Pets .....................................................................55 Legal Notices ..................................................55 Home + Garden ..............................................57 Picture Perfect Properties.......................58 Real Estate .......................................................59 Market Place ...................................................63

GAMBIT COMMUNICATIONS, INC. Chairman | CLANCY DUBOS + President & CEO | MARGO DUBOS

COVER DESIGN BY Dora

Open ‘til 8 O’CLOCK every THURSDAY Evening

Viewpoint .......................................................... 17 Common Core values

Sison

We treat all foot conditions including: Ingrown Toenails Ankle Sprains Corns & Callus Removal Bunions • Fungus Hammertoes Diabetic Foot Care Dr. Maria Markiewicz, DPM Dr. Leon T. Watkins, DPW, FACFAS Heel Pain • Injuries Dr. D. Elaine Fulmer, DPM Arch Problems

2520 HARVARD AVE., SUITE 2B METAIRIE, LA 70001 • 504-454-3004 www.gulfsouthfootandankle.com

Weekend Appointments & House Calls Available

Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. (504) 486-5900. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2013 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

Jacqueline F. Maloney

Attorney at Law Notary Public

SUCCESSIONS • WILLS CRIMINAL DEFENSE • DWI BUSINESS FORMATION & LITIGATION

2713 Division St. Metairie, LA 70002

(504) 333-6934

Licensed to practice law in Louisiana since 1998


seven things to do in seven days

The Features Wed. May 29 | The Nashville, Tenn.-based indie band incorporates strains of krautrock and psychedelia and sometimes echoes Kings of Leon, on whose label the band released 2012’s Wilderness. The Features just released a self-titled album. At Hi-Ho Lounge. PAGE 36. Down the Dirt Road Blues Thu. May 30 | Spencer Bohren chronicles the evolution of roots music and instrumentation by following a single song from a slave ship to the South to Chicago and into the hands of Bob Dylan and The Rolling Stones. At the Old U.S. Mint. PAGE 36.

Pine Leaf Boys Fri. May 31 | In the midst of a busy festival season, the Pine Leaf Boys are finishing an album before heading on summer tour in the Northeast and West Coast. Catch the Cajun band at d.b.a. before it hits the road. PAGE 36.

JUNE

Megan Hilty | Although NBC recently cancelled the musical drama

Smash, its star Megan Hilty consistently shone. Her Broadway roles include Glinda in Wicked and Dolly Parton’s character in 9 to 5: The Musical, and she’s appeared on TV in Louie, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and Desperate Housewives. She performs at NOCCA. PAGE 36.

Back to the Beach Sat.-Sun. June 1-2 | The festival features a custom and classic car show, a run/walk and music by The Yat Pack, Chee Weez, The Boogie Men, Bucktown All-Stars, The Topcats and others. There’s also a volleyball tournament. At Laketown in Kenner. PAGE 49. Mobb Deep Sun. June 2 | Reunited and celebrating 20 on-and-off, up-and-down years, Queensbridge bosses Prodigy and Havoc have survived a prison sentence, a specious Twitter spat and the looming shadow of an all-time classic, 1995’s The Infamous. At Maison. PAGE 36.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Black Moth Super Rainbow with the Hood Internet Thu. May 30 | The members of Pittsburgh analog enigma Black Moth Super Rainbow are riddles unto themselves: Tobacco, The Seven Fields of Aphelion, Pony Diver, Iffernaut, Ryan Graveface. Sixth LP Cobra Juicy is the comedown from a decade of splatter-pop high times. The Hood Internet opens at One Eyed Jacks. PAGE 36.

5


2N4NTUH AL A

PROCEEDS BENEFIT

JUNE 1 & 2, 2013

LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN IN LAKETOWN

(END OF WILLIAMS BLVD. IN KENNER)

ADMISSION PRICES Adults $10 · Students with ID $8 Children (under 12) $4

CONTRAFLOW

NO REFUNDS · RAIN OR SHINE GENERAL PARKING AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN CENTER SHUTTLE SERVICE PROVIDED BY TREASURE CHEST CASINO LIMITED PARKING ON SITE GROUNDS $5

SATURDAY · JUNE 1 >>>> GATES OPEN @ 3:30PM 3:45–4:45pm ................ Groovy 7 5:05–6:15pm ................. The Yat Pack 6:35–7:45pm................. Contraflow 8:05–9:20pm ............... Supercharger 9:40–11:00 pm .............. Chee Weez GROOVY 7

MAIN STAGE 6:15pm ............................ Fishing Rodeo Awards 9TH ANNUAL

BACK TO THE BEACH RUN/WALK SATURDAY, JUNE 1ST · 1/2 Mile & 2 Mile Run/Walk Registration 5:30pm • Levee at the end of Williams Blvd. SCENIC SUNSET COURSE ALONG LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN Pre-registration $20 until 5/26; $25 after 5/26 Youth 15 & under $10 until 5/26; $15 after 5/26

THE YAT PACK

FOR MORE INFO, CALL: 504-468-1488 OR VISIT WWW.NOLARUNNING.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

SUNDAY · JUNE 2

6

CHEE WEEZ

>>>

GATES OPEN @ 10AM

11:45 am – 1:10 pm ........ Bobby Cure & The Summertime Blues 1:30–3:00 pm ................ The Wiseguys 3:25–4:55 pm ............... The Boogie Men 5:20–6:50 pm .............. Bucktown All-Stars 7:15–8:45 pm ................ The Topcats 2ND STAGE 4:00pm .......................... Car Show Awards 11TH ANNUAL

BACK TO THE BEACH CAR SHOW BUCKTOWN ALL-STARS

SUNDAY, JUNE 2ND • REGISTRATION 8AM STREET RODS, CUSTOM CARS, RACECARS, BIKES, JR. DRAGSTERS, BICYCLES, TRAILERED CARS & ANTIQUES Pre-Registration $25 until May 28 Show-Day Registration $30 For more information, call Walter or Pam (504)282-2862 or visit www.customcruiser.com

COCONUT BEACH

VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT THE TOPCATS

ARTS & CRAFTS AWESOME FESTIVAL FOODS! BRING LAWNCHAIRS NO COOLERS, OR PETS PLEASE

FOR MORE INFO CALL 836-SAVE OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE: WWW.SAVEOURLAKE.ORG

PROCEEDS BENEFIT LPBF

SUNDAY, JUNE 2ND • NOON START FOR DETAILS VISIT WWW.COCONUTBEACHNOLA.COM 16TH ANNUAL

SAVE OUR LAKE & COAST

FISHING RODEO ACTIVITIES

FRIDAY, MAY 31ST & SATURDAY, JUNE 1ST

RODEO AWARDS PRESENTATION

SATURDAY, 6:15PM (MAIN STAGE) Honorary Chair-Derek Kevra, WWL-TV Channel 4 Open Division, Kayak Division & Youth Division For rodeo info & to register go to www.saveourlake.org


NeWs + vieWs

C O M M E N TA R Y  12 J E R E M Y   A L F O R D  13  B L A K E   P O N TC H A R T R A I N  14 V I E W P O I N T    17

BOuqueTs + brickbats ™

heroes + zeroes

Clancy DuBos is on vacation.

knowledge is power

The Big Wanda Book Giveaway

will donate 500 copies of Happy Johnson’s book The Adventures of Happy and Big Wanda to New Orleans  schoolchildren this summer.  Gentilly Trace Elementary  School received 100 copies  last week. Johnson’s book  prepares children for hurricane season. The Team Happy Foundation, Big Easy Kiwanis Club, Royal Engineers and Lindy Boggs National Center for  Community Literacy sponsor the giveaway.

The City of New Orleans

received the Bronze Bicycle Friendly  Community Award from the League of  American Bicyclists May 20. The award  recognizes the city’s bike  infrastructure improvements,  including 58 miles of bikeways  and plans to build another 10  over the next year. The League  of American Bicyclists uses  advocacy and education programs to  promote bicycle fitness and transit.

Chevron

Paula and the Pontiacs perform at a benefit to help reopen Jimmy’s Music Club on April 4, 2013.

The legendary Jimmy’s Music Club may be on its way back to presenting live music, but first it needs to satisfy the Alcohol Control Board, City Council and its Uptown neighbors.

PHOTO BY ROBERT MORRIS |  UPTOWN MESSENGER

By Robert Morris | Uptown Messenger

W

hen the New Orleans Alcoholic Beverage Control Board  (ABO) rejected a request by Jimmy’s Music Club May 21,  it may have seemed like the hand of The Man slapping  down the former punk rock haven once again.     The reality, however, is that attorneys, city officials and even  the club’s neighbors agree that Jimmy’s may be closer to reopening than it has been in the last year.     Technically, club owner Jimmy Anselmo and his partners in  Lucky Tab LLC were requesting last week to appeal the denial  last year of their application for a liquor license. Their argument  — an unusual one — was that when liquor license applications  are denied, they must be appealed to the city’s independent  Alcohol Control Board. And because the basis for that denial  was a moratorium preventing any new businesses from selling  alcohol in the Carrollton area without permission of the New  Orleans City Council, Anselmo was essentially asking the board  to declare the City Council’s moratorium illegal.     The board — made of council appointees — was, unsurprisingly, having none of it. For months, commissioners have said for  months that Jimmy’s had two options — appeal the moratorium to  the council like other new Carrollton businesses have done, or  file a lawsuit against the moratorium in Civil District Court.

    “This board does not have the power to say that something  the City Council did is illegal or unconstitutional,” said board  member Jerry Speir, a Carrollton resident appointed by District  A Councilwoman Susan Guidry. Keeping the Jimmy’s item  before the alcohol board simply confuses the public, Speir said:  “There is nothing to be gained in my opinion from keeping this  on our docket.”     With that, the board members voted Jimmy’s off the docket  page 9

c’est

Connie M. Knight

was sentenced recently to 57 months in  prison by U.S. District Court Judge Lance  Africk for providing fraudulent waste safety  training following the BP oil  disaster. In January, Knight  pleaded guilty to three felony  criminal charges and one  misdemeanor criminal charge  for creating false identification  documents and impersonating an Occupational Safety and Health Administration  hazardous waste safety instructor. Knight  collected cash primarily from fishermen  trying to help cleanup efforts.

?

Will the mass shooting at the Mother’s Day second line affect your inclination to attend large street festivals in New Orleans?

Vote on “C’est What?” at www.bestofneworleans.com

62%

No

38%

Yes

THis WeeK’s question:

Do you expect that businessman John  Georges’ purchase of The Advocate  will be good for news reporting in  New Orleans?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Rock on?

funded the renovation of Hollygrove’s Harrell Stadium, which features the turf from  Super Bowl XLVII as well as a basketball  court. The facility opened May 17. Five  New Orleans Recreation  Development Commission  (NORDC) playgrounds  received capital improvements  from the NFL Foundation, with  matching grants provided by  the NORD Foundation through Chevron.  

7


@ Y The_Gambit

Speak AWARDS

The Finalists are now

LIVE!

CAST YOUR VOTE NOW!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

on bestofneworleans.com/yatspeak

8

JOIN US FOR THE Y@SPEAK AWARDS

$4 BEERS JUNE 3 WINE BY 5:30pm $5 thru 7:30pm. M O N DAY

AT THE FRERET STREET PUBLIQ HOUSE 4528 FRERET ST.

ALL DRAFT

THE GLASS

AND SPECIALTY COCKTAILS

Hosted by actor and comedian Ian Hoch and Gambit’s Lauren LaBorde


news + vIeWS page 7

free style

crinkled cottons $29

- 38

clothes + accessories 7732 maple 865 . mon - sat 10-6

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 28 > 2013

and out of the room, without so much as a comment from Anselmo himself or the dozen or so supporters he brought with him. This time around, however, something was different. Prior to the hearing Anselmo, his partners and attorney Michael Tifft had spent about an hour outside the council chambers in private conference with city attorneys. Tifft said they were advising the Jimmy’s team to pursue a traditional appeal of the alcohol moratorium through the City Planning Commission and City Council. “That was the first real breakthrough we got from City Hall,” Tifft said afterward. “I see it as a risky process, but they did indicate that the mayor’s office is committed to seeing us through the process.” Another tentative “breakthrough” has been with the Carrollton Riverbend Neighborhood Association (CRNA). Anselmo met personally with association members in February and several of its leaders reminisced about their own days at the original Jimmy’s Music Club. Their main concern is that Jimmy’s does not become a repeat of the Frat House bar; Anselmo leased the space to that club for about five years until it closed in 2012 following neighborhood complaints and charges of underage drinking. “CRNA and the neighbors support Jimmy’s reopening — if it’s done right,” said Jill Stephens, an association member leading nearby residents in discussions with Jimmy’s about a good-neighbor agreement. “We just want the problems that existed at the Frat House to never happen again. Since the property is owned by the same person, we have no comfort that they wouldn’t happen again. The memory of that is still fresh.” The negotiations thus far have centered on Jimmy’s responsibility for outside litter, noise from the bands and patrons’ conduct outside the bar. But one sticking point has emerged — whether to allow customers younger than 21 inside the bar to hear music. In order to book bands that draw an audience from the nearby universities, Jimmy’s needs to be able to admit customers age 18 and older, Tifft said. He said he met his future wife outside the original Jimmy’s — he was 18, she was 17 and she was left standing outside because she was too young to go in. Neighbors say those youngest patrons tend to cause the most problems, however, so restricting the bar to people of legal drinking age will help the neighborhood get behind the club. (It’s unclear if the club could open as an all-ages venue, but Tifft says Anselmo doesn’t want to, anyway.) “If we can close that gap, we’ll be very close to a solution,” Stephens said. If Jimmy’s pursues an appeal, the City Planning Commission will weigh it first, and then it will go to the City Council. Guidry — the target of Jimmy’s supporters’ ire since proposing the moratorium — declined to say what she would do at that point, but signaled that the neighborhood’s support would be crucial. “If a developer or a business owner can work things out with the neighborhood, including the near neighbors, that always creates a more positive path to whatever the business is requesting,” Guidry said. The City Council already has a pending ordinance, proposed by Council President Jackie Clarkson, to make all bars in the city 21-and-up — a proposal that has been docked in the criminal justice committee for months. Guidry said she actually doesn’t favor the blanket approach in Clarkson’s ordinance, but that individual circumstances must be considered — as in the case of Jimmy’s. “Of course that’s something we’ll be looking at carefully,” Guidry said. “This same owner allowed a nuisance bar to operate at that location that these neighbors had to deal with from 2007 to 2012. A lot of the problem was underage drinking.” If the City Council route ultimately fails, Jimmy’s still has one other option: sue over the legality of the moratorium. And that path was served by the alcohol board’s rejection, Tifft said — based on city code, the alcohol board had to rule before he could turn to the courts. “On one hand, we lost at the ABO board,” Tifft said. “On the other hand, we’re free to sue if we want to.” — This story was produced with our partners at Uptown Messenger. Read more at www.uptownmessenger.com.

9


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Janine Waters, left, and Christie Jourdain of the Original Pinettes Brass Band showed up to give blood at the “Frenchmen Street: Roll Up Your Sleeves” event put on by the New Orleans Musicians’ Assistance Foundation and The Blood Center. PHOTO BY KEVIN ALLMAN

The clubs on Frenchmen Street were open, with Ben Polcer playing at the Spotted Cat and the Washboard Chaz Trio at d.b.a., along with other bands. Jeff Broussard, bar manager at Snug Harbor, donated ice and opened the club’s bathrooms. “I was worried the rain would keep people away,” said Liz Freeman, a volunteer with the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic, “but it’s not. This is great.” After the jab, donors with “I Gave Blood” stickers on their shirts received free Radiators CDs and restorative snacks and juice. The goal of 50 pints was reached and topped within the first two hours of the drive, according to Dudas. And neither threatening gray skies nor a swarm of Formosan termites kept people from donating. By the end of the evening, 117 pints of blood had been collected by eight volunteer nurses, and nearly 200 people had tried to donate, according to The Blood Center. “This is definitely the best blood drive I’ve been to,” said Jocelyn Ninneman of OffBeat magazine, one of the event’s sponsors. “Only in New Orleans could you have a blood drive that has three areas of live music and local food.” Chittenden, of The Blood Center, said she wasn’t sure how much blood would be needed to replenish the amount used by the shooting victims, but that the “replenishment” was largely symbolic. The Blood Center is called upon to donate 300 to 350 pints of blood per day to New Orleans hospitals, Chittenden said, adding, “In cases like this, people want a way to help and we provide it.” — Additional reporting by Megan Braden-Perry

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wo enormous bloodmobiles — one in neon chartreuse, the other, well, blood-red — stretched down Frenchmen Street from the Apple Barrel to the Spotted Cat May 22. The event was called “Frenchmen Street: Roll Up Your Sleeves,” and it was a replacement blood drive for the 19 victims of the Mother’s Day second-line shooting in the 7th Ward — a shooting that had occurred seven blocks away down Frenchmen Street May 12. More than 100 people preregistered to give blood between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m., according to Amanda Chittenden, The Blood Center’s public relations manager. “But the first 12 people we got were all walkups,” said Erica Dudas of the New Orleans Musicians’ Assistance Foundation, the group that staged the blood drive. The event — held in the concrete pad that’s home to the Frenchmen Art Market — was busy from the start, with would-be donors lining up and musicians David and Roselyn serenading the crowd with a song appropriately called “Kiss It and Make It Better.” “New Orleans has given us a lot,” Roselyn said. “Helping other musicians is just what you do.” Among the first donors were Janine Waters and Christie Jourdain of the Original Pinettes Brass Band, who said they’d heard about the drive on Facebook and TV news. Both are friends of second-line chronicler and Gambit contributor Deborah Cotton and said they showed up in tribute to her. Cherice HarrisonNelson (“Queen Reesie”) of Guardians of the Flame and Queen Rita Johnson of the Mohawk Hunters also came out to donate, as did Ed Buckner of the Original Big 7 Social Aid & Pleasure Club, which had staged the Mother’s Day second line.

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ast week’s horrific tornado, which killed 24 people in Moore, Okla., served as a reminder that the southern United States is in its severe weather season. For those of us who remember the scenes following Hurricane Katrina and the federal floods nearly eight years ago, the televised images of destruction, despair and hopelessness were all too familiar. Sadly, the people who live around Oklahoma City had been there before — in 1999, when a tornado outbreak killed dozens of people and devastated Moore. There’s not much you can do when a twister of that magnitude is bearing down on your house, but preparation can and does save lives. This week is the National Hurricane Center’s (NHC) annual Hurricane Preparedness Week, and longtime New Orleans residents know that means it’s the time for an annual review of hurricane readiness preps. The many people who have moved to New Orleans in recent years should remember that a hurricane’s intensity on the Saffir-Simpson scale is a relative thing. A strong tropical storm

per day, with a three-day minimum. Some people fill their bathtubs to ensure a water supply. Other essentials include a tool kit, medicines, fire extinguisher, large garbage bags, a change of clothes and shoes. Keep some cash on hand. For people with small children, a supply of diapers and toys is a must (and an iPad or DVD player with headphones can be a sanity saver). Pet owners need a supply of food, a carrier and proof of up-to-date vaccinations. Find out if your shelter of choice takes pets — but under no circumstances stay put during an evacuation because you aren’t sure what to do with your pets. Get out and take them with you. Keep your car gassed up from June through November. Get your car inspected in early June and be sure to change the wiper blades. A container of wet wipes in the car is a good idea, along with a trash bag; evacuations are long and it’s not always possible to leave your vehicle. If you evacuate, take important papers (including insurance information) as well as family photos — many of us learned that one the hard way during Katrina.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

This is the time for locals to check on stockpiled supplies, replenishing and replacing as necessary.

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requires as much attention and preparation as a major hurricane. Last year’s slow-moving, rain-soaked Isaac was a tropical storm, yet many people in metro New Orleans were left without power for a week. William Gray of the Colorado State University Department of Atmospheric Science is predicting a slightly busierthan-average hurricane season, with 18 named storms and nine hurricanes. Our mild spring has nothing to do with what New Orleans may or may not see this year in the way of tropical events. “Many hurricane forecasters are predicting this to be an above-average season,” says WWL-TV meteorologist Derek Kevra. “A lot of the time, people think a cool spring like the one we just had means the water in the Gulf of Mexico is going to be cooler, but that is not the case. It has no bearing on hurricane season.” This is the time for locals to check on stockpiled supplies, replenishing and replacing as necessary. Get fresh packs of batteries for flashlights and batterypowered radios or TVs; eat the canned goods you’ve stocked and replace them with new ones. (Don’t forget the manual can opener.) Stock up on bottled water for drinking as well as washing — the guideline is at least 1 gallon per person

And put a spare cellphone charger in the car now — we relearned that lesson last year during the blackouts after Isaac. Check with elderly or infirm neighbors to verify their evacuation plans. In a mandatory evacuation, freeways will switch to “contraflow,” meaning all roads will lead away from the coast. Whether you’re going to a motel, staying with family or at a shelter, practice patience — and plan ahead. You can get more tips and sign up for text alerts at the City of New Orleans hurricane preparedness website, ready. nola.gov (which performed well last year) as well as at the Entergy New Orleans’ website (www.entergy.com). And the NHC has issued an updated guide to preparing for hurricanes; download yours at www. bit.ly/prepare2013. Most important, pay attention to local meteorologists so you can plan early — and if you’re told to leave, do so. — Our partners at WWL-TV will air their annual “Eye on Hurricanes” special June 3 at 7 p.m. The broadcast will repeat during the week and can be watched at www. wwltv.com. You can download the free WWL-TV weather app for mobile devices including iPhone, Android and BlackBerry.


jeremy alford report from red stick

Howdy Doody time If and when a budget passes, Gov. Bobby Jindal may very well blame lawmakers for sending him a terrible document. a few lawmakers may in turn blame Jindal for introducing one. But not all legislators will challenge the governor. They’ve heard of Barham’s Siberia and they are in no hurry to visit. Senate chairmen and vice chairmen were called into meetings last week and likely will fall in line, along with their colleagues in the Upper Chamber, where Howdy doody time was first recognized for its political benefits. These are troubling political times that don’t relate well in the self-celebrity world of social media, where Googling “Howdy doody” and posting a few videos takes less effort than typing “Jindal health care budget” and reading for an hour or two. Back in the real world, the health care issue has become fueled by unexpected and increasing costs related to the administration’s ideology-driven push to privatize public hospitals and to refuse Medicaid expansion. Education is being funded with change found under sofa cushions while the courts overturn one administration program after another. Jindal’s failed tax plan, which was supposed to be the session’s focus, was probably the biggest Howdy doody of the year. It sidetracked everybody. Most lawmakers focused on Jindal’s sideshow instead of the ailing budget, although the House appropriations Committee met for weeks before the session convened april 8. More lawmakers should have joined them. finally, we’re all Howdy doodies for not getting more riled up. distractions are easier to swallow than policy and budget numbers. The distractions may be even more welcome in coming years, when the state runs out of dedicated funds to plunder in order to prop up higher education and health care. a speech from the strawberry queen will be a nice respite from the debt that’s stacking up. a bill declaring Bayou Pigeon the official garfish capital just might one day be enough to soothe nerves in the face of increased outmigration. We’ll practically need around-theclock Howdy doody, which, if Google is to be trusted, was nothing more than a marionette — and a fitting metaphor for louisiana lawmakers. We all know who pulls their strings. — Jeremy Alford is a freelance journalist in Baton Rouge. Contact him at Jeremy@jeremyalford.com. Follow him on Twitter: @alfordwrites.

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ew things were more comical than former state Sen. Joe McPherson at his most frustrated. a self-described country boy with a shock of salt-and-pepper hair and a push-broom mustache, McPherson hails from Woodworth, a community of roughly 1,000 people just south of alexandria. He returned there after terming out in 2012. When the Upper Chamber would stumble into its afternoon routine, pausing so members could introduce the louisiana Swine festival queen or their insurance agent’s cousin from dry Creek, McPherson eventually would make his way to the mic. “Heeeerrreee we go,” he would twang. “It’s Howdy doody time!” a graduate of the rural acting academy, he motioned in one speech to the sides of the chamber. “Howdy doody to you and Howdy doody to you. Howdy doody to everybody!” McPherson was funny even when scolding colleagues for wasting time. (He wasn’t above it all; in questioning another’s use of time, he once paid for and distributed bumper stickers emblazoned with “Jindal for V.P.”) another comedic complainer was former Sen. robert Barham, now secretary of the department of Wildlife and fisheries. Barham had caught the fury of former Gov. Kathleen Blanco for switching parties, and he spent his final years noting the topography, temperature and political climate of Siberia, where he claimed the “Queen Bee” had exiled him. although he halfheartedly tried and failed, McPherson couldn’t end the timehonored practice of senators indulging in a little Howdy doody time. If anything, it has expanded in his absence. lawmakers in this year’s abbreviated session (which ends June 6) have already competed against each other in a football game, a basketball matchup and a bowling tournament. all proceeds went to charity, but some might argue that their time and effort was borrowed from taxpayers. They’ve advanced bills creating a barbecue cook-off for West Baton rouge, exploring bass fishing as a new high school sport, adding “I’m a Cajun” to louisiana-issued identification cards and slating money for film festivals. Not that there’s anything shameful about these competitions and causes. They’re a part of the legislative process and our collective culture. Yet they’re hard to swallow when, in the final two weeks of the session, there’s no making sense of the budget, which ignores the long-term funding needs of higher education and health care.

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DEAR ABBY, The Old U. S. Mint, designed by architect William Strickland of Philadelphia, was built on the site of Fort St. Charles, and is the only mint to produce both American and Confederate coins. Built in Classic Revival style, the structure cost $180,000 and opened in 1838. Its walls range from 18 inches to 3 feet thick, and it is constructed of river mud brick and stucco with granite trim. The mint was authorized on March 3, 1835, and President Andrew Jackson, hero of the Battle of New Orleans, signed the bill. Yellow fever, other illnesses and delays prevented the facility from opening until 1838. The mint was transferred to the Confederacy when Louisiana seceded from the Union in 1861, and it produced Confederate coins and housed troops. Operations halted in April 1862, however, when federal troops occupied New Orleans and, on the morning of April 25, raised an American flag in front of the mint. Professional gambler William Mumford quickly tore down the flag, dragged it through the streets and shredded it, for which he was court-martialed and publicly executed by hanging from a flagstaff on the mint. Coining operations were suspended from 1862 to 1879, but during that time the mint served as an assay office, where metals are tested for purity. The mint resumed making coins in 1879, the only

The Old U.S. Mint has made coins, housed prisoners and was the scene of a public hanging. Now it is a state museum. PHOTO BY KANDACe POWeR GRAveS

Southern mint to do so. Minting ceased in 1909. During its years of operation, the Old U.S. Mint produced more than 427 million gold and silver coins with a value of more than $307 million. From 1909 until 1932, the building housed an assay office, then it had a new role: federal prison, which lasted until 1942. The following year, it housed members of the U. S. Coast Guard, and for a while after World War II, it was used as a storage facility. In 1966, ownership of the Old U.S. Mint was transferred to the state. The building was completely renovated and reopened to the public in 1983 as a state museum. It is a National Historic Landmark and the oldest surviving structure in the country that served as a federal mint. The New Orleans mintmark is an “O” at the bottom of the back of the coin. If you can find one, the 1838 O half-dollar could be worth a lot of money. The New Orleans mint struck just 20 in proof format, most likely to commemorate the facility’s opening. Of historical note: The coins were the first half-dollars to be struck at a branch mint, and one of the earliest U.S. coins to include a mintmark. The building currently is home to the Louisiana Historical Center, The New Orleans Jazz Club Collections of the Louisiana State Museum and a performing arts center. The tents you see from time to time are set up for both private and public events, including free music concerts and film screenings.


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compete and succeed — not just nationally but also here in Louisiana. We must identify and teach what young people need to know and do in academics, creativity, critical reasoning, communications and more. Louisiana’s future belongs to those who have a strong, competitive academic foundation and are adaptable. • States, districts or schools are not restricted in any way from adopting additional standards outside the Common Core, which is merely a set of basic goals for knowledge and skills based on higher expectations. Common Core also encompasses professional development, better use of technology and feedback for teachers, students and parents. Concerns that have arisen in a few states seem to center on the speed or

Common Core is most successful when proper time and support are given to train teachers and prepare students prior to testing. quality of implementation, not the standards themselves. If there is a lesson to be learned from the experience of other states, it would be that Common Core is most successful when proper time and support are given to train teachers and prepare students prior to testing. The bottom line is simple: The Common Core is not being forced on Louisiana by the federal government; it’s not a national takeover of public education; and it doesn’t threaten Louisiana’s sovereignty. Safeguards need to be in place to ensure it is implemented appropriately and that student privacy rights are protected. But Louisiana also needs to move forward. This is the next phase in the evolution of our school accountability model. It builds on our successful efforts of the past, and we should embrace it without delay.

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he Louisiana Senate struck a blow for educational standards and improvement last week. It did so by summarily defeating a resolution requesting the state Department of Education and the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) to cease implementation of the Common Core State Standards Initiative in public education. The topic of educational standards may sound boring, but the resolution elicited more than two hours of sometimes surreal testimony in the Senate Education Committee. So what is the Common Core initiative? It’s a voluntary program launched by the National Governors Association in 2009 that 45 states — including Louisiana — have joined thus far. The goal is to align educational standards across the country to provide a clear understanding of what students should know and be able to do at various stages of their development. It’s not a standard curriculum, and it doesn’t tell teachers how to teach or how to run their classrooms. It’s simply a set of standards that suggests, for example, what types of math equations a student in fifth grade should be able to perform or at what level a sixth grader should be able to read and comprehend. The standards set a level of rigor for students that has been lacking in Louisiana. They’re designed to prepare students for the real world in a way that’s relevant and reflects the knowledge and skills they’ll need to succeed in college and beyond. Listening to some of the debate, you might have thought it was part of a plot to undermine the youth of Louisiana. The words “communism” and “socialism” were tossed around, along with the suggestion of a federal plot to control curricula. Fortunately, there was also testimony from educators who are implementing the Common Core standards. They praised it for its rigor, saying it will help raise student achievement in Louisiana and give us a better indication of how our students perform compared to those in other states. The Council for A Better Louisiana (CABL) supports Louisiana’s ongoing implementation of the Common Core. We do so for a variety of reasons that we think make common sense: • Louisiana’s previous standards and LEAP tests were developed 16 years ago and were right for the time. Although we have raised our standards, they are still lower than national standards. This is evident when you look at the performance of Louisiana students on the state LEAP tests compared to the national NAEP assessment. Louisiana’s minimum is not enough. • The world’s economy constantly changes. Our kids need to know more to

— Barry Erwin is the president of the Council for A Better Louisiana (CABL), an organization that focuses on issues of importance to the state.

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Faith no

Former Pentecostal preacher Jerry DeWitt went from small-town Louisiana minister to atheist. Now he’s trying to spread a different word.

more BY ALEX WOODWARD

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

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his has been the loneliest experience in the world.” Jerry DeWitt sighs. After a whirlwind year of renouncing his faith along with his 25 years in the Pentecostal ministry and discussing it in a New York Times profile, the former minister nurses the flu at his home in DeRidder, La. In a few weeks his memoir, Hope After Faith, will be released. “It’s so ironic that it borders on being tragic,” he says, “that this once-in-a-lifetime phenomenon can happen and there’s literally nobody to celebrate it with.” DeWitt still looks and sounds like a Louisiana preacher. His black hair is often pulled back high and tight and neatly parted, framing a round face and a trim beard. He speaks with a warm Southern lilt. During the last year, however, he has emerged as something of an atheist leader. It’s cost him a lot, he says — respect from the town he loves, as well as his friends, his job and his family. “Normally, if a story about you ended up in the New York Times, or if you ended up with a book deal, it would be cause for Louisiana-style celebration,” he says. “I think that’s the reason why I’m so bent, so determined, to make Louisiana proud. I’m determined to create a secular community in a Louisiana way.” Born into a family of ministers in neighboring Rosepine, DeWitt spent most of his life in DeRidder in Beauregard Parish. DeWitt’s grandfather helped build churches throughout Louisiana. A couple of miles down the road is the church of his grandmother, the “Pentecostal religious matriarch” of the DeWitt family. Less than a mile in the other direction is Grace Church, where DeWitt spent the latter half of his ministry. From a young age, DeWitt was expected to follow the family mold.

“The Pentecostals who raised me were not community activists. They weren’t involved in trying to shape policy, or in larger charitable acts or anything like that,” he says. “We were pretty exclusionary. … It was the only avenue, only profession, only method that existed in my world of trying to make peoples’ lives better.” In 1986, at age 16, DeWitt visited Jimmy Swaggart’s megachurch in Baton Rouge, where he was “saved.” At 17, he joined the ministry, delivering passionate sermons to congregations along the Gulf South.

felt like I was in this position to say to people, ‘Y’all come and meet me where I’m at.’ Instead I always felt like I was trying to help them on their own path. Even now, I don’t go out and try to de-convert people from Christianity. I don’t post things (on the Internet) with intentions of trying to shake people’s faith. I’m still a pastor. I try to help people where they’re at, and very much allow them to figure out where they’re going.” DeWitt preached about heaven and hell, but couldn’t shake the feeling there was a more human, less biblical

“I’m still a pastor. I try to help people where they’re at, and very much allow them to figure out where they’re going.” After a few months of dating, he married Kelly Lee Swain. He was 20; she was 18. Two years later, the couple had a son. The family preached together throughout the South. In those few short years, DeWitt became a rising star in the Pentecostal community. “But I really wasn’t that great of a Christian evangelist, because my heart was always just checking in trying to deal with where I was at — spiritually, intellectually, doctrinally,” he says. “I guess because there was always a certain amount of uncertainty in my own life. I never

and less “superstitious” method to reach his flock. “These become priorities that outweigh starvation, the climate, any other form of life enrichment that a humanist would naturally be concerned with,” he says. “What difference does it make to end hunger if all those people go to hell with full bellies? All of a sudden my humanism had been hijacked with this idea of eternal punishment and salvation. … Those people, I’ve lived in their homes, I’ve ridden in the car with them for hours, I feel like I know so many of their hearts. I think


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“I grew up thinking that one day I’ll get old enough and all the fun will be over, and I’ll submit myself to the Lord,” he says. “Then suddenly hell became my responsibility. It became my obligation to warn these people I loved in the congregation that their actions could condemn them to hell for all eternity. Somewhere in the midst of that, somewhere the formulas didn’t seem to add up. I thought, ‘Is it really true that the creator of the universe would send a young lady to hell for all eternity because she felt peer pressure at school and trimmed her bangs?’” Late one night, while searching on the Internet, DeWitt found online communities of ministers who also questioned their doctrines and faiths. He joined The Clergy Project, an anonymous online refuge for clergy members who no longer believe in God. He also reached out to Recovering From Religion, a postclergy support group. “Once the Bible itself begins to lose its divinity, before long everything is on the table,” he says. “Once you begin to question our traditions, you eventually question your superstitions.” DeWitt delivered his last sermon in April 2011. DeWitt changed his Facebook religious views to “secular humanist.”

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they’re humanists who have been hijacked by antiquated theology.” DeWitt served as DeRidder’s code enforcement officer from 1998 to 2004, when he began preaching full time. He resumed working for the city of DeRidder in 2006 as director of community services. He never truly left the ministry — city officials knew it was good business to keep a religious figure close to City Hall. “The preachers are still the kingmakers and they’re able to make or break you,” he says. “Why be the tribal leader when you can be the shaman?” In a 2009 story from the Beauregard Daily News, DeWitt is described as “an avid reader. His preferences are history, nonfictions — especially about sociology and religion. He’s also a self-proclaimed Internet junkie. When a city is as intent on improvement as DeRidder is, it takes a certain type of person to do the job. DeRidder is lucky to have … such men working for its citizens.” He had a natural rapport with the ministers, but DeWitt’s secular job forced him to work alongside different denominations and philosophies. Then the doubts crept in. DeWitt felt trapped, but his flock was satisfied with his public message despite his private concerns.

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Hope After Faith In this excerpt from Hope After Faith, Jerry DeWitt describes his mother’s disappointment when a Pentecostal revivalist preacher is unable to “heal” his sister Britney, who has Down’s syndrome.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

M

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y reevaluations of what had been the most cherished moments in my life of faith — my conversations with God — were both energizing and enervating. I was feeling more in control of my life — particularly when it came to the panic attacks that were plaguing me — yet I believed that I could have a deep, intimate relationship with God. When a minster named Charles Pierce, who had a reputation within the United Pentecostal movement for presiding over a healing ministry without peer, held a revival at the United Pentecostal Church in Leesville, I felt that I had to attend to revalidate what I had experienced in my revival days. Arriving at the United Pentecostal Church on a cool Sunday morning in the early spring of 1999, I took in its tall, cathedral ceilings, white molding, and color-coordinated pews and carpet with a mix of disdain and envy. Its clean, sparse design reminded me of a funeral home and I had long felt whenever I walked into expensively decorated sanctuaries that it was wasteful of the Lord’s money. At the same time, I was envious — and desperately wanted to be a part of — the upper class of Pentecostalism and could be just as harsh in judgments when I visited a poor church with an old, staticky sound system or an unpaved parking lot. But when Brother Pierce, a slender, square-shouldered, middle-aged minister who wore a clean white suit, began the service and ministered to the congregants individually, I was far from impressed. Brother Pierce addressed churchgoers with a very vague and general diagnosis of their problems — Sister, are you feeling ill? Brother, are you dissatisfied with your job? — and he ministered from the distance of the stage, which only added an even more impersonal feel to the proceedings. About halfway through the service, however, Brother Pierce walked down the small set of stairs from the stage and into the aisles. To my horror, it seemed as though he was walking directly toward me. God is using Brother Pierce to chastise me, I thought nervously to myself, about just how doubtful I had become and how far I had moved from my Evangelizing days. To my great relief, Brother Pierce passed by my seat to focus on a slender man in his early sixties with scraggly facial hair who was seated in a pew behind me. The man had a disheveled look about him and he wore a tattered suit jacket that appeared to be about 30 years old with threads poking out from it. There were deep stress lines in his face — he was, as the saying goes, rode hard and put away wet. When Brother Pierce stood three feet away from the man, he asked him to stand up. The man rose from the pews and stood silently before Brother Pierce. “Let’s talk about your relationship with God,” Brother Pierce said. “I know that you’ve been closer to God than you are now.” The man nodded his head in agreement. “Yes, Brother Pierce,” he murmured. “I know that you’ve had habits, that you’ve gone to smoking,” Brother Pierce continued, bringing another nod of

the head from the man and another “yes.” An intensely serious look came over Brother Pierce’s face. “Yes, indeed, you have gone to smoking. And you are smoking… Pall Malls.” Just then, the man’s eyes became as big as saucers. He opened his well-worn suit jacket with his right hand, rustled through an inside pocket and thrust out a pack of Pall Malls for Brother Pierce and the church to behold, bringing an ecstatic Ahhhhhh! which rose from the congregation and echoed throughout the sanctuary. In those first few seconds after the Pall Malls revelation, I felt that I should get on my knees right then and there and pray and perhaps even bow before God. But as the worshipper slid the Pall Malls back into his rumpled suit pocket, I grew suspicious of Brother Pierce’s ministering even though a part of me was shouting, screaming, and berating the naysayer inside of me, “Move on!” Steadying my nerves, I realized that what had unsettled me about Brother Pierce was that his ministering seemed all too much like a parlor trick — this was far from the personal dialogue with God that I had been seeking when I attended the revival. Belief, I thought to myself then, had to be larger and greater in spirit than a magic trick. My feelings about Brother Pierce, unfortunately, did not dissuade my family members from seeking out his healing ministry. Just a few days after the services at United Pentecostal Church in Leesville, Brother Pierce brought his revival to the First United Pentecostal Church — known simply as “First Church” — in DeRidder. My mother took my sister, Britney, to the revival in hopes that Brother Pierce would heal her of her Down’s syndrome. I remember thinking that the idea of Brother Pierce healing Britney was ridiculous because I did not see Britney as being ill — I saw her as genetically different. If Brother Pierce heals Britney, I remember thinking, it truly would be a miracle because God would have to heal her all the way down to the chromosomes. I didn’t have any confidence that Britney’s Down’s syndrome would simply disappear due to Brother Pierce’s prayers and, worse, I worried that the services would make her feel afraid or like a lesser person. I couldn’t bring myself to attend the revival with Britney and my mom. My skepticism about Brother Pierce was confirmed when my mom told me after services that Britney simply got in line and was prayed for. Brother Pierce offered no special prayer for — or individual attention to — Britney and, of course, she was not “healed” of her Down’s syndrome. But what was of no surprise to me was a huge disappointment for my mother. She had been reluctant to attend the revival at first but once she committed to going she had high hopes for how Brother Pierce might help Britney. My mother was all too aware of what made Britney but she still allowed herself hope. My grandmother, meanwhile, expressed a quiet disappointment about the revival. “It just wasn’t God’s will,” she said and purposefully left it at that. Neither one of them attempted to explain why Brother Pierce’s healing ministry had not worked wonders on Britney — it was simply a mistake to not be repeated or talked about. — Reprinted from Hope After Faith: An Ex-Pastor’s Journey from Belief to Atheism by Jerry DeWitt and Ethan Brown. Available from Da Capo Press, a member of The Perseus Books Group. Copyright © 2013.

PAGE 19

His family discovered his online history, and The Clergy Project announced DeWitt as its first pastor-turned-atheist. The town of DeRidder was stunned. “Disappointed, shocked betrayed, lied to,” DeWitt says. “I’ve had people contact me and try to nail down what I believed and when, for them to know whether their baptism was valid.” In June 2011, two months after his last sermon, his wife left him. The city fired him in December of that year. He took over as executive director of Recovering From Religion. In April 2012, DeWitt “came out” at the American Atheists’ Convention “Reason Rally,” where he unveiled his atheist preacher persona. “I’m not just trying to be an atheist with a smile,” DeWitt says. “I’m still very nostalgic for a lot of Christian culture. I can still very easily attend a service and unlike so many of my counterparts, I wouldn’t run out throwing up. This is family, this is culture, this is tradition, and that’s why I don’t say I lost my faith — I feel like I graduated from it.” With a preacher’s sing-song affectation, DeWitt’s “sermons” involve pumped fists and pointed fingers while he rocks back and forth on his heels. (“I found myself down in such a low place. I was all alone, trapped. I’m going to tell you, brother,” he preached at an Arkansas Society of Free Thinkers meeting in 2012. “But little did I know my mind was completely filled with all the wrong things. Religion had completely baptized me in falsehoods. … Can I get a Darwin?”) “I felt like to not be myself would be to condemn myself to living a lie, to walking around a facade, the same way I felt I had been doing religiously the next few years,” DeWitt says. “So I just got up and did my preacher thing, and I’ve been pushing that now for the last year. … I know there’s a large portion of Louisiana that will resent me or hold me suspect because of my religious views. At the same time I want to make Louisiana proud, and show our way of communicating, our way of building community is so special and is so successful that it even will work in the secular realm. My intention is to continue being a minister.” Last August, The New York Times published a profile of DeWitt, “From BibleBelt Pastor to Atheist Leader,” unmasking DeWitt and putting DeRidder on the map. The Beauregard Daily News, DeWitt’s local paper that had praised his civil servitude, didn’t report DeWitt’s conversion until he appeared at a DeRidder City Council meeting. A local law group had requested a zoning change to house its office inside Fellowship Hall of Assembly of God Church. “Here was the only known atheist in the community defending my grandfather’s vision for his church,” DeWitt says, laughing. The story concluded with the reveal: “DeWitt is well-known for his life change


creation

evolution

Jerry DeWitt was born into a family of Pentecostal ministers. In 1986, at age 16, Dewitt visited Jimmy Swaggart’s megachurch in Baton Rouge, where he was “saved.”

DeWitt changed his Facebook religious views to “secular humanist”.

it’s why you shop. At 17, he joined the ministry, delivering sermons to congregations along the Gulf South.

The Clergy Project announced DeWitt as its first pastorturned-atheist.

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DeWitt connects with journalist Ethan Brown, best known for Shake the Devil Off.

DeWitt became a rising star in the Pentecostal community.

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DeWitt delivered his last sermon in April 2011.

“Quite honestly,” DeWitt says, sighing, “I’m afraid how things are going to be when the book comes out.” The morning after The New York Times published DeWitt’s profile, agents and publishers flooded his Facebook and email inboxes. “I’m not a writer. I’m a preacher,” he says. “How is it possible that this Southern-fried Pentecostal preacher is sitting in a hot tub of water reading an email from Simon and Schuster?” DeWitt connected with New Orleans journalist Ethan Brown, best known for Shake the Devil Off, which chronicles Iraq War veteran Zackery Bowen’s return to New Orleans before Hurricane Katrina and the gruesome murder he commits after the levee failures. The two spent four months revisiting DeWitt’s life and career, pulling out memories and fleshing out the details. “It was truly therapeutic,” DeWitt says. “It was four months of intense counseling. It caused all these pieces to click together in a way that I think it would’ve taken a lifetime to get as well as I was by the time the book was over.” The book, Hope After Faith (Da Capo Press), will be published June 25.

theshopsatcanal

DeWitt is bracing himself for the attention. “I’m horrified,” he says, laughing. “I’m worried about the next wave of rejection.” Aside from the occasional glances from conservative Pentecostals at his local Walmart, DeRidder hasn’t faced any serious criticism, he says. He has no plans to leave DeRidder, though he preaches on the road during public speaking tours. He’s booked throughout Florida in December. He also serves on the board of The Clergy Project and Foundation Beyond Belief, assisting former clergy members and fellow humanists find a community. “(In Louisiana), it’s easy for days to turn into weeks and weeks to turn into years in the process of just getting by and doing good,” he says. “We don’t necessarily have institutionalized breaks where we stop and debate theology. What we’re trying to do is build community and enrich the lives of those people around us. … “How do we create secular communities? … How do we meet the needs of secular people in a way that religious communities are able to meet those needs? How do we meet those needs in a Louisiana way?”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

that turned his faith from Christianity to Atheism.” The law firm’s request was denied.

The Shops at Canal Place

His book, Hope After Faith (Da Capo Press), will be published June 25.

21


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WHAT’S

in store

Endear

RING

by eileen Loh

work. That led to her first collection, Jewelry designer Marion Cage Totem, made of McCollam worked polished wood as an architect and precious before opening metals. “I like her store. making things PhOTO by with unexCheRyL GeRbeR pected materials,” she says. Other collections followed, including Arabesque, inspired by ornamental Persian tile; Point, with metal and wood talons, bones and barbs; and Sliver, her latest collection of gracefully carved stakes, spears and spikes. There’s even a “Canine” collection — engraved dog tags in brass or white bronze — inspired by the artist’s Rhodesian ridgeback, Whistler (who is at the shop as often as McCollam is). All of McCollam’s jewelry pieces are cast in fine metals from original prototypes and sent to professional casters. Some are made from hard wax sliced with a sharp knife; others are sculpted in clay; still others use computerassisted design to create a pattern, which is then laser-cut in metal. McCollam’s background in design, architecture and graphic art contributes toward a distinctive style. Later this year McCollam will launch a hardware collection of pulls and knobs. As for her bridal collection, McCollam is heartened by the response so far. “People are really liking the fact that our jewelry looks so different,” she says. “They can customize, they can mix and match, they can have something that truly suits their own style as individuals and as a couple.”

SHopping NEWS W New Orleans (333 Poydras St., 504525-9444; www.wneworleans.com) kicks off its “adults swim” series Sunday, June 2. every Sunday through Aug. 25, the hotel opens its rooftop pool to the public and features drink specials, bottle service and a DJ. H20 Salon and Spa (441 Metairie Road, Metairie, 504-835-4377; www.h2osalonspa.com) celebrates the grand opening of its blow dry bar, Just blow Dry, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, May 30. There will be Champagne, hors d’oeuvres and classical guitar by John Rankin. The Audubon Institute (www.theauduboninstitute.com) will extend its hours through

by Missy Wilkinson

Sept. 8. The Audubon Zoo, Aquarium of the Americas, entergy IMAX Theatre and butterfly Garden and Insectarium are open seven days a week. The Rice Mill Lofts (522 Montegut St., 504-875-3429; www.ricemilllofts.com) hosts a children’s fashion show from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, June 22. The show is a fundraiser for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and will feature food, drinks and fashions design by 10-year-old Grace Rose bauer, who has cystic fibrosis. Tickets cost $120 to $150. email gr4cffundraiser@gmail. com or call 504-455-5194 to purchase.

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ince 2009, women who love chic, edgy jewelry have beaten a path to Marion Cage (3719 Magazine St., 504-891-8848, www.marioncage.com) for contemporary pieces inspired by nature and architecture. Now designer Marion Cage McCollam is seeing a new subset of customer: unconventional brides and grooms. McCollam’s recently launched collection of wedding rings includes the work of two other jewelry designers, Carla Caruso and Rebecca Overmann. They are her friends and contemporaries, and like McCollam’s, their pieces are powerful and minimalistic, with organic inspirations evident in their elegant simplicity and flow. “Carla’s is more dainty; Rebecca’s is more sculptural,” McCollam says. “Our styles really complement each other and our work is cohesive.” Though their styles are their own, the three designers’ offerings can be worn together, even stacked on the same finger. Overmann’s eye-catching bands evoke water, stone, leaves and bark, while Caruso’s have details like tiny dots and scalloped edges. McCollam’s wedding styles include stackable bands of small brown or black diamonds set in white, yellow or rose gold or black rhodium. “It’s a nontraditional approach to the wedding ring,” McCollam says. McCollam designed jewelry for years before she launched her shop. An architect, she began making jewelry to vent creative impulses frustrated by the constraints of the building business. “A lot of architects need an outlet,” McCollam says. She got her start from clients who owned retail shops and asked to carry her

3138 Magazine St (Enter on 9th Street) 504.309.7557 • open daily 7am-3pm • artzbagelz.com

23


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013


EAT DRINK

+

FORK + center BY IAN MCNULTY Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net

putting everything on the table

Coffee and Milkfish Milkfish showcases a fascinating cuisine. By Ian McNulty

P

Access to locally produced foods is improving quickly around New Orleans. Just ask anyone gearing up for this year’s Eat Local Challenge, which asks participants during the month of June to eat foods produced within a 200-mile radius of New Orleans. “It’s so much easier now than when we started this, and that was just three years ago,” says Lee Stafford, co-founder of the annual event. “We can get more food at the grocery stores and there are more specialty shops for some of the stuff that had been hard to find before, especially meat. The first week is still hard, but once your refrigerator is filled with all local items, you’re good to go.” Stafford and New Orleans native Leslie Brown, a Covington pediatrician, started the Eat Local Challenge as a way to encourage people to explore the richness of local foods and connect with local food producers. It since has evolved into a month of events, from workshops about making your own wine, sausage or gelato to a bicycle tour of urban gardens to wild berry foraging excursions along the batture. This year, there will be a garden-to-glass cocktail contest June 17 at the Old New PAGE 27

WINE OF THE week BY BRENDA MAITLAND Email Brenda Maitland at winediva1@earthlink.net

2012 Honoro Vera Garnacha CALATAYUD, SPAIN $9-$10 RETAIL

Chef Cristina Quackenbush presents an appetizer sampler at Milkfish. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

what

Milkfish

reservations

where

what works

Inside Who Dat Cafe, 2401 Burgundy St., (504) 3270635; www.milkfishnola.com

accepted

robust flavors, artful presentations

what doesn’t how much moderate

some letdowns with mock meat alternatives

when

check, please

dinner Wed.-Mon., late-night Fri.-Sat.

a pop-up for fine Filipino cooking

In France’s Rhone region, grenache is used as an elegant blending grape. Spain’s sun-drenched, dry Aragon region, which includes Calatayud, is a great place to grow “heavy” fruit like garnacha (the Spanish name for the grape). Here aged vines produce fruit that exhibits the grape’s unique character and style. This all-garnacha wine’s bouquet features aromas of red and black cherry and blackberry. On the palate, taste plums, currants, pepper and spice notes. It has low tannins, and even with all its fruit characteristics, there’s not a hint of sweetness. Drink it with lamb stew, ratatouille, coq au vin, cannelloni, wild game and red beans and sausage. Buy it at: Pearl Wine Co. and Swirl Wine Bar & Market. Drink it at: Lilette, Dick & Jenny’s, Salu, Basil Leaf, Capdeville, Cowbell, 45 Tchoup and Barcadia Bar & Grill.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

op-up burger joints, taco stands and Italian dinners can be fun. But at its highest and best use, a pop-up restaurant can introduce or test the market for food that’s otherwise absent from established places. That’s part of the reason for the creation of Milkfish and its Filipino menu of lumpia eggrolls, pancit noodles and Spam fried rice. Local restaurant veteran Cristina Quackenbush, a native of the Philippines, staged her first pop-up last spring. It led to an encore, then to a weekly gig at Marie’s Bar, a Marigny dive that’s become a pop-up incubator. Soon, a fan invited her to take over the kitchen in his neighboring coffee shop, the Who Dat Cafe. Tucked behind the barista counter, Milkfish still retains some trappings of a pop-up. But it also features service more like a full-fledged restaurant, with table service, an inexpensive wine selection and a few Philippines-inspired tropical drinks. Filipino food is a fusion of Latin American, Chinese and southeast Asian cooking, and it’s robustly expressed at Milkfish. But while many traditional Filipino dishes have the mishmash contours of comfort food, Quackenbush draws from her long career in fine dining to compose original, striking contemporary renditions. The best example is the namesake milkfish, a staple in the Philippines with white, firm flesh and a strong, oily flavor akin to a sardine. Its other name is bangus, and I’m not sure which of these terms is least appetizing. But in Quackenbush’s kitchen, milkfish is grilled, doused with creamy, shrimp-studded coconut milk curry and topped with an intensely spicy red cabbage slaw that rivals kimchee. The result is a unique showstopper. Assertive garnishes, artfully arranged bok choy and long beans and precisely molded rice shapes are hallmarks of Quackenbush’s style, even for the burly oxtail vertebrae of kare-kare. Fist-sized columns of bone and meat are smothered in stew that is a bit slimy and gray but powered by a surprisingly compatible combination of peanut butter and garlic and ignited by dabs of pungent shrimp paste. Your whole palate may tingle after eating this, and your lips will stick together. Pork turns up everywhere, from the brittle-crusted, cigarillo-sized lumpia and the dark-seared ribs in the classic adobo, to unwieldy fried pig feet (best reserved for pig cultists) and “pork face,” which sounds provocative but tastes like especially tender, garlicky carnitas when mixed with chicken livers for sisig, a spicy, sizzling, fajitalike dish. There are vegetarian alternatives for most dishes but they rely too much on mock meats. End a meal with the mellow cassava cake, dripping with coconut milk and topped with cheddar, or the Asian-style shaved ice parfait called halo-halo. Unique food like this is always worth a try, and when it’s all put together as well as it is at Milkfish, it could become a habit.

Local eats

25


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page 25

interview Orleans Rum Distillery (2815 Frenchmen St., 504-945-9400; www.oldneworleansrum.com) for drink recipes using all-local ingredients at 6 p.m. May 31, the day before the start of the eat-local month, Rouses Market CBD location (701 Baronne St.) will host a kickoff party at the rooftop garden. “That’s a chance to mingle with people who have done it before and get some of their tips,” says Anne Mueller, an Eat Local Challenge organizer. Mueller completed the challenge last year and says the experience was especially valuable for helping her teach her young son what really goes into their meals. Her experience also demonstrates that there are different ways to approach the Eat Local Challenge. An self-described “addict” to iced coffee and certain New Zealand wines, Mueller says she couldn’t commit completely to the 200-mile radius rule. But that’s fine, because people can sign up for the Eat Local Challenge at different levels, from “ultrastrict,” which is just as it sounds, to “ultra ultra lenient,” for people who just want to give it a shot for a few days. Participants don’t have to rely entirely on home cooking either. Forty New Orleans restaurants have promised to offer at least one Eat Local Challengecompliant dish on their menus in June, more than three times the count of last year’s participating restaurants. Eat Local Challenge registration costs $25. Sign up online at www.nolalocavore.org or at the May 31 kick-off event.

Refreshing seafood concept

CuLINARY BICYCLE TOuR GuIDE

f you spot Cassandra Snyder leading a group of bicyclists around town, chances are they’ll be stopping to eat soon. Snyder runs the Culinary Bike Tour for Confederacy of Cruisers (504-400-5468; www.confederacyofcruisers.com), which provides a hands-on overview of New Orleans’ food history. Snyder worked in restaurant kitchens and catering jobs around New Orleans, and she previously conducted historic cooking demonstrations at the Hermann-Grima House. Today, she’s a pretty handy bicycle mechanic too. : Stops on your tour range from po-boys at Parkway Bakery to African food at Bennachin. What’s the organizing principle here? Snyder: We look at it as a progressive lunch and the diversity is the point. We do not always eat what people might think of as classic Creole food. The idea is to get people into what the locals eat. And these people come prepared. They almost always have a list of restaurants they want to try, and they’re always running those lists by me. We’re talking about restaurants the whole time.

FIVE dIstInct lObstER dIsHEs

Cafe B 2700 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 934-4700 www.cafeb.com Bacco’s popular lobster ravioli lives on here.

Canal Street Bistro 3903 Canal St., (504) 482-1225 www.canalstreetbistro.com Chilled lobster meat is wrapped in a crepe with pasilla pepper cream sauce.

Kim Son

: What difference does it make that you’re all on bicycles? S: That’s part of the magic of this thing. The pace is really what makes it. If we run into a second line and someone’s selling pies, we’ll stop and I’ll make sure they get some street food, because that’s a really important part of the story. I tell them it’s a culinary adventure. We get some type-A people who want to know exactly what we’re going to do, but a big part of it is being flexible for some of the spontaneity of this city and that’s not all at restaurants. In the spring, we might get crawfish and beer and go to City Park. : What’s it like leading strangers around for a progressive meal? S: One of the things I love about it is bringing people together. It can be tricky sometimes when you have these different personalities and they’re all supposed to ride around and eat together. But something always seems to happen to bring them together. It’s usually something about the food and convening together, but sometimes we might find out everyone in the group is playing hooky from the same convention. — IAN MCNuLTY

and herb sauce, seared snapper with grapefruit beurre blanc, a tuna tartare with watermelon and cucumber and a chunky smoked snapper dip to spoon onto grilled ciabatta. Dinner entrees cost between $18 and $23, and lunch has more po-boys ($11-$14). The seafood gumbo is served with potato salad, a country tradition not seen much in New Orleans. The crawfish bisque is done in an even less familiar style, with the bisque basically drizzled like a sauce over a half-dozen stuffed crawfish heads. Watch for specials like grilled snapper neck and stuffed flounder. Basin Seafood took over the address formerly occupied by Rocky’s Gourmet Pizzeria. It’s a casual spot with a small bar and fishing camp decor of animal prints and bamboo screens. A rear patio has views into the boiling room. The bar serves interesting cocktails (the Yucatan firecracker is made with tequila, grapefruit syrup and pickled jalapenos) and offers a short but smart wine list. Gruner veltliner is a good match for seafood and costs $6 a glass. Basin Seafood serves lunch and dinner Tuesday through Sunday.

349 Whitney Ave., Gretna (504) 366-2489 www.kimsonnola.com Vietnamese “salt baked” lobster is actually fried with peppery batter.

Restaurant R’evolution 777 Bienville St. (504) 553-2277 www.revolutionnola.com Lobster roe and lobster meat are tossed with sheep ricotta gnocchi.

The Sammich Inside Chickie Wah Wah, 2828 Canal St., (504) 813-5259 Tempura-battered lobster chunks fill a po-boy dressed with spicy mango butter sauce.

Hot and coals

Next door to Basin Seafood, renovations are underway for a pizzeria called Amici, which will serve pizzas cooked in a coal-fired oven. The restaurant is expected to open in mid-June at 3218 Magazine St., which had been the home of Byblos (3242 Magazine St., 504894-1233; www.byblosrestaurants.com) before that Middle Eastern restaurant moved a block up the street last year. Amici’s menu is not yet available, but marketing manager Michelle Jones says the restaurant’s concept is centered on its coal-fired pizza oven. This approach to pizza is far more common in the pizza hubs of the Northeast, and it typically produces crisp, thin-crusted pies with an element of smokiness from the coals. Rocketfire Pizza Co. (1950 N. Hwy. 190, Covington, 985-327-7600; www.rocketfirepizza.com) is another local example. Amici concept will have an “icehouse,” which Jones describes as a beer bar with about 50 brews on tap, along with frozen liquors. Jones says Amici is aiming for a “familyfriendly” feel. It’s also a concept the company may expand in the future.

OFF

the

menu

“Right now, kale is enjoying a moment. Kale is considered a superfood, rich with vitamins and minerals, but it is also an increasingly classy food. Kale is presently positioned firmly in the category of foods enjoyed by those rich in cultural capital, though fortunately you don’t need economic capital to acquire it. Kale is now something people feel that they need to learn to eat and cook, to be initiated into, or even to feel smug about enjoying.” — Sara Davis on the impact of social factors on food preferences, on the website Table Matters.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Chef Edgar Caro made his name in New Orleans at his restaurant Baru Bistro & Tapas (3700 Magazine St., 504-895-2225; www.barutapas.com), where he serves dishes from his native Colombia. The food at his most recent venture, Basin Seafood & Spirits (3222 Magazine St., 504-302-7391), has a lot more to do with his adopted Louisiana home, and also with his partner in the new restaurant. Caro recently opened Basin Seafood with Tommy Peters, a former fishing guide whose family operated a fishing charter business out of Venice, La. Caro was one of their clients, and Peters says he was always impressed by what the chef could do with the day’s catch once he got it dockside – or even before then. “We caught a snapper one time and he made it into ceviche right there on the boat,” Peters says. “It was just four ingredients and it was the best ceviche I’d ever had. We’ve been friends ever since.” At Basin Seafood, the short menu takes a straightforward, more modern, often lighter approach to Louisiana seafood than the fried and boiled template, joining what’s turning into a promising trend around town. There is a fried seafood platter, a shrimp po-boy and, while they’re in season, boiled crawfish. But then there’s whole grilled fish with roasted jalapeno

cassandRa snydER

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COMPleTe lIsTIngs aT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

you are where you eat

Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN Indulge Island grIll — 845 Carondalet St., (504) 609-2240; www.indulgeislandgrill.com — This Caribbean- and pirate-themed restaurant offers everything from seafood and salads to burgers, sandwiches and ribs. Pirate’s Kiss seafood pasta combines sauteed shrimp, crawfish and catfish in lemonvodka cream over linguine and is topped with pepper bacon. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 28 > 2013

KnuCKleHeads eaTerY — 3535 Severn Ave., Suite 10, Metairie, (504) 888-5858; www. knuckleheadsnola.com — This casual eatery serves burgers, sandwiches, wraps, salads and bar noshes. Mulligan Mike’s all-Angus chuck burger is topped with grilled ham and Swiss or cheddar cheese and comes with fries and a pickle. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

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O’HenrY’s FOOd & sPIrITs — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, (504) 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ sOMeTHIn’ else CaFe — 620 Conti St., 373-6439; www.somethingelsecafe.com — Combining Cajun flavors and comfort food, Somthin’ Else offers noshing items including shrimp baskets, boudin balls and alligator corn dogs. There are burgers, po-boys and sandwiches filled with everything from cochon de lait to a trio of melted cheeses on buttered thick toast. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, late-night Thu.Sat. Credit cards. $$ Treasure Island BuFFeT — 5050 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 443-8000; www. treasurechestcasino.com — The all-you-can-eat buffet includes New Orleans favorites including seafood, salad and dishes from a variety of national cuisines. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri.,

dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL BaYOu Beer garden — 326 N. Jefferson Davis Pwky., (504) 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, late-night Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $ dOWn THe HaTCH — 1921 Sophie Wright Place, (504) 5220909; www.downthehatchnola. com — The Texan burger features an Angus beef patty topped with grilled onions, smoked bacon, cheddar and a fried egg. The house-made veggie burger combines 15 vegetables and is served with sun-dried tomato pesto. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ rendOn Inn’s dugOuT sPOrTs Bar — 4501 Eve St., (504) 826-5605; www. therendoninn.com — The Boudreaux burger combines lean ground beef, hot sausage and applewood-smoked bacon on a ciabatta bun with cheese, onions and remoulade. Fresh cut fries are served with Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of truffle oil. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ THe rIVersHaCK TaVern — 3449 River Road, (504) 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ sHaMrOCK Bar & grIll — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 301-0938 — Shamrock serves an Angus rib-eye steak with a side item, burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, grilled chicken, spinach and artichoke dip and more. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St., (504) 202-4741; www. bookoobbq.com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $

HICKOrY PrIMe BBQ — 6001 France Road, (757) 2778507; www.hickoryprimebbq. com — Proprietors Billy Rhodes and Karen Martin have won several barbecue competitions. They serve Texas-style brisket, smoked chicken, ribs and more. The pulled pork platter features pork cooked for 12 hours over hickory and white oak and it comes with two sides. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ sauCY’s — 4200 Magazine St., (504) 301-2755; www. saucysnola.com — Saucy’s serves slow-smoked St. Louisstyle pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled chicken. The cochon blue is a sandwich of pulled pork, blue cheese and melted mozzerella on a bun. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BURGERS CHeeseBurger eddIe’s — 4517 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 455-5511; www. mredsno.com — This eatery serves a variety of specialty burgers, Mr. Ed’s fried chicken, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, tacos, wings and shakes. Besides patty melts and chili-cheeseburgers, there also are seafood burgers featuring tuna, salmon or crabmeat. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CAFE anTOIne’s anneX — 513 Royal St., (504) 525-8045; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Caprese panino combines fresh mozzarella, pesto, tomatoes and balsamic vinaigrette. The ham and honeyDijon panino is topped with feta and watercress. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Breads On OaK — 8640 Oak St., Suite A, (504) 3248271; www.breadsonoak.com — The bakery offers a range of breads, muffins, pastries and sweets. Pain au chocolat is a buttery, flakey croissant filled with dark chocolate, and a vegan version also is available. The breads include traditional, hand-shaped Parisian-style baguettes. No reservations. Breakfast Thu.-Sun., lunch Thu.Sat. Credit cards. $ CaFe FrereT — 7329 Freret St., (504) 861-7890; www. cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted


out to eat white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ CAFE NOMA — New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, (504) 482-1264; www. cafenoma.com — the cafe serves roasted Gulf shrimp and vegetable salad dressed with Parmesan-white balsamic vinaigrette. other options include chipotle-marinated portobello sliders and flatbread pizza topped with manchego, peppers and roasted garlic. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch tue.-Sun., dinner Fri. Credit cards. $  LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE  — 5606 Canal Blvd., (504) 483-7001 — this casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CHINeSe FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 482-3935 — the large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., (504) 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ANGELO BROCATO’S — 214 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1465; www.angelobrocatoicecream.com — this sweet shop and serves its own gelato, spumoni, Italian ice, cannolis, fig cookies and other treats. No reservations. Lunch and dinner tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — Citywide; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. there also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONteMPORaRY BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., (504) 525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., (504) 3021485; www.oaknola.com — this wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. the hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE  — 8132 Hampson St., (504) 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CReOLe ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis St., (504) 581-4422; www. antoines.com — the city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ THE LANDING RESTAURANT — Crowne Plaza, 2829 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 467-5611; www.neworleansairporthotel.com — the Landing serves Cajun and Creole dishes with many seafood options. Louisiana crab cakes are popular. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., (504) 524-4747 — this casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. the menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., (504) 309-3570; www.redemptionnola.com — Chef Greg Piccolo’s menu includes dishes such as the crispy avocado cup filled with Louisiana crawfish remoulade. Roasted duck breast is served with red onion and yam hash, andouille, sauteed spinach and grilled Kadota fig jus. Reservations recommended. Lunch tue.-Fri., dinner tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ ROUX ON ORLEANS — Bourbon Orleans, 717 Orleans Ave., (504) 571-4604; www.bourbonorleans.com — this restaurant offers contemporary Creole dishes including barbecue shrimp, redfish couvillion, gumbo and catfish and shrimp dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast daily, dinner tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ SAINTS & SINNERS — 627 Bourbon St., (504) 528-9307; www. saintsandsinnersnola.com — Styled to reflect era of Storyville, the restaurant serves Creole and Cajun dishes, raw oysters, seafood, steaks, po-boys, burgers and more. the Politician’s Special features a trio of jambalaya, crawfish pie and a cup of gumbo. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$$ STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ — Toulouse Street Wharf, (504) 569-1401; www.steamboatnatchez.com — the Natchez serves Creole cuisine while cruising the Mississippi River. At dinner, the Paddlewheel porkloin is blackened pork served with Creole mustard sauce or Caribbean butter spiked with Steen’s cane syrup. Bread pudding is topped with candied pecans and bourbon sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and

dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ WILLIE MAE’S SCOTCH HOUSE  — 2401 St. Ann St., (504) 8229503 — this popular neighborhood restaurant is know for its wet-battered fried chicken. Green beans come with rice and gravy. there’s bread pudding for dessert. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

DeLI JIMS — 3000 Royal St., (504) 3048224 — the Reuben is fill seeded rye bread with corned beef, pastrami, provolone and Swiss cheeses, German sauerkraut and thousand Island dressing. the Bywater cheese steak sandwich combines marinated steak, grilled onions, green pepper and Havarti cheese on a rustic roll. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI  & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-2010; www. koshercajun.com — this New Yorkstyle deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-thu., dinner Mon.-thu. Credit cards. $ MARDI GRAS ZONE — 2706 Royal St., (504) 947-8787; www.mardigraszone.com — the 24-hour grocery store has a deli and wood-burning pizza oven. the deli serves po-boys, salads and hot entrees such as stuffed peppers, beef stroganoff and vegetable lasagna. Vegan pizzas also are available. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , (504) 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — the wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. the Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. the Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ QUARTER MASTER DELI — 1100 Bourbon St., (504) 529-1416; www. quartermasterdeli.com — Slow-cooked pork ribs are coated in house barbecue sauce and served with two sides. Slowroasted beef is sliced thin, doused in gravy and served on 10-inch French loaves. No reservations. 24 hours daily. Cash only. $ QWIK CHEK DELI & CATERING  — 2018 Clearview Pkwy., Metairie, (504) 456-6362 — the menu includes gumbo, po-boys, pasta, salads and hot plate lunches. the hamburger po-boy can be dressed with lettuce, mayo and tomato on French bread. Shrimp Italiano features shrimp tossed with cream sauce and pasta. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FReNCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St., (504) 895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — the menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and corianderspiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., (504) 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — this French

bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMet tO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, (504) 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, (504) 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Half Price Pitchers Coors Light & Abita Amber

Tuesdays & Thursdays 2035 METAIRIE ROAD

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INDIaN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT  SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., (504) 944-6666; www.schiroscafe.com — the cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., (504) 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-6859 — the traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

ItaLIaN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT  — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie, (504) 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/ owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., (504) 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ MAXIMO’S ITALIAN GRILL — 1117 Decatur St., (504) 586-8883; www. maximosgrill.com — Sit at the bar overlooking the open grill and watch chefs prepare dishes like the fish of the day pan-sauteed in habanero-infused olive oil and served with seasonal vegetables. osso buco is a braised veal shank served with garlic, thyme and white wine demi-glace, herb-roasted Parmesan potatoes and grilled asparagus. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, lunch Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ page 30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

COFFee/DeSSeRt

onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

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MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, (504) 4368950; www.moscasrestaurant. com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$ RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., (504) 561-8844; www.redgravycafe.com — The cafe serves breakfast items including pancakes, waffles and pastries. At lunch, try handmade meatballs, lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. Reservations accepted. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Thu.-Fri., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, (504) 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., (504) 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like vealand spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

JAPANESE

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C H11:30AM N U B R AYS & 3PM

YS URD SAT S U N D A

NEW DISHES INCLUDE: BANANAS FOSTER FRENCH TOAST

MENTION THIS AD WESTERN OMELET & GET BREAKFAST BURRITO A FREE BREAD PUDDING MIMOSA W/ RUM SAUCE *1 per guest

ChIbA — 8312 Oak St., (504) 826-9119; www.chiba-nola.com — Chiba puts creative local touches on Japanese cuisine. The satsuma strawberry roll bundles scallop, yellowtail, strawberry, mango, jalapeno, wasabi tobiko and tempura flakes and is topped with spicy sauce and satsuma ponzu. Pork belly steamed buns are served with Japanese slaw and pickled onions. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ KAKKOII JAPANESE bISTREAUX — 7537 Maple St., (504) 570-6440; www. kakkoii-nola.com — Kakkoii offers traditional sushi, sashimi and Japanese cuisine as well as dishes with modern and local twists. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., (504) 891-3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

DELIVERY

FRI & SAT UNTIL 3AM SUN - THUR UNTIL 2AM

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKhOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., (504) 410-9997; www.japanesebistro. com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood

teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ORIGAMI — 5130 Freret St., (504) 899-6532 — Nabeyaki udon is a soup brimming with thick noodles, chicken and vegetables. The long list of special rolls includes the Big Easy, which combines tuna, salmon, white fish, snow crab, asparagus and crunchy bits in soy paper with eel sauce on top. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., (504) 581-7253; www. rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ YUKI IZAKAYA — 525 Frenchmen St., (504) 943-1122; www. facebook.com/yukiizakaya — This Japanese tavern combines a selection of small plates, sake, shochu, live music and Japanese kitsch. Dishes include curries, housemade ramen soups, fried chicken and other specialties. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

LATIN AMERICAN LA MACARENA PUPSERIA AND LATIN CAFE — 8120 Hampson St., (504) 862-5252; www.pupsasneworleans.com — This cafe serves Latin and Caribbean dishes, tapas and appetizers like guacamole and chips. Spanish garlic shrimp is served with refried black beans, saffron rice and tropical salad. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.Mon. Cash only. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY 7 ON FULTON — 700 Fulton St., (504) 525-7555; www.7onfulton.com — New Orleans barbecue shrimp features a peppery butter sauce made with blonde ale. Oven-roasted lobster tail is topped with Louisiana crawfish and corn cream sauce and comes with fingerling potatoes and asparagus. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ hERITAGE GRILL — 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 150, Metairie, (504) 934-4900; www. heritagegrillmetairie.com — This power lunch spot offers dishes like duck and wild mushroom spring rolls with mirin-soy dipping sauce and pan-fried crab cakes with corn maque choux and sugar snap peas. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$ MANNING’S — 519 Fulton St., (504) 593-8118; www.harrahsneworleans.com — Named for former New Orleans Saints quarterback Archie Manning, this restaurant’s game plan sticks to Louisiana flavors. A cast iron skillet-fried filet is served with two-potato hash, fried onions and

Southern Comfort pan sauce. The fish and chips feature black drum crusted in Zapp’s Crawtator crumbs served with Crystal beurre blanc. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RALPh’S ON ThE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., (504) 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include turtle soup finished with sherry, grilled lamb spare ribs and barbecue Gulf shrimp. Tuna two ways includes tuna tartare, seared pepper tuna, avocado and wasabi cream. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RESTAURANT R’EVOLUTION — 777 Bienville St., (504) 553-2277; www.revolutionnola. com — Chefs John Folse and Rick Tramanto present a creative take on Creole dishes as well as offering caviar tastings, housemade salumi, pasta dishes and more. “Death by Gumbo” is an andouille- and oysterstuffed quail with a roux-based gumbo poured on top tableside. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ TOMAS bISTRO — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 5270942 — Tomas serves dishes like semi-boneless Louisiana quail stuffed with applewood-smoked bacon dirty popcorn rice, Swiss chard and Madeira sauce. The duck cassoulet combines duck confit and Creole Country andouille in a white bean casserole. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMMY’S WINE bAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ZAChARY’S RESTAURANT — 902 Coffee St., Mandeville, (985) 626-7008 — Chef Zachary Watters prepares dishes like redfish Zachary, crabmeat au gratin and Gulf seafood specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Fri., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI bAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., (504) 587-3756 — This restaurant and hookah bar serves an array of Mediterranean dishes. Tomato Buffala features baked tomatoes and mozzarella topped with basil and olive oil. Grilled filet mignon is topped with creamy mushroom sauce and served with two sides. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$ bAbYLON CAFE — 7724 Maple St., (504) 314-0010; www.babyloncafe.biz —The Babylon platter includes stuffed grape leaves, hummus, kibbeh, rice and one choice of meat: lamb, chicken or beef kebabs, chicken or beef shawarma, gyro or kufta. Chicken shawarma salad is a salad topped with olives, feta and chicken breast cooked on a rotisserie. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$


OuT EAT

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to

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MON-FRI 11AM-9:30PM SAT 12 NOON-9:30PM DINNER MENU ONLY

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BREAKFAST

BURRITOS + BRUNCH fresh & healthy latin food made from scratch.

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PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., (504) 861-9602 — Diners will find Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN

LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS’ BAR & RESTAURANT — 701 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 5238995; www.lucysretiredsurders. com — This surf shack serves California-Mexican cuisine and the bar has a menu of tropical cocktails. Todo Santos fish tacos feature grilled or fried mahi mahi in corn or flour tortillas topped with shredded cabbage and shrimp sauce, and are served with rice and beans. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., (504) 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguesestyle fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TIJUANA’S MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 533 Toulouse

MUSIC AND FOOD BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., (504) 586-0972; www. thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepperseared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ ThE COLUMNS — 3811 St. Charles Ave., (504) 899-9308; www.thecolumns.com — There’s live music in the Victorian Lounge at the Columns. The menu offers such Creole favorites as gumbo and crab cakes and there are cheese plates as well. Reservations accepted. Breakfast daily, lunch Fri.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Thu., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., (504) 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ hOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www. hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

SoBou (310 Chartres St., 504-552-4095; www.sobounola.com) offers creative cooking and craft cocktails.

8120 Hampson St. Uptown/Riverbend • 504.862.5252

WWW.PUPUSASNEWORLEANS.COM

PhOTO By CheRyL GeRBeR

LITTLE GEM SALOON — 445 S. Rampart St., (504) 2674863; www.littlegemsaloon.com — Little Gem offers Creole dining and live jazz. Chef Robert Bruce prepares dishes including Two Run Farms oxtail stew, Creole crab cakes with caper-lemon beurre blanc and fish amandine. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ ThE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur St., (504) 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., (504) 265-8855; www. siberianola.com — The Russki Reuben features corned beef, Swiss cheese, kapusta (spicy cabbage) and Russian dressing on grilled rye bread. Potato and cheese pierogies are served with fried onions and sour cream. No reservations. Dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $. $

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St., (504) 309-7557; www. page 33

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., (504) 569-0000; 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — Mardi Gras Indian tacos are stuffed with roasted corn, pinto beans, grilled summer squash, Jack cheese and spicy slaw. Red chile chicken and goat cheese quesadilla features grilled Creole chicken breast, salsa fresca, chile-lime adobo sauce, and Jack, cheddar and goat cheeses pressed in a flour tortilla. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

St., (504) 227-3808; www. tijuanasmexicanbargrillnola. com — This eatery serves nachos, flautas, quesadillas, burritos, enchiladas, tacos, fajitas, ropa vieja and more. Fritanga features traditional carne asada with gallo pinto, fried pork, cabbage salad, fried plantains and fried cheese. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Mon-Thur 10am-7pm Fri.& Sun. 10am-3pm www.koshercajun.com

888-2010

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SATURDAY

JUNE 8 10Am To 4 pm

REACH moRE THAN 25,000 CoNSUmERS

IN LoUISIANA’S

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

AT LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER

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out to eat page 31

artzbagelz.com — Artz bakes its bagels in house and options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamonraisin, salt and others. Get one with a schmear or as a sandwich. Salads also are available. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $ CAFE B — 2700 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 934-4700; www.cafeb. com — this cafe serves an elevated take on the dishes commonly found in neighborhood restaurants. Grilled redfish is served with confit of wild mushrooms, spaghetti squash, charred Vidalia onion and aged balsamic vinegar. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., (504) 488-6582; www. katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. the Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. there also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

PIZZa

NEW YORK PIZZA — 4418 Magazine St., (504) 891-2376; www. newyorkpizzanola.com — Choose from pizza by the slice or whole pie, calzones, pasta, sandwiches, salads and more. the Big Apple pie is loaded with pepperoni, Canadian bacon, onions, mushrooms, black olives, green peppers, Italian sausage and minced garlic and anchovies and jalapenos are optional. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., (504) 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., (504) 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — there is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1600 — this Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SaNDWICHeS & PO-BOYS BEAR’S POBOYS AT GENNAROS — 3206 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 833-9226 — the roast beef po-boy features beef slow-cooked in house, sliced thin, soaked in gravy and dressed with lettuce, tomato, pickles

DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., (504) 571-7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SeaFOOD

SteaKHOUSe

ACME OYSTER HOUSE — 724 Iberville St., (504) 522-5973; 1202 N. Hwy. 190, Covington, (985) 2466155; 3000 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 309-4056; www. acmeoyster.com — the original Acme oyster House in the French Quarter has served raw oysters for more than a century. the full menu includes chargrilled oysters, many cooked seafood dishes and New orleans staples. the Peace Maker po-boy combines fried shrimp and oysters and is dressed with tabasco-infused mayo. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

AUSTIN’S SEAFOOD AND STEAKHOUSE — 5101 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-5533; www. austinsno.com — Austin’s serves prime steaks, chops and seafood. Veal Austin features paneed veal topped with Swiss chard, bacon, mushrooms, asparagus, crabmeat and brabant potatoes on the side. Reservations recommended. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

JUGHEAD’S CHEESESTEAKS — 801 Poland Ave., (504) 304-5411; www.jugheadsneworleans.com — Jughead’s specializes in cheese steaks on toasted Dong Phuong bread. the regular cheese steak features thin-sliced rib-eye, sauteed mushrooms, onions, peppers and garlic and melted provolone and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

GALLEY SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 2535 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-0955 — Galley serves Creole and Italian dishes. Blackened redfish is served with shrimp and lump crabmeat sauce, vegetables and new potatoes. Galley’s popular soft-shell crab po-boy is the same one served at the New orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner tue.Sat. Credit cards. $$

KILLER POBOYS — 811 Conti St., (504) 252-6745; www.killerpoboys. com — At the back of Erin Rose, Killer Poboys offers a short and constantly changing menu of po-boys. the Dark and Stormy features pork shoulder slowly braised with ginger and old New orleans Spiced Rum and is dressed with house-made garlic mayo and lime cabbage. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.-Sun. Cash only. $

GRAND ISLE — 575 Convention Center Blvd., (504) 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — the Isle sampler, available as a half or full dozen, is a combination of three varieties of stuffed oysters: tasso, Havarti and jalapeno; house-made bacon, white cheddar and carmelized onions; and olive oil, lemon zest and garlic. the baked Gulf fish is topped with compound chili butter and served with local seasonal vegetables and herb-roasted potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Magazine St., (504) 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. there are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., (504) 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys. com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. there are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 885-3416; www.parranspoboy.com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. the veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $ SLICE — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., (504) 897-4800; www.slicepizzeria. com — Slice is known for pizza on thin crusts made from 100 percent wheat flour. other options include the barbecue shrimp po-boy made with Abita Amber and the shrimp Portofino, a pasta dish with white garlic cream sauce, shrimp and broccoli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THE STORE — 814 Gravier St., (504) 322-2446; www.thestoreneworleans.com — the Store serves sandwiches, salads and hot plates, and there is a taco bar where patrons can choose their own toppings. Red beans and rice comes with grilled andouille and a corn bread muffin. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$

MR. ED’S SEAFOOD & ITALIAN RESTAURANT. — 910 West Esplanade Ave., Kenner, (504) 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, (504) 838-0022; www.mredsno.com — the menu includes seafood, Italian dishes, fried chicken, po-boys, salads and daily specials. Eggplant casserole is stuffed with shrimp and crabmeat and served with potatoes and salad. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ NEW ORLEANS HAMBURGER & SEAFOOD CO. — citywide; www. nohsc.com — Menus vary by location but generally include burgers, salads, po-boys, fried seafood and New orleans favorites. the thin fried catfish platter comes with wedge-cut garlic-herb fries, hush puppies and Mardi Gras coleslaw. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., (504) 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood favorites include hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Barbecue oysters are flash fried, tossed in Crystal barbecue sauce and served with blue cheese dressing. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., (504) 241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Momma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322 Magazine St., (504) 522-7902; www.chophousenola.com — this traditional steakhouse serves uSDA prime beef, and a selection of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. the menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

taPaS/SPaNISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal St., (504) 872-9868 — the decadant Mushroom Manchego toast is a favorite here. or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-2007; www. vegatapascafe.com — Paella de la Vega combines shrimp, mussels, chorizo, calamari, scallops, chicken and vegetables in saffron rice. Pollo en papel features chicken, mushrooms, leeks and feta in phyllo pastry. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

VIetNaMeSe AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St., (504) 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. there are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ CAFE MINH — 4139 Canal St., (504) 482-6266; www.cafeminh.com— the watermelon crabmeat martini is made with diced watermelon, Louisiana jumbo lump crabmeat, avocado, jalapenos and cilantro and comes in a martini glass with crispy shrimp chips. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ DOSON NOODLE HOUSE —135 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 309-7283 — traditional Vietnamese pho with pork and beef highlight the menu. the vegetarian hot pot comes with mixed vegetables, tofu and vermicelli rice noodles. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$ PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, (504) 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ ROLLS-N-BOWLS — 605 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 309-0519; www. facebook.com/rollsnbowlsnola — this casual eatery serves a variety of spring rolls, pho, rice and vermicelli bowls, banh mi, a few stir fry entrees and bubble tea. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

DON FORTUNATO’S PIZZERIA — 3517 20th St., Metairie, (504) 302-2674 — the Sicilian pizza is topped with tomato sauce, mozzarella, prosciutto, roasted red peppers and kalamata olives. the chicken portobello calzone is filled with grilled chicken breast, tomato sauce, mozzarella, ricotta, portobello mushrooms and sun-dried tomato mayo. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-8032; www. marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch tue.-Sat., dinner tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

and mayo on toasted Leidenheimer bread. the 10-ounce Bear burger is topped with roast beef debris, Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato, pickles and mayo on a toasted brioche seeded bun and served with fries or loaded potato salad. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013


MUSIC 36 FILM 40

AE +

ArT 43 S TAG E 4 6

what to know before you go

E VENTS 49

Offensive coordinator Comedian Anthony Jeselnik returns to New Orleans. By Will Coviello

A

The show has drawn some outrage and complaints. “The show is more subversive (than his stand-up act), because we frame it like a regular late-night show,” Jeselnik says. “People think we’re going to talk about normal things, but I am talking about the worst things in the world. That can trick people into getting more upset than they would.” Jeselnik doesn’t consider himself a shock comic. “People say, ‘Oh you’re just doing that to get attention,’” he says. “No, I have the attention. This is what I want to talk about. I know I am funny and can craft a great joke. My challenge is to talk about something horrible and make people laugh at it. You have to be clever to make a good joke. I am not trying to hurt people or offend people. Some people are going to be offended. But why tone it down when there are people who get it?” Dark humor is nothing new to comedy writers. “People would say that in writers’ rooms the funniest joke is always followed by ‘Yeah, but we can’t do that, so what else?’” Jeselnik says. “But why can’t I do that? Why can’t I sell that on TV? [The Jeselnik Offensive] is a comedy writer’s dream show.” As was the case when he worked at Fallon’s show, Jeselnik says he’s still got the darkest sense of humor among his writers. “It’s always, ‘How can we pull this off?’” he says. “How can we show a baby going around in a dryer? What do we have to do to make this work? That’s the challenge. If I couldn’t do that, I wouldn’t want to be on TV.” Comedy Central recently picked up the show for another season, which begins July 9 and runs eight to 10 weeks. Jeselnik hopes to do another 10-show season in winter, and would like to do two 15-show seasons like Daniel Tosh’s Tosh.0. Jeselnik’s sense of humor has its roots in New Orleans. “In college among my friends, it was always who could say the most offensive thing or the most inap-

propriate thing that was the funniest. Comedy Central has commissioned a I was never afraid second season of Anthony Jeselnik’s of failing.” The Jeselnik Offensive. But Jeselnik never PHOTO BY TYLEr GOLDEN tried doing comedy in New Orleans. “People in New Anthony Jeselnik Orleans don’t need junE 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Saturday comedy,” he says. “They have their food Harrah’s New Orleans and booze and stuff. 8 Canal St. You don’t need it.” That’s one of the (855) 234-7469 reasons he is happy www.harrahsneworleans.com to come back. Tickets $35 (including fees) “New Orleans is my favorite city in the world,” he says. “I come back twice a year just to eat. I used to come back just to drink, but I got older.”

01

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

fter Anthony Jeselnik graduated from Tulane University with a degree in English, he moved to Los Angeles to become a writer. After what he describes as a disastrous first year in L.A., he tried comedy. “It’s a lot easier to get up and tell jokes every night than get someone to read a piece of paper,” he said from Los Angeles, a week before his first stand-up performance in New Orleans. Eventually, he landed a job as a writer for Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. It didn’t go well. “I came in like, ‘This is what I think is funny,’ and they would be like, ‘That’s really funny to you, but Jimmy can’t say this,’” Jeselnik says. Did his material ever get on air? “I remember this one joke, it wasn’t even dark or anything. It was absurd. I thought it’ll be weird and funny if he does this,” Jeselnik says. “It was Shakespeare’s birthday, and [Shakespeare] was born and died on the same day. So Jimmy says, ‘Today, Shakespeare was born in 16-whatever, and then he died on this day in 17-whatever, and I don’t care what anyone says, that guy was a great writer.’ “After that, they told me they had a meeting. They decided they would never do any more jokes like that.” After a year, Jeselnik quit the show rather than adjust his style of humor. His stand-up comedy and an album did well and he became known for jokes like one about a girlfriend. “My girlfriend loves chocolate,” he would start. “She’s always eating chocolate, and she likes to joke that it’s an addiction. … So I put her in the car and drove her downtown, and I pointed out a crack addict, and I said, ‘Do you see that, honey? Why can’t you be that skinny?’” Then Comedy Central hired him to write jokes for roasts. He spent four weeks writing material for the celebrity guests on the roast of actor and singer David Hasselhoff. Comedy Central liked his work so much, it put him on stage to roast Donald Trump. Jeselnik’s dark humor was on track. He got his own stand-up special on Comedy Central, and then the network hired him to do his own show: The Jeselnik Offensive. On it, he’s had guests try to guess whether paintings are by a serial killer or a famous artist. In a segment called “Sacred Cow,” he has joked about racial issues, bullying and missing children (he asks a private detective whether it’s better to use a “Help me find my puppy” or “Who wants candy?” approach. The detective advises the puppy approach.).

35


MUSIC listings

Showcasing Local Music MON 5/27

Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes

TUE 5/28

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 5/29

FRI 5/31

Saxarama

SAT 6/1 SUN SUN 6/2 3/13

Maple Leaf Bar — the Quickening, 10:30

VOTED

-No Cover Zagat Rated

NO COVER MON 5/27 KIM CARSON

9PM

Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes

TUES 5/28 HONKY TONK OPEN MIC W/ JASON BISHOP

9PM

WED 5/29 PATRICK COOPER

9PM

Joe Krown Trio Pigeontown

THU 5/30

feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

FRI 5/31

Old U.S. Mint — tom mcDermott, noon

Live Music Nightly

The Quickening

THU The Trio feat. Johnny V 5/30 & Special Guests

PAINTBOX FEAT. DAVE JAMES & TIM ROBERTSON 9PM PATRICK COOPER HURRICANE REFUGEES

5PM 9PM

331 Decatur St. French Quarter 504-527-5954

www.kerryirishpub.com

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

all show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

brass-a-Holics, lagniappe brass band, 6

TUeSDAY 28

AllWays Lounge — michael evans, susan Hefner & the Death posture, 10

3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top — Dementians, ratty scurvics, sundog, High in one eye, 7 Blue Nile — mark mcgrain, tom fitzpatrick & friends (upstairs), 10 Bombay Club — monty banks, 6 Chickie Wah Wah — Johnny sansone & John fohl, 8 Columns Hotel — John rankin, 8 d.b.a. — the treme brass band, 9 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — tom Hook & wendell brunious, 9:30 Euclid Records — wyatt blair, star trek, 5

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30

36

The Maison — new orleans Jazz Vipers, 6

Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Jason marsalis, 8 Little Gem Saloon — Charlie miller & richard moten, 5 The Maison — magnitude, 6; gregory agid, 6 Maple Leaf Bar — rebirth brass band, 10:30 Mudlark Theatre — black pus, baby aspirin, Caddywhompus, 7 Old Point Bar — ian Cunningham, 8

Banks Street Bar — major bacon, 10 Blue Nile — new orleans rhythm Devils, 7; gravity a, 10 Bombay Club — monty banks, 6 Buffa’s Lounge — Cody blaine, 7 Cafe Negril — sam Cammarata & Dominick grillo, 7:30; another Day in paradise, 9:30 Carousel Piano Bar & Lounge — smoking time Jazz Club feat. Chance bushman, 8:30 Chickie Wah Wah — meschiya lake & tom mcDermott, 8 Columns Hotel — andy rogers, 8 d.b.a. — tin men, 7; walter “wolfman” washington & the roadmasters, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Cristina perez, 9:30 Freret Street Publiq House — Dopapod, 9 Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30 Hi-Ho Lounge — Quiet Company, 9; features, 11 House of Blues — Domenic, 6

Preservation Hall — preservation Hall-stars feat. shannon powell, 8

Howlin’ Wolf Den — the night Janitor, Context Killer, isidro, 10

Siberia — nasimiyu, altercation, Doombalaya, 9

Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Kipori woods, 5; new orleans Jazz orchestra’s all-stars & guests, 8

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — stanton moore, James singleton & David torkanowksi, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — andy J. forest, 4; meschiya lake & the little big Horns, 6

WeDneSDAY 29 Algiers Ferry Dock — wednesdays on the point feat.

Lafayette Square — wednesday at the square feat. irvin mayfield & the Jazz playhouse revue with Kermit ruffins, the new orleans Jazz institue’s saturday music school, 5 Little Gem Saloon — bruce “sunpie” barnes & marc stone, 5

Palm Court Jazz Cafe — lars edegran, topsy Chapman & palm Court Jazz band, 8 Preservation Hall — preservation Hall Jazz band feat. mark braud, 8 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Jerry embree, 8:30 Siberia — abigail, rotten sound, speedwolf, Cruciamentum, anhedonist, Kromosom, nomad, 8 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Uptown Jazz orchestra feat. roderick paulin, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — ben polcer, 4; orleans 6, 6; st. louis slim & the frenchmen street Jug band, 10 United Bakery — Hoax, nasa space Universe, thee nodes, Coltranes, 9

THURSDAY 30 AllWays Lounge — woolen men, scarecrow sonic boombox, lame Drivers, Hawn, 10 Armstrong Park — Colin lake, 5; george porter Jr. & bill summers, 6:30 Blue Nile — micah mcKee & little maker, 7 The Blue Note — bella nola, 9 Bombay Club — tony seville, 7 Buffa’s Lounge — aurora nealand & tom mcDermott, 8 Cafe Istanbul — tonya boydCannon & friends, 7 Carousel Piano Bar & Lounge — george french Quartet, 8:30 Chickie Wah Wah — seth walker, 8 Circle Bar — the men, lovey Dovies, 10 Columns Hotel — Kristina morales, 8 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 d.b.a. — Jon Cleary, 7; egg Yoke Jubilee, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — loren pickford, 9:30 Freret Street Publiq House — brass-a-Holics, 9:30 Fulton on Tap — the last new beginning, 9 Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30 House of Blues — washboard Chaz blues trio, 6 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — roman skakun, 5; James rivers movement, 8 Lafreniere Park — lafreniere live feat. bucktown all-stars, 6:30


MUSIC LISTINGS PREVIEW

The Men

May

30

10 p.m. Thursday Circle Bar 1032 St. Charles Ave. (504) 588-2616 www.circlebarneworleans.com

Little Gem Saloon — Lucas Davenport & Alexandra Scott, 5; Living Rumours feat. Camile Baudoin & David Doucet, 9 The Maison — Erin Demastes, 5; Messy Cookers Jazz Band, 7; Barry Stephenson’s Pocket, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — The Trio, 10:30 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — 30x90 Blues Women, 9:30 Mudlark Theatre — Michael Evans, Susan Hefner & The Death Posture, 8 Oak — Billy Iuso, 9 Ogden Museum of Southern Art — Tribute to Gary

Hirstius feat. Jim McCormick, Theresa Anderson, Tommy Malone, Kim Carson, Ray Ganacheau & others, 6

Old Point Bar — Upstarts, 6; Chapel Blues, 9 Old U.S. Mint — Navy Band Brass Quintet, 3 One Eyed Jacks — Black Moth Super Rainbow, The Hood Internet, 7 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Tim Laughlin & Crescent City Joymakers, 8 Pavilion of the Two Sisters — Thursdays at Twilight feat. Lena Prima, 6

Republic New Orleans — Borgore; Bassik feat. Borgore, 9 Rivershack Tavern — Dave Ferrato & John Autin, 7 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Leroy Thomas & the Zydeco Roadrunners, 8:30 The Saint Hotel, Burgundy Bar — The Yat Pack, 9 Siberia — Integrity, Full of Hell, Fat Stupid Ugly People, Ossacrux, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Rex Gregory, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6 page 38

wednesday

MAY 29 thursday

MAY 30

Dopapod 9pm Brass-A-Holics 9:30pm

Trivia Night

Tues 7-10pm Wed

Bar Bingo Night 7-10pm {Participant drink specials & great prizes including free show tickets!}

Dog Day Afternoons Saturdays 2-6pm leashed dogs welcome. Water & Scooby Snacks provided.

Happy Hour

DailySpecials

$

wine by the glass

5

4-8pm

specialty & frozen

cocktails

all draft $ brews

4

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Go back in time — not that far, say May 2011 — and tell a member of The Men that in two years the band would employ a full-time lap steel guitarist and draw Tom Petty comparisons, and they’d have either laughed you out of the building or staged a human sacrifice to the blown-out Wiccan rituals “Think” and “L.A.D.O.C.H.” If that member was former bassist Christopher Hansell, the sacrifice would be his own. The primordial force behind Leave Home’s stormy hardcore audible would not survive that album’s tour cycle, replaced on 2012’s Open Your Heart by the band’s audio engineer, Ben Greenberg, on bass and by lap steel player Kevin Faulkner in spirit. Immediately, these were different Men: shoegaze and punk became classic rock and power pop, the diversion routes marked not by guttural outbursts but by motorik grooves (seven-minute droner “Oscillation”), slide rule (self-explanatory “Country Song”) or, in one rare case (the Kafkaesque “Presence”), both. Led by a shuffling, sun-setting piano ballad (“Open the Door”), March release New Moon (Sacred Bones) completes the metamorphosis, squashing any hope of reawakening the beast in its reckless pursuit of other, older muses. “Half Angel Half Light” and “The Seeds” are near-perfect alt-’80s bar rockers, while the back-to-back placement of “High and Lonesome” and “The Brass” — the quietest and loudest tracks — is both side change and olive branch: Everyone wins. Lovey Dovies open. Tickets $10 in advance, $12 at the door. — NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS

4528 Freret ST. Tickets and Info at

www.publiQhouse.com

37


GRIL L OPEN LATE !

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS • MON-FRI • 11AM-2PM

NO COVER!

Thurs., May 30 • David Ferrato & John Autin 7pm Fri., May 31 • Austin Sicard & the Medics 10pm Sat., June 1 • Dave Ferrato & Tchoupazine 10pm

3449 River Rd. (at Shrewsbury in Jefferson Parish) • 834-4938 • www.therivershacktavern.com

MuSiC LISTINGS page 37

St. Roch Tavern — JD Hill & the Jammers, 8:30

Little Gem Saloon — Micah McKee, 5

Vaughan’s — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

The Maison — Emily Estrella & the Faux Barrio Billionaires, 7; Yojimbo, 10

Friday 31 8 Block Kitchen & Bar — Anais St. John, 9 AllWays Lounge — Louisiana Americana Series, 10 Andrea’s Capri Blu Lounge — Phil Melancon, 8 Banks Street Bar — Dummy Dumpster, Bills, Nick Name & the Valmonts, 10 Bayou Beer Garden — Soul Project, 8:30 Blue Nile — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7; Smokey Greenwell (upstairs), 9; Colin Lake Band, 10 Bombay Club — Linnzi Zaorski, 9:30 Buffa’s Lounge — Honeypots, 8 Cafe Negril — El DeOrazio, 7 Carrollton Station — Twangobangorama, 9 Circle Bar — Norbert Slama, 6; Coliseum, 10 Columns Hotel — Ted Long, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

d.b.a. — The Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; the Pine Leaf Boys, 10

38

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 10 Fulton on Tap — Rich Collins Trio, 11 Funky Pirate — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 Green Room — Street Parade, 6; Disappearing Yoshis, 9:30; Stone Rabbits, 11:30 Hangar 13 — We Are Wires, Fighting Gandhis, Routine Friend, 10

singles jazz

nights!

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Martinis & Cocktails $6

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Jazz music by Monty Banks! 830 Conti St. (in the prince conti hotel) 504.586.0972 • 800.699.7711

www.thebombayclub.com dinner & entertainment 7 nights a week

House of Blues — Gary, 8; Down, Honky, Mount Carmel, 8:30 House of Blues (Parish) — Sports & Leisure EP release feat. Big Rock Candy Mountain, Denton Hatcher, 10 Howlin’ Wolf — ZEALE, Quickie Mart, Computa Games, Kung Fu Chris, 10 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Tom McDermott, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8 Kerry Irish Pub — Patrick Cooper, 5 Le Bon Temps Roule — Tom Worrell, 7

Maple Leaf Bar — Saxarama, 10:30 Mudlark Theatre — Michael Evans, Susan Hefner & The Death Posture, 8 Oak — Jenn Howard, 9 Old Point Bar — Rick Trolsen, 5; Space Heaters, 9:30 One Eyed Jacks — Big History, Evangelistas, 9 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Duke Heitger & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 Rivershack Tavern — Austin Sicard & the Medics, 10 Rivertown Heritage Park — Music in the Park feat. Topcats, 6:30 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Groovy 7, 8:30 Siberia — Turf War, Babes, Buck Biloxi & the Fucks, Bottom Feeders, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; Cottonmouth Kings, 10 Three Muses — Seva Venet, 6; Glen David Andrews, 9 Tipitina’s — Johnny Vidacovich, Luther & Cody Dickinson and others, 10 Warehouse Grille — John Autin & Dave Ferrato, 6 Windsor Court Hotel (Cocktail Bar) — Shannon Powell Trio, 5

Saturday 1 8 Block Kitchen & Bar — Anais St. John, 9 Andrea’s Capri Blu Lounge — Phil Melancon, 8 Blue Nile — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Brass-AHolics, 10 Buffa’s Lounge — Honor feat. Jerry Jumonville & Freddy Staehle, 8; Darwin’s Monkeywrench, 11:30 Cafe Negril — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7 Carousel Piano Bar & Lounge — Wendell Brunious Band, 9

Circle Bar — Baak Gwai, Leopold, His Fiction & Inaeona, 10 Coco Bamboo — The Blake Amos Group, 10 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — Little Freddie King, 11 Dew Drop Social and Benevolent Hall — Dr. Michael White lecture & concert, 11 a.m. Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Basin Quintet, 10 Fulton on Tap — Ben Joseph & the Laylows, 11 Funky Pirate — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 House of Blues — Omaira Falcon, 3; Kelly Love Jones, 8:30; SOJA, Nahko, Medicine for the People, 9 Howlin’ Wolf — Lillian Axe, 10 Howlin’ Wolf Den — Rosco Bandana, Vagabond Swing, 10 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Don Vappie, 8; Deja Vu Brass Band, midnight Little Gem Saloon — David & Roselyn, 4:30; Shamarr Allen & the Underdawgs, 7 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — Lefty Keith, 12:30; Blues Trees, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7:30 NOCCA Riverfront Lupin Hall — Megan Hilty, 7:30 Oak — Jon Roniger, 9 Old Point Bar — JD Hill & the Jammers, 9:30 Old U.S. Mint — New Orleans Helsinki Connection, 2 Ritz-Carlton — Catherine Anderson, 1 Rivershack Tavern — Dave Ferrato & Tchoupazine, 10 Rock ’N’ Blues Cafe — Soul Revival, 10 The Saint Hotel, Burgundy Bar — New Orleans Express, 9 Saturn Bar — Chris Rehm, Babes, Sun Hotel, Dent May, 9 Siberia — Satan’s Satyrs, NERV, 9 Spotted Cat — Casual Baby, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Davis Rogan Band, 10

SuNday 2

Carrollton Station — Grayson Capps & the Lost Cause Minstrels, 10

Blue Nile — Mykia Jovan, 8; To Be Continued Brass Band, 10

Checkpoint Charlie — Sweet Jones, 11

Buffa’s Lounge — Some Like It Hot!, 11 a.m.

Chickie Wah Wah — Some Dark Holler, Bonnie Whitmore album release, 9

Cafe Istanbul — Cindy Scott feat. Randy Porter, Dan Loomis & Jamison Ross, 7


Circle Bar — Micah McKee & Little Maker, 6 Columns Hotel — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m. d.b.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Honeypots, 10 Funky Pirate — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 Howlin’ Wolf Den — Hot 8 Brass Band, 10 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Germaine Bazzle, 8 Maple Leaf Bar — Joe Krown Trio feat. Walter “Wolfman” Washington & Russell Batiste, 10:30 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — Kevin Clark & Tom McDermott, 11:30 a.m.; Larry Foyen Jazz Quartet, 3:30; Rumba Buena, 11 Old Point Bar — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 3:30; Albert Allenback Quartet, 7 Ritz-Carlton — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m.; Catherine Anderson, 2 Roosevelt Hotel (Blue Room) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m. Siberia — Pompeya, Carmine P. Filthy, aboynamedruth, 9 Spotted Cat — Rights of Swing, 3; Pat Casey & the New Sounds, 10 Three Muses — Raphael & Norbert, 5:30 Tipitina’s — Bruce Daigrepoint, 5 Warehouse Grille — Prescriptions, 4

Monday 3 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top — Vaginor, Bloodkrow Butcher, Charged Water, 7

BMC — Lil’ Red & Big Bad, 6 Circle Bar — Missy Meatlocker, 6 Columns Hotel — David Doucet, 8 d.b.a. — Glen David Andrews, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — John Fohl, 9:30 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 Maple Leaf Bar — Jon Cleary & the Absolute Monster Gentlemen, 10:30 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — Larry Foyen Big Band, 6; Basin Quintet, 9:30

“Since 1969”

Old Point Bar — Brent Walsh Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7 Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall Living Legends feat. Maynard Chatters, 8 Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy & the Oopsie Daisies, 4; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6

classical/ concerts Trinity Episcopal Church — 1329 Jackson Ave., (504) 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth Organ Recital feat. Albinas Prizgintas, 6

METAIRIE 750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716 COVINGTON 1415 N. HWY 190 (985) 809-9101

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 28 > 2013

BJ’s Lounge — King James & the Special Men, 10

VISIT US ON

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

39


FIlM

listings war, tom Cruise plays a security repairman whose life is changed by the arrival of a strange woman. Hollywood 9 Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

NOw shOwING 42 (PG-13) — the film tells the story of Jackie robinson and his history-making signing with the brooklyn Dodgers. Hollywood 9

AFTERSHOCK (R) — an earthquake traps a group of tourists in a Chilean town. Hollywood 9

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — the museum screens a 4-D film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

40

COLUMBIA PIMUSICTURES PRESENTS AN OVERBROOK ENTERTAINMENT/BLINDING EDGE PICTURES PRODUCTION A FILM BY M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN C EXECUTIVE “AFTERPRODUCEDEARTH” BY JAMES NEWTON HOWARD PRODUCER E. BENNETT WALSH STORYBY WILL SMITH SCREENPLAYBY GARY WHITDITARECTEDAND M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN BY CALEEB PINKETT JADA PINKETT SMITH & WILL SMITH JAMES LASSITER M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN BY M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN STARTS FRIDAY, MAY 31 CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE HANGOVER PART III (PG-13) — following their disaterous bangkok trip, the gang from the last two films are leading happy lives at home — until one of them (Zach galifianakis) has a personal crisis. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

THE CROODS (PG) — a prehistoric family is taken off guard by the arrival of a more evolved caveman in the animated film. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9

HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — the film tells the story of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX

EPIC (NR) — a headstrong teenager is transported to a mythic realm in the animated adventure featuring the voices of amanda seyfried, beyonce Knowles, Colin farrell and others. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

IRON MAN 3 (PG-13) — tony stark (robert Downey Jr.), plagued with worry and insomnia after saving new York, faces off against an enemy known as the mandarin. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

FAST & FURIOUS 6 (PG-13) — the latest in the franchise finds its characters scattered across the globe following a successful heist. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE LAST REEF: CITIES BENEATH THE SEA (NR) — the documentary explores exotic coral reefs and vibrant sea walls around the world. Entergy IMAX

THE GREAT GATSBY (PG-13) — baz luhrmann’s colorful interpretation of the f. scott fitzgerald novel is in 3-D and features a contemporary soundtrack. AMC

MUD (PG-13) — a pair of arkansas boys help a fugitive (matthew mcConaughey) reconnect with his love (reese witherspoon). AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand OBLIVION (PG-13) — working on earth after a devastating alien

PAIN & GAIN (R) — michael bay’s action-comedy follows bodybuilders who get caught up in a crime ring. AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9 PEEPLES (PG-13) — a regular Joe (Craig robinson) is a fish out of water while on vacation with the preppy family of his girlfriend (Kerry washington). AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9 SCARY MOVIE 5 (PG-13) — the latest installment of the horror-spoof franchise includes send-ups of recent films. Hollywood 9 STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (PG-13) — the crew of the starship enterprise returns home after an act of terrorism that leaves earth in a state of crisis. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 TO THE ARCTIC (G) — meryl streep narrates the documentary following a polar bear and her two seven-month-old cubs as they navigate the arctic wildernes. Entergy IMAX

OPENING FRIDAY AFTER EARTH (PG-13) — a father and son (will and Jaden smith) live on the planet nova prime, where earth residents moved after cataclysmic events, and their relationship is tested when they find themselves back on earth navigating its hostile terrain. NOW YOU SEE ME (PG13) — in the new orleansshot film, a federal agent and interpol detective seek to shut down magicians who pull off heists during their performances and give audiences the money.

sPEcIAl scREENINGs BLACK DYNAMITE (R) — this blaxploitation spoof follows black action legend black Dynamite, who seeks to avenge the death of his brother. Tickets $10.50


© 2012 MiLLenniuM Pictures

REVIEW

The Iceman

The Iceman (R) Directed by Ariel Vromen Starring Michael Shannon, Winona Ryder, Ray Liotta and James Franco Limited release

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Richard Kuklinski is not your typical cult figure. The serial killer monetized his behavior by working for the Mob for more than two decades, and he died in 2006 at age 70 under suspicious circumstances while serving five consecutive life sentences for murder. He is believed to have killed more than 100 men — but no women or children. A hit man must have principles. Two main factors set Kuklinski apart from most psychopaths. Throughout his career he successfully maintained a double life by balancing his murderous activities with a mundane suburban existence, complete with a wife and kids who knew nothing of his true calling. Once he was caught in 1986 and incarcerated, he talked eloquently about his life with criminologists, psychologists, journalists and filmmakers, detailing his horrifying crimes while calmly explaining how his abusive father created a monster. The results included bestselling books and a lurid HBO documentary series. Probably the most surprising thing about The Iceman, a based-on-true-events Kuklinski biopic from co-writer and director Ariel Vromen, is that Kuklinski’s fascinating story took 25 years to find its way to the big screen. Vroman does a nice job of recreating the dingy, low-rent feel of New York and New Jersey in the 1970s, even though The Iceman was shot almost exclusively in Shreveport, La. The Mob-centered movies from that era by directors like Scorsese and Coppola serve as obvious touchstones. But the reason people will be talking about The Iceman well into next year’s awards season is Michael Shannon’s breakout performance in the title role. Shannon was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for 2008’s Revolutionary Road, and his star has risen with his ongoing work on HBO’s Boardwalk Empire. As the endlessly tormented Kuklinski, Shannon delivers the kind of indelible work that leads to lifelong A-list acting careers. By the end of The Iceman, you may be surprised to recognize you’ve just spent two hours rooting for a cold-blooded killer to resolve his inner conflicts and defeat the mobsters who abuse him — all in a movie that’s too graphically violent for mainstream audiences. Shannon’s Kuklinski is that human and real. Familiar faces surround Shannon throughout the film — because that’s what it takes to get a Hollywood movie made in 2012 when your star is a relative unknown. Winona Ryder turns in her best work in ages as Kuklinski’s wife, a woman who makes an almost conscious decision to ignore the clues to her husband’s double life. And Ray Liotta displays his usual flair as the mid-level mobster he’s played too many times to count. James Franco and Stephen Dorff chip in with single-scene performances, presumably so the producers could point to the very fact of their presence if the financing suddenly dried up. By the time you realize that it’s David Schwimmer (Ross from the TV show Friends) hiding under a massive 1970s mustache to play a fledgling hit man, it’s too late — The Iceman has set its hook. Cults always find a way to attract new members. — KEN KORMAN page 42

41


FILM LISTINGS page 41

general admission, $9.50 college students, $8.50 seniors and children. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., (504) 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

Windows By Design

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 28 > 2013

WindoW Covering SpeCialiStS

42

GREETINGS FROM TIM BUCKLEY (NR) — The biopic about a young Jeff Buckley (Penn Badgley) focuses on his relationship with a close friend and memories of his late father, folk singer Tim Buckley, whom he barely knew. Tickets $7 general admission, free for New Orleans Film Society members and CAC members. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., (504) 5283800; www.cacno.org THE LESSER BLESSED (R) — A teenager from a remote town in Canada deals with life in high school. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Sunday and June 4-6, 9:30 p.m. Monday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

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LET MY PEOPLE GO! (NR) — A French-Jewish gay mailman living in Finland returns to his zany family in Paris after a series of quarrels with his boyfriend. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net NORTH BY NORTHWEST (NR) — Cary Grant plays a

In Greetings From Tim Buckley, musician Jeff Buckley (Penn Badgley) lives in the shadow of a famous father be barely knew, folk musician Tim Buckley. The Contemporary Arts Center and the New Orleans Film Society present a screening at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 28.

New York advertising executive who is mistaken for a government agent by foreign spies in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 film. Tickets $5.75. 10 a.m. Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., (504) 891-2787; www. theprytania.com POST TENEBRAS LUX (NR) — An upscale family’s move to the Mexican countryside results in domestic dissonance and class friction. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 8:15 p.m. Friday-Sunday and June 4-6, 5:15 p.m. Monday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net STUCK IN LOVE (R) — A respected writer, his ex-wife and their teenage children learn to understand love over a year. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7 p.m. Monday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net THANK GOD IT’S FRIDAY (PG) — Hosted by DJ Soul Sister as part of her Musically Speaking film series, the 1978 film is

about dancing, drugs and decadence in the disco era and includes musical performances by The Commodores and Donna Summer. Free admission. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Antenna Gallery, 3718 St. Claude Ave., (504) 298-3161; www. press-street.com THE WOMEN (NR) — The love lives of several women intertwine in the 1939 film adaptation Clare Boothe Luce’s play of the same name. Tickets $5.75. 10 a.m. Sunday and June 5, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., (504) 891-2787; www.theprytania.com AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, (504) 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, (504) 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), (504) 4640990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, (504) 468-7231; Prytania, (504) 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, (504) 527-6012


ARt

LISTINGS

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 504.483.3116

OPENING ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., (504) 5243233 — Works by George Loli, jewelry by Betsy Meyers Green, crafts by Renee Melito and works by Jacques Soulas, through June. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., (504) 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “Paintings, Drawings and Photographs,” mixed media by George Dureau; “Southern Gothic: An Insider’s View,” paintings and sculpture by Willie Birch; both through July 13. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., (504) 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com — “Turning Corners,” paintings by Karen Jacobs, through June 29. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., (504) 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery.com — “Jaguar Empire,” oil and wax paintings by Paul Tarver, through June 29. Opening reception 5:30 pm. to 8 p.m. Saturday. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., (504) 524-3936; www.docsgallery.com — “So Much Art, So Little Time IV,” a group exhibition of gallery artists, through August 1. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., (504) 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Life Under the Sweet Magnolias,” oil paintings by Larry

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., (504) 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “Philadelphia,” a group exhibition curated Jonathan Ferrara, through July 27. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., (504) 5225988; www.lemieuxgalleries. com — “Wisdom: a Book Art Exhibition,” a group exhibition celebrating the gallery’s 30th anniversary, through July 27. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO. 727 Magazine St., (504) 529-7277; www. neworleansglassworks.com — An exhibition of glass paperweights in conjunction with the International Paperweight Collectors Association’s visit to New Orleans, through June. Opening 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., (504) 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “Translucents,” paintings by Julie Robinson, through June 29. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. TEN GALLERY. 4432 Magazine St., (504) 333-1414 — “I Like Coconuts. They Remind Me of the Good Times,” collaborative works by Valerie Corradetti and Ariya Martin, through June. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERIES A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., (504) 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photographs by Diane Arbus and Lisette Model, through June.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., (504) 5248211; www.angelakinggallery. com — Paintings by Richard Currier and Paul Tamanian, through June 15. Works by Peter Max, ongoing. ANTENNA GALLERY. 3718 St. Claude Ave., (504) 298-3161; www.press-street. com — “My Mom Thinks My Work Has Really Improved Too,” an exhibition illustrating connections between childhood and adulthood in art, through Sunday.

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BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., (504) 525-2767; www.barristersgallery.com — “LaPopSexTVArtShow,” works by Beau Tardy, Mara Marich, LJ Gorry, Sebastien Birchler and Cyr Boitard, through Saturday. BENEITO’S ART. 3618 Magazine St., (504) 8919170; www.bernardbeneito. com — Oil paintings by Beneito Bernard, ongoing. THE BRASS CAMERA PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY. 1201 St. Philip St.; www.thebrasscamera. com — “New Orleans Street Celebrations,” photographs by L.J. Goldstein, ongoing. CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., (504) 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com — “Coming Into View,” paintings by Michael Chambers, through Tuesday. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., (504) 524-3936; www. docsgallery.com — “Exploring the Abstract,” paintings by Roberto Ortiz, through Thursday. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., (504) 818-6032; www.dumoisgallery.com — “Intorsion,” works by Chad Harris and John Norris, through June 15. THE FOUNDATION GALLERY. 608 Julia St., (504) 568-0955; www.foundationgallerynola.com — Works by Zhang Chongguang, through July 6. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., (504) 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — Louisiana Watercolor Society annual exhibit, through Tuesday. GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., (504) 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com — “Hell’s Bells / Sulfur / Honey,” photographs by Sophie T. Lvoff, through Sunday. page 44

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CALLAN CONTEMPORARY. 518 Julia St., (504) 525-0518; www.callancontemporary.com — “Creeper Lagoon,” mixed media by John Folsom, through July 27. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

“Kip” Hayes, through June. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

AKG PRESENTS THE ART OF DR. SEUSS. 716 Bienville St. — Works by Dr. Seuss, ongoing.

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art LIStINGS page 43

rEVIEW

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

LaPopSexTVArtShow

44

the St. Claude Arts District often is considered a post-Hurricane Katrina phenomenon — and it is, mostly — but this show illustrates how deep the experimental Marigny/Bywater art scene’s roots really are. Curated by Beau tardy and Michael Fedor, both veterans of Fedor’s former (19871990) Marigny-based Galerie Avant Gout, it also includes works by Pati D’Amico and William Warren, whose Waiting Room Gallery in Bywater was active from 1997 to 2008. Both spaces catered to emerging artists, a focus that continues in this show. tardy, who worked for MtV in New York for years, was inspired by mass media’s fixation on erotic titillation as we see in GotCha (pictured), his manipulated image of a woman in a vortex of flashy graphics like tV ads that inspire salacious thoughts based on nothing more than subliminal suggestion. the paintings by his French counterpart, Louis Jean Gorry, are far more graphic, but his style is as raw as scrawled subway graffiti. Somehow slick is more insidious. Fedor’s intricately surreal collages look like something an absintheinspired French Quarter Max Ernst might have created, a sensibility complemented by D’Amico’s mystically tinged canvas The Medium, among others. In 2008, she and partner Warren moved to Water Valley, Miss., where the omnipresent kudzu inspired him to paint humanoid vine critters like Kudzu Blues Man, a wavy gravy exercise in animist pointillism in the form of a vinous Delta musician. throw in Margaret Meinzer’s adjacent expo of pop-expressionist dreamscapes and it’s a weirdly wonderful show in the grand St. Claude tradition of ad hoc epiphanies by artists with eternally youthful attitudes. It’s a sensibility that resonates neatly with French digital artist Nicolas Sassoon’s Green Waves, a vast surround-sound and light environment of choreographed pixels in motion at the May Gallery in Bywater, and Irish artist Jane Cassidy’s electronic music-video composition at Parse Gallery. Both of these sublimely ethereal shows at two of the newer art spaces in town extend a long local tradition of experimental art in unlikely places. — D. ERIC BOOKHARDt

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JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., (504) 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Earth, Sea & Sky: Paintings of the Gulf Coast,” works by Christopher Inglis Stebly, Melissa Smith and Susie Ranager, through Friday. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., (504) 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery. com — “O Bury Me Not,” mixed-media collage and

drawings by Michael Pajon, through tuesday.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., (504) 5225988; www.lemieuxgalleries. com — “Wisdom: a Book Art Exhibition,” a group exhibition celebrating the gallery’s 30th anniversary, through July 27. LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., (504) 484-7245 — “Southern Fried Fractals,” paintings by Chris Clark; “Light & Atmosphere,” paintings by Sean

tHRu JUNE

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LaPopSexTVArtShow: Group exhibition curated by Beau tardy and Michael Fedor Barrister’s Gallery 2331 St. Claude Ave (504) 710-4506 www.barristersgallery.com

Friloux; “Random Shots from My Camera,” photographs by Eliot Kamenitz, through Friday.

themayspace.com — “Green Waves,” moving image installation by Nicolas Sassoon, through Friday.

MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERY NEW ORLEANS. 433 Royal St., (504) 299-9055; www. martinlawrence.com — Works by Rene Lalonde, through Friday.

NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO. 727 Magazine St., (504) 529-7277; www.neworleansglassworks.com — “Celebrations,” glass sculpture by Jonathan Christie, etchings by John Furchess and copper enameled jewelry by Cathy DeYoung, through Friday.

MAY GALLERY AND RESIDENCY. 2839 N. Robertson St., Suite 105, (504) 316-3474; www.

PARSE GALLERY. 134 Carondelet St.; www.parsegallery.com — “Swells for the Night Season,” multimedia works by Jane Cassidy, through June 14. POET’S GALLERY. 3113 Magazine St., (504) 899-4100 — “Mississippi Mermaids,” works by Sean Yseult, through Friday. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St.,


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second floor, (504) 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by Lauren thomas, Sabine Chadborn, Vitrice McMurry, Andrew Jackson Pollack and others, ongoing.

SCOTT EDWARDS PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY. 2109 Decatur St., (504) 610-0581 — “We Saw the Music,” photographs by Baron Wolman and Bob Compton, through Saturday. SECOND STORY GALLERY. New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., (504) 710-4506; www. thesecondstorygallery.com — “Lite Bright: Experiments of Form and Light,” works by Bonita Day and Madeleine Faust, through Friday. SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., (504) 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Kingdom,” mixed-media paintings by KOLLABS, through tuesday. STAPLE GOODS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., (504) 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — “the Rams,” painting and sculpture by Abdi Farah, through Sunday. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, (504) 568-9050; www.stellajonesgallery.com — “Modernist: A Look Back,” paintings by Richard Dempsey, through Friday.

TULANE UNIVERSITY, NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, (504) 314-2406; www.newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “Endless Line” and “Self Portrait,” site-specific wall-drawing installation by Pat Steir, through June 16. UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — Visual Arts League juried exhibition, through Saturday.

SParE SPaCES FAIR GRINDS COFFEEHOUSE. 3133 Ponce de Leon St., (504) 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — “Sip of Life” photographs by Gitesh Gupta, through Friday.

Call for artiStS ALL HAIL OUR SACRED DRUNKEN WOOKIEE: A CHEWBACCHUS ART SHOW. 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top, 1638 Clio St., (504) 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — the Intergalactic Krewe of Chewbacchus seeks works in all mediums that celebrate fandom (sci-fi, fantasy, horror, comics, gaming, etc.) for an upcoming exhibition at the Big top. Email chewbacchusartshow@gmail.com for details. Submissions deadline is June 14. NO DEAD ARTISTS NATIONAL JURIED EXHIBITION OF CONTEMPORARY ART. Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, 400A Julia St., (504) 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com — Artists can apply to be included in the annual juried exhibition at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery. One artist from the September exhibition will win a solo show at the gallery. Visit the website for details. Submissions deadline is June 15.

muSEumS AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., (504) 862-3222 — “Am I Not a Brother, Am I Not a Sister?: An Exhibition Commemorating the Emancipation Proclamation,” through June 28. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., (504) 528-3800; www.cacno. org — “A thousand threads,” works by Luba Zygarewicz, through Sunday. “Brilliant Disguise: Masks and Other transformations,” an exhibit curated by Miranda Lash; “Beyond Beasts: the Art of Court 13”; “I’m Not Lost, Just Undiscovered,” works by New Orleans teenagers curated by the CAC teen Board; both through June 16. “After You’ve Been Burned by Hot Soup You Blow in Your Yogurt,” site-specific installation by Margot Herster, through Aug. 18.

HEY! CAFE. 4332 Magazine St., (504) 891-8682; www. heycafe.biz — Paintings by Mario Ortiz, ongoing.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., (504) 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Seeking the Unknown: Natural History Observations in Louisiana, 1698–1840,” through Sunday.

LA DIVINA GELATERIA. 621 St. Peter St., (504) 302- 2692;

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Road, (504) 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — “A Year and One Day,” sculpture by Andy Behrle, through Dec. 20.

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LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., (504) 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “they Call Me Baby Doll: A Carnival tradition,” an exhibit about the Baby Dolls, the African-American women’s Carnival groups, through January 2014. “It’s Carnival time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and other items; “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond”; both ongoing.

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MADAME JOHN’S LEGACY. 632 Dumaine St., (504) 568-6968; www.crt.state. la.us — “the Palm, the Pine and the Cypress: Newcomb College Pottery of New Orleans,” ongoing. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, (504) 658-4100; www.noma.org — “Portrait of Faith: John Paul II in Life and Art,” through June 16. “Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs, 1851-1939,” through Aug. 4. “Forever,” mural by Odili Donald Odita, through Oct. 7. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., (504) 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — “What Becomes a Legend Most?: the Blackglama Photographs from the Collection of Peter Rogers,” through June. “to Paint and Pray: the Art and Life of William R. Hollingsworth Jr.”; “Eudora Welty: Photographs from the 1930s and ‘40s,” through July 14. “When You’re Lost, Everything’s a Sign: Selftaught Art from the House of Blues,” through July 21. Works by Walter Inglis Anderson from the museum’s permanent collection; an exhibition of southern regionalists from the museum’s permanent collection; both ongoing. SOUTHEASTERN ARCHITECTURAL ARCHIVE. Tulane University, Jones Hall, 6801 Freret St., (504) 8655699; seaa.tulane.edu — “the Dome,” an exhibition anticipating the 40th anniversary of the Superdome, through Nov. 1. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, (504) 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Lena Richard: Pioneer in Food tV,” an exhibit curated by Ashley Young; “then and Now: the Story of Coffee”; both ongoing.

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THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., (504) 581-2113; www.thomasmann. com — “Expressions of Scale: Big and Little Ideas in Metal,” works by thomas Mann and BRM Design, through June 6.

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STAGE listings

REVIEW

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

THEATER 6X6. Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — southern rep’s showcase features six plays written by six local writers. tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. wednesday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

THE ADVENTURES OF BUTT BOY AND TIGGER. Elm Theatre, 220 Julia St., (504) 218-0055; www. elmtheatre.org — steven Dawson’s comedy follows two men who meet online and embark on a raunchy ride through the world of internet chatting. tickets $15. 8 p.m. thursday-saturday, through June 8.

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CLYBOURNE PARK. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., (504) 2988676; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — Cripple Creek theatre Company presents the regional premiere of bruce norris’ exploration of past and present race relations and middle class hypocrisies in america. Visit www. cripplecreekplayers.org for details. tickets $15. 8 p.m. friday-sunday, through June 23. CRIMES AGAINST NATURE: A LOVE STORY. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — featuring music by ratty scurvics, the play follows two cousins who hit the road and end up in new orleans after getting caught in the act together. tickets $10 monday performances, $15 all other performances. 8 p.m. friday-saturday and monday. DRIVING MISS DAISY. North Star Theatre, 347 Girod St., Mandeville, (985) 626-1500; www. northstartheatre.com — Janet shea stars in the pulitzer prize-winning play that follows the unlikely

relationship between an elderly southern woman and her driver. tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors, $20 students and $15 children 12 and under. 7:30 p.m. friday-saturday and 3 p.m. sunday. NEXT TO NORMAL. Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., (504) 528-3800; www.cacno.org — leslie Castay stars in the tony award- and pulitzer prize-winning rock musical about a suburban mother’s fight with mental illness and her family’s attempts to hold everything together. Visit www.southernrep.com for details. tickets $20-$35. thursday-sunday, through June 9. RE-DESIGNING WOMEN. Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — Varla Jean merman, ricky graham, brian peterson and Jack long star in the send-up of Designing Women, where the tV series’ characters are reimagined as new orleans women. tickets $30. 8 p.m. thursday-saturday and 6 p.m. sunday. WICKED. Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., (504) 525-1052; www. mahaliajacksontheater.com — the hit musical explores the story of what happened before Dorothy arrived at oz. tickets $60-$170 (plus fees). 8 p.m. tuesdaysaturday, 2 p.m. saturdaysunday, 7:30 p.m sunday.

BURLESQUE, CABARET & VARIETY BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, Royal Sonesta Hotel, 300 Bourbon St., (504) 553-2299; www.sonesta.com — trixie minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of romy Kaye and the

Next To Normal photo by John barrois

thru JUNE

09

Next To Normal 7:30 p.m. thu.-sat.; 2 p.m. sun. Contemporary arts Center, 900 Camp st., (504) 522-6545; www.southernrep.com

Just when pompous period melodramas like The Phantom of the Opera seemed to have cornered the market on serious musical theater, Next To Normal ran off with a pulitzer prize, among many other honors. this inventive oddity, deftly produced by southern rep, might be characterized as the revenge of the middle class. it’s contemporary, suburban and a maelstrom of psychological torments. the show is a soft rock opera. almost all the narrative is sung, and a fourpiece band under the direction of Jefferson turner accompanies the impressive cast. bill walker’s set is a two-level abstract metallic structure, and most of the time it represents the new york home of the goodman family. wife and mother Diana goodman (leslie Castay) has had bipolar syndrome since her son gabe died 16 years ago at the age of 18 months. teenage gabe (Clint Johnson) is one of the main characters, and we realize he is a ghost in his mother’s mind. Diane’s teenage daughter natalie goodman (madison Kerth) is a promising musician and hopes to earn a university scholarship. she is wretchedly jealous of her dead brother, who still dominates her mother’s affections. a ray of hope shines on her in the form of henry (matthew thompson), a musician who falls in love with her. husband Dan goodman (richard hutton) struggles to stand by his wife and help guide her back to normalcy. there are many laughs amid this wreckage, and they are all the funnier because they are not forced. the family turns to a doctor (michael Krikorian) for help and also to pills. lots of pills. when they don’t do the trick, the doctor recommends electroconvulsive therapy. the sometimes-perplexing narrative becomes clearer as you recognize how the pieces of the puzzle all fit together. the complexities are counterbalanced as cast members throw themselves into their parts with mesmerizing conviction. the singing is impressive, and Dan Zimmer’s lighting mirrors the psychic fireworks of the plot. gradually, one realizes the allure of Diana’s ghostly son has a dark side. his sweetest moments bring her perilously close to the grave, and the emotional tangle plays out interestingly. the script is more challenging than those of most musicals, and under blake Coheley’s direction the cast turns in a stunning performance. — Dalt wonK


StAGE LIStINGS

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CREOLE SWEET TEASE. The Saint Hotel, Burgundy Bar, 931 Canal St., (504) 522-5400; www.thesainthotelneworleans.com — the show features jazz drummer Gerald French, burlesque dancer Kitty twist and jazz singer Jayna Morgan. Free admission. 9 p.m. Friday. FLEUR DE TEASE. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., (504) 569-8361; www. oneeyedjacks.net — the burlesque troupe presents its season finale. tickets $15 general admission, $20 reserved table seating. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Sunday.

DANCE OH, THOSE BABY DOLL LADIES’ CABARET: ACT 1. Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., (504) 568-6993; www.crt.state.la.us/museum/ properties/usmint — First in a three-part series, the show chronicles the Carnival tradition of doll masquerading. tickets $20 general admission, $15 students and seniors. 7 p.m. Fri., May 31.

CALL FOR tHEAtER NEW ORLEANS FRINGE FESTIVAL. the annual theater festival, held Nov. 20-24, seeks applications for 30-to-60 minute alternative theater performances. Visit www.nofringe.org for details. there is a $25 application fee. Submission deadline is Sunday.

COmEDy ALLSTAR COMEDY REVUE. House of Blues Voodoo Garden, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www. houseofblues.com — Leon Blanda hosts the stand-up comedy show with special guests and a band. Free admission. 8 p.m. thursday.

COMEDY BEAST. Howlin’ Wolf Den, 828 S. Peters St., (504) 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — the New Movement presents a stand-up comedy showcase. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. tuesday. COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., (504) 944-0099; www.lostlovelounge.com — Cassidy Henehan hosts the weekly comedy showcase. Free admission. 9 p.m. tuesday. COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf Den, 828 S. Peters St., (504) 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open-mic portion. 8 p.m. thursday. COMEDY NIGHT. Grit’s Bar, 530 Lyons St., (504) 8999211 — Vincent Zambon hosts the free stand-up comedy showcase. 9 p.m. thursday. COMEDY SPORTZ. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., (504) 231-7011; www.nolacomedy.com — the theater hosts an all-ages improv comedy show. tickets $10. 7 p.m. Saturday. DUOCITY. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St.; www.newmovementtheater. com — two-person improv groups perform. tickets $5. 9 p.m. Saturday. FEAR & LOATHING WITH GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., (504) 2317011; www.nolacomedy.com — the double bill includes Fear and Loathing, the sketch comedy show, and God’s Been Drinking, the improv comedy troupe. tickets $10, $5 with drink purchase. 8:30 p.m. Friday. GIVE ‘EM THE LIGHT OPEN-MIC COMEDY SHOW. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., (504) 3104999; www.houseofblues. com — Leon Blanda hosts the showcase. Sign-up 7:30 p.m., show 8 p.m. tuesday. ICE COLD COMEDY. Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., (504) 265-8855 — the comedy show features stand-up, an open mic and

free ice cream. Free admission. 9 p.m. Monday. LAUGH & SIP. Therapy Wine Lounge, 3001 Tulane Ave., (504) 784-0054; www. therapynola.com — Mark Caesar and DJ Cousin Cav host the weekly showcase of local comedians. Call (504) 606-6408 for details. tickets $7. 8 p.m. thursday.

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LIGHTS UP. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St.; www.newmovementtheater. com — the theater showcases new improv troupes. tickets $5. 9 p.m. thursday. THE MEGAPHONE SHOW. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St.; www. newmovementtheater.com — Each show features a guest sharing favorite true stories, the details of which inspire improv comedy. tickets $8. 10:30 p.m. Saturday. NOLA COMEDY HOUR OPEN MIC & SHOWCASE. Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., (504) 9454446; www.hiholounge.net — Andrew Polk hosts the open mic series that features a booked showcase on the last Sunday of every month. Free admission. 8 p.m. sign-up, 9 p.m. show. Sunday. THE REAL @CHRISTREW SHOW. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St.; www.newmovementtheater. com — the comedian presents a variety show. tickets $5. 10:30 p.m. Friday.

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THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? COMEDY SHOWCASE. Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., (504) 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation. com — the weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up 8 p.m., show 9 p.m. Wednesday. TNM MATCH GAME. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St.; www.newmovementtheater.com — the theater presents its version of the game show. tickets $5. 9 p.m. Friday.

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SATURDAY NIGHT LAUGH TRACK. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., (504) 231-7011; www.nolacomedy.com — the theater hosts a stand-up comedy showcase. tickets $5. 11 p.m. Saturday. SIT-DOWN STAND-UP. Prytania Bar, 3445 Prytania St., (504) 891-5773; www.prytaniabar.com — Jonah Bascle hosts the stand-up comedy show presented by Accessible Comedy. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Monday.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

KOMENKA ETHNIC DANCE & MUSIC ENSEMBLE SPRING CONCERT. Loyola University New Orleans, Louis J. Roussel Performance Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave., (504) 8652074; www.montage.loyno. edu — the concert includes dance and music selections representing Acadia, Basque Country, Brazil, Bulgaria and more. Call (504) 529-4676 or visit www.komenka.com for reservations. tickets $15 general admission, $10 seniors, students and children. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

C-4 COMEDY NIGHT. Eiffel Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave., (504) 5252951; www.eiffelsociety. com — Corey Mack hosts the stand-up comedy showcase. Visit www.c4comedy1. eventbrite.com for details. Admission free in advance, $5 at the door. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

HOURS

Brent Walsh Jazz trio. Call (504) 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

Call For An Appointment

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013


eveNT LISTINGS

PRevIeW New Orleans Oyster Festival

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 504.483.3116

eveNTS

FRIDAY 31

TUeSDAY 28

BUST-A-RHYME TEEN RAP CONTEST. New Orleans Public Library, Martin Luther King Branch, 1611 Caffin Ave., (504) 529-7323; www. nutrias.org — Rappers ages 11 to 18 can compete with either freestyle or written raps. They can compete solo, as half of a duo or as part of a group. Call (504) 596-2695, visit www.nutrias.org or email mlandrum@ neworleanspubliclibrary.org for details. Free registration. 1 p.m.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. Visit www.crescentcityfarmersmarket.org for details. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RACE AND ETHNICITY IN AMERICAN HIGHER EDUCATION. Hilton New Orleans Riverside, 2 Poydras St., (504) 561-0500; www. hilton.com — New Orleans university presidents discuss their institutions’ responses to Hurricane Katrina at the nation’s largest conference on race and ethnicity. Other issues regarding race and ethnicity in American higher education will be discussed. Visit www.ncore.ou.edu for details. General registration $725, student registration $425. Tuesday-Saturday. VEGETABLE GARDENING. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, (504) 838-1190 — J.B. Anders, an LSU AgCenter horticulture agent for Jefferson Parish, discusses the basics of vegetable gardening for homeowners. 7 p.m.

SATURDAY 1 CRITTER CINEMA. LA/ SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., (504) 368-5191; www. la-spca.org — The LA/SPCA screens G-rated movies at the event with pizza, popcorn and animals for cuddling. The event is for children ages 5-10, and guests should bring a sleeping bag and pillow. Pre-registration is required. Call (504) 368-5191 ext. 207 or email hollie@la-spca.org for details. Admission $25. 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. LIBRARYPALOOZA. The East Bank Regional (4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie) and West Bank Regional (2751 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey) branches of the Jefferson Parish Library host kick-off events for their summer reading programs. Visit www.jplibrary. net for details. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

SUNDAY 2 GIRL SCOUTS’ THIN MINT SPRINT 5K AND 1-MILE DAISY DASH. City Park, 1 Palm Drive, (504) 482-4888; www.neworleanscitypark. com — People of all ages are invited to participate in the non-competitive races and the celebration afterward. Call (504) 733-8220 ext. 1224 for details. Thin Mint Sprint registration $35, Daisy Dash registration $25. 7 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

WeDNeSDAY 29 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. GENEALOGY SERIES. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, (504) 838-1190 — Sal Serio, curator of the library’s American Italian Research Center, leads a series of genealogical seminars for beginners. Free admission. 1 p.m. WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. West-

wego Farmers & Fisheries Market, Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art, live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

THURSDAY 30 DINNER FOR DANCERS. Lighthouse Glass, 743 Camp St. — Proceeds from the four-

course meal with wine pairings provide scholarships for at-risk teens to attend Hope Stone Kids New Orleans Summer Arts Camp. Chefs for the event include Chris Lynch of Atchafalaya and Eric Labouchere and Nat Carrier of Martinique Bistro. Visit www.dinnerfordancers.eventbrite.com for details. Admission $100. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

GREEN NATTIES SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS AWARDS CEREMONY. Eiffel Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave., (504) 525-2951; www.eiffelsociety. com — Local nonprofits’ and businesses’ achievements in sustainability are honored at the event featuring food, drinks, a silent auction and more. Call (504) 909-2489 or visit www.mylifecity.com for details. Admission $35 in advance, $40 at the door. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, North Rampart and

St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, handmade beauty products, art, crafts and entertainment. Visit www.icdnola. org for details. 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. STEP BY STEP: THE JOURNEY WITH ALZHEIMER’S EDUCATION SERIES. Vista Shores Assisted Living and Memory Care, 5958 St. Bernard Avenue, (504) 288-3737 — The Alzheimer’s Association and the New Orleans Regional Advisory Council host the series that includes information for caregivers and family members on the basics of Alzheimer’s disease. Free admisison. Call (800) 272-3900 or visit www.alz.org/louisiana for details. 6 p.m. THURSDAYS AT TWILIGHT. Pavilion of the Two Sisters, City Park, 1 Palm Drive, (504) 482-4888 — A different musician performs every week at the event that includes food, mint juleps, wine, beer and soft drinks. Admission $10, $3 children ages 5-12. 6 p.m.

FRIDAY 31 FRIDAY NIGHTS AT NOMA. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, (504) 658-4100; www. noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, lectures, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

JUNe

1-2

New Orleans Oyster Festival 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Woldenberg Park (504) 888-7608 www.neworleansoysterfestival.com

SATURDAY 1 B-17 TOURS & RIDES. Lakefront Airport, 6001 Stars and Stripes Blvd. — The Texas Raiders, an authentically restored World War II B-17 Bomber, is available for tours and rides at the event. Admission $5 general, $3 children, free for WWII veterans and children ages 5 and under. Rides start at $425; email b17rides@ gulfcoastwing.org or call (817) 304-0393 for reservations. Visit www.hawthorne.aero for details. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. BACK TO THE BEACH. Laketown, end of Williams Boulevard, Kenner, (504) 4687200; www.laketownkenner. com — The 24th annual festival offers two days of music by local bands, vendors selling food and drinks, arts and crafts and children’s activities. Sunday features a car show of about 500 classics. Call (504) 836-2205 or visit www. saveourlake.org for details. Admission $10. 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday. COVINGTON ART MARKET. Covington Trailhead, 419 N. Hampshire St., Covington — The market features a variety of work from local and regional artists, including jewelry, crafts, photography, paintings and more. Visit www. sttammanyartassociation.org for details. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod streets, (504) 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation, 13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRAZE+GROW: DIY ECO BODY PRODUCTS. Green Project, 2831 Marais St., (504) 945-0240; www.thegreenproject.org — The workshop teaches how to make allnatural body products. Email education@thegreenproject. org for details. Email education@thegreenproject.org for details. Admission free for Green Project members, $5 nonmembers. 11 a.m. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET. Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, (504) 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. INTERNATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL OF NEW ORLEANS GALA. First NBC

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

FAMILY

The versatile oyster is the life of the party at the New Orleans Oyster Festival. There is a shucking contest Saturday and a raw oyster-eating contest Sunday. More than 20 local restaurants set up booths serving oysters raw and char-broiled and in tacos, po-boys, gumbo and pasta dishes. There also are non-seafood options, plus sno-balls and desserts. The musical lineup includes the Stooges Brass Band and Shamar Allen and the Underdawgs and others on Saturday. The Brass-A-Holics, The Revivalists and Gin Blossoms play on Sunday. There’s also a children’s tent, cooking demonstrations, craft vendors and a heritage area with displays about the oyster industry in Louisiana. — WILL COVIELLO

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SUPPORT

E

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Check out the charities…

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Akula • AMI Kids • Angel’s Place • Animal Rescue • ARC • Armstrong Park Bike Easy • CADA • Chartwell Center • Community Center St. Bernard Dancing for Dystrophy • Dawn Busters 2 • Each One Save One • Friends of Jeff Animal Shelter • Friends of Palmer Park • Friends of St. Alphonsus • Girls First Greater NOLA Youth Orchestras • Greater Treme • La. Society Cruelty Animals Lake Pontchartrain Basin • Lakeview Shepherd • Lantern Light • Lighthouse for the Blind • Lower Nine • Luke’s House • Lycee Francais • Magnolia School Make a Wish TX/Gulf Coast/LA • Midcity Youth Volleyball • Miracle League of NOLA New Heights Therapy Center • NO AHH • NOLA Fruit Tree Project NOLA Green Roots • Ozanam Inn • PAWS • Pelican Bomb • Project Lazarus Project Spay/Neuter • Riverdale Middle School • S.T.A.I.R. • Save Our Cemetary Second Harvest • Special Olympics • St. Joseph Hospice • Threadhead Tulane Drop in Center • WRBH Radio • YLC

AUGUST 10 • 2013

If you don’t register, you’re just another dude in a dress.

REGISTER NOW ! NOLAreddress.com

TS

EV

RY

More than just a really great party.

HO P E & E AC

A BE AT

O

R

PE

F

THE 19 FUND

ON E C O UN

THE 19 FUND IS A SPECIAL FUNDRAISING

effort to aid the victims of the May 12 shooting

— and future victims of violence in greater New Orleans. United Way will serve as the fiscal sponsor and Silence Is Violence will serve as the fund administrator.

TO DONATE VISIT

WWW.UNITEDWAYSELA.ORG/19FUND Make a true impact in our community. Please give today. Text NOLA to 80088 to make a $10 donation.* *$10.00 donation to United Way of Southeast Louisiana. Charges will appear on your wireless bill, or be deducted from your prepaid balance. All purchases must be authorized by account holder. Must be 18 years of age or have parental permission to participate. Message and data rates may apply. Text STOP to 80088 to STOP. Text HELP to 80088 for HELP. Full terms: www.mGive.org/T. Privacy Policy


eVeNT LISTINGS

STORMFEST. Academy of the Holy Angels, 3600 St. Claude Ave. — Movie screenings, food trucks and beverages prepared by Sankofa HEAL students are some of what attendees can expect of this hurricane preparedness event. Visit www.goodchildrencarnivalclub.org for details. Free admission. Noon to 5 p.m. WILDHOUSE FASHION. House of Blues Foundation Room, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www.hob.com — Three New Orleans designers compete to create wildlife-inspired ensembles at the style blog WearHouse District’s event benefiting the Audubon Institute’s Audubon Fund. Visit www.thewearhousedistrict. com for details. Admission $20. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

SUNDAY 2 ADULTS/SWIM. W Hotel New Orleans, 333 Poydras St., (504) 525-9444 — The hotel opens its rooftop pool to the public at events featuring DJs, drink specials, food, cabana service packages and more. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. BOYS TOWN BOWL-APALOOZA. Rock ’N’ Bowl, 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-1700; www.rocknbowl. com — Amanda Shaw & the Cute Guys are performing at this benefit for Boys Town Louisiana. There will also be food and a chance to win autographed Saints gear. Visit www.boystown.org/louisiana for details. Tickets $25. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. FOOD ALLERGY RESEARCH & EDUCATION WALK. Audubon Park, 6500 Magazine St. — The walk helps to fund food allergy education, advocacy, awareness and research. Visit www.foodallergywalk.org for details. Registration 8 a.m., walk 9 a.m.

MONDAY 3 COVINGTON BICENTENNIAL GOLF TOURNAMENT. Money Hill Country Club, 100 Country Club Drive, Abita Springs, (985) 892-3300 — The tournament celebrates Covington’s 200th anniversary and features lunch and dinner. Visit www.covla.com for details. Admission $150. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. FROM GARDEN TO GLASS. SoBou, 310 Chartres St., (504) 552-4095; www. sobounola.com/ — Mixologist Star Hodgson creates cocktails using seasonal herbs, fruits and vegetables. Admission $35, $28 Southern

Food and Beverage Museum and Museum of the American Cocktail members (includes drinks and snacks). 5:30 p.m.

SPORTS ZEPHYRS. Zephyr Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, (504) 734-5155; www. zephyrsbaseball.com — The Zephyrs play the Round Rock Express. 7 p.m. TuesdayFriday.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS HUMANA COMMUNITIES BENEFIT GRANT. Humana awards a $100,000 grant to a local nonprofit working to improve health experiences or build healthy communities. Visit www.humana.com/hcb for details. Application deadline is July 30.

CALL FOR VOLUNTeeRS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY. American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, (504) 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www. cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 543-3480, anotherlifefoundation@hotmail.com or visit www.anotherlifefoundation.org. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION. Bayou Rebirth seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth. org for details. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, (504) 309-7304; www.bbbssela. org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Bank, 201 Baronne St. — There will be food, drinks and entertainment representative of several international cultures at the high school’s second annual benefit. Call (504) 613-5726 or visit www. ihsnogala.eventbrite.com for details. Admission $40-$500. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. NEW ORLEANS LADIES ARM WRESTLING BRAWL. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., (504) 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net — Arm wrestlers assume professional wrestling-esque personas and compete in theatrical bouts to raise money for Nola to Angola. Admission $5. Visit www.nolaw.org for details. 8 p.m. NEW ORLEANS OYSTER FESTIVAL. Woldenberg Riverfront Park, Canal Street at Mississippi River, (504) 565-3033; www.auduboninstitute.org — The fourth annual festival features restaurants offering oyster dishes, music, an oyster-eating contest, an oyster-shucking competition and a largest oyster contest. Proceeds help to support the Louisiana oyster community, fishermen and their families, as well as security for NOPD’s 8th District. Call (504) 835-6410 or visit www. neworleansoysterfestival.org for details. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. SaturdaySunday. PAINT DROP-OFF. Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., (504) 899-9119 — Whole Foods and the Green Project offer a monthly paint drop-off event. Visit www.greenproject.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. RIVERTOWN FARMERS MARKET. Rivertown, 400 block of Williams Boulevard., Kenner, (504) 468-7231; www.kenner.la.us — The twicemonthly market features local fruit, vegetables and dairy, homemade jams and jellies, cooking demonstrations and more. 8 a.m. to noon. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. ARISE Academy, 3819 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly market offers locally grown fruits and vegetables, fresh eggs and other goods. Call (504) 872-9214 or visit www.sankofanola.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call (504) 355-4442 or visit www.visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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EVENT LISTINGS

3

DAYS Pieces of Fried

CHICKEN W/CHOICE

OF SIDE

$8.95

DINE IN ONLY / LIMIT 1 PER CUSTOMER

Pick Your Day

TREME TUESDAYS Locals Delight! Show us your Louisiana ID for a 3 Piece Special!

WHIPPER SNAPPER

e

WE D NE SDAYS

Calling all students! Bring your school ID for a 3 Piece Special!

THROWB ACK

THURSDAYS SENIOR DAY!!

We’ll See You Soon! 2401 St. Ann St. • NOLA • 70119 Mon-Sat 11am-5pm • 504-822-9503

Thursdays at Twilight Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Garden Concert Series

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THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Lena Prima MAY 30

Adults: $10 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

outings you both would enjoy. Call for information. CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at (504) 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans.org for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER. The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call (504) 717-4257 or email mmorgan@gnofairhousing.org for information. GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS. The group that provides free energy-efficient lightbulbs seeks volunteers to help install the bulbs in homes. Email peter.schamp@ greenlightneworleans.org or visit www.greenlightneworleans.org/volunteerapply.html for details. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign up for service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call (504) 304-2275, email volunteer@ handsonneworleans.org or visit www.handsonneworleans. org for details. HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS. Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at (504) 832-8111 for details. IRON RAIL. The book collective seeks volunteers to table shows and other events, help catalog the library, host free movie nights, organize benefits and other duties. Email ironrailbookcollective@ gmail.com or visit www.ironrail. org for details. JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at (504) 837-0175 or email daveharrell@yahoo.com for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS. The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org for details. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at (504) 888-5880 for details. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., (504) 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call (504) 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine.alpert@nationalww2museum.org for details. OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS. Operation REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleansarea inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www. operationreach.org. SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEER. New Orleans Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., (504) 821-4121; www.nocoa. org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details. START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call (504) 8990820, email elizabeth@scapc. org or visit www.stairnola.org for details. TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION. The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upper-school New Orleans students. Call (504) 831-8475 for details.

WORDS BARNES & NOBLE JR. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information.

ELIZABETH BECKER. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., (504) 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses Overbooked. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE. Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., (504) 5962625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday. LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday. NATHAN TURNER. Tara Shaw, Ltd., 1240 Camp St., (504) 525-1131; www. tarashaw.com — The interior designer signs and discusses Nathan Turner’s American Style: Classic Design and Effortless Entertaining. 5 p.m. Thursday. ROBERT M. EDSEL. National World War II Museum, U.S. Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center, 945 Magazine St., (504) 528-1944; www.nationalww2museum.org — The author discusses and signs Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation’s Treasures from the Nazis. 5 p.m. Thursday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., (504) 8913381; www.neutralground. org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. WANDA A. RAMIREZ. St. Tammany Parish Library, Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 893-6280; www.sttammany. lib.la.us/covington.html — The author signs Hurricane Tsunamis. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. THE WELL: A WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE. St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., (504) 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — The group for writers of all levels meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 655-5489 or email fleurdeholly@gmail.com for details.

CALL FOR WRITERS GRAND CIRCUS PUBLISHING. The group accepts submissions from New Orleansbased writers for a short story collection about alcohol. Email info@grandcircuspublishing. com for details. Submissions deadline is Saturday.


Summer Safety Page gambit's

KIDS: Color the animals and send them back to us to be entered in a drawing to win a GAMBIT PRIZE PACK Featuring 4 Tickets to The Audubon Zoo, Aquarium of the Americas or the Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium AND a Family 1 Membership to the Louisiana Children’s Museum!

A B Ask questions if you are unsure about something

Attorney Stephen Schoenfeld Law Corporation 504-586-0025

g

504-494-1977

Grab some sunscreen before you head outside to play!

gambit

Keep Away from Strangers!

Pay Attention to Your Surroundings

L

Learn Your Complete Address & Phone Number in Case of Emergency

q

U v U is for using sunscreen

Up’Hair SaStudio Daisy

504-284-3445

Quiz Your Friends on their Safety Knowledge

Venturing can be dangerous. Ask your Parents First!

x y

Help Others Be Safe & Avoid Danger

Make Safety Your Priority

Repel Insects - Wear Bug Spray

W

Watch out for the ceiling fan while you’re on your bunk bed!

Wood ‘n Things 504-362-4749

504-888-8466

X-rays are necessary to find if a bone is broken.

d E i J h m N o r S T c

Create a Buddy System for You and Your Friends

Your Safety is Important! Put it First!

z

Zoom Around your Block with Care!

Drink Plenty of Fluids when Paying in the Heat.

Include a plan for Emergencies

N is for never play with fire

Secure helmets and other safety gear before you start to play

Attorney Stephen Schoenfeld Law Corporation 504-586-0025

E is for Educating Everyone on the Importance of Safety

Jump feet first into the shallow end of the pool!

Only ride your bike with a Helmet

Taking 15 minutes a day for 12 weeks keeps kids active and learning all summer long. Summer Activity Books

istop@teachersstop.com 504-258-7867 Shop 24/7 at teachersstop.com

PARENTS: Mail your Child’s colored Summer Safety Page and contact info to: Gambit, 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, Louisiana 70119 by Friday, June 14, 2013. Winners will be contacted by phone that day! Good luck and Have a Safe and Happy Summer From Your Friends at Gambit! CONTACT INFO Child’s Name: ______________________________ Parent’s Name: _____________________________ Address: __________________________________ Telephone Number: __________________________

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

f k p

Falling can cause serious injury. Be careful!

Be careful around electricity!

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EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS AGENTS & SALES Exp. Direct Sales/Fundraising

Earnhardt Endorsed Marketing promotions. Weekends. Positions up to Nat’l Distributor (no investments, no risks, 100% turnkey). Training provided. Cash Paid Daily. 504-304-2877

DRIVERS/DELIVERY DRIVERS:

8 Needed - Local and Regional. Great Pay, Bonuses and Benefits. CDL-A, X-End. TWIC, 1yr T/T Exp. Req. Martin Transport, Reserve, LA: 1-888-380-5516

DOMESTIC/HOUSEHOLD LaCosta Faciliy Support Services, a leader in our industry, is NOW HIRING PT janitors, day porters, housekeeping supervisors in the New Orleans area. Positions available at multiple locations throughout the city. Janitor/Day Porter positions $9.00/hr, Supervisor Positions $12.00/hr. Apply online www.lacostaservices.com

MISCELLANEOUS $$$$HELP WANTED$$$

Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from home! N experience needed. Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 ext 2540 http://www.easy-workgreatpay.com

NEW ORLEANS

FARM LABOR BU Growers, Bay City, TX, has 4 positions for rice; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days appropriate driver’s; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.18/hr; threefourths work period guaranteed from 7/02/13 – 5/2/14. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office with Job Order 3176903 or call 225-342-2917.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Texas Farm LLC, Perryton, TX, has 60 positions for swine production; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days appropriate driver’s; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.18/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 7/11/13 – 5/11/14. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office with Job Order TX4924042 or call 225-342-2917.

JOB GURU

Dear New Orleans Job Guru, “As a person progresses in his or her career and moves into management and perhaps senior management, is there a point in which it is no longer necessary (or appropriate) to include the entire work history in the resume? Thanks.” — Donna D., Metairie, LA Dear Donna, Occasionally, clients tell me they heard that, “You only have to go back 10 years on your résumé.” I put that type of advice in the same category as other pronouncements made by well-meaning but uninformed “experts” who are not on the front Grant Cooper lines of today’s job search battles. For a 35-40 year old candidate to fail to document what he/she did for 5-10 years after leaving college would be a transgression few decision-makers would overlook in the interview selection process.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

The basic answer to your question, Donna, is that it entirely depends on the situation at hand. For example, whether you include your entire work history on your résumé would depend in large measure on the job you are applying for, the nature of the jobs you held earlier in your career, and how old you are.

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NON-PROFIT

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

VOLUNTEER

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

A recent client had a job history that was quite sketchy in her earlier years. She had worked in restaurant server positions at several major restaurants in New Orleans for years, then later went on to earn her bachelor’s degree at U.N.O. and worked in the biomedical sales industry. She came to us because she was applying to a higher level regional management position in the biomedical sales field. We left her six years of restaurant work entirely off of her résumé and began it with her first job after graduating. Since the graduation date and her first biomed job matched up, the six years was unnecessary, making her appear to be a younger candidate. She landed the job.

One of the techniques we use here at Strategic Résumés is to create a section immediately following the main job description area entitled “Previous Positions” that simply lists the older, less relevant jobs. In this way, the jobs are documented so that decision-makers can see how your career progressed without devoting too much space or attention to positions in the more distant past. Of course, there are cases in which older jobs are entirely relevant, as in the case of those hoping to change career directions back to something they did in earlier years, or where the job announcement specifically requests skills gained earlier in one’s career. Also, those who are evaluating your résumé may wish to see that you “worked your way up” and are predisposed to look favorably upon careers that show a consistent upward trajectory. Here are a few simple guidelines to decide how far back to go and which jobs to keep on your résumé: • If you have “gaps” that would appear in your job history by excluding some older positions, leave them in, or simply list them with no job descriptions. • If the older positions were at prestigious companies or demonstrated that you have a wellrounded skill set, leave them in. • If the older positions are obviously irrelevant, too lightweight, or age you too much, feel free to leave them off as long as it does not create a gap in employment after your graduation date. New Orleans Job Guru is New Orleans native Grant Cooper. President of Strategic Résumés®, Grant ranks within the top LinkedIn Résumé Writing Experts nationwide and has assisted the U.S. Air Force, Kinko’s, the Louisiana Dept. of Labor, the City of New Orleans, NFL/NBA players & coaches, as well as universities, regional banks, celebrities, and major corporations.

Send your questions to New Orleans Job Guru at: grant@resupro.com or 504-891-7222

SENIOR STAFF ATTORNEY Senior Staff Attorney for Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center. Law degree from accredited School of Law, admission to or willingness to sit for Louisiana State Bar, and five years of experience in housing or civil rights litigation. Must have demonstrable commitment to civil rights. Salary commensurate with experience. Mail cover letter, resume, and references to: Ronald Morrison, Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center, 404 South Jefferson Davis Parkway, New Orleans, Louisiana 70119. No phone calls or faxes. Position closes June 1, 2013. www.gnofairhousing.org

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016 To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100


CLASSIFIEDS AUTOMOTIVE

MERCHANDISE

WANTED TO PURCHASE

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

CASH FOR CARS

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer. 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT HEALTH/FITNESS Change Your Consciousness Change Your Life

A day of workshops Presented by Eckankar, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday, June 22, 2013 New Orleans Healing Center (second floor) 2372 St. Claude Avenue Call 504-362-5492 for detailed information

LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

Stress & Pain Relief

Therapeutic massage, Metairie office. Flexible hours, in- and out-calls avail. $65 one-hr in-call, discounts avail. Glenn, LA#1562, 504.554.9061.

To Advertise in Call (504) 483-3100

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES BLANTON’S BOURBON BOTTLES

VERY CLASSY LOOKING! (1) - $6.00. All 10 for $50.00. Call 504-460-3416 or rkgre@cox.net

ART/POSTERS SAILBOATS ON CANVAS In Pastel with Hanger. 36 X 45. $45.00. Call (504) 287-4104

AUDIO/WIRELESS EQUIPMENT DVD CASES

CLEAR PLASTIC - 35 for $5.00. 315 Total. Call 504-460-3416 or rkgre@ cox.net

BABY ITEMS Double Jogging Stroller by In Step Great for Festivals! Only $65.00. Call 504-832-1689.

CELLULAR/PAGING LG LUCID 2 BY VERIZON

Comes with Charger and Manuals. Call Patrice 504-220-4193. patriceprice.pp@gmail.com

MISC. FOR SALE •••HUMIDIFIER•••

Vicks Filter Frree Humidifier, Model V4500. Perfect Condition, Brand New, Never Used! Sells at Walmart for $40.00, will sell for $25.00 . PLEASE CAL NORTHSHORE 985-8097777, LEAVE MESSAGE WITH YOUR PHONE NUMBER AND I’LL CALL YOU BACK ASAP.

POLARIS 4 Wheeler

Expedition 4X4. Water Cooled. Shaft Drive System. About 14-years-old. $2,500.00. Call (601) 248-0888.

PETS

PET ADOPTIONS 2 AKC Registered Tea Cup Yorkies Puppies

Male and female. Free to a new good home. They have current shots and play along w/children & other animals. Contact (jaksmith777@gmail.com) for more info. ANNOUNCEMENTS

ADOPTIONS ADOPTION

Adoption: A Suburban life, Secure future, Love & Laughter for your Newborn. Expenses Paid. Call Maria anytime at 1-866-429-0222.

LEGAL NOTICES LOST PROMISSORY NOTE: Anyone knowing the whereabouts or having possession of one (1) certain promissory note executed by Brenda Jones Jackson, dated November 29, 2004 in the principal sum of 111,549.00 please contact Kimberly Calais at P.O. Box 80459 Baton Rouge, LA 70898 or at 225-216-1099. Gambit: 5/21/13, 5/28/13 & 6/4/13. Louis H. Gomez, or anyone knowing the whereabouts of Louis H. Gomez, his heirs, or assigns or legatees, or successors in interest, please contact Atty., Bonita Y.Watson, 1100 Poydras St., Ste. #2900-129, NOLA, 504.708.3975. www.thewatsonfirm. com (504) 708-3975. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of ROSALIND JONES WIFE OF/AND GREGORY M. LARKINS, please contact Justin A. Reese, Atty, 2216 Magazine St., New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 525-1500. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of The Heyward Gibbes Hill Trust, Lindsay Turpin Hill, Sr., Arthur M. Hill, and the Heirs and Legatees of Heyward Gibbes Hill (also known as Hayward G. Hill), please contact Attorney Clay Monroe at (225) 222-4725.

24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON

24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS

SUCCESSION OF DOLORES R. HIRTH AND THOMAS W. HIRTH, SR.

SUCCESSION OF DEBORAH LUCILLE QUARLES

SUCCESSION OF LAWRENCE SIMON, JR.

NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE

NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE

STATE OF LOUISIANA NO. 707-687 DIV. L

NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY given that Thomas W. Hirth, Jr., the duly appointed, acting and qualified executor of the Succession of Dolores R. Hirth and Thomas W. Hirth, Sr., has, pursuant to the provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure, Article 3281, petitioned this Honorable Court to sell, at private sale, for the price of SIXTY THOUSAND AND NO/100 ($60,000.00) DOLLARS, payable in cash, the following described property belonging to the succession, to-wit: A CERTAIN LOT OF GROUND, together with all of the buildings and improvements thereon, and all the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the Parish of Jefferson, State of Louisiana, in that section thereof known as JEFFERSON PARK SUBDIVISION, in SQUARE “I” thereof, bounded by Julius Avenue, Morris Avenue, Jefferson Park West, and Honore Drive, designated by the NO. 2 on a survey made by Adloe Orr, Jr., Civil Engineer, dated June 2, 1950, a copy of which is annexed to an act passed before Margaret Gaudin, Notary Public, dated June 2, 1950, and according to which, said lot commences at a distance of Fifty (50’) feet from the corner of Julius Avenue and Morris Place, and measures thence Fifty (50’) feet front on Julius Avenue, by a depth between equal and parallel lines of One Hundred Ten (110’) feet. Improvements thereon bear Municipal number 603 Julius Avenue. Being the same property acquired by Helen L. Hammond, wife of/and John H. Hirth by Act before Stanley McDermott, Jr., Notary Public, dated December 21, 1970, and recorded at COB 726, Folio 372. NOW, THEREFORE, in accordance with the law made and provided in such cases, notice is hereby given, that Thomas W. Hirth, Jr., executor, proposes to sell the aforesaid immovable property, at private sale, for the price and upon the terms aforesaid, and the heirs, legatees and creditors are required to make opposition, if any they have or can, to such course, within seven (7) days, including Sundays and holidays, from the day whereon the last publication of this notice appears. BY ORDER OF THE 24th Judicial District Court on this 29th day of April, 2013 Attorney: Daniel R. Martiny Attorney: 131 Airline Dr., Ste. 201 Metairie, LA 70001 Telephone: 504-834-7676 Gambit: 5/7/13 & 5/28/13 Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Danoda R. Knockum, please contact Ralph Bickham, Attorney at Law, 1515 Poydras Street, 23rd Floor, Suite 2355 New Orleans, Lousiana 70112 or call 504-584-5730. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Elmore Arnold Gibson, Sr, or his heirs, please contact Norlisha Parker Burke, atty, 504-444-1943. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of RODNEY B. THOMAS, SR. AND JOYCELYN M. THOMAS, please contact Justin A. Reese, Atty, 2216 Magazine St., New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 525-1500.

STATE OF LOUISIANA NO.: 723-136 DIV. I

STATE OF LOUISIANA PARISH OF JEFFERSON WHEREAS, the duly named and qualified administratrix, L. Marlene Quarles, has filed a Petition to the Court for authority to sell at private sale the hereinafter described property, to wit: THAT CERTAIN PORTION OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes, appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the State of Louisiana, Parish of Jefferson, City of Kenner, in that subdivision known as CHATEAU ESTATES EAST, SECTION 2, in accord with a plan of sucdivision by J.J. Krebs & Sons, Inc., C.E., dated March 25, 1975, approved by the City of Kenner under Ordinance No. 1722, registered in COB 835, folio 167. According to said plan of subdivision, said portion of ground is described as follows: LOT 13 in SQUARE 10, which said square is bounded by Normandy Drive, Anjou Drive, Brittany Drive and 41st Street. Lot 13 commences 272.98 feet from the corner of Normandy Drive and 41st Street, measures 60 feet front on Normandy Drive, same width in the rear, by a depth between equal and parallel lines of 125 feet. And according to survey by J.J. Krebs & Sons, Inc., dated June 18, 1976, resurveyed October 2, 1976, said lot has the same measurements and location as above set forth, except that it now commences 264.98 feet from the new right of way line of 41st Street. The improvements thereon bear the Municipal No. 9 Normandy Drive. Acquired by the Decedent at CB 3297, page 841 and further at CB 3298, page 992, official records of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. For the total gross sale price of $225,000.00 cash. The property will be sold pursuant to those terms and conditions as more fully set forth in the said Purchase Agreement attached to the Petition For Authority To Sell Immovable Property At Private Sale filed in this proceeding. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties to whom it may concern, including the heirs and/or creditors of the decedent herein, be ordered to make any opposition which they have or may have to such application, at any time, prior to the issuance of the order or judgment authorizing, approving and homologating the application; and that such order or judgment may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of the last publication of such notice, all in accordance with law. By Order of the Court, Jon A. Gegenheimer Clerk of Court Attorney: Ronald J. Vega Bar No. 13038 D’Aquila, Mullins, & Contreras Address: 3329 Florida Ave. Kenner, LA 70065 Telephone: 504-469-1866 Gambit: 5/28/13 & 6/18/13 Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Charles A. Ferguson, formerly of Harvey, LA, contact Carl J. Selenberg, Attorney at Law, 504-835-1053

STATE OF LOUISIANA NO. 721-100 DIV. B

WHEREAS, the Provisional Administratrx of the above estate has made her application to the court for the sale at private sale of the immovable property hereinafter described, to wit: A CERTAIN LOT OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all the rights ways, privileges, servitudes, appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the PARISH OF JEFFERSON, STATE OF LOUISIANA, in Section 47, Township 12 South, Range 10 East, Southeastern District of Louisiana, East of the Mississippi River, in WEST LABARRE SUBDIVISION, as shown on a print of survey made by Clifford G. Webb, C.E., dated October 4, 1950, on file in the office of the Clerk of Court, revised February 23, 1951, and annexed to an act passed before Jerome Meunier, Notary Public, dated July 6, 1951, according to which said lot is designated by the NO. 8 in SQUARE NO. 3, bounded by Lurline Drive, Berkwick and Westbury Streets and Claiborne Parkway Subdivision (or Claiborne Drive side), which Lot No. 8 commences at a distance of 132.50 feet from the corner of Lurline Drive, the same in width in the rear, by a depth of 71 feet, between equal and parallel lines. All as more fully shown on white print copy of survey made by Clifford G. Webb, dated July 2, 1951. The Improvements thereon bear the Municipal No. 808 Lurline Drive, Jefferson, Louisiana. UPON THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS, TO-WIT: All cash to seller in accordance with the terms of that Agreement to Purchase and all amendments thereto, annexed hereto in globo as Exhibit “A.” Notice is hereby given to all parties whom it may concern, including the heirs and creditors of the decedent herein, and of this estate, be ordered to make any opposition which they have or may have to such application at any time prior to the issuance of the order or judgment authorizing, approving and homologating such application and that such order or judgment may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of the last publication of such notice, all in accordance with law. BY ORDER OF THE COURT Kim Garland, Clerk THIS THE 29TH DAY OF APRIL, 2013 Attorney: Kevin C. Schoenberger Address: 201 St. Charles Ave., Ste. 2422 New Orleans, LA 70170 Telephone: (504) 525-1143 Gambit: 5/7/13 & 5/28/13 Pursuant to the requirements of La. R.S. 47:6007 (D) (2) (e), Chemical Mind Production, LLC has completed principle photography on the feature film titled “2 Bedroom 1 Bath”. Any creditor will need to file a claim by June 15, 2013. All claims should be sent to: Chemical Mind Production, LLC, 102 Cambridge Drive, Belle Chasse, LA or via fax at (504) 524-2969. Please note that the outstanding obligations are not waived should a creditor fail to file by the specified date.

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA NO.:2013-2232 DIV. N DOCKET 8

NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE SUCCESSION OF SHERMAN B. REYNOLDS, II Whereas Marc Hauser, the Ancillary Administrator of the above Estate, has made application to the Court for the sale at private sale of the immovable property hereinafter described, to-wit: TWO CERTAIN LOTS OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all of the rights, ways, servitudes, privileges, appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the Second District of the City of New Orleans, in Square 462, bounded by St. Ann, Moss, Dumaine and Hagan Avenue, designated as Lots 16 and 17 as shown on sketch by W.J. Seghers dated June 5, 1910, copy of which is annexed to act before H. L. Loomis, Jr., on January 3, 1913, according to which sketch said lots adjoin and measure as follows: Lot 17 forms the corner of Moss and St. Ann Streets, and measures 30 feet, two lines (30’2”’) front on Moss Street, 30 feet (30’) in width in the rear, by a depth and front on St. Ann Street of 122 feet, 10 inches, 6 lines (122’10” 6’”) and a depth on the other side line dividing it from Lot 16 of 121 feet, 9 inches, 6 lines (121’9”6”’). Lot 16 measures 30 feet 1 line (30’1 “‘) front on Moss Street, 30 feet (30’) in width in the rear, by a depth on the side dividing it from Lot 17 of 121 feet, 9 inches, 6 lines (121 ‘9”6”’) and a depth on the other side line towards Dumaine Street of 120 feet 9 inches (120’9”). According to survey by Gilbert & Kelly, Surveyors, dated December 13, 1938, copy of which is annexed to act before Frank Macheca, Notary Public, dated December 14, 1938, property herein above described is situated in the same district and square, has the same lot numbers and measures as herein above set forth. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY acquired by Succession of Sherman B. Reynolds from Succession of Constance Reynolds Green by Judgment of Possession dated March 27, 2013, registered in Conveyance Office o f the Parish of Orleans, in CIN 530580. UPON THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS, TO-WIT: For the price and sum o f Six Hundred Eighty Thousand ($680,000.00) Dollars cash, with the succession to pay proration of taxes, and for all proper certificates and transfer taxes. Notice is hereby given to all parties whom it may concern, including the heirs and creditors of the decedent herein, and of this estate, be ordered to make any opposition which they have or may have to such application, at any time, prior to the issuance of the order or judgment authorizing, approving and homologating such application and that such order or judgment may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days, from the date of the last publication of such notice, all in accordance with law. DALE N. ATKINS, Clerk Attorney: Lawrence J. Springer Address: 1430 Henry Clay Ave. New Orleans, LA 70118 Telephone: (504) 895-5292

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

REAL ESTATE

$135 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. 504-952-8404 (504) 846-5122 $249 Brand New Queen Size Leather Bicast . Can deliver. 504952-8404 (504) 846-5122 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $299 Can deliver. 504-9528404 (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $250. 504-952-8404 (504) 846-5122

24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON

Gambit: 5/7/13 & 5/28/13

55


CLASSIFIEDS CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA NO.: 11-8470 DIV. B

SUCCESSION OF SANDRA MCELVEEN ROBIHO NOTICE TO LEASE IMMOVABLE PROPERTY WHEREAS, the administrator of the above Succession, has made application to the Court for the lease of a portion of immovable property situated in the Parish of Orleans, State of Louisiana, bearing municipal number 2126 A.P. Tureaud Ave, New Orleans, Louisiana 70119, and more particularly described as follows: THAT CERTAIN PIECE OR PORTION OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon and all of the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes, advantages and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining being situated in the Third District of the City of New Orleans, in Square 1050 bounded by A.P. Tureaud (formerly London Avenue), N. Miro, N. Galvez, Aubry and Havana Streets, which lot is designated by the No. 8 on a sketch of survey by W.J. and C.J. Seghers, D.C.S. dated June 18, 1926, and according to which sketch said Lot No. 8 commences at a distance of 100 feet from the corner of A.P. Tureaud and N. Miro streets, and measures thence 49 feet, 3 inches, 2 lines front on London Avenue, by 100 feet in depth on the line dividing it from Lot No. 7 and 107 feet, 8 inches, 7 lines on the other side line and 9 feet, 3 inches, 1 line in width in the rear line. UPON THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS: $2,250 monthly rent for a term of 6 months – Notice is hereby given that an order granting such authority may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of this publication, and that an opposition may be filed at any time prior to the issuance of the order.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

Respectfully Submitted, ROY M. BOWES & ASSOCIATES

56

Attorney: ROY M. BOWES, LBN 3343 Attorney: JOSHUA MATHEWS, LBN 30615 Of Counsel JOAQUIN SHEPHERD, LBN 30056 Address: 2550 Belle Chasse Hwy., Ste. 200 Gretna, Louisiana 70053 Telephone: (504)368-2700 Facsimile1: (504)368-2900 Gambit: 5/28/13

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA NO.: 10-4893 DIV. N-8

SUCCESSION OF GERTRUDE MARIA WABNIG NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY Notice is given that the Executor of this Succession, Norbert Wabnig, has petitioned this Court for authority to sell the immovable property described herein below belonging to the decedent at private sale in accordance with the provisions of La. C.C.P. Article 3281 for the price and sum of One hundred forty five thousand and No/100 Dollars (145,000.00) cash, “as is,” subject to the terms and conditions as contained in the Agreement to Sell attached to the Petition filed in these proceedings. The immovable property proposed to be sold at private sale is described as follows: All that certain piece or portion of ground, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all the rights, ways, means, privileges, servitudes, appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining being situated

in Section 47, Township 7 South, Range 11 East, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, in that part thereon known as Flowers Estates Subdivision, Section A, according to the survey and plat by E. J. Champagne dated January 22, 1956, and the survey by Robert A. Berlin dated June 16, 1963, revised June 25, 1963 and being more fully described as Lot 69 and the Northerly one-half of Lot 68 and being more fully described as follows, to wit: From the South East intersection of Camelia and Dogwood Drives, go in a southerly direction along the easterly line of Camelia Drive a distance of 828 feet to the Point of Beginning. From the Point of Beginning, being the North West corner of lot 67, go South 75’ 32 min. East 1173.83 feet to the West bank of the Tchefucte river; thence recommence at the point of beginning and go southerly along the west line of Camelia Drive 150 feet to the center of Lot 68; thence South 75’ 32 min. East 800 feet more or less to the West bank of the Tchefuncte River; thence follow the meanderings of the West Bank of the Tchefuncte northeasterly to the point heretofore set. Any legatee, heir or creditor who opposes the proposed sale must file any opposition which they have or may have to such application, at any time, prior to the issuance of the order or Judgment authorizing, approving and homologating, such Petition and such Order or Judgment may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date the last publication of such Notice appears, all in accordance with law. By Order of the Court, Attorney: Provino Mosca, Bar Number 8473 Address: 7212 Stoneleigh Dr. Harahan, LA 70123 Telephone: 504-738-3994 Gambit: 5/7/13 & 5/28/13

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA NO. 11-8470 DIV. B

SUCCESSION OF MELISSA MARIA ROBIHO NOTICE TO LEASE IMMOVABLE PROPERTY WHEREAS, the administrator of the above Succession, has made application to the Court for the lease of a portion of immovable property situated in the Parish of Orleans, State of Louisiana, bearing municipal number 2126 A.P. Tureaud Ave, New Orleans, Louisiana 70119, and more particularly described as follows: THAT CERTAIN PIECE OR PORTION OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon and all of the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes, advantages and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining being situated in the Third District of the City of New Orleans, in Square 1050 bounded by A.P. Tureaud (formerly London Avenue), N. Miro, N. Galvez, Aubry and Havana Streets, which lot is designated by the No. 8 on a sketch of survey by W.J. and C.J. Seghers, D.C.S. dated June 18, 1926, and according to which sketch said Lot No. 8 commences at a distance of 100 feet from the corner of A.P. Tureaud and N. Miro streets, and measures thence 49 feet, 3 inches, 2 lines front on London Avenue, by 100 feet in depth on the line dividing it from Lot No. 7 and 107 feet, 8 inches, 7 lines on the other side line and 9 feet, 3 inches, 1 line in width in the rear line. UPON THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS: $2,250 monthly rent for a term of 6 months – Notice is hereby given that an order granting such authority may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the

date of this publication, and that an opposition may be filed at any time prior to the issuance of the order. Respectfully Submitted, ROY M. BOWES & ASSOCIATES Attorney: ROY M. BOWES, LBN 3343 Attorney: JOSHUA MATHEWS, LBN 30615 Of Counsel JOAQUIN SHEPHERD, LBN 30056 Address:2550 Belle Chasse Hwy., Ste. 200 Gretna, Louisiana 70053 Telephone: (504)368-2700 Facsimile: (504)368-2900 Gambit: 5/28/13

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA NO.: 2012-10193 DIV. N DOCKET NO. 8 SUCCESSION OF KIRBY E. HILLS, JR. ALSO KNOWN AS KIRBY E. HILLS NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR AUTHORITY TO PERFORM EXECUTORY CONTRACT NOTICE IS GIVEN that Daisy Hills Strickland and Thelma Hills McLean, Testamentary Co-Executrixes of the Succession of Kirby E. Hills, Jr. also known as Kirby E. Hills, has, pursuant to the provisions of Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure article 3227, applied for authority to carry out the terms of a Counter Letter to transfer all title and interest in 312 Portsmouth Drive in Slidell, Louisiana executed by the decedent prior to his death, a copy of which is attached as Exhibit A to the Petition for Authority to Perform Executory Contract filed herein. The Order granting such authority may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of the publication of this Notice. Any opposition to the Application must be filed prior to the issuance of the Order. DALE ATKINS, CLERK OF COURT CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS Attorney: D. Juan M. Hernandez Address: 1100 Poydras Street, Suite 2300 New Orleans, LA 70163-2300 Telephone: (504) 585-7000 Gambit: 5/28/13 Times-Picayune & The Louisiana Weekly

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA

NO.: 13-4773 DIV. H DOCKET #1 SEC. 12 SUCCESSION OF EUNICE HONORE, WIFE OF/AND VERNON WHITE NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE Whereas the Administrator of the Succession of Vernon White has made application to the Court for the sale at private sale of the immovable property hereinafter described, to wit: Lot 23, Square 33, Pontchartrain Park Subdivision Section 2, third municipal district, municipal number 4508 Mithra Street, New Orleans, Louisiana, on the terms of $25,000.00, all cash to seller. Notice is hereby given to all parties

whom it may concern, including the heirs and creditors of the decedent herein, and of this estate, be ordered to make any opposition which they have of may have to such application, at any time, prior to the issuance of the order or judgment authorizing, approving and homologating such application and that such order or judgment may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of the last publication of such notice, all in accordance with law.

MONTH THE BID IS SUBMITTED MUST BE ATTACHED TO THE BID FOR THE FISCAL AGENT CONTRACT.

Dale N. Atkins, Clerk

THE ENVELOPE CONTAINING BIDS IS TO BE CLEARLY MARKED “FISCAL AGENT BID.” ALTERNATIVELY, THE BANK MAY SUBMIT A BID ELECTRONICALLY TO HYPERLINK “mailto:KYOUNG@ JPCLERKOFCOURT.US” KYOUNG@ JPCLERKOFCOURT.US WITH THE SUBJECT LINE MARKED AS “FISCAL AGENT BID”. ELECTRONICALLY SUBMITTED BIDS WILL BE OPENED ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED AS THE DEADLINE FOR RECEIVING BIDS.

ATTORNEY: James G. Maguire Address: 6059 Argonne Blvd. New Orleans, LA 70124 Telephone: (504) 975-3038

THE JEFFERSON PARISH CLERK OF COURT’S OFFICE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO ACCEPT OR REJECT ANY OR ALL BIDS.

Gambit: 5/28/13 & 6/18/13 & The Louisiana Weekly

JON A. GEGENHEIMER CLERK OF COURT JEFFERSON PARISH

LEGAL NOTICE

PROPOSAL NUMBER 13-001 THE JEFFERSON PARISH CLERK OF COURT’S OFFICE WILL RECEIVE SEALED BIDS UNTIL THURSDAY, JUNE 10, 2013 AT 10:30 A.M. AT WHICH TIME BIDS WILL BE OPENED AND PUBLICLY READ AT THE JEFFERSON PARISH CLERK OF COURT’S OFFICE, 200 DERBIGNY STREET, GENERAL GOVERNMENT BUILDING, SUITE 5600, GRETNA, LOUISIANA FOR A FISCAL AGENT FOR THE PERIOD BEGINNING ON OR ABOUT JULY 1, 2013 AND ENDING JUNE 30, 2015. TO BE A QUALIFIED BIDDER, THE BANK MUST OPERATE WITHIN JEFFERSON, PARISH, LOUISIANA AND MUST HAVE A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK CHARTER. THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THE PROPOSED FISCAL AGENCY CONTRACT ARE THAT THE FISCAL AGENT SHALL PERFORM ALL DUTIES AND DISCHARGE ALL OBILIGATIONS IMPOSED BY THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA UPON FISCAL AGENTS AND SHALL RENDER THE FOLLOWING SERVICES TO THE JEFFERSON PARISH CLERK OF COURT’S OFFICE : COLLATERALIZE ALL TIME AND DEMAND DEPOSITS 100% WITH GOVERNMENT SECURITIES. THE BANK WILL PROVIDE CHECKS FOR ALL ACCOUNTS AT NO COST TO CLERK OF COURT’S OFFICE. ALL BANK STATEMENTS WILL BE CUT-OFF ON THE LAST DAY OF THE MONTH FOR ALL ACCOUNTS. STATEMENTS MUST LIST EACH CHECK CLEARING IN CHECK NUMBER ORDER. IMAGES OF CANCELLED CHECKS MUST BE RETURNED ON COMPACT DISK WITH STATEMENT. ALL ACCOUNTS MUST BE ACCESSIBLE THROUGH THE INTERNET FOR PURPOSES OF TRANSFERS AND VIEWING. THE BANK WILL PROVIDE EQUIPMENT FOR PROCESSING OF CREDIT CARD CHARGES. THE BANK WILL PROVIDE PROCEDURES TO ALLOW INTERNET COMMERCE FOR ONLINE CHARGES (PAYPAL). THE BANK WILL SUBMIT INFORMATION REGARDING OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE AND THEIR COST. THE BANK WILL INDICATE THE AVAILABILITY OF CONTRACT EXTENSIONS UNDER THE SAME TERMS. THE BANK WILL SUBMIT COMPETITIVE BIDS FOR THE INTEREST RATE TO BE PAID ON ALL DEPOSITS. THE INTEREST RATE ON REGISTRY FUNDS IS TO BE FIXED FOR TWO YEARS. THE BANK WILL SUBMIT COMPETITIVE BIDS FOR ALL CHARGES AND COSTS. A SWORN STATEMENT OF THE FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE BANK SUBMITTING THE BID AS OF THE FIRST DAY OF THE MONTH PRECEDING THE

GAMBIT: 5/21/13, 5/28/13 and 6/4/13

24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON STATE OF LOUISIANA NO.: 713862 DIV. C

SUCCESSION OF WILLIAM JAMES LEE, JR. CONSOLIDATED WITH IN RE: ROSARIA DIMITRI LEE NO.: 720858 DIV. C NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given that the Administratrix of the Successions of William James Lee, Jr. and Rosaria Dimitri Lee has petitioned the 24th Judicial District Court for authority to sell Succession property at private sale for $5,500.00, as follows: 2005 Toyota Camry, bearing VIN 4T1BE32K15U617350 Any heir or creditor who opposes the proposed sale must file his opposition prior to the issuing of an order or judgment authorizing, approving and homologating such application, and that such order may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of publication of this notice, all in accordance with law. By Order of the Court this 21st day of May, 2013. Attorney: Christine W. Marks Conroy Law Firm Address: 3838 N. Causeway Blvd., Ste 3130 Metairie, LA 70002 Telephone: (504) 830-3450 Gambit: 5/28/13 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the FY 7-113 to 6-30-14 proposed Budget for the Clerk of Civil District Court of Orleans Parish is available for public inspection in the Clerk of Court’s Office, 421 Loyola Avenue, Room 402, New Orleans, LA 70112. A public hearing will be held at 10:00 a.m. on June 7, 2013 at 421 Loyola Avenue, Room 308 - Division “H,” New Orleans, LA 70112. The budget is fiscally conservative and expenditures are budgeted within estimated funds available. BUDGET SUMMARY REVENUES Fees, charges and commissions for services: $5,205,948 Court costs, fees and charges 4,378,542 Fees for recording legal documents 1,068,468 Charges for use of photocopier 0 FEMA Stabilization Project Reimbursements 274,351 Interest income

TOTAL REVENUES $10,927,309 EXPENDITURES Compensation and related benefits 7, 382,726 Computers, equipment, furniture and supplies 880,892 Administration 2, 422,789 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 10,686,407 EXCESS OF EXPENDITURES OVER REVENUES 240,902 ESTIMATED FUND BALANCE AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 14,589,579 ESTIMATED FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR 14,830,481 FUND BALANCE ASSIGNMENTS Legal Mandates 8,164,019 Special Projects 4,808,417 TOTAL FUND BALANCE ASSIGNMENTS 12,972,436 ESTIMATED UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR $1,858,045 DALE N. ATKINS, CLERK, CIVIL DISTRICT COURT

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA NO. 2013-3659 DIV. A

S U C C E S S I O N OF LEANDER OSCAR ROBERTS (a/k/a Leander O. Roberts, Sr.) NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN that Darryl Burnell Roberts and Leander Joseph Roberts, Jr., the Co-Administrators of the Succession of Leander Oscar Roberts, are applying for authority to sell at private sale, on terms of SIXTY THOUSAND AND 00/100 ($60,000.00) DOLLARS cash (FOR THE ENTIRE PROPERTY), the immovable property owned in community by June Darensburg wife of/ and Leander O. Roberts described as follows, to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN TRACT OR PORTION OF LAND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, lying and being situated in FIRST DISTRICT of the City of New Orleans, Parish of Orleans, State of Louisiana, in SQUARE NO. 242, bounded by Baronne, Melpomene, Carondelet and Terpsichore Streets, designated as LOT NO. 13-A on a survey made by J.J. Krebs & Sons, Inc., Surveyor, dated November 9, 1977, a copy of which is annexed to an act passed before Edmond G. Miranne, Jr., N.P., dated March 17, 1978, and according thereto, said lot forms the corner of Melpomene and Baronne Street, measures thence 30’ front on Baronne Street, the same width in the rear, by a depth of 90’3” between equal and parallel lines. Said lot is composed of a portion of original Lot 13. Municipal No. 1500 Baronne Street, New Orleans, Louisiana An order authorizing Administrator to do so may be issued after seven days from the date of second publication of this notice. An opposition to the application may be filed at any time prior to the issuance of such an order. By Order of the Court, Dale N. Atkins, Clerk Attorney: Scott R. Simmons, L.L.C. Louisiana Bar Roll No. 23304 Address: 1820 St. Charles Ave., Ste. 201 New Orleans, LA 70130 Telephone: (504) 896-7909 Gambit: 5/28/13 & 6/18/13


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57


Picture Perfect Properties picture yourself in the home of your dreams!

Steve Richards

Your Property Specialist

914 St. Louis St.

712 Orleans @ Royal French Quarter New Orleans, LA 70116 504.529.8140

504.258.1800 SteveRichardsProperties.com

1856 7th St.

Wonderful French Quarter Pied-a-terre Ready For You! Beautiful Building. Excellent French Quarter Location on St. Louis between Dauphine & Burgundy Streets. Let your dreams come true and own a piece of the Historic French Quarter.

Super-Cute Home built in July 2005. 3 BR, 2 BA, Drive-way & Private Yard w/10x10 Storage Shed. Two blocks from St Charles Ave. (Parade Route/Street Car Access!) All Appliances. New Fence. Zone B. Great Opportunity!

617 Dauphine St. 5

Your French Quarter Home Away from Home Awaits! Offering One Yr. HOA Dues Pd w/ Full Price Offer! Beautiful French Quarter, Top-Floor Condo w/ Fabulous Pool & Courtyard. Updated w/ New Carpet, Paint & Lighting. Wonderful Views of F. Q. Gardens/Skyline. Very Strong Condo Assoc. w/ Healthy Reserves. May be sold furn upon request.

Latter & Blum, Inc, ERA Powered, is independently owned & operated

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EAL SERVICE EAL RESULTS 504.450.5221 504-298-7653

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

4119 South Drive in Old Jefferson!

58

2 bd, 1 bath charmer. Brick front, circle drive. Renovated with delightful touches. New appliances & washer/dryer. Big back yard for summer fun! 100’ X 100’ lot. Huge oak tree in front welcomes you home. Steps to the river levee & Jefferson Playground. Close proximity to hospitals, universities, downtown NOLA, & airport. MLS #950643 Located across from the Beach on Hwy 90

$159,900 • 3 BR 3 BA Perfect Investment or 2nd Home!

Market Your Property Here!

228-348-2114 Beth Blanchard Beth Blanchard Realty, LLC Licensed in MS and LA (228) 348-2114 Mississippi Cell (504) 913-5220 Louisiana Cell Oaks of Long Beach Luxury Townhomes www.oaksoflongbeach.com 91 Oak Alley Place Long Beach, MS 39560

Sales & Resort or Corporate Rentals Office (228) 822-1134 FAX (228) 822-1238

Carl Mixon, Agent

4716 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70119

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CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE MISSISSIPPI

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

OLD METAIRIE SPARKLING POOL Bike Path & Sunset Deck

1 BR apt with new granite in kit & bath. King Master w/wall of closets. Kit w/ all built-ins. Laundry on premises. Offst pkg. NO PETS. Avail now. Owner/ agent, $724/mo. 504-236-5776.

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718

GENTILLY

515A MAGNOLIA ROAD NEAR POPLARVILLE, MS

3 BR/2 BA 1,450 sf Energy efficient weekend retreat situated on 8.5 wooded acres bounded by a 20+ acre stocked lake. House includes 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, wood burning stone fireplace in vaulted great room, fully furnished kitchen and utility room with washer and dryer. Screened rear porch overlooking pier and lake make you feel like you have gotten away from it all. To see this fabulous property, call Jean at 601-795-2105. For Sale by Agent/Broker, $220,000.

BAY ST. LOUIS BEACH $75,000

317 Ballentine St. Beach Cottage in the Bay. Walk 2 1/2 blks to the beach, Old Towne, Depot Dist. 2 BR,1 Bath, Screen Porch, LR, Den, Eat In Kit, Study, Deck, Large Yard, All Appliances. Needs TLC. Susan@Property New Orleans Call 504 231-2445.

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750-$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

DOWNTOWN 1930’s PAINTERS

Close to Bywater/Marigny. Near bus. Real nice 2 bedroom, carport, wd hook-ups. Section 8 OK. $900/month. Call Eddie (504) 481-1204

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

JAZZ FEST SPECIAL!

2809 Onzaga, $139,000. Unique property 1/2 block to Gentilly Blvd entrance to Fairgrounds. 2 BR, 1200 sq. ft, large 40x100 lot has big side yard for garden or extra parking. Open floor plan. Exc. cond! Great area, low maint. ext. Zoned Commercial. Gardener Realtors, Louis (504) 874-3195

LAKEFRONT

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

GENERAL RENTALS BRAND NEW RENOVATION

1 BR/ 1 BA, Basement apt w/all new appls. ALL UTILITIES PAID. Private entrance w/ fenced yard. Quiet family neighborhood with easy parking. W/D. Open kitchen/living room combo. Non smoker. 1 year lease, $850/mo, bleuticia@gmail.com

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $700/mo w/wtr pd. No pets. (504) 858-2162.

LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. 504-443-2280

20 LAKEWOOD PLACE $440,000

Wonderfully appointed 4 bd/4ba in Lakewood Est., a gated NO subdiv. Master ste. w/space for lounge seating & an XL closet. Home features an 2nd master bdrm on 2nd flr. Lrg. den space; fully furnished kit. w/5 burner CT & dbl. oven. Designer paint colors. You simply must see!!!! Contact Todd Taylor, Realtor, ReMax Real Estate Partners, (504) 232-0362. Each Office Independently Owned & Operated.

WESTBANK

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CALL 504.483.3100 TO ADVERTISE IN

REAL ESTATE

Lower Furnished & Upper Unfurnished Units Beautiful Garden District flats on St. Charles Ave. Top floor w/balc. Lovely Greek Revival duplex. Approx 3k sqft on 2 levels (3-4BR/2BA, FMDL + office) Furnished Lower Level: 2BR/2.5BA Garden Apt.

For more info & price call (415) 359-6445

Owner is a licensed Real Estate Broker

1 BDRM CLOSE TO UNIV

Clara St nr Nashvl. Renov Lg upr, 1 br, dr, lr, furn kit, uti rm w/d hkps, cen a/h, wd flrs, ceil fans, w/d avl on site. $1,000/mo. Avail now. 895-0016.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1095

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry/3 mo. min. Avail now Call 504-442-0573/985-871-4324

1205 St. Charles/$1600

Large 1 Bedroom with Living Room, and study/guest room. Can be Furnished or not. Min 3 Month Lease. Facing the Avenue/ Parade Route. Garage Parking, Security, Pool, Gym & More. Call Susan @ Property New Orleans, 504 231-2445.

SPACIOUS HOME NEAR AUDUBON

2 Story house. Nicely furn’s w/art. Wonderful patio & o/s pkng. Quiet residential n’brhood. Looking for super responsible people who can take care of an older cat. Sublease starts Aug. 1 thru October. Can negotiate length of stay. $3500/month. (504) 975-2185 or sal502@cox.net

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

ROOMS BY WEEK. Private bath. All utilities included. $175/week. 2 BR avail. Call (504) 202-0381 or (504) 738-2492.

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REAL ESTATE

French Quarter Realty New FQR Office open! 713 Royal MON-SAT 10-5pm Sun-1-5 Full Service Office with Agents on Duty! 522-4585 Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Kaysie • Billy • Andrew • Eric

1017 Ursulines

Space #10 Motorcycle/Scooter,Gated,OffstPkg,YrLease$100

1041 Ursulines #101

2/2 1227sqft,ctyd,closetspace,w/d,newkitappl$2395

1041 Ursulines #102

2 /2 1178sqft,ctyd,closetspace,w/d,newkitappli$2395

1041 Ursulines #202

2 /2 1178sqft,ctyd,closetspace,w/d,newkitappli$2495

931 Bienville

Parking uncovered spot for $200, covered for $250

214 Chartres

studio furnished,

214 N Anthony 2200 Royal

central

AC,

W/D

$875

2/1 free standing house, avail June 1, 1000 sqft $1250 commercial Blue chip loc w/ favorable HMC-2 Zoning. $4,000

CONDOS FOR SALE 421 Burgundy #1

1/1 Nice size grnd fl just off crtyd. $180,000

421 Burgundy #3

1/1 Bamboo flrs. exp wood Central HVAC. $180,000

1608 N Broad

2/2 Sngl fam renov. Near fairgrounds.$82,500

1125 Royal #3

1/1 3rd flr,exp beams,storage! Lush crtyrd $269,000

611 Dauphine B

1/1 townhouse w/ common courtyard $169,900

823 Burgundy #3

2/2 1,600 sqft, brand renov, balcony, $599,000

416 Burgundy #5

1/1 lovely, crtyrd, no pets/low condo fees $159,000

729 Dauphine A

1/1 HeartofFQ.Grtfrntporch.Updatedkit/ba$359,000

1205 St Charles #703 spacious w/ tons of light, prkng & pool $195,000

COMMERICAL 3817 Chartres Huge comm 2200 Royal comm 512 Wilkinson Row Comm 1228-30 N Broad Comm

3k sqft whse&3k sqft office space $6,500/mo 3,760sq/ft. Blue chip loc HMC-2 Zone $4k/mo comm condo on quaint FQ street $445,000 B-1 comm zoned dbl w/parking $199,500

Call (504) 483-3100

1466 Magazine St., $539,900

117 S. Hennessey St., $ 329,900

5 suites currently used as a Bed and Breakfast with large yard and off street Parking. Real Estate Only $539,900. Owner/Broker

Move in cond, lots of architectural details, 1st block off Canal, off street pkng for several cars, garage. 2 br, 2 dens, encl porch/sun rm & wood flrs. Must see to appreciate.

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688 dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS

Northshore Atmosphere Southshore Convenience

155 SARAH VICTORIA $419,500 Beautiful custom built 5 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath. 3250 sq. ft. on 3/4 acres. Contact Jay Susslin, Keller Williams Realty, Direct: 504-723-5403, 504-207-2007 Each Office Independently Owned & Operated

523 Dumaine - 2 bd/ 2 ba ................ $3000 921 Chartres - 2 bd/ 1 ba ................ $2100 1804 Magazine - Commercial .......... $2000 3005 Bore - 3 bd/ 1 1/2 ba .............. $1850 1135 St. Andrew - 2 bd/ 2 ba .............. $1400 CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

2340 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

METAIRIE

Near shopping, 2 br, 1 ba, 1/2 dbl, hdwd flrs, furn kit, w/d, a/c&h, fenced front, side & back yd, shed, off st prkg, external security lightning. $1095 • 615-9478.

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

GREAT STORM GETAWAY!

2-5 Acres of land ONLY 5 mins. from I-55 @ Magnolia, MS. $5,000 per acre. Call 601-248-0888.

4618 ANNUNCIATION ST.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

59


REAL ESTATE

Gatehouse

Luxury Apartment Homes

2500 SOUTH I-10 SERVICE RD. METAIRIE, LA 70001

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

• Newly Renovated Apartment Homes Available • New Stackable & Full Size Washers and Dryers Available • Newly Updated Kitchens and Bathrooms • Granite Countertops and Wood Cabinets • Carpet and Faux Wood Flooring • 24 Hour Emergency Maintenance • 24/7 Courtesy Security • New Fitness Center • 5 Renovated Pool Areas for Your Relaxation

60

(504) 835-1731

GATEHOUSEAPTS@HOTMAIL.COM MONDAY-THURSDAY 8:30-5:00 FRIDAY 8:30-4:00 SATURDAY BY APPTS. ONLY

T H E F E I L O RG A N I Z AT I O N

1 BR/1BA from $920-$970 2BR/1 & 2BAs from $1125-$1400 2BR/1 1/2 BA from $1175 2BR/1BA w/ DEN from $1275-$1325 3BR/2BA from $1425-$1625 Prices & Availability Subject to Change Renter’s Insurance Is Required to Move In Lease: 12 Months Deposit: $400 Pets: Welcome w/ Resitrictions Please Inquire


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS NOLArealtor.com Your Guide to New Orleans Homes & Condos

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(c) 504.343.6683 (o) 504.895.4663

ERA Powered, Independently Owned & Operated

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1720 St. Charles #605 $389,000

St Charles Avenue’s most premiere address. Spacious 1 BR condo with beautiful wd flrs, granite counter tops, stainless appl, marble bath. Beautiful courtyard. State of the art fitness center. Rooftop terrace with incredible views of the city. Secured off street parking. View of St Charles from unit.

NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT!

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905 Aline $329,000

Traditional single family home in excellent condition in a wonderful location. 3 Bedrooms/2 Baths.

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1720 St. Charles #502 $319,000

St Charles Avenue’s most premiere address. Spacious 1 BR condo with beautiful wd flrs, granite counter tops, stainless appl, marble bath. Beautiful courtyard. State of the art fitness center. Rooftop terrace with incredible views of the city. Secured off street parking. View of St Charles from unit.

• 536 Soniat ..................................................................................................................... TOO LATE! $329,000 • 760 Magazine .............................................................................................................. TOO LATE! $239,000 • 1750 St. Charles #442 ............................................................................................... TOO LATE! $229,000 • 4941 St. Charles (5Bdrm/3Ba) ................................................................................. TOO LATE! $1,900,000 • 3638 Magazine (Commercial) .................................................................................... TOO LATE! $649,000 • 1215 Napoleon (3Bdrm/2.5Ba) .................................................................................... TOO LATE! $899,000 • 1225 Chartres (2Bdrm/1Ba) ......................................................................................... TOO LATE! $289,000 • 13 Platt (3Bdrm/2Ba) ..................................................................................................... TOO LATE! $309,000 • 601 Baronne (2Br/2Ba) ................................................................................................ TOO LATE! $489,000 • 1224 St. Charles (1Bdrm/1Ba) ................................................................................... TOO LATE! $169,000

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 28 > 2013

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Gambit New Orleans: May 28, 2013