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E VA L U AT I O N K I T


Table of Contents Dear Educators Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Company Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Customer Testimonials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Classroom Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Sample Pages: Student Workbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Sample Pages: Teacher Resource Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Sample Pages: Enrichment Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Sample Pages: Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Sample Pages: Test Prep CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Sample Pages: Teacher’s Edition Student Workbook . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Sample Pages: Timelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Page 2

P.O. Box 2779, Peachtree City, GA 30269 • t. 800-536-2438 • f. 800-871-2979 • www.virginiacurriculum.com


Dear Virginia Educators, Gallopade International is pleased to offer you the Virginia Experience, the finest curriculum program available for grades K-8 that meets Virginia’s Standards of Learning (SOL). Every Virginia Experience product is 100% comprehensive and 100% aligned and correlated with Virginia’s SOL, and proven to improve test scores 400%. Every word, every activity, every map skill, and every assessment was written based on VIRGINIA’S standards, to meet the needs of VIRGINIA’S teachers and VIRGINIA’S children in each grade, K-8. Each grade’s comprehensive student workbook covers all of the content of the Virginia SOL, including essential understandings, questions, knowledge and skills. Each standard is covered, using “small bites” of instruction and reinforcing hands-on activities, skill practice, and other involvement of the student to make complicated topics interesting and understandable. The student workbook is supplemented with Teacher Resources, Test Prep CDs, cross-curricular “Rich Curriculum” enrichment packs, and other resources to provide a comprehensive, effective, enriching solution. This Evaluation Kit provides an overview of each product, giving you an opportunity to preview a sample of the entire Virginia Experience curriculum program. The program covers exactly what Virginia students need to learn to pass the SOL Test, and its design is unique and effective, helping your students to both truly understand the material and enjoy learning. Gallopade International, a proud Partner in Education, has been in business for 30 years and is dedicated to creating products and tools that help educators like you achieve academic success! Founder and CEO Carole Marsh is passionate about supporting educators and students, and we are confident the Virginia Experience program will exceed your expectations!

The Gallopade Team

P.O. Box 2779, Peachtree City, GA 30269 • t. 800-536-2438 • f. 800-871-2979 • www.virginiacurriculum.com

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Gallopade International, Inc. Company Profile • Founded in 1979 by Georgia native, Carole Marsh • Woman-owned and family-operated business located in Peachtree City, GA • Publisher of over 15,000 educational products, including over 200 items about Georgia • Products include books, maps, software, decoratives, games, and more • Named Publisher’s Weekly fastest growing small publisher in 2000 • Recipient of the NSSEA Advance America Award in 2002 • Winner of the Teacher’s ChoiceTM Award in 2002 for state series, available for all 50 states • Winner of the 2003 National School Supply and Equipment Association’s Excellence in Education Award • Winner of the Teacher’s ChoiceTM Award for the Family in 2004, Carole Marsh MysteriesTM series • Carole Marsh named Georgia Author of the Year for mid-level readers in 2007 • Winner of the 2013 Teacher’s Choice™ Award for the Classroom for Digital Readers

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P.O. Box 2779, Peachtree City, GA 30269 • t. 800-536-2438 • f. 800-871-2979 • www.virginiacurriculum.com


Customer Testimonials The Virginia Experience directly follows the SOLs. Easy to understand. No extraneous materials. It has helped students zero in on material they read. I think the Virginia Experience is so great that I wrote a grant to buy every student in my class his/her own copy. I also got a reading grant from the Federation of Women's Clubs to supplement my class set. - Brooke Winker, Teacher/Librarian

I’ve used the Virginia Experience 12 years for Grades K-5. I really like how tightly aligned it is to the Virginia SOLs. The books offer various activities that other books don't offer. We have used this curriculum with our differentiated learning students and as part of our summer school and after school programs. All of our teachers are happy using this curriculum! - Chuck Baumgardner, Social Studies Teacher Specialist

I’ve used the Virginia Experience for 8 - 10 years. It is user-friendly and it has appealing images that engage the learner. The resource is current, eye-catching and in-line with our SOLs. The information in the text is presented using SOL terminology: essential questions and essential knowledge. - Mindy Rew, 6th Grade Civics Teacher

I’ve used the Virginia Experience for 3 years. I love the higher level thinking! It's to the point! Students love the quick pace and interesting illustrations! The author wrote specifically to our SOLs. I believe the test scores improved greatly! - Chris Brewer, 6th Grade Civics Teacher

The Virginia Experience workbook is very beneficial to my students. I use it in my classroom on a regular basis. The activities give good practice for all levels of thinking. It is a great resource to use for the higher level kids as well, with great activities for them. - Daniel R. Bono, Teacher

P.O. Box 2779, Peachtree City, GA 30269 • t. 800-536-2438 • f. 800-871-2979 • www.virginiacurriculum.com

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USA II

CORE RESOURCES These four resources are essential components to teaching the USA II SOL curriculum. The Virginia Experience is 100% aligned and correlated to the Virginia Standards of Learning. The “small bites” interactive approach increases understanding and student retention for all levels of learners. The digital component enhances class participation and collaboration with visual activities and lesson review! Student Workbook The Student Workbook is the core component of the Virginia Experience: • Not your ordinary workbook; this book is content and workbook in one • Uses a successful formula of “small bites” of information plus reinforcing activities • Created from scratch for Virginia; comprehensive, aligned, correlated • Engages students and creates an interactive learning experience • Addresses all SOL – content knowledge and performance skills

Student Workbook - Digital Edition 176-page Workbook!

Complete Student Workbook in an eBook format: • Whiteboard compatible; runs on PC and Mac • Project Student Workbook pages for class instruction • Project activity pages for instruction and review • Visually demonstrate key concepts and performance skills

Teacher’s Edition Of Student Workbook The Teacher's Edition follows the complete Student Workbook page-by-page plus includes ALL the answers: • Presents a sequence of lessons that is 100% aligned to the SOL • Assists teachers with planning their lessons by identifying essential understandings and defining essential content knowledge

Teacher Resource Book Activities, projects, and background information directly related to the SOL: • Reinforces lessons by encouraging collaboration, creativity, and problem solving • Builds interest and prompts discussion • Provides teachers with SOL-related content that can be used to enhance and enrich instruction

USA II Core Resources Class Set 30 Student Workbooks plus 1-Year Digital Teacher License, 1 Teacher’s Edition, 1 Teacher Resource Book $748.68 $568.68 Save $180 with Set!

VAUS2CR

BENCHMARK AND ASSESSMENT • Use to benchmark and measure students’ improvement • Give standards-specific tests at the end of each unit to provide a formative assessment of each student’s understanding of content • Identify students needing intervention or remediation on specific topics • Generate 20-question random tests for extra SOL practice • Use on electronic whiteboard for class participation and review

6Page 6

USA II Test Prep CD Single Version CD $99.00

VACTPUS2

Lab Pack (5 CDs) $299.00 VACTPLABUS2 Site License (Server CD) $399.00

VACTPSITUS2

Gallopade • P.O. Box • Peachtree City, GA 30269 • www.gallopade.com • 800-536-2438 • 800-871-2979 fax P.O. Box 2779, Peachtree City, GA 30269 • t.2779 800-536-2438 • f. 800-871-2979 • www.virginiacurriculum.com


SUPPLEMENTAL STUDENT RESOURCES These mixed-format resources are instrumental for ensuring the success of all students, as well as for differentiating instruction, RTI, remediation, and ESL. “Indispensable for a comprehensive, standards-based classroom learning environment.”

Interactive Write-In Biography Readers – Packs of 30 Hands-on reader format combines interesting, straightforward story to read with write-in activities. Glossary and pop quiz in each book. Only 99 cents per student at pack pricing! Go to www.virginiacurriculum.com and click on RESOURCES for a complete list of USA II Reader Packs. USA II Reader Pack Set VAUS2RS $891.00 $801.90 Save $ with Set! (Complete set includes 30 each of ALL 30 USA II Biography Readers) Individual Reader Pack REP _______ $29.70/pack (Includes 30 copies of 1 Biography Reader – specify name)

SOL Vocabulary Books – Pack of 30 Student Books + Teacher’s Guide 60 grade-specific word definitions and lessons prepare students for standards-based content. Teacher’s Edition includes definitions, examples, discussion questions, and more. Student Edition includes definitions, corresponding quiz sheets, reference, and vocabulary tips. SOL Vocabulary Class Set VAUS2VOCCS $99.69 $69.99 Save $ with Set! Vocabulary Teacher’s Edition only VAPVOCUS2T $9.99 Vocabulary Student Edition only VAPVOCUS2S $2.99

SUPPLEMENTAL TEACHER RESOURCES

USA II Enrichment Pack

The Virginia Experience Book

Pack of 20 stand-alone pages, printed in color on card stock, provides 20 “stories” that go into extra depth on grade-specific standards. VAPENRUS2 $29.99

Colorful, illustrated pages of ALL things Virginia! VAPEXP $14.95

Virginia Experience Reference Guide USA II Timeline Set Teacher book + 30 student reference timelines + 1 BIG wall timeline. VATIMUS2 $34.99

Wealth of Virginia resources to promote curriculum enrichment. VARREF $7.99

20 Ways to Teach the SOL with Pizzazz! Virginia Experience Poster Map Colorful; 22” x 34”; aligned to standards. A must for every classroom! VAPPOS $9.99

Activities facilitate creative teaching, thinking, and collaboration! VAT20 $7.99

Gallopade • P.O. Box 2779 • Peachtree 30269 • www.gallopade.com • 800-536-2438 • 800-871-2979 fax P.O.City, BoxGA 2779, Peachtree City, GA 30269 • t. 800-536-2438 • f. 800-871-2979 • www.virginiacurriculum.com

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7


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK

Evaluation Sample

Map Skills — One More! On a globe, locate the two states that are NOT contiguous to the other 48 states. The two states are: __________________________ and ___________________________.

Life in the Big City! Cities serve as centers of trade and have political, economic, and cultural significance. Cities that most significantly influenced the historical development of the United States include: Northeast: New York, Boston, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia Southeast: Washington D.C., Atlanta, New Orleans Midwest: Chicago, St. Louis, Detroit Southwest: San Antonio, Santa Fe

E L P M SA

Western (Rocky Mountains): Denver, Salt Lake City Pacific: San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle Noncontiguous: Juneau, Honolulu

Blast From The Past!

Examine the two photographs of Chicago and identify them as past or present in the space provided.

_________________________

_________________________

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 22 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Developing Cities Faced Many Challenges!

Map Skills Why did cities develop? Use the map and the reasons given on previous pages to decide which city developed where it did.

Technological advances had both positive and negative effects on society. Population changes, growth of cities, and new inventions produced problems in urban areas. Rapid industrialization and urbanization created overcrowded immigrant neighborhoods and tenements.

industrialization: adopting industrial

Milwaukee

methods of manufacturing and production urbanization: the process of turning rural areas into cities tenements: crowded apartment houses ghettos: minority area of a city, usually crowded and poor

Rochester Buffalo

Lake Michigan

Detroit

ie Er ke La

Ann Arbor

Cleveland

Chicago

Wilmington Baltimore

Oh

io R .

Pittsburgh

Dayton Cincinnati

Look-It-Up! Match these words with their definitions. _____ tenement

A. adopting industrial methods of manufacturing and production

_____ urbanization _____ ghettos

E L P M SA B. the process of turning rural areas into cities

• Settlement houses such as Chicago’s Hull House, founded by Jane Addams. The Hull House provided childcare, education, and medical care. • Political organizations known as “political machines” that gained power by attending to the needs of new immigrants by providing jobs and housing. But, problems sometimes arose in these political organizations as corruption created a misuse of power.

Who Invited Them, Anyway? Population changes, growth of cities, and new inventions produced interaction and conflict between different cultural groups. Immigrants, such as Chinese and Irish, were discriminated against and persecuted.

N

E L P M SA

C

P

This city is located on Lake Michigan, which provided easy access for travelers, and easy access for shipping meat products.

C

P

This city is located where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers join to form the Ohio River, which provided easy access for travelers and easy access for shipping steel products.

C

P

This city specialized in steel production, which meant more jobs.

C

P

This city specialized in meatpacking industries, which meant more jobs.

D. area of a city where many members of the same group must live because of poverty or prejudice

Efforts made to solve immigration problems included the creation of:

Louisville

Circle C if the phrase fits Chicago. Circle P if the phrase fits Pittsburgh.

C. old, crowded apartment house with only bare necessities

_____ industrialization

Page 8

St. Louis

ri R.

Hard-To-Believe-But-True! Chicago was known for many years as “Second City,” a name which recognized Chicago’s population as second only to the population of New York City!

persecute: to treat in a cruel or harsh manner

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 47

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 45

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK

———— Chapter 11 ———— USII.4e - Show how life changed after the Civil War by describing the impact of the Progressive Movement on child labor, working conditions, the rise of organized labor, women’s suffrage, and the temperance movement. Correlates with USII.1a, USII.1b, USII.1c, and USII.1d.

Industrialization: Good and Bad!

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 176 pages

Evaluation Sample

Horrors Of The Holocaust

anti-Semitism: prejudice or cruel and unfair treatment against Jews The Holocaust is an example of prejudice Aryan supremacy: and discrimination taken to the extreme. AntiSemitism and Aryan supremacy were two elements belief that Germans represent of the terrifying Holocaust forced upon the Jews at the hands a superior form of humanity of Adolf Hitler. Hitler and his troops attempted to systematically rid Europe of all Jews. Tactics of the Holocaust included:

The effects of industrialization led to the rise of organized labor and important workplace reforms. Reforms in the workplace were necessary because of the negative effects of industrialization that included child labor, low wages and long hours, and unsafe working conditions. The Industrial Observer

• Boycott of Jewish stores • Threats • Segregation • Imprisonment and killing of Jews and others in concentration camps

December 17, 2008

The Ill Effects of Industrialization In the cities, there were more workers than jobs. That gave big business leaders the advantage. They could lay down the rules in the workplace, knowing that if the workers didn’t like it, there were

plenty of others who needed a job. Wages were very low and hours were very long, and big business leaders did not feel pressured to improve working conditions.

E L P SAM

Quick Quiz

Select the correct answer.

1. What led to the rise of organized labor and much needed reforms in the workplace? The effects of: AUTOMATION

INDUSTRIALIZATION

SOCIAL REALIZATION

2. There were more ______________________________ than jobs in the cities. PIGEONS

CARS

WORKERS

E L P SAM Allied forces liberated Jews and others in concentration and death camps.

The War Journal

December 20, 1943

What Drives Hitler’s Hatred?

Hitler believes the Germans must stay “pure,” by avoiding marriage to Jews and Slavs. He blames Jews for the evils in the world and accuses them of polluting everything of ethical and national value. Those beliefs are coming from someone who is bombing the daylights out of Europe? Heinrich Himmler and Adolf Hitler

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 58 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 116 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Baby Boomers Are Booming! demographics: The period in U.S. history from 1946 through 1964 was called “The Baby Boom” because so many babies were born. People born during this time are known as “Baby Boomers” or just plain “Boomers.”

characteristics of a group of people including age, gender, occupation, and income

There were about 76 million baby boomers born in the United States from 1946 to 1964. That’s 26 million more births than the same length of time before and 10 million more births than the same period after it.

Seection VII

With the baby boom came the ’burb boom as families prospered, bought a car, and moved out of the cities to live in single family dwellings in the suburbs. The ’burb boom caused a great change in U.S. demographics.

Essential Skills Number these events in the order they occurred in U.S. history.

E L P M SA

TH HEN

Birth rate increases and babies boom

Americans feel economically able to support children World War II ends

United States’ economy prospers People move from the cities to the suburbs U.S. demographics change greatly

NO OW

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 136 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

E L P M SA

C i v i l R i g ht s a n d t h e Chang i ng R ol e of Women ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 143 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 9


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK

Evaluation Sample

Virginia Experience Titles Virginia Experience Grade-Specific Readers—Famous People in the SOL

The Virginia Experience Kindergarten Student Workbook The Virginia Experience Kindergarten Teacher Resource The Virginia Experience First Grade Student Workbook The Virginia Experience First Grade Teacher Resource The Virginia Experience Second Grade Student Workbook The Virginia Experience Second Grade Teacher Resource The Virginia Experience Third Grade Student Workbook The Virginia Experience Third Grade Teacher Resource The Virginia Experience Virginia Studies Workbook The Virginia Experience Virginia Studies Teacher Resource The Virginia Experience Civics and Economics Workbook The Virginia Experience Civics and Economics Workbook Teacher Resource The Virginia Experience United States History I Workbook The Virginia Experience United States History I Teacher Resource The Virginia Experience United States History II Workbook The Virginia Experience United States History II Teacher Resource The Virginia Experience Standards of Learning Reference Guide The Virginia Experience Poster/Map The Virginia Experience Civics for Teachers The Virginia Experience Economics for Teachers 20 Ways to Teach the SOL with PIZZAZZ! A Virginia Mystery Musical! Pass The Test! CD-ROM Kindergarten–Virginia Studies—Social Studies Test Prep CD-ROM Kindergarten–Civics and Economics—Social Studies Virginia Facts & Factivities! CD-ROM (Lesson Plans, Reproducible Activities, & Teacher’s Guide also available) Let’s Discover Virginia! CD-ROM The BIG Virginia Reproducible Activity Book My First Book About Virginia! Virginia Jeopardy!: Answers & Questions About Our State Virginia “Jography!”: A Fun Run Through Our State My First Pocket Guide: Virginia The Very Virginia Coloring Book Virginia Stickers Virginia Biography Bingo Game Virginia Geography Bingo Game Virginia History Bingo Game

Addams, Jane Anderson, Jo Anthony, Susan B. Appleseed, Johnny Ashe, Arthur Byrd, Harry Flood Brown, John Cabot, John Cartier, Jacques Carver, George Washington Champlain, Samuel de Crockett, Davy Columbus, Christopher Cornwallis, Lord Franklin, Benjamin Fulton, Robert Garrison, William Lloyd Grant, Ulysses S. Henry, Patrick Hill, Oliver Holton, Linwood Jackson, Thomas “Stonewall” James I, King Jefferson, Thomas Jones, John Paul Jouett, Jack Keller, Helen King, Martin Luther, Jr. Lafayette, James Lafayette, Marquis de Lee, Robert E. Lincoln, Abraham Madison, James Marshall, Thurgood Mason, George McCormick, Cyrus Monroe, James Newport, Christopher Parks, Rosa Ponce de Leon, Juan Pocahontas Powell Jr., Lewis F. Powhatan, Chief Revere, Paul Rolfe, John Robinson, Jackie Ross, Betsy Smalls, Robert Smith, Captain John Stuart, J.E.B. Tubman, Harriet Turner, Nat Walker, Maggie Lena Washington, Booker T. Washington, George Wilder, L. Douglas Wilson, Woodrow Wythe, George

Evaluation sample of student workbook. Shown page-by-page.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 3 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

A Word from the Author...

Icon Identification

Table of Contents Icon Identification

6

Section I ~ Geography and Westward Expansion

7

Section II ~ Life in the United States after the Civil War

28

Dear Student, Welcome to the USA—after the Civil War! You may be studying this period in United States history for the very first time. Or, you may be reviewing for your Standards of Learning test. Either way, this workbook will make your studying faster and more fun! As you progress in school, you will find that your USA Studies will prepare you to understand people and places around the world. Why? Because you will already possess a wealth of knowledge about how things work—history, geography, politics, and more! How exciting it is to study the greatest country in the world! Have you ever wondered how geography affected westward expansion and how we overcame major obstacles to forge a nation? How did we conquer the Great American Desert and turn it into abundant farmland? How did advances in transportation connect the East to the West? How did cities became mega-industrial centers? How did America become the most technologicallyadvanced country in the world? Read on and we’ll help you learn how! You’ll discover how the United States, once a country determined to remain isolated from world conflicts, was drawn into not one, but two, world wars. You’ll see the tide turn in both wars after America became involved, and the global superpower that the United States became to lead the world out of chaos. I’ve learned a lot by researching and writing the USA books and other products about our great nation. Come along with me and enjoy your very own journey through our past. Remember, learning is fun!

Section III ~ Spanish American War and World War I

68

Section IV ~ Technological Changes of the Early 20th Century

81

Section V ~ World War II

105

Section VI ~ Life after World War II

121

Section VII ~ Civil Rights and the Changing Role of Women

143

Section VIII ~ Appendix

169

Practice Test

170

Glossary

172

Map of the United States

173

Timeline

174

Index

176

Carole Marsh

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 4

Question for Discussion

Reading Activity

Learn map skills and never be lost!

Who wants to be a millionaire?!

The best kind of activity!

Scavenger Hunt!

Math Experience

Stuff for you to look for!

A neat math problem or info!

Quick Quiz Think fast!

Money Makes the World Go ‘Round

Special Economics Info

Origin/Definition

The Great Debate

Background Check

Look-It-Up!

Word origins or definitions.

A chance to share your opinion!

Deep digging unearthed this stuff!

We can’t give you EVERYTHING!

Enrichment

High Tech

Stuff that will stick with you!

Computer Technology Connections!

Special Civics Information

You didn’t forget, did you?

Write About It!

Think About It

One More - Just for Fun!

Essential Skills

A writing activity.

Put your thinking cap on!

All work and no play...

You can’t live without these!

The Elaborative Press

Quick Review

December 21, 2008

Newspapers Provide Elaboration of Standards Material The information contained within the pages falls within the Virginia Standards of Learning guidelines as accurately as possible. Sometimes, however, we felt that you, as a student, could use a little elaboration upon the material covered. So, what we did was whip up some

interestingly informative—and factual!— “newspaper articles” that will give you a more colorful look at history. We hope that these articles will inform you, enlighten you, help you retain all of the facts, and hey, even make you laugh every once in a while!

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 6 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 1 ———— USII.2a - Explain how physical features and climate influenced the movement of people westward. Correlates with USII.1a and USII.1f.

Topography Is Tops! The Great Plains were treeless flatlands that rose gradually from east to west. The land was tough prairie soil eroded by wind and water. Dust storms often occurred. Rainfall was infrequent and other water sources were scarce.

Essential Skills

Westward Ho! In the early 1800s, settlers headed west across America toward the Pacific Coast. They crossed the Great Plains, but kept right on going. These Great Plains were once considered part of a “treeless wasteland.” As Colonel Richard Irving Dodge reported in his book The Hunting Grounds of the Great West:

When I was a schoolboy, my map of the United States showed between the Missouri River and the Rocky Mountains a long and broad white blotch, upon which was printed in small capital letters, “THE GREAT AMERICAN DESERT – UNEXPLORED.”

Map Skills Using information from Colonel Dodge, locate and label the Great Plains region of the United States. Locate the Great Plains on a classroom globe. Vancouver Island

Lake Winnipeg

R. Col umb ia

Match the physical characteristic of the Great Plains with the obstacle it presented to settlers. A. Little rain, and rivers or streams that had only a seasonal flow

_____ No materials to use for building a house, a barn, or to use for fuel

B. No trees

_____ Lack of sufficient water for humans and crops to survive

C. Tough prairie soil eroded by wind and water

_____ Land was difficult to cultivate

Explorers reported what they found, or didn’t find, the Great Plains to be. Scientific investigators, military personnel, travelers, and journalists confirmed these reports of a barren land that was impossible to settle. Following an expedition from 1819 to 1820, Major Stephen H. Long reported:

C A N A D A

Columbia

Lake Nipigon

uri R. M i sso

R.

Lake Superior

St

Lake Sakakawea

R.

In regard to this extensive section of the country, I do not hesitate in giving the opinion that it is almost wholly unfit for cultivation, and of course, uninhabitable by a people depending upon agriculture for their subsistence.

Lake Oahe Mis

Lake Ontario sissi ppi

M Rive r

Lake Michigan

Erie Lake

S T A T E S Ohio

U N I T E D

unta

r

M i s sou i Arkan sas

ins

do R.

Colora

R.

i s sou r

. iR

Mo

Plat te

R.

cky

Great Salt Lake

ce ren Law

Lake Huron

Ro

Snake R.

R.

R. R. Ohio

i R. ssipp Missi

Gran

de

Channel Islands

A t l a n t i c

Rio

Geography and Westward Expansion

Map Skill Builder

Fascinating trivia!

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 5

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Seection I

Hard-To-Believe-But-True!

P a c i f i c

O c e a n

True or False: Major Long thought the Great Plains would be a good place for farmers

O c e a n Rio

Guadalupe

Gra nde

to make a living. ____________________

Golfo de California

M E X I C O G u l f Rio

o f

M e x i c o

Grand Bahama

Abaco

THE BAHAMAS Eleuthera

Gran de

New Providence

Cat Island San Salvador

A d

Page 10

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 7

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 8

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 9

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK A Treeless Wasteland? No Way! In the years following the Civil War, people’s perceptions and use of the Great Plains changed. Technological advances allowed people to adapt to more challenging environments. Because of new technologies, people saw the Great Plains not as a “treeless wasteland,” but a vast area to be settled.

Without wood, settlers looked for other materials to use to build their homes. Sod houses or “soddies” were built of large bricks of prairie sod. Soddies were enhanced or replaced with lumber and other materials brought to the Great Plains by the railroads. The technique of dry farming was developed to cultivate the drier lands of the Great Plains. The soil is plowed deeply to break the soil and slow evaporation. Or the land is plowed, but not planted for a season, allowing it to hold moisture.

New technologies included inventions such as: • Barbed wire • Steel plows • Windmills

Beef cattle were raised on large areas of open grassland that were unsuitable for growing crops. Thousands of cattle were herded from area to area during the “open range” period on the Great Plains.

Barbed wire became available commercially during the 1880s. It was an answer to one of the settlers’ main concerns—lack of wood. Many settlers became farmers with large amounts of land. Without wood for fences, they couldn’t keep the cowboys and cattle drives off their property. Barbed wire now protected the farmers’ lands and kept the cattle in. The steel plow, invented in 1837, enabled farmers to cut through the thick, tangled roots of the tough prairie soil. Windmills and mechanical well-drilling machines allowed farmers to get enough water for their families and crops. Windmills were common sights on the Great Plains by the 1890s.

Farmers began growing crops that were better suited to the drier climate. Wheat is a hardy crop that adapted to the dry growing conditions of the Great Plains.

Evaluation Sample

It’s All in the Name of Progress! The United States government played a major role in the development of the Great Plains. The Homestead Act offered 160 acres to settlers who would move to the Great American Desert and establish homes. The government gave railroads free land to develop rail line routes out West. Towns were established to provide water and other necessities for the rail lines. To recover some of their expenses, the railroads offered this land for sale and advertised in eastern newspapers to encourage settlers to move west. Railroads transported settlers and goods to the Great Plains. They provided a way for farmers and ranchers to transport cattle and crops raised on the Great Plains to markets in the East with buyers hungry for beef and grains.

Essential Skills Complete the information under the photographs showing the technological advance and the challenge it overcame. The first one has been done for you!

Quick Quiz! Because of these new technologies, people saw the Great Plains not as a “treeless wasteland,” but as a:

A Quick Review For You!

___ A. great place to spend a vacation

Number each scene to show how the Great Plains became farmland.

___ B. vast area to be settled ___ C. barren land that could not be farmed

A Quick Review For You!

Sod houses _______________________

_______________________

Lack of wood _______________________

_______________________

_______________________

_______________________

_______________________

_______________________

Fill in the blanks to show how technological advances allowed people to live in a more challenging environment: 1. Since farmers on the Great Plains did not have access to wood, they used ______________________________ to build their houses.

We Will Overcome!

2. ______________________________ is a technique that was developed to cultivate the drier lands of

To overcome the challenges of the Great Plains, settlers adapted in many ways including: • Sod houses • Beef cattle raising

• Dry farming • Wheat farming

the Great Plains. 3. ______________________________ is a crop that is hardy enough to survive the dry conditions of the Great Plains.

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December 11, 1901

The Final Frontier—Gone For Good! the Great Plains, surged westward between 1870 and 1890. A larger domain was settled in the last three decades of the century than in all America’s past: 407 million acres were occupied and 189 million improved between 1607 and 1870; 430 million acres peopled and 225 million acres placed under cultivation between 1870 and 1900.”

Math Experience Using Ray Allen Billington’s historical data, we’ve plotted the growth the Great Plains experienced from 1607 to 1870. Now it’s your turn. Using Billington’s data, plot the growth between 1870 and 1900. Show acres peopled and acres cultivated. Acres, in millions

450 425

Acres Peopled

Acres Improved

Acres Occupied

275 250 225 200

1607 - 1870

Acres Cultivated

400 375 350 325 300

175 150 125

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

The Pioneer Times

The far western frontier in the United States began to attract settlers around 1860. Over the next 30 years, the final frontier disappeared. In 1890, the Bureau of the Census declared in a report that a definite frontier no longer existed. According to noted historian from the future, Ray Allen Billington: “Millions of farmers, held back for a generation by the forbidding features of

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Write About It!

Quick Review

You and your family have just moved to the Great Plains! How exciting! Write an entry in your journal telling about your trip. What did you take with you? How was your journey? What geographic barriers did you encounter? What obstacles do you now face?

1. The Great Plains were once considered a __________________________ ________________________________________.

2. According to Colonel Richard Irving Dodge, when he was a schoolboy, his map of the United States showed The Great American Desert located between the ______________________________________________________________ and the

__________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________.

3. Steel plows cut through the tough ________________________________________ of the Great Plains.

4. Windmills and mechanical well-drilling machines allowed farmers to get enough ____________________ for their families and crops to survive.

5. The Homestead Act offered ______________________________________________ to families who would move to the Great American Desert and establish homes.

6. What did the railroads do with the free land that the U.S. government had provided on which to build rail lines? ________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

7. In 1890, the Bureau of the Census reported that a definite frontier ________________ ______________________________________________________________________.

1870 - 1900

Now it’s time to exercise your math skills by calculating the average number of acres improved per year for each time period. Just divide the number of acres by the number of years!

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———— Chapter 2 ———— USII.2b - Explain relationships among natural resources, transportation, and industrial development after 1865. Correlates with USII.1b, USII.1c, and USII.1f.

An Industrial Revolution! After the Civil War, the United States quickly expanded. Advances in transportation linked natural resources, products, and markets. Towns and big cities developed across the nation.

We’re Clustered!

The Industrial Observer

Manufacturing areas in the East were clustered near centers of population. Factories made finished products, such as textiles, automobiles, and steel, to meet the growing demands of people across America. Examples of manufacturing areas located near centers of population include: • Textile industry in New England • Automobile industry in Detroit, Michigan

Railroads moved natural resources, including copper and lead, to factories in the East. Iron ore deposits were moved to sites of steel mills in cities such as Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Eastern factories processed natural resources into finished products. The finished products were then transported to national markets to be sold across the country.

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December 13, 1899

Is Factory Life the Final Frontier? All the advancements in technology these days are increasing the number of factories we have in this country. All these factories are giving birth to new communities. Cities are growing from these communities, providing our factory workers with places to live. More and more Americans are moving from the rural farmlands looking for

work. Immigrants are also coming to these manufacturing areas from other countries, hoping for a chance at a better life. It is clear to this reporter that the industrial age is coming up to full swing, and with it, a new host of glorious cities full of peoples from all over the world!

• Steel industry in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Quick Quiz Quick Quiz

Check all the ways transportation linked resources, products, and markets after 1865.

Circle the finished products made in the eastern United States during the late 1800s.

Quick Quiz

1. Move natural resources to eastern factories

Fill in the blank.

2. Transport finished products to national markets

Advances in __________________________________________ linked resources, products, and markets.

3. Move natural resources to western factories 4. Transport people to vacation resorts out West Essential Skills Put the pictures in the correct sequence to show how natural resources become finished products on their way to markets across the country.

5. Move iron ore deposits to steel mills 6. Move textile deposits to automobile factories

__________

__________

__________

__________

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 11


___________________________________

N __ __ __ __ E __ __ __.

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Map Skills

On a globe, locate the two states that are NOT contiguous to the other 48 states. The two states are:

On this map, find the cities that were most significant to the historical development of the United States listed on the previous page. Look at a map to help you. Label the cities with the associated number from the list below.

o f

HAWAII

G u l f

TEXAS

M E X I C O ALASKA

MAINE Lake Superior

MONTANA

VERMONT

NORTH DAKOTA

Lake Sakakawea

OREGON MINNESOTA IDAHO

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Lake Huron

NEW YORK

Lake Oahe

Northeast: New York, Boston, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia

Lake Ontario

WISCONSIN

SOUTH DAKOTA

Lake Michigan

WYOMING

RHODE ISLAND e

CONNECTICUT

e Eri

Southeast: Washington D.C., Atlanta, New Orleans

PENNSYLVANIA

IOWA

NEW JERSEY

NEBRASKA

NEVADA

OHIO

Midwest: Chicago, St. Louis, Detroit

UTAH U N I T E D

DELAWARE

INDIANA

ILLINOIS COLORADO

CALIFORNIA

Southwest: San Antonio, Santa Fe

MASSACHUSETTS

MICHIGAN Lak

Great Salt Lake

S T A T E S

KANSAS

WEST VIRGINIA MISSOURI

Regions

Cities Significant to Historical Development

Northeast

New York

MARYLAND VIRGINIA

A t l a n t i c

KENTUCKY

O c e a n

Western (Rocky Mountains): Denver, Salt Lake City

NORTH CAROLINA TENNESSEE OKLAHOMA

ARIZONA

Pacific: San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle

NEW MEXICO

Noncontiguous: Juneau, Honolulu

Atlanta

SOUTH CAROLINA

ARKANSAS

P a c i f i c

MISSISSIPPI GEORGIA ALABAMA

O c e a n

Chicago

TEXAS

St. Louis

LOUISIANA

Blast From The Past!

G u l f

o f

Southwest

M e x i c o

Golfo de California

Examine the two photographs of Chicago and identify them as past or present in the space provided.

San Antonio

ALASKA

FLORIDA

Salt Lake City

Western (Rocky Mts.)

M E X I C O

HAWAII

San Francisco Noncontiguous 1. New York 2. Boston 3. Pittsburgh 4. Philadelphia 5. Washington, D.C. 6. Atlanta 7. New Orleans

_________________________

8. Chicago 9. St. Louis 10. Detroit 11. San Antonio 12. Santa Fe 13. Denver 14. Salt Lake City

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

National Geographer

December 14, 2008

The Lines Go Up, The Lines Go Down, The Lines Go Sideways and Round and Round! Parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude are imaginary lines that describe hemispheric locations. The equator, at 0º latitude, divides the Earth into the northern and southern hemispheres. The prime meridian, at 0º longitude, divides the Earth into the eastern and western hemispheres. Every place in the world is in two hemispheres (northern or

15. San Francisco 16. Los Angeles 17. Seattle 18. Juneau 19. Honolulu

_________________________

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southern and eastern or western). The Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn are also parallels of latitude. They are each 23.5º north or south of the equator. They mark where the sun is directly overhead (straight up) when it reaches its most northerly or southerly point in the sky.

Map Skills Exercise

Quick Review

On the globe below, label the northern and southern hemispheres. Write E on the equator. Label the eastern and western hemispheres. Write PM on the prime meridian. Write NP on the North Pole and SP on the South Pole.

1. A state is an example of a _____________________________________ ________________________________________.

Now use the labeled map to answer these questions. 1. In which hemisphere is North America? 2. In which hemisphere is the United States?

northern

southern

eastern

western

2. What is one way to define certain areas of the United States? ___________________ ____________________________________________________.

3. Based on the above answers, Virginia is located in which hemispheres? (circle two!) northern

southern

eastern

western

3. Which region contains Richmond, Virginia? _________________________________

4. Which region contains New Orleans, Louisiana? _____________________________

180º

90º

90º

5. Which region contains Juneau, Alaska? ____________________________________

60º

60º

6. Which region contains New York City? _____________________________________ 30º

30º

7. Parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude are imaginary lines that describe EQUATOR

0º IAN MERID IME PR

30º

60º

30º

___________________________________________________ locations.

8. The prime meridian is located at ___________º longitude.

60º

9. The Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn are parallels of 180º

90º

__________________________________________________.

90º

10. The United States is located in the ___________________________________ and __________________________________________________ hemispheres.

Page 12

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Noncontiguous

Pacific

M e x i c o

GEORGIA ALABAMA MISSISSIPPI

LOUISIANA

ARKANSAS NEW MEXICO

WASHINGTON

Cities serve as centers of trade and have political, economic, and cultural significance. Cities that most significantly influenced the historical development of the United States include:

Rocky Mts.

Southwest FLORIDA

Midwest

Southeast

Northeast

O c e a n

A t l a n t i c

Color Key SOUTH CAROLINA TENNESSEE OKLAHOMA

Essential Skills Use the regions and names of cities listed on the previous pages to complete this table. You don’t need to fill in the gray spaces.

C A N A D A

Life in the Big City!

NORTH CAROLINA

DELAWARE OHIO ILLINOIS

MISSOURI U N I T E D

COLORADO

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Map Skills — One More!

__________________________ and ___________________________.

KANSAS

S T A T E S

IOWA NEBRASKA

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

KENTUCKY

INDIANA

MICHIGAN Lake Michigan

WISCONSIN

___________________________________

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MARYLAND

VIRGINIA

PENNSYLVANIA

Lake Ontario

La

ke

ie Er

WEST VIRGINIA

MASSACHUSETTS

RHODE ISLAND

NEW JERSEY

NEW HAMPSHIRE

CONNECTICUT

MAINE VERMONT

NEW YORK Lake Huron

Lake Superior

MINNESOTA

3. Texas is located in what region?

On your classroom globe, find the region in the United States that contains these manufacturing areas. It’s known as the:

LEGIONS

Golfo de California

REGIONS 2. Virginia is located in which region?

O c e a n

_________________________________________

3. New England _________________________________________

P a c i f i c

2. Pittsburgh

Map Skills

_________________________________________

ARIZONA

1. What is one way of grouping the 50 states?

Oh

1. Detroit

UTAH

Quick Quiz io R.

area produces in the space below.

CALIFORNIA

Write the products each manufacturing

NEVADA

noncontiguous: not connected Oh io R.

(if you need a little help, see page 21!)

ie

SOUTH DAKOTA

Er

WYOMING

ke

Great Salt Lake

3 New England

La

NORTH DAKOTA

Lake Ontario

Lake Michigan

Lake Oahe

Lake Huron

2 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Lake Sakakawea

1 Detroit, Michigan

MONTANA

R.

Law

IDAHO

St

OREGON

e

nc

re

Lake Superior

A

Label each of the following places on the map with its assigned number:

D

Northeast: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania Southeast: Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi Midwest: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota Southwest: Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona Western (Rocky Mountains): Colorado, Utah, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho Pacific: Washington, Oregon, California Noncontiguous: Alaska, Hawaii

Map Skills

A

A state is an example of a political region. States may be grouped as part of different regions, depending upon the criteria used. Using regions to define certain areas is one way of grouping the 50 states of the United States:

_______________

N

Let’s Get Regional!

_______________ 2. Factories in Detroit began producing automobiles in the early 1900s. True or False: Factories in Detroit still make automobiles today.

Evaluation Sample

A

USII.2c - Locate the 50 states and the cities most significant to the historical development of the United States. Correlates with USII.1b, USII.1f, and USII.1g.

C

1. In the late 1800s, railroads were the most important source of transportation for people and products crossing America. True or False: Today, railroads are outdated and no longer serve as a major source of transportation in the United States.

WASHINGTON

———— Chapter 3 ————

One More – Just for Fun!

Color the states according to their regional division! Make sure you fill in the color key with the corresponding colors you’ve chosen.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK

Seection II

———— Chapter 4 ———— USII.3a - Analyze the impact of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America. Correlates with USII.1a, USII.1b, USII.1c, and USII.1d.

Time for Some Additions After the conclusion of the Civil War, which included freeing the slaves in the South, the Union’s lawmakers realized that some changes were needed to the U.S. Constitution. Without changes, the ordeal of the war would have been for nothing. They added three amendments—the 13th, 14th, and 15th— to the U.S. Constitution. ● The 13th Amendment banned slavery in the United States and any of its territories. ● The 14th Amendment grants citizenship to all persons born in the United States and guarantees them equal protection under the law. ● The 15th Amendment ensures that the right to vote cannot be denied because of race, or color, or previous conditions of servitude. These three amendments guarantee equal protection under the law for all citizens.

Evaluation Sample

Special Civics Information Unscramble the words to help explain these amendments.

1. The 13th Amendment says, “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. In other words, slavery was __________________ (NEDBAN). 2. The 14th Amendment says, “All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” In other words, people born in the United States are ____________________________ (ZICTINES) of the United States. 3. The 15th Amendment says, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the color, or previous condition of servitude.” In other words, people could not be kept from voting just because theyhad been ____________________________________ (VASLES).

Essential Skills

L i fe i n t h e U nited S tates af ter the Civil War

Section 1 of the 15th Amendment actually reads: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”

Quick Review Who were the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments written for? ________________________________________________________________

Is this a primary source document?

__________________________________________________________________

____ YES ____ NO

______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 5 ————

Scavenger Hunt Here are some real and possible amendments. Determine if they are from the past or present. Write PAST or PRESENT under each, based on when it would have been important.

USII.3b—Describe the impact of Reconstruction policies on the South and North. Correlates with USII.1a, USII.1c and USII.1d.

1. People 16 years old or younger are not allowed to drive cars. ________________________

Putting Things Back Together

2. People born in the United States are allowed to vote. _____________________________

After the Civil War, the nation went through a period called Reconstruction. It was a time when the broken nation was being put back together. Imagine trying to put back together a plate that was broken into 12 pieces: the Union and four border states were reunited with the 11 Southern states that had seceded.

3. Slavery is not allowed in the United States. _____________________________________ 4. A person younger than 18 will not be allowed to buy tobacco products. ______________

Essential Skills The 13th Amendment was ratified on December 6, 1865. The 14th Amendment was passed on July 9, 1868, and the 15th Amendment passed on February 3, 1870. Look at the brief description of the amendments below and put them in the order in which they were ratified.

Many Southerners resented the Reconstruction policies. The policies were harsh and created problems in the South. For example: ● Southern military leaders could not hold public office. ● African Americans could hold public office. ● Northern soldiers supervised the South. Make a 3 beside the time period(s) when a Southern military leader could have held a political office.

1. ____ Former slaves shall be allowed to vote. 2. ____ Slavery is banned in the United States.

____ Before the Civil War

____ During the Civil War

____ After the Civil War

3. ____ Anyone born in the United States is considered a U.S. citizen.

Free at Last? Another goal of Reconstruction was the attempt to give meaning to the freedom that the former enslaved African Americans had achieved. African Americans gained equal rights as a result of the Civil Rights Act of 1866. Federal troops were authorized to enforce it. The U.S. government established the Freedmen’s Bureau in 1865 to aid former enslaved African Americans. The bureau provided food, clothing, medicine, and other services. It also built thousands of schools and helped African Americans with legal and job problems. While the Constitution guaranteed African Americans the right to vote, new laws called “Black Codes,” or “Jim Crow” laws were put into effect to keep them from voting in the South. One was called the “grandfather clause.” Grandfather clauses required voters to have ancestors who had voted before 1867, which left out former enslaved African Americans. Laws were also made that said people couldn’t vote if they couldn’t read or write. A poll tax was established which required voters to pay all back taxes before they could vote. These laws clearly discriminated against newly freed African Americans.

Essential Skills Look at the statements below and decide who you think may have said them. Write the correct letter before each statement. A. Southern white

B. Carpetbagger

C. Former slave

D. Union soldier

1. ___ An election is coming up. I really want to vote, but I can’t because I can’t read or write.

Write About It Imagine you were a young African-American man in the year 1869. Write about how you feel about : 1. slavery being banned: ______________________________________________________ 2. becoming a citizen of the United States: _______________________________________

2. ___ Losing the war was bad enough. My farm was destroyed and I have nothing, and now I have to put up with Yankee soldiers telling me what to do!

Profiting from Tragedy During the Reconstruction period, thousands of white Northerners moved to the South. The South lay in destruction, and the newcomers saw a chance to make a lot of money by building new industries in the ruins. They opened mines, built factories, and replanted crops such as tobacco and cotton. The Southerners often called these people who were taking advantage of them “Yankee invaders.” They were more commonly called “carpetbaggers” after the luggage made of carpets that they brought with them to the South.

3. having the right to vote: ____________________________________________________

3. ___ After spending four years fighting, I thought I was through with wearing a uniform. Now, I am still stuck here in the South enforcing laws I didn’t make with people who still think I’m the enemy. 4. ___ The South is a wreck. I think I can come down here and start a business and make some easy money. 5. ___ The Freedmen’s Bureau has helped me get back on my feet. They are making sure I get paid fairly for the work I do.”

Background Check Southern whites who worked with carpetbaggers were called “scalawags.”

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Reconstruction Ends With the Election of 1876

———— Chapter 6 ————

controversial: something that arouses disagreement or dispute

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Think About It General Lee knew that because he was a high-ranking Confederate official during the Civil War, he wouldn’t be pardoned by the U.S. government. Even so, why do you think General Lee urged the South to reconcile their differences with the North?

Standard USII.3c—Describe the legacies of Abraham Lincoln, Robert E. Lee, and Frederick Douglass.

_____________________________________________________________________ In 1876, Republican Rutherford B. Hayes was elected president of the United States. The election was a controversial one, because the Democratic candidate won the popular vote but Hayes won the electoral vote by one vote! Southern Democrats were unhappy about the election results. They agreed to accept President Hayes’ election if federal troops were removed from the South. This compromise, known as the Compromise of 1877, ended Southern protests about the controversial election results and led to the end of Reconstruction (1867-1877). Before the election of 1876, African Americans had the right to vote and had some power in government. Once the federal troops were removed from the South, the rights African Americans had gained were lost through new laws called “Black Codes,” or “Jim Crow” laws.

Quick Quiz Fill in the blanks below. Use the Word Bank to help you. Rutherford B. _______________ was elected U.S. president in 1876. The election was

Lasting Legacies

_____________________________________________________________________

The actions of several important men during Reconstruction had long-lasting impact on American life. These men included Abraham Lincoln, Robert E. Lee, and Frederick Douglass. reconciliation: creating peace and ending hostilities

Lincoln’s Plan President Abraham Lincoln’s Reconstruction plan called for reconciliation. Many Northerners thought his plan was too easy on the South. Lincoln wanted to create peace and unity as quickly as possible between the North and the South. His ideas included plans for pardoning Southerners, state representation in Congress, and readmission of the Southern states to the Union. Preservation of the Union, in his mind, was more important than punishing the South.

_________________________ . Southern _________________________ were unhappy about the election.

Quick Review

They agreed to accept the election if federal _________________________ were removed from the South.

Unscramble the words to fill in the blanks.

This removal caused African Americans to ____________ many of the rights they had gained after the Civil

Impact of Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass, a former enslaved African American, also impacted American life during the Reconstruction era. He fought for the 15th Amendment to the Constitution that would guarantee voting rights to all U.S. citizens, regardless of their race or color. He was a powerful voice for human rights and civil liberties for all! North Star

1847

History of the North Star Founded in 1847, the North Star was an abolitionist newspaper founded by Frederick Douglass. The New York publication’s motto was “Right is of no Sex — Truth is of no Color — God is

the Father of us all, and we are all brethren.” The North Star provided an outlet for abolitionists, women’s right activities, and oppressed groups everywhere.

1. Lincoln’s Reconstruction plan called for _______________. (ENOINAORIITCLC)

Word Bank

War through laws known as _______________ _______________. troops Black Codes lose

2. His plan strived for _______________ (EPACE) and _______________ (YINUT).

Democrats Hayes controversial

3. Preservation of the Union was more important than _______________ (SHININGUP) the South.

Quick Quiz Look at the statements below and decide who you think may have said them, based on what you have just learned. Write the correct letter before each statement. A. Lincoln

Essential Skills Put the following events in U.S. history in the proper sequence:

Lee’s Plan During the Civil War, Robert E. Lee commanded the Confederate Army. At the end of the war, when some Southerners wanted to continue to fight, he urged Southerners to reconcile and reunite as Americans. After the war, Lee became president of Washington College, now known as Washington and Lee University.

❑ COMPROMISE OF 1877 ❑ RECONSTRUCTION ❑ THE CIVIL WAR ❑ JIM CROW LAWS

B. Lee

C. Douglass

1. ____ “Though we lost to the North, I sincerely believe we need to end the fighting and make peace as one Union.” 2. ____ “The time is ripe to fight for voting rights.” 3. ____ “Now that the war is over, we need to focus on uniting our country as one—not on punishing the South.” 4. ____ “It is a great honor to be president of Washington College.”

Hard-To-Believe-But-True Robert E. Lee deeply wanted to be pardoned and regain his citizenship, but he wasn’t officially granted citizenship until after his death in 1875.

5. ____ “I firmly believe that all people are created equal, and I will fight for human rights and civil liberties for all.” 6. ____ “Reconstruction plans must include reconciliation, or our country will never become united.”

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 13


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK ———— Chapter 7 ———— USII.4a—Demonstrate knowledge of how life changed after the Civil War by identifying the reasons for westward expansion, including its impact on American Indians. Correlates with USII.1a and USII.1d.

Go West, Young Man—and Young Woman!

Essential Skills Who Said That?!

Write About It! Pretend you’re a newspaper reporter in 1875. You work for the Wild West Times and you’re interviewing some of the newest residents to the area. Select one of the characters on the previous page and write an article telling all about their trip, why they left their home to come to the West, and what they expect to find.

Decide who said the following “lines”. Write the letter of each speech balloon in the blanks below the characters.

Wild West Times

The Wild, Wild, West! Yippee! Yeehaw! That’s the life for me! I’m looking for Now that action and adventure! my family and I are finally free from slavery, we’re B A moving out West to start a I work for the Union new life. We are so glad to Pacific Railroad. We’ve just met up have a chance for a new with the Central Pacific Railroad at PromonC beginning. tory Point, Utah. The East and West are now connected and folks can There’s GOLD in them travel all the way across America thar hills! I just know I’m by train. All Aboard! D gonna strike it rich! Quick!

I’m so excited that my family is moving out West! We’re going to have a farm, on which we plan on growing lots of wheat!

Why did westward expansion in the United States occur? The West was a land of opportunity! A land of promise and new beginnings! A land of adventure! A land where you could strike it rich—quick!

New opportunities and technological advances that led to westward migration following the Civil War include: • Opportunities for land ownership • Technological advances, including the Transcontinental Railroad

Evaluation Sample

December 18, 1875

Why I moved to the Wild, Wild West!

E

• Possibility of wealth created by the discovery of gold and silver • Adventure • A new beginning for former enslaved African Americans

Background Check California Gold Rush! In 1848, gold was discovered at a sawmill in California. The nation got “gold fever” and thousands of people moved to the state. Few struck it rich, but most stayed to find jobs or start businesses. California’s population increased by ten times between 1848 and 1853! People looking for gold used simple tools. Circle the tools you might use if you were looking for gold in a river or on land.

Laura

Casey

Buck

Althea

Lucky

_____

_____

_____

_____

_____

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Hey! We Were Here First!

More Changes and Broken Promises

Westward expansion had a tremendous impact on the lives of American Indians. Their land, their homes, and their very culture were at stake.

Attempts were made to assimilate Indian groups and change their lifestyles:

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In His Own Words….

American Indian leaders resisted westward expansion and many bloody battles took place: • The Battle of Little Bighorn was a battle between U.S. Army troops led by Lt. Colonel George Custer and thousands of Lakota and Cheyenne warriors along the Little Bighorn River in Montana. The American Indians, headed by Sitting Bull, defeated the troops in what is called “Custer’s Last Stand.” • Geronimo, a famous Apache leader, successfully fought westward expansion into Apache tribal lands for many years.

• One way the U.S. government forced the American Indians to stay on the reservations was by cutting off their food supply—buffalo. Buffalo was the main food source and a major economic source for the Lakota. By killing off many of the buffalo, the U.S. government effectively gave the American Indians (who depended on the buffalo) a choice—stay on the reservations or starve.

American Indians were forced to relocate:

Broken treaties reduced homelands:

• Chief Joseph, a peaceful man, successfully negotiated with the federal government to allow his Wallowa band of Nez Percé to stay in the Wallowa Valley in what is now Oregon. But in 1877, the government reversed its policy, and Chief Joseph reluctantly led his people to the Idaho Reservation where other bands of Nez Percé had already been relocated.

• The 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie was broken when the reservation boundaries were redrawn. The Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians, headed by the great warrior Sitting Bull, joined forces in 1876 to protest white settlers moving onto their sacred lands in the Black Hills. White settlers wanted the land to mine for gold. Lt. Colonel George Custer and his men were defeated in the battle. Americans were shocked by Sitting Bull’s defeat of the U.S. Army’s finest cavalry unit. Despite their victory, the Sioux and Cheyenne lost the Black Hills to the white settlers when their reservation boundaries were redrawn!

Warfare and disease reduced the population of American Indians: • The Battle of Wounded Knee, also known as the Wounded Knee Massacre, was the last of many conflicts between the Lakota Sioux and the U.S. government. On December 29, 1890, U.S. troops, with orders to escort the Lakota to a reservation in Omaha, Nebraska, surrounded the Lakota Indians. While disarming the Lakota, a shot was fired and chaos ensued. Several hundred Lakota men, women, and children were killed that day.

In a letter to the Secretary of the Interior, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs talked about the terrible conditions under which the Lakota Sioux were living after the buffalo were gone:

• The Great Lakota (Sioux) Reservation of South Dakota was formed by a treaty with the U.S. government. The treaty was broken when the land was divided up. The Indians were made to farm and raise livestock and send their children to boarding schools. At these schools, the Lakota children were not allowed to practice their native customs.

“. . . buffalo and deer were the main support of the Sioux. Food, tents and bedding were the direct outcome of hunting. And with furs and pelts as articles of barter or exchange, it was easy for the Sioux to procure whatever constituted for them the necessities, the comforts, or even the luxuries of life. Within eight years from the agreement of 1876 the buffalo had gone, and the Sioux had left to them alkali land and Government rations.”

Essential Skills 1. Prior to government intervention and the forceful removal of the Lakota to reservations, describe how the Lakota lived, using the Commissioner of Indian Affairs letter as a guide.

Quick Review Fill in the blanks below. Choose words from the Word Bank to help you. reservations source

customs livestock

boarding schools buffalo

_________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

Quick Quiz Indian groups were assimilated into white culture by making them farm and

Match the person or event to the description. 1. ____ Battle of Little Bighorn

2. How did government intervention change the way the Lakota lived?

raise___________________. The children were sent to ___________________. The children were not

_________________________________________________________________________________

allowed to practice their native ___________________. The U.S. government promoted the killing of

_________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

A. Last conflict between Lakota and U.S. troops.

2. ____ Geronimo

B. Custer’s Last Stand

___________________, a major food ___________________for the Lakota. Many starved and were

3. ____ Chief Joseph

C. Tried to preserve Apache tribal lands

forced to return to the ___________________.

4. ___ Wounded Knee Massacre

D. Lost the Wallowa Valley/ relocated to an Idaho reservation

3. Is this letter a primary or secondary source document? _________________________

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 8 ———— USII.4b - Show how life changed after the Civil War by explaining the reasons for the increase in immigration, growth of cities, new inventions, and challenges arising from this expansion. Correlates with USII.1b, USII.1c, USII.1d, and USII.1f.

They’re Coming To America!

Developing Cities

Map Skills Why did cities develop? Use the map and the reasons given on previous pages to decide which city developed where it did.

As the population increased after the Civil War, cities developed and grew. Reasons for the development of cities include the following: • Specialized industries such as steel processing in Pittsburgh and meatpacking in Chicago • Immigration from other countries • Movement of Americans from rural to urban areas for job opportunities

Milwaukee

Rochester Buffalo

Lake Michigan

Detroit k

Ann Arbor

As the United States grew and opportunities increased, immigration increased, too. Why would someone leave his or her homeland and make the long—and often dangerous—journey to a new country?

La

Chicago

Cleveland

Essential Skills Pittsburgh

Number the pictures in the proper sequence to show how cities develop.

Wilmington Baltimore

Oh

io R

.

The reasons for increased immigration to the United States following the Civil War include:

Dayton Cincinnati

• Hope for better opportunities • Religious freedom • Escape from oppressive governments • Adventure

St. Louis

ri R.

Louisville

N

Circle C if the phrase fits Chicago. Circle P if the phrase fits Pittsburgh.

Background Check! Based on the reasons above, are the following statements correct for immigrants coming to America in the late 1800s? Write True or False in the space provided.

Page 14

ie

r eE

1. I hope to find better opportunities for my family.

__________

2. I expect things will be the same in America. The United States government is just as oppressive as the one here at home.

__________

3. My family is so happy. We’re leaving for America. Some of our friends are already there and we know we’ll be able to worship God as we please.

__________

4. What a waste of time. I don’t know why I’m leaving my homeland. It’s going to be pretty dull. Nothing new or exciting ever happens in America.

__________

C

P

This city is located on Lake Michigan, which provided easy access for travelers, and easy access for shipping meat products.

C

P

This city is located where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers join to form the Ohio River, which provided easy access for travelers and easy access for shipping steel products.

C

P

This city specialized in steel production, which meant more jobs.

C

P

This city specialized in meatpacking industries, which meant more jobs.

Hard-To-Believe-But-True! Chicago was known for many years as “Second City,” a name which recognized Chicago’s population as second only to the population of New York City!

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK Inventive Inventors and Their Inviting Inventions Advances in technology were important to the growth of the United States after the Civil War. Inventions that contributed to great change and industrial growth include:

Hard-To-Believe-But-True!

Developing Cities Faced Many Challenges!

Essential Skills

Technological advances had both positive and negative effects on society. Population changes, growth of cities, and new inventions produced problems in urban areas. Rapid industrialization and urbanization created overcrowded immigrant neighborhoods and tenements.

Consider two different perspectives as tensions and conflicts arose in overcrowded U.S. cities. Write I if the statement applies to an immigrant. Write NB (native born) if the statement applies to someone born in the USA!

Thomas Edison received 1,093 United States patents—the most patents ever issued to one person.

• Lighting and mechanical uses of electricity (invented by Thomas Edison)

Evaluation Sample

1. _______ We left our home and gave up everything to come to this golden land of opportunity. But I can’t even find a job to pay for food for my family! How will we survive?

industrialization: adopting industrial methods of manufacturing and production

The British scientist Sir William Thomson called the telephone “the most wonderful thing in America.” Do you agree? ______

urbanization: the process of turning rural

2. _______ I’ve lived in this country all my life, but now I’m having trouble finding work because these foreigners are taking all the jobs!

areas into cities

tenements: crowded apartment houses ghettos: minority area of a city, usually crowded

• Telephone service (invented by Alexander Graham Bell)

3. _______ The Americans hate us! My children can’t even go to school because they’re treated so badly!

and poor

One More — Just For Fun! Look-It-Up!

How have Thomas Edison’s and Alexander Graham Bell‘s inventions affected our lives? Write the numbers of the workers who can do their jobs because of Edison and Bell.

Quick Review Match these words with their definitions. 1. Cities built _________________________________________________ to help relieve overcrowded tenements and ghettos where immigrants lived. _____ tenement

1

A. adopting industrial methods of manufacturing and production

3 _____ urbanization

2

2. Sometimes corruption created a _________________________________________ of power in political organizations.

B. the process of turning rural areas into cities

_____ ghettos

C. old, crowded apartment house with only bare necessities

_____ industrialization

D. area of a city where many members of the same group must live because of poverty or prejudice

4

5

6

Unscramble the words to fill in the blanks: 3. _________________________________ had positive and negative effects on society. VENTINIONS

Efforts made to solve immigration problems included the creation of: • Settlement houses such as Chicago’s Hull House, founded by Jane Addams. The Hull House provided childcare, education, and medical care.

9 8

7

4. The problems of overcrowded immigrant neighborhoods were a result of rapid

• Political organizations known as “political machines” that gained power by attending to the needs of new immigrants by providing jobs and housing. But, problems sometimes arose in these political organizations as corruption created a misuse of power.

Workers:______________________________________________

Who Invited Them, Anyway? Population changes, growth of cities, and new inventions produced interaction and conflict between different cultural groups. Immigrants, such as Chinese and Irish, were discriminated against and persecuted. ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 46

persecute: to treat in a cruel or harsh manner

I Z AT I O N D U S T R I A L I N

and _________________________________________________________________. Z AT I O N U R B A N I

5. Reasons for increased immigration to the United States following the Civil War include: A. Hope for better opportunities B. ________________________________________________________________ C. ________________________________________________________________ D. ________________________________________________________________

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 47

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 9 ————

How Shall We Respond?

Enrichment Exercise Circle the letter of the correct answer to each question.

African Americans differed in their response to discrimination and “Jim Crow.” Two important African American leaders were Booker Taliaferro Washington and William Edward Burghardt (W. E. B.) Du Bois.

1. An example of segregation is not being able to: A. Go to the bank B. Go to the same school as other children

USII.4c - Show how life changed after the Civil War by describing racial segregation, the rise of “Jim Crow,” and other constraints facing African Americans and other groups in the post-Reconstruction South. Correlates with USII.1a, USII.1b, USII.1c, and USII.1d.

Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois were influential in the African American struggle for equal rights beginning in the late 1800s. But they had different perspectives on the issues.

C. Travel to another state

Equality for All?—NO!

_____________________________________________________________________

racial segregation: practice

of forcing people of different racial Discrimination against African groups to be separate, to live apart, go Americans continued after Reconstruction. to separate schools, and use “Jim Crow” laws were passed to discriminate separate public facilities against African Americans. “Jim Crow” laws, as they became known in the 1880s, made discrimination practices legal in many communities and states. These laws were characterized by unequal opportunities in housing, work, education, and government.

2. The result of Jim Crow laws and segregation was: A. Discrimination B. Literacy C. Employment

• Booker T. Washington believed equality could be achieved through vocational education. He accepted social separation. He felt African Americans could advance faster through hard work than by demanding equal rights.

3. Segregation divided Americans by: A. Age

• W.E.B. Du Bois believed in full political, civil, and social rights for African Americans. He felt that African Americans should speak out constantly against discrimination. Du Bois believed the way to beat prejudice was for college-educated African Americans to lead the fight against it.

B. Race C. Gender

Racial segregation was based on race. Although segregation was directed primarily against African Americans, other groups were also kept segregated. For example, American Indians were not considered citizens until 1924!

Enrichment Exercise Questions for Discussion—How would you feel…?

Based on what you’ve read, decide who made the following statements. Was it Booker T. Washington or W.E.B. Du Bois? Write the correct name under each quote.

Quick Quiz 1. If you were not allowed to go to the same school as other children in your community?

Jim Crow laws required that whites and African Americans use separate facilities. Oklahoma required separate phone booths. Courts in many areas had separate Bibles for swearing in witnesses. Draw a check by the laws that might have been known as “Jim Crow.” _____ Whites and African Americans cannot buy the same food. _____ Whites and African Americans cannot go to the same school.

“One ever feels his twoness—an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.”

RESTAURANT

________________________________________________

2. If you could not eat at the same restaurant as other people?

Whites Only

_____ Whites and African Americans cannot live in the same building.

Essential Skills Put the following events in U.S. history in the proper sequence:

Th hen

3. If you had to live in a very poor place because of your race? “Nothing ever comes to one, that is worth having, except as a result of hard work.”

RECONSTRUCTION THE CIVIL WAR

_________________________________________________

Segregation Laws become known as JIM CROW LAWS

no ow ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 50

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

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———— Chapter 10 ————

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Heavy Industry!

Map Skills On this map, circle the cities where the “Captains of Industry” operated.

USII.4d - Show how life changed after the Civil War by explaining the impact of new inventions, the rise of big business, the growth of industry, and life on American farms. Correlates with USII.1b, USII.1c, and USII.1f.

• Access to raw materials and energy • Availability of workforce due to immigration

Really Big Business!

• Inventions

Between the Civil War and World War I, the United States was transformed from an agricultural (rural) country to an industrial (urban) nation.

MAINE Lake Superior

VERMONT

Quick Quiz Match the following: 1. _____ Rural 2. _____ Urban

Industry experienced tremendous growth in the United States following the Civil War. Factors for industry growth included:

C. Based on technology

4. _____ Industrial

D. Country

Lake Ontario

CONSIN

B. City

3. _____ Agricultural

Lake Michigan

e

“Big Business” was on the rise. These powerful commercial giants included railroads, oil, and steel. What created the shift from an agricultural to an industrial nation?

Big Business: activity of giant commercial organizations; or these giant organizations grouped together

Reasons for the rise and prosperity of big business included:

go ica Ch

ILLINOIS

D

INDIANA Cincinnati

NEW YORK

Boston

MASSACHUSETTS

Hartford New York

MICHIGAN oit etr

Raw s Material

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Lake Huron

A. Based on farming

• Financial resources

ke

La

d lan ve Cle OHIO

Eri

Newark

RHODE ISLAND CONNECTICUT

PENNSYLVANIA

urg tsb Pit

ia lph de ila Ph

h

WEST VIRGINIA

NEW JERSEY DELAWARE MARYLAND

Essential Skills What were the reasons for the rise of big business and the growth of industry? Check all that apply.

1. ______ Lack of advertising • National markets created by advances in transportation • Captains of industry coming into power: – John D. Rockefeller – oil (businesses located in Cleveland, Ohio; Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and New York City) – Andrew Carnegie – steel (in Pittsburgh) – Cornelius Vanderbilt – shipping and railroads (connected Chicago to New York City by railroad)

One More – Just for Fun!

2. ______ Limited work force

Big business in the United States included:

3. ______ Inventions

railroads, ________________________ and ________________________.

4. ______ Emergence of “Big Business” leaders

Can you think of some big businesses today? Name one company for each industry. 5. ______ Raw materials were not readily available Oil: _____________________________________________________________________ 6. ______ National markets created by transportation advances

• Advertising

Computer: ______________________________________________________________

• Lower-cost production

Airline: __________________________________________________________________

7. ______ The cost of production was very high

Automobile:______________________________________________________________

8. ______ Financial resources

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 54

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 15


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK Industrialization Affected Life on the Farm, Too!

The Farming Almanac

December 17, 2008

• Mechanization (the reaper) had reduced farm labor needs and increased production. • Industrial development in cities created increased labor needs. • Industrialization provided access to consumer goods (mail order).

Background Check

Productive Farming

Industrialization and the rise of big business influenced life in the cities. It also affected life on American farms. Postwar changes in farm and city life:

A “drive in the country” has always meant winding down fence-lined narrow roads above which the tree limbs hang so low that, from the view in the backseat, you just knew they’d scrape the roof of the car. Endless fields of grain and vegetable crops dotted with stands of trees—a view that was often accompanied by that not-too-pleasant smell of nature’s fertilizer. But have you ever thought about where all those grains and vegetables go? In case you

didn’t know, farming has changed over the years. Farm production in the United States has increased tremendously since the Civil War. Before the Civil War, each farmer in the United States produced, on average, enough food for four people (or enough for his family). Today, each farmer in the United States produces, on average, enough food for over 80 people (enough for his family and many more).

Essential Skills Number each scene in the correct sequence to show how life has changed on America’s farms. Then, circle the picture that shows how most farms in the United States look today.

A Farm in Time Below are illustrations of two harvests from different time periods. Identify the farm from 1850 and the farm from today by writing Past or Present on the line by each farmer.

Math Experience! Rapid industrialization greatly affected the American people. People moved from farms to cities in record numbers. In 1870, only about 25 percent of the American people lived in cities. By 1916, the number of Americans living in cities had climbed to almost 50 percent. Identify the years Where represented by the Americans pie charts by writing Live 1870 and 1916 in the spaces provided.

farms

cities

farms

__________

———— Chapter 11 ———— USII.4e - Show how life changed after the Civil War by describing the impact of the Progressive Movement on child labor, working conditions, the rise of organized labor, women’s suffrage, and the temperance movement. Correlates with USII.1a, USII.1b, USII.1c, and USII.1d.

Industrialization: Good and Bad! The effects of industrialization led to the rise of organized labor and important workplace reforms. Reforms in the workplace were necessary because of the negative effects of industrialization that included child labor, low wages and long hours, and unsafe working conditions. December 17, 2008

The Ill Effects of Industrialization In the cities, there were more workers than jobs. That gave big business leaders the advantage. They could lay down the rules in the workplace, knowing that if the workers didn’t like it, there were

Use arrows to draw the route that Vanderbilt’s customers took to get to California during the Gold Rush. Draw a ship next to the sea routes. Draw a stagecoach near the land route.

Nicaragua

cities

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 57

plenty of others who needed a job. Wages were very low and hours were very long, and big business leaders did not feel pressured to improve working conditions.

Quick Quiz

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Labor Stands United!

The Progressive Movement Changes a Nation!

Workers responded to the negative effects of industrialization by forming organized labor unions, such as the American Federation of Labor, which was organized in 1886. Unions were created to represent workers and the interests of their families. They tried to create a safe and profitable working environment for the workers.

The Progressive Movement worked to help the poor and control the size and power of big business from the 1890s until 1917. Reforms of the Progressive Movement Progressive Movement: changed the American workplace movement for economic, political, and sothrough: cial reform in the United States that • Improved safety conditions began in the 1890s and ended as the United States entered World War I in 1917 • Reduced work hours

In 1892, a battle erupted at the Carnegie Steel Company in Homestead, Pennsylvania between strike: when workers stop workers and guards. The fight followed a strike working until certain demands called by the Amalgamated Association of Iron and (better wages and/or benefits, Steel Union because of a wage cut. Many people better working hours, better were injured and several killed in the Homestead working conditions) are met Strike. When calm was restored, most of the workers quit the union and went back to work. American big business won the battle—this time!

• Restrictions placed on child labor that limited hours worked and set a minimum age

Enrichment Exercise Match the Progressive Movement reform to the labor problem it addressed.

Quick Quiz Circle the correct answer. 1. During the late 1800s, poor workers _____ have wanted

WOULD or WOULD NOT

unions to be organized in the workplace.

1. _____ Child labor

A. Improved safety conditions

2. _____ Low wages, long hours

B. Restrictions that limited hours and set a minimum age

3. _____ Unsafe working conditions

C. Reduced work hours

WOULD or WOULD NOT

Select the correct answer.

Quick Quiz

1. What led to the rise of organized labor and much needed reforms in the workplace? The effects of: INDUSTRIALIZATION

Who did Progressive Movement reformers support and work to help?

SOCIAL REALIZATION

CARS

_____ Poor workers

NT WE WA BETTER ! AG W ES

2. There were more ______________________________ than jobs in the cities. PIGEONS

New York City

__________

2. During the late 1800s, rich “big” business leaders _____ have wanted unions to be organized in the workplace.

AUTOMATION

Francisco. Now, the journey to the West was much shorter and safer. Vanderbilt became a very rich man!

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The Industrial Observer

It was during the California Gold Rush (1848–1855 ) that entrepreneur Cornelius Vanderbilt struck gold! It wasn’t really gold—he got an idea! Prospectors from the East headed west to California to make their fortunes. The trek took several weeks and it was dangerous! For a cost of $150 paid to Vanderbilt’s Accessory Transit Company (ATC), a passenger could travel by steamship from New York down to the coast of Nicaragua. From there, passengers would take the stagecoach across land. Finally, they would travel by San Francisco steamship to San

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Evaluation Sample

WORKERS

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We’ll Fight for Our Right to Vote!

Reading Activity Many Americans fought in the battle for social reform. Upton Sinclair was an American writer whose main goal was to expose social and political evils. Sinclair made an important contribution to the Progressive Movement. His best-known novel is The Jungle (1906) written about the meatpacking industry in Chicago.

Susan B. Anthony became the first woman to be pictured on a United States coin in general circulation in 1979 and 1980 when the U.S. government minted $1 coins bearing her picture.

The fight for women’s suffrage, or the right to vote, began in the early 1800s. Suffragists believed that if women had the vote, they could use it to gain other rights. They faced strong opposition. The Women’s Advocate

December 18, 1920

Suffragists Reign!

Selected text from The Jungle:

“There would be hams found spoiled, some of them with an odor so bad that a man could hardly bear to be in the room with them.” “There would be meat stored in great piles in rooms; and the water from leaky roofs would drip over it, and thousands of rats would race about on it.” “Such were the new surroundings in which Elzbieta was placed, and such was the work she was compelled to do. It was stupefying, brutalizing work; it left her no time to think, no strength for anything. She was part of the machine she tended…”

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Opposition to women’s suffrage came from those who believed that women were less intelligent and unable to make

_____ Wealthy big business leaders

political decisions. Opponents thought that men could represent their wives better than the wives themselves.

The Progressive Movement helped women attain the right to vote through efforts of reform leaders such as Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who worked for women’s suffrage. The Progressive Movement also increased educational opportunities for women. In 1920, women gained the right to vote with passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution!

Essential Skills It’s 1900 in Virginia. A husband and his wife are sitting in their parlor putting together a puzzle. The wife is a suffragist. The husband opposes women having the right to vote. Draw a “W” on the pieces the wife would choose to work on the puzzle. Draw an “H” on the pieces the husband would pick. How the U.S. govern ment sho uld

According to Susan B. Anthony, “Webster, Worcester, and Bouvier all define a citizen to be a person in the United States, entitled to vote and hold office.”

The rig hts of all

be run.

the pe ople.

“This is no fairy story and no joke…”

Use the excerpts from The Jungle to fill in the blanks: Upton Sinclair’s account helped make Americans aware of the U N S __ __ E__ __ __ __

W K __ __ G __ __ __ __ __

C__ __ __ N __ __ __ __ __ O __ __ S

Women are too uninformed to vote!

Essential Skills

Results of the American public’s outrage to the horrible working conditions exposed in The Jungle also led to passage of America’s first pure food laws to ensure the safety of the foods we eat.

It’ll be the end of family life if women ever get the vote!

1. The date of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution giving women the right to vote: A. 1910

B. 1920

C. 1930

D. 1940

Quick Quiz

E. It has not yet been passed

in the meatpacking industry.

Susan B. Anthony also said, “We, the people, formed the Union. Not just we, the white male citizens.”

2. The Progressive Movement affected women in the United States by helping to achieve: A. voting rights for women B. increased educational opportunities for women

Would Progressive Movement reformers have supported the husband’s or the wife’s position on women’s suffrage? They would have supported the ____________________________________’s position.

C. equal pay for men and women in workplace D. all of the above E. A and B

Page 16

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 63

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK Temperance Rules!

One More—Just For Fun!

Enrichment Exercise

It is important to be observant about what goes on around you. Being observant means noticing differences and changes. Take a look at the photograph below. There are parts of the photo that tell you this photo was taken in the past. Make a list of details from the photo that give you these clues.

1. Which amendment to the U.S. Constitution granted women’s suffrage?

The Temperance Movement was composed of groups opposed to the making and consuming of alcohol. They supported the 18th Amendment prohibiting the manufacture, sale, and transport of alcoholic beverages. The 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified in 1919, but it was repealed in 1933.

_______________________________________________________ 2.

Evaluation Sample

_________________________

Which amendment to the U.S. Constitution prohibited the manufacture, sale, and transport of alcoholic beverages?

_________________________ _________________________

3. The Sign of the Times

_______________________________________________________

_________________________

Are either of these amendments still in effect today? If so, which one(s)?

_________________________

December 18, 1918

Progressive Movement Pushing PROHIBITION! Many Progressive Movement reformers are supporting national prohibition for a variety of reasons. Reformers believe alcohol is to blame for poverty and health problems, and for the neglect by husbands of their wives and children. Reformers see saloons as the backbone of corrupt urban political organizations. Employers think drunkenness reduces workers’ productivity and endangers workers’ safety.

_________________________ _______________________________________________________

_________________________ _________________________

What will the Prohibition stemming from the 18th Constitutional Amendment lead to? This reporter sees an increase in crime. Liquor will be secretly manufactured, smuggled to its destinations, and sold either on the black market or in secret barrooms with entrances in dark alleys where you have to know a password to get in. These “illegal” operations will profit heavily from this ill-conceived law.

_________________________

A Quick Review for You! Timeline Activity—number these events in U.S. history in the order in which they occurred:

Many factors affect the way people live. The way we live today is very different from the way people lived a hundred years ago. Over time, changes take place in society, including advances in technology, shifts in population, economic trends, and developments in our government.

TH HEN American Federation of Labor is formed

The photograph above was taken in the late 1800s. In it, Dwight Lyman Moody (in the top hat) appears with some orphans from one of his Chicago missions. Dwight Moody came to Chicago as a salesman in 1853. He became a preacher and was one of the most influential religious figures of his time.

18th Amendment is ratified Upton Sinclair’s novel The Jungle is published 19th Amendment is ratified Progressive Movement ends as World War I begins

Essential Skills

Write About It!

Susan B. Anthony is pictured on U.S. Coin

The boys had interesting street names such as “Jacky Candle,” Sniderick,” “Rag-breeches Cadet,” and “Madden the Butcher.” In what ways were their lives different from your life now? List three ways below.

Complete the statements with SUPPORTED or OPPOSED.

Homestead Strike erupts at Carnegie Steel 1. Reformers in the Progressive Movement ______________________________________ women’s right to vote. 2. Reformers in the Progressive Movement ______________________________________ the manufacture, transport, and sale of alcoholic beverages.

18th Amendment is repealed 1. __________________________________________________________________________________

NO OW

2. __________________________________________________________________________________ 3. __________________________________________________________________________________

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 65

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 12 ————

A Quick Review For YOU! 1. List two results of industrialization in the United States. A. _______________________________________________________ B. _______________________________________________________ 2. Reforms in the workplace were necessary because of the negative effects of industrialization that included :

Seection III

USII.5a - Show how the role of the United States changed from the late nineteenth century through World War I by explaining the reasons for and results of the Spanish American War. Correlates with USII.1a and USII.1c.

Remember The Maine! The role of the United States in international affairs changed during the late 1800s. The United States emerged as a world power after the victory over Spain in the Spanish American War. The conflict lasted from April through August 1898.

A. _________________________________________________________________ B. _________________________________________________________________ C. _________________________________________________________________

SPAIN

PORTUGAL

3. Workers responded to problems created by industrialization by forming: U. S. A.

A. Brown bag lunch breaks

ATLANTIC

B. Organized labor unions

O CC RO MO

Canary Islands

C. New benefits programs CUBA

4. In 1892, a battle erupted at the Carnegie Steel Company in Homestead, Pennsylvania between workers and guards. Many people were injured and several killed. But, when the fight was over, calm was restored and the company met all of the workers’ demands!

MALI DOM. REP.

MAURITANIA

JAMAICA HAITI

BELIZE HONDURAS UATEMALA

True or False: ____________________

SENEGAL GAMBIA

NICARAGUA

USS Maine

5. From the 1890s until 1917, the Progressive Movement worked to help the poor and control the size and power of big business through reforms that included:

The International Courier

C. __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________

December 18, 1920

A War for Independence?

A. __________________________________________________________________ B. __________________________________________________________________

ALGERIA

WESTERN SAHARA

THE BAHAMAS

In the 1800s, some Americans wanted to acquire Cuba, a country under Spanish rule. Following the Civil War, interest in

Sp panish American War and World War I

acquiring Cuba declined, but the United States was still unhappy with the way Spain ruled Cuba.

Map Skill Builder Name the two countries that fought over Cuban independence and circle them on the map above: ____________________________________ ____________________________________

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Causes of the Spanish American War include:

yellow journalism: a style of journalism that uses news stories sensationally or unethically to attract readers

• Protection of American business interests in Cuba • American support of Cuban rebels to gain independence from Spain

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Results of the United States’ victory in the Spanish American War included:

Map Skill Builder Chukchi Sea

Name the harbor where the U.S. battleship USS Maine sank and circle it on the map:

ARCTIC OCEAN

RUSSIA

Kara Sea

Beaufort Sea

• The United States emerged as a world power. • Cuba gained independence from Spain.

Barents Sea Gulf of Alaska

Greenland Sea

R U S S I A

SWEDEN

Baffin Bay

Aral Sea

FINLAND

GREENLAND

Norwegian Sea NORWAY

Baltic ESTONIA LATVIA Sea

Casp

LITHUANIA

ian BELARUS

Sea

ICELAND CANADA

UKRAINE

North Sea DENMARK

Hudson Bay

POLAND MOLDOVA SLOVAKIA

• The United States gained possession of the Philippines, Guam, and Puerto Rico.

IRAN

Black Sea

GERMANY NETH.

ROMANIA

CZECH U. K.

__________________________________

BELGIUM

HUNGARY AUSTRIA BULGARIA CROATIA YUGOSLAVIA SLOVENIA BOSNIA MACEDONIA

LUX.

IRELAND

TURKEY SYRIA IRAQ

SWITZERLAND

ALBANIA FRANCE

LEBANON

ITALY

GREECE ISRAEL

ANDORRA

SAUDI ARABIA

SPAIN U. S. A.

Sea

EGYPT

Red

n Sea anea iterr Med

Sea of Japan NORTH KOREA

(East Sea)

SOUTH KOREA

JAPAN

Yellow Sea

LIBYA

A T L A N T I C

Sea of Okhotsk

RUSSIA

MONGOLIA

TUNISIA PORTUGAL

• Rising tensions because of the sinking of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor

C

H

I

N

A

East China Sea

MOROCCO

ALGERIA SUDAN MEXICO

NEPAL

Gulf of Mexico

BHUTAN

P A C I F I C

Canary Islands

BANGLADESH LAOS

CHAD

• Exaggerated news reports of events, called yellow journalism

MYANMAR

INDIA MALI

WESTERN SAHARA

C.A.R.

Bay of Bengal

MAURITANIA JAMAICA

HONDURAS

South China Sea

NIGER

THE BAHAMAS CUBA BELIZE GUATEMALA

EL SALVADOR

HAITI DOM. REP.

VIETNAM THAILAND

PHILIPPINES

KAMPUCHEA

DEM. REP. OF CONGO

NIGERIA

BURKINA

NICARAGUA

BENIN SENEGAL CAMEROON

BRUNEI

TOGO

Caribbean Sea

COSTA RICA

GAMBIA

CONGO GUINEA

GHANA

GUINEA BISSAU

IVORY COAST

PANAMA SIERRA LEONE

MALAYSIA EQUATORIAL GUINEA GABON SAO TOME & PRINCIPE

MALAYSIA

SRI LANKA

SINGAPORE

LIBERIA

VENEZUELA

A Quick Review For You!

COLOMBIA

GUYANA ANGOLA

FRENCH GUIANA

I

I N D I A N

SURINAME

N

D

O

N

E

S

I

PAPUA NEW GUINEA

A

ECUADOR

O C E A N

Beach O C E A N

Fort Myers FLORIDA

Circle the correct answers.

Grand Bahama

NAMIBIA

A t l a n t i c

Abaco

PERU

BRAZIL

Nassau

Miami

FIJI

Eleuthera

BOLIVIA

NEW CALEDONIA

AUSTRALIA PARAGUAY

New Providence

Key West

A. Economic interests and public opinion often influence United States involvement in international affairs:

FALSE

B. American businesses being in Cuba is an example of:

Great Exuma

ARGENTINA

Camaguey

Caicos Islands

Luzon

Baguio

TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS Turk Islands

George Town

Cayman Brac

CAYMAN ISLANDS

P h i l i p p i n e

S e a Ross Sea

Manila

Guantanamo

Esperanza Gonaives

HAITI G r Port-au-Prince e a t e JAMAICA r A n Kingston t

C a r i b b e a n

Saipan

Quezon City

Great Inagua

Baracoa Little Cayman Grand Cayman

FALSE

Tasman Sea

NEW ZEALAND

a

Mayaguana

Acklins Little Inagua

TRUE

O C E A N

Laoag

Samana Cay Crooked Island

CUBA

U.S. economic interests

Great Australian Bight

URUGUAY

Long Island

Long Cay

Cabaiguan

Isla De La Juventud

U.S. public relations

O c e a n

San Salvador Rum Cay

Havana Guane

CHILE

Cat Island

Andros

TRUE

Colon

C. “Yellow journalism” can influence public opinion:

THE BAHAMAS

S e a

DOM. REP.

San Juan

Santo Domingo i l l e s

VIRGIN ISLANDS (U.S. & UK.) Anegada

PUERTO RICO

St. Thomas

St. Croix

Virgin Gorda Tortola St. John St. Martin St. Eustatius

GUAM

PHILIPPINES ANGUILLA St. Barthelemy Barbuda St. Kitts

Samar AN AN BA

SAINT KITTS AND NEVIS Nevis MONTSERRAT

Antigu

Plymouth

G

Iloilo Bacolod

Palawan

Basse –Terre

The Sensational Press

P a c i f i c

Cagayan De Oro

February 16, 1898

Mindanao

SPAIN SINKS USS MAINE IN HAVANA HARBOR!!! The battleship USS Maine was sunk yesterday evening at approximately 9:40 pm local time in Havana, Cuba. The ship sank immediately to the bottom of the harbor, where hundreds of sailors perished! Locals reported a small boat leaving the vicinity of the battleship, leading us to believe that a Spanish mine may have been involved.

This event culminates from the 1895 fighting that broke out between Cuban rebels and Spanish forces. Cuban rebels were fighting for their independence from Spain. Some U.S. newspapers (but certainly not this one!) printed exaggerated accounts of Spanish oppression. Americans demanded that the United States intervene.

Davao

The Conservative Press

Agana

December 18, 2008

PALAU

Koror

O c e a n

Zamboanga

You Should Still Remember the Maine “Remember the Maine” became a popular slogan that echoed across the nation. War was officially declared against Spain in April 1898. The fighting lasted only a few months. By August, the war was over. More than 5,000 soldiers and sailors had lost their lives, but fewer

than 400 were actually killed in battle— over 90% of the casualties were due to disease! The Treaty of Paris was signed in December 1898. Spain granted Cuba its freedom and ceded Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines to the United States.

Map Skill Builder Fill in the blanks below. Then, circle the territories you listed on the map. The territories the United States gained through the 1898 Treaty of Paris were Puerto Rico, _____________________________________________________, and ______________________________________________________________________.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 70

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 72

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 17


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK

———— Chapter 13 ————

A Quick Review For YOU! What were the causes and results of the Spanish American War?

Evaluation Sample

Keeping the Peace by Being the Police! President Roosevelt once said, “We cannot afford to let Europe get a foothold in our backyard, so we’ll have to act as policemen for the West.”

Circle Cause or Result to identify the statements below. 1. Protecting American business interest in Cuba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CAUSE

RESULT

2. United States emerged as a world power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CAUSE

RESULT

3. America supported Cuban rebels in their efforts to gain independence . . . . . . . . CAUSE

RESULT

4. Cuba gained their independence from Spain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CAUSE

RESULT

5. Americans blamed Spain for the USS Maine explosion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CAUSE

RESULT

6. United States gained possession of the Philippines, Guam, and Puerto Rico . . . . CAUSE

RESULT

7. American newspapers exaggerated the Spanish oppression of Cubans . . . . . . . .

RESULT

CAUSE

USII.5b – Show how the role of the United States changed from the late nineteenth century through World War I by describing Theodore Roosevelt’s impact on the foreign policy of the United States.

The Monroe Doctrine Expands!

Think About It

Late in the 19th century, the United States was drawn into affairs in Latin America. Many Latin American countries had borrowed lots of money from European countries to build banks and grow industries. President Roosevelt feared that if these nations could not pay their debts, the European countries might come in and take them over. The United States had economic interests in the Caribbean and in South American countries and did not want European countries to control them.

1. What do you think President Roosevelt meant when he said, “We cannot afford to let Europe get a foothold in our backyard, so we’ll have to act as policemen for the West”?

President Roosevelt wanted to make sure the United States remained the strongest power in the Caribbean and Latin America. In the early 1900s, he added the Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine. In it, he asserted the right of the Unites States to interfere in the economic matters of Latin American nations. He also said that the U.S. would use force, if necessary, to protect its economic interests in the region.

Enrichment Exercise Put the events in the correct sequence by numbering them from 1 to 5.

TH HEN USS Maine explodes and sinks in Havana Harbor.

The Monroe Doctrine The Monroe Doctrine of 1823 was an important piece of U.S foreign policy that President James Monroe presented at the seventh annual State of the Union Address to Congress. It stated that European powers should not interfere with the newly colonized states or their dependencies in the Western Hemisphere. It also stated that any attempt to do so would be considered an act of aggression, and the United States would step forward and intervene.

The United States officially declares war on Spain. Quick Quiz Circle the correct answers below.

Treaty of Paris signed.

1. Which president presented the Monroe Doctrine?

The Spanish American War ends.

A. James Monroe

B. James Madison

C. Thomas Jefferson

Revolution breaks out between Cuban rebels and Spanish forces.

________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. Is the quote above an example of a primary or secondary source? A. Primary

B. Secondary

A Powerful President! A famous slogan described President Roosevelt’s foreign policy during his presidency. Roosevelt believed in a policy of “speak softly and carry a big stick.” This Big Stick Policy describes a foreign policy where a country makes its point calmly and clearly, but backs it up with a “big stick”—the threat of military action. The negotiations to build the Panama Canal were an example of Roosevelt’s Big Stick Policy. Roosevelt wanted to build a canal through Central America so the United States would control that vital artery. A U.S.-controlled canal would greatly increase U.S. trade and enable U.S. military boats to move quickly between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. President Roosevelt used military pressure and negotiations to get the rights to build the Panama Canal. Theodore Roosevelt’s foreign policies had a tremendous impact on the United States. In short, he moved the United States into the role of a global leader! He was willing to intervene in the affairs of neighboring countries to maintain stability in the region. He strengthened the U.S. Navy, believing a strong military would keep enemies from attacking the United States.

2. The Monroe Doctrine said the ___________ powers should not intervene in affairs in the newly colonized

NO OW

states or their dependencies in the Western Hemisphere. A. Australian

B. European

C. Asian

3. President ____________ established a corollary to the Monroe Doctrine in 1904. a. Roosevelt

B. Reagan

C. Monroe

4. The Roosevelt Corollary said the U.S. would use force if necessary to protect its interests in __________ A. Western Europe

B. Latin America

C. New Zealand

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 73

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 14 ————

Essential Skills Answer the questions below.

USII.5c - Show how the role of the United States changed from the late nineteenth century through World War I by explaining the reasons for the United States’ involvement in World War I and its international leadership role at the conclusion of the war. Correlates with USII.1a, USII.1c, and USII.1d.

1. Name the famous foreign policy that Theodore Roosevelt believed in. ________________________________________________________________________

The Yanks Are Coming!

2. Name two advantages gained by the United States when the Panama Canal was built.

The role of the United States continued to change from the late 19th century through World War I. Before World War I, the United States avoided getting involved in European conflicts. Americans disagreed about how involved the United States should be in world affairs.

________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 3. What impact did Roosevelt’s foreign policy have on the United States?

On one side of the war were the Allied Powers—Great Britain, France, Russia, Serbia, and Belgium. On the other side were the Central Powers—Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Empire.

________________________________________________________________________

Arkansas

Map Skill Builder

Mississippi Georgia

This map shows Europe as it looked during World War I.

Florida

Atlantic Ocean

The Bahamas

The Panama Canal

Cuba Dominican Republic

Jamaica

Puerto Rico

Haiti

Antigua

Belize

1. Circle the Panama Canal in blue.

Guadeloupe

Guatemala

Dominica

Honduras

Caribbean Sea El Salvador

Nicaragua

Costa Rica

2. With a red crayon, trace the route a ship would have had to take from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean before the canal was built. (Now, do you see why building the canal was a good idea?)

Mark the Allied countries with an A.

Virgin Islands

Martinique Grenada

Panama Canal

St. Lucia St. Vincent Trinidad and Tobago

Mark the countries of the Central Powers with CP.

Panama

Venezuela

Guyana Suriname

French Guiana

Colombia

The Lusitania

In May 1915, a German U-boat, or submarine, torpedoed the British passenger liner Lusitania without warning. Almost 2,000 people died. Among the dead were 128 Americans. American sympathies were then with the Allied Powers. The sinking of the Lusitania was another reason for German Unterseebooten (U-Boat) the United States’ involvement in the war. Americans were further outraged when German U-boats sank several U.S. cargo ships. The United States was no longer able to remain neutral. U.S. democracy had to be defended!

In January 1917, British agents intercepted a Western Union telegram from Germany to Mexico known as the Zimmermann Telegram. In it, Germany said that submarine warfare would continue against the United States and promised the return of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona to Mexico if Mexico allied with Germany. Soon after receiving the Zimmermann telegram, Mexico declined the invitation. By then, though, the United States, having gained information about Germany’s plans, had waged war against Map showing Mexican territory in 1917 Germany and had joined the Allied Powers! (light gray), with territory promised to

Texas

Gulf of Mexico

Germany began to develop a navy that was big enough to challenge the British navy. Americans became concerned because the United States was tied economically and politically to Great Britain. U.S. economic and political ties to Great Britain were one reason for America’s involvement in the war.

Tricky Telegram!

Map Skill Builder

South Carolina

Louisiana

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 75

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Ecuador

Mexico in the Zimmermann telegram shown in dark gray.

Peru

B r a z i l

Essential Skills

Bolivia

Complete the diagram showing reasons why the United States became involved in World War I.

Paraguay

Pacific Ocean

Chile

Why the United States entered World War I

Uruguay

Atlantic Ocean

Argentina

The United States was unable to remain neutral. Falkland Islands

South Georgia

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 76

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 77

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 78 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

The United States Becomes A World Leader!

A Quick Review For YOU! 1. Which came first, World War I or the Spanish American War? ______________________________________________________ 2. Which came first, the sinking of the Lusitania or the sinking of the USS Maine?

At the end of World War I, the United States stepped up and provided leadership to put the world back in order. Treaties reduced Austria and Hungary to less than a third of their former area. Boundaries were drawn and new countries were formed throughout Europe. Following the war, U.S. leadership efforts included:

Seection IV

______________________________________________________ • At the end of World War I, U.S. President Wilson prepared a peace plan known as the Fourteen Points that called for the formation of the League of Nations, an international peacekeeping organization.

If It’s War You Want, It’s War You’ll Get! The United States declared war on Germany in April 1917. The long U.S. tradition of avoiding involvement in European conflicts had come to an end. America provided the manpower that was needed to win the war. In the fall of 1918, the Central Powers surrendered.

Signing of the Treaty of Versaillies to end World War I

• The United States decided not to join the League of Nations because the United States Senate failed to ratify the treaty. The stage was now set for the United States to emerge as a global superpower later in the 20th century!

A Quick Review For You!

Enrichment Exercise

Circle the correct answer.

Who made the following statement in April 1917? Put a check by your answer.

1. During World War I, the United States sided with Great Britain, France, Russia, Serbia, and Belgium. These countries were known as the:

“The world must be made safe for democracy.”

Central Powers

Allied Powers

_____ Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, Germany’s prime minister 2. Which British ship did Germany sink without warning? _____ U.S. President Woodrow Wilson Lusitania

Das Boot

Maine

_____ Czar Nicholas II of Russia Hint: Germany and Russia were NOT democracies!

3. U.S. President Wilson’s peace plan called for the formation of: The United Nations

Chancellor Otto von Bismarck

Page 18

U.S. President Woodrow Wilson

The League of Nations

Technological Changes of t he E a rl y 2 0 t h C e n t u r y

Czar Nicholas II of Russia

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 81

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK ———— Chapter 15 ———— USII.6a - Demonstrate knowledge of the social, economic, and technological changes of the early twentieth century by explaining how developments in factory and labor productivity and transportation (including the use of the automobile), communication, and electrification changed American life. Correlates with USII.1b and USII.1d.

Cars and Planes and the Changes They Bring! As the United States moved into the 20th century, technology extended progress into all areas of American life—from people living in the cities to those in neglected rural areas. Social and economic life changed greatly in the United States.

automobile: first applied to the horseless carriage in France about 1890. The word automobile comes from the Greek word autos, which means self, and the French word mobile, which means moving.

When “horseless carriages,” or automobiles, were first introduced in the 1890s, only the rich could afford them. Prices dropped in the early 1900s, as automakers such as Henry Ford began using the assembly line for mass production. Automobiles were now accessible to more people.

The invention of affordable automobiles brought about improved transportation that resulted in: • Greater mobility (people could move about easily, and they could arrive at their destinations much quicker) • Creation of jobs • Growth of transportation-related industries (road construction, oil, steel, automobile) • Movement to suburban areas (people didn’t have to live so close to their work in the cities)

Quick Quiz 1. Advances in technology changed life for Americans who lived in the ___________________________ as well as people who lived in neglected ___________________________ areas. 2. What did the invention of affordable automobiles bring about?

Evaluation Sample

A Quick Review For YOU! 1. Who was the first group of people to buy cars on a large scale? A. wealthy Americans B. farmers C. teenagers 2. Cars brought about: A. the growth of suburbs B. better car insurance C. crazy drivers 3. Late in the 1890s, what portion of Americans lived in the country? A. the majority B. the minority C. same percent as those who lived in the cities 4. What did the rise of mechanization in industry lead to? A. Reduced time needed to complete tasks B. Productivity improvements C. Both A and B

________________________________________________________________________________________ The Automotive Press

December 19, 2008

Quick Quiz

Rollin’, Rollin’, Rollin’

What did Henry Ford’s use of assembly lines do to the price of automobiles? ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

Hard-To-Believe-But-True! Today, Americans drive about 2.5 trillion miles a year across the United States.

During the late 1890s, about threefifths of Americans lived in rural areas. These farm families had little contact with people more than 20 miles away. But with cars, they were now only a short distance away from neighbors and towns. These farmers became the first large-scale group of car owners and were able to sell their products farther away and get them to market faster and more often. More cars meant more and better roads, which in turn, increased travel. Today, travelers can drive all the way across the

nation. Cars led to the growth of suburbs, highways, motels, and shopping centers. You can drive across America on a vacation to your favorite theme park. You can use the drive-thru at your favorite fast-food restaurant or your bank. Of course, 20th century advancements in technology have made vehicles capable of making these trips. Can you imagine driving cross-country in a Model A? You don’t have to—you can witness just such an event: The Great Race. Check out: www.greatrace.com.

Background Check! Read each phrase and decide if it applies to life in America “before cars” or “after cars.” Place a check in the proper column. Life in America...

Before Cars

Travelers can go farther in less time

______ ______

______

People must work close to home

______

______

______

______

Faster Production!

Road construction, oil, and steel industries grow

______

______

The assembly line ushered in a rise of mechanization in industry. Mechanization is the use of machines to do tasks. This new mechanization in many different industries reduced the amount of time needed to complete tasks, and led to great improvements in productivity! More products could be made, and they could be made much faster!

Families must depend on horses for transportation

______

______

Farmers can’t socialize with neighbors who live 20 miles or more away

______

______

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Quick Quiz

A Quick Review For YOU!

True or False: Today, radio is used to transmit words, music, and movies around the world.

1. The most common use of radio is:________________________________________. AB C R D O IAPD LC UAM S RTXI O NAG December 19, 2008

Rollin’, Rollin’, Rollin’

Which came first, second, and third? Number them in order:

Improved Lines Of Communication! Important changes occurred in our methods of communication through the increased availability of telephones, and the development of the radio and movies. Radio is one of our most important means of communication. People can send words, music, codes, and other types of signals to any place in the world. Radio is even used to send signals far into space. Today, there are radio stations all over the world that continuously fill the air around us with radio waves. The most common use of radio is broadcasting.

From the 1920s to the early 1950s, Americans listened to radio broadcasts like we watch television broadcasts today. Every night, millions of families would gather around their radios to listen to programs such as: Little Orphan Annie, The Lone Ranger, Sherlock Holmes, Abbott and Costello, Flash Gordon, The Green Hornet, Inner Sanctum, and Dragnet. The most memorable moment in radio show broadcasting came on an otherwise normal autumn day on the 30th of October in 1938. Orson Welles’ Mercury Theater On The Air broadcast The War of the Worlds. The nationwide

broadcast stirred the American people into a panic, thinking that we were being invaded by aliens! Today, radio broadcasts include music, news, sports, interviews, weather, advertising, and more. We listen to radios at home, in the car, at work, at play, and even while we’re jogging. We can even listen to radio broadcasts through headphones so that we don’t disturb anyone else. Most recently, digital satellite radio has become available. Two satellites orbiting Earth provide nationwide broadcasts of over 100 channels.

New movie technology in the 1920s allowed filmmakers to include sound to their films. These sound films were called ‘talking pictures.’ Since then, movies have become one of the most popular forms of entertainment in the world!

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Electrifying!!

electrification: the Electrification significantly changed life in process of electrifying or America. It gave us labor-saving products such as charging with electricity washing machines, electric stoves, and water pumps. With the invention of electric lighting, Americans no longer had to rely on open flames, such as candles or kerosene lamps, to light the way.

Write About It! It’s hard for us to think what life would be like without all the “modern conveniences” we have today, with more on the way! Imagine you are a young person living in Virginia in the early 1900s. Write your friend in Georgia and tell him all about the new inventions that are changing your life. Tell him about electric lights that have been installed at your home, the new “horseless carriage” your father just bought, and the radio your family is going to buy.

Electrification brought about improved communications. Entertainment took on new sights and sounds with the development of radio, movies, and television, all powered by electricity!

7

8

9

High Tech Sometimes you may listen to an AM station on the radio, and sometimes you may listen to an FM station. Do you know what the difference between AM and FM is? Catch the wave: • AM means amplitude modulation. It’s a broadcasting method where the strength of the carrier waves changes to match audio-frequency waves. • FM means frequency modulation. It’s a broadcasting method where the frequency of the carrier waves changes to match audio-frequency waves.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 87 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 16 ———— USII.6b - Demonstrate knowledge of the social, economic and technological changes of the early twentieth century by describing the social and economic changes that took place, including Prohibition, and the Great Migration north and west. Correlates with USII.1d and USII.1f.

The Struggle To Make Life Better!

PAST PRESENT ____

6

The United States has more than 11,000 radio stations—that’s more than any other country in the world! Americans own more than 535 million radios!

During the reforms of the early Prohibition: refers to the period in the 1900s, some Americans opposed the United States from 1920 to 1933 when federal drinking of alcohol. They believed laws made the manufacture, transport, and alcohol was harmful to Americans sale of alcoholic beverages illegal. and their families. They fought for federal laws to protect Americans against the evils of alcohol. In 1920, Prohibition was imposed by the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which prohibited, or made illegal, the manufacture, transport, and sale of alcoholic beverages.

What was life like before cell phones, DVDs, and computers? Decide which items were used in the Past (before electrification) and which are used in the Present. List the numbers in the correct “time zone.” (Mark both if things are still used!)

5

Hard-To-Believe-But-True!

The reforms of the early 20th century were an attempt to improve the condition of life in America. The reform movement brought about laws that improved life, but the reforms could not legislate how people acted.

A Quick Review For YOU!

4

3. Today, we can listen to radio just about _________________________________! TE LVAE O R SYO W PH C E U R M E

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3

2. Radio was to kids in the 1930s what _______________________________________ is to kids today. QTOEPLOENVUIWSTIAOBN

For you techno-buddies: Carrier waves “carry” the sounds of the radio program by being combined with audio-frequency waves. Audio-frequency waves are electric waves that represent the sounds of a radio transmission. Radio waves travel basically in two directions: horizontally along the ground (ground waves) and up into the sky (sky waves). When the sky waves reach the ionosphere (a layer of the Earth’s atmosphere), two things can happen: the waves are reflected back to Earth (AM), or pass through into space (FM). That’s why you can listen to AM radio stations from far away!

The telephone is becoming more and more versatile. First designed for voice communication, the telephone is now used for fax and Internet communication, in addition to voice communication.

2

Starting with the first, cross out every other letter to unscramble the signal to receive the answer.

________________________________________

The American Communicator

Quick Quiz

1

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Another life-changing invention made its debut near Kitty Hark, North Carolina in 1903. Orville Wright became the first person to successfully fly an engine-driven machine that was heavier than air. The flight only lasted about 12 seconds, but it changed our lives forever. Orville and Wilbur Wright had made aviation history!

______

More jobs are available

Farmers can get crops to market quicker and more often

Technology Takes Off!

After Cars

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

Essential Skills What three things regarding alcoholic beverages did Prohibition “prohibit”? List each in the bottles after the reform.

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 19


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK

Evaluation Sample

North We Go In Search Of A Better Life! Quick Quiz

Quick Quiz “Reforms in the early 20th century could not legislate how Americans behaved.”

1. How would Al Capone, a wealthy Chicago bootlegger, answer these questions? True or False? _______________ A. Did Prohibition benefit the American people? _______________ Prohibition sharply reduced the use of alcohol in the United States, but many people ignored the law and drank alcohol illegally. Prohibition resulted in the creation of speakeasies as places for people to drink alcoholic beverages. Bootleggers smuggled illegal alcohol and promoted organized crime. How did the period of Prohibition in America end? In 1933, the 18th Amendment was repealed by the 21st Amendment. To date, the 18th Amendment is the only amendment to the U.S. Constitution that has ever been repealed.

B. Was Prohibition effective? _______________

Jobs for African Americans in the South were scarce and low-paying. They lived in poverty and faced discrimination and violence. They moved to northern and Midwestern cities in search of higher-paying jobs and a better life.

2. How would a Progressive Movement reformer answer these questions? A Did Prohibition benefit the American people? _______________ B. Was Prohibition effective? _______________

Quick Quiz What factors forced African Americans to migrate to the North in the early 1900s?

3. The 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was abolished in 1933. TRUE

During the early 20th century, poor economic and social conditions led African Americans to migrate from the South to the North and Midwest. This massive movement of people was known as the Great Migration.

FALSE

repeal: to cancel; to do away with

A. violence 4. The 18th Amendment was one of three amendments to the U.S. Constitution that have been repealed. B. discrimination TRUE

FALSE

C. low-paying jobs D. all of the above

Enrichment Exercise

5. If Questions #4 is false, how many amendments to the U.S. Constitution have been repealed?

Identify each of the following as a cause or result of Prohibition.

______________________________ Circle Cause or Result to identify the statements below. 1. Speakeasies were created as places for people to drink alcoholic beverages............................................................................................................ CAUSE

RESULT

2. Reformers in America believed alcohol was harmful to Americans and their families................................................................................................... CAUSE

RESULT

3. Bootleggers promoted organized crime .......................................................................... CAUSE

RESULT

4. Reformers wanted federal laws to protect American families against the evils of alcohol ......................................................................................................... CAUSE 5. Bootleggers smuggled illegal alcohol .................................................................................. CAUSE

RESULT RESULT

The Sign of the Times

December 19, 1920

Prohibition?! Not For All Of us! Two years ago, I wrote about the upcoming 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. I predicted that: “Liquor will be secretly manufactured, smuggled to its destinations, and sold either on the black market or in secret barrooms with entrances in dark alleys where you have

to know a password to get in. These “illegal” operations will profit heavily from this ill-conceived law.” All of you read in the daily newspapers about speakeasies and bootleggers and organized crime. Who knew I could predict the future?

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 91

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Map Skills Builder

What economic conditions did African Americans experience in the South? What conditions did they find in the North and Midwest? Check the economic conditions that apply for each region. (If conditions apply to both, check both regions.)

African Americans moved to northern and Midwestern cities in search of better jobs. Label these cities with the associated number from the list.

North/Midwest

Lake Nipigon

1. New York

Had to work as servants or laborers

______

______

3. Cleveland

Jobs were low-paying

______

______

4. Detroit

Jobs were scarce

______

______

Lived in poverty

______

______

Faced discrimination

______

______

———— Chapter 17 ———— USII.6c - Demonstrate knowledge of the social, economic, and technological changes of the early twentieth century by examining art, literature, and music from the 1920s and 1930s, emphasizing Langston Hughes, Duke Ellington, Georgia O’Keeffe, and the Harlem Renaissance. Correlates with USII.1a, USII.1c, and USII.1d.

2. Philadelphia e nc

Lake Superior

St

A Defining Moment In Art!

R.

re w La

The 1920s and 1930s were important decades for American art, literature, and music. New art forms were developed. New styles were created.

5. Chicago Lake Huron

Leaders in art, literature, and music expressed the cultural climate of the 1920s and 1930s. They included:

Lake Ontario

Lake Michigan

ke

Eri

• Art: Georgia O’Keeffe, an artist known for her urban scenes and later, paintings of the Southwest

e

La

• Literature: F. Scott Fitzgerald, a novelist who wrote about the Jazz Age of the 1920s

io R.

Quick Quiz

Oh

Most African Americans were happy to move from the South because they found improved conditions in the North and Midwest that allowed them to live better.

• Literature: John Steinbeck, a novelist who portrayed the strength of poor migrant workers during the 1930s

R.

True or False? _______________

• Music: Aaron Copland and George Gershwin, composers who wrote uniquely American music

io R.

Oh

December 19, 2008 R.

The Migrator

Discrimination and violence followed African Americans from the South to the North and Midwest. Northerners and Midwesterners resented the migrating African Americans who increased competition for jobs and housing.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 93

Enrichment Exercise

South

Living conditions were horrible. Many African Americans were forced to live together in crowded, cheap, unsanitary housing. Large slums grew in big cities throughout the North and Midwest.

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Economic Conditions

African Americans were unskilled and uneducated. Many were forced to become servants or laborers and do the same work they had done in the South. Others could not find work of any kind.

ippi

The Great Migration

Miss

iss

A t l a n t i c

More than 1 million African Americans moved from the South to the North and Midwest between 1910 and 1930. They moved to cities such as New York, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and Philadelphia, but were disappointed to find that the North did not offer solutions to their problems. Here, a group of migrants waits—with all of their worldly possessions—at the Union Railroad Depot in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1921.

O c e a n

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Essential Skills

• Literature: Langston Hughes, a poet who combined the experiences of African and American cultural roots

Reading Activity

Who Am I? What Did I Do? Identify each artist and write his or her name in the space provided.

• Music: Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong, jazz composers

Langston Hughes was an author who wrote plays, poems, and novels. He was best known for his poetry and his sketches about an African American named Jesse Semple, who is known as “Simple.” Simple is an outspoken man who shows how an intelligent, but uneducated, proud African American might respond to different issues.

• Music: Bessie Smith, blues singer 1. The music I compose is uniquely American!

The Harlem Renaissance influenced American life by expressing the talents of African-American artists. The popularity of these artists soon spread to the rest of American society.

______________________________________________________________________ 2.The music I compose is uniquely American, too!

Langston Hughes

Harlem Renaissance: an outpouring of art that revealed the freshness and variety of African-American culture

______________________________________________________________________ 3. I’m an author who writes about the Jazz Age.

Duke Ellington

______________________________________________________________________

Quick Quiz

4. I paint landscapes of the city and the Southwest. ______________________________________________________________________

The paintings of Jacob Lawrence portray the daily life of African Americans and their history. Did his paintings precede or follow the Great Migration north? PRECEDED

5. My books tell of the strength of poor migrant workers. ______________________________________________________________________

The leaders of the Harlem Renaissance drew upon the heritage of black culture to establish themselves as powerful forces for cultural change. African-American artists, writers, and musicians included: • Art: Jacob Lawrence, a painter who chronicled the experiences of the Great Migration north through art

Read the following selections and determine which is from the writings of Langston Hughes and which from John Steinbeck. “I know. That’s what makes us tough. Rich fellows come up and they die. Their kids ain’t no good and they die out. But we keepa comin’. We’re the people that live. They can’t wipe us out. They can’t lick us. We’ll go on forever, Pa, cause we’re the people.”

Author: ____________________________________________________

FOLLOWED

Essential Skills Match the artist with his or her area of artistic expression. Answer(s) may be used more than once.

I, Too, Am America!

John Steinbeck wrote of the struggles of poor people in America. His most famous novel, The Grapes of Wrath, tells the story of a poor Oklahoma farming family who migrates to California in search of a better life during the 1930s. Steinbeck’s novel mirrored the hardship of the entire nation.

_____ 1. Duke Ellington

A. Music

_____ 2. Langston Hughes

B. Literature

_____ 3. Jacob Lawrence

C. Art

“Columbus didn’t start out with Jim Crow around his neck. Neither did the guy who owns this bar. Any foreigner can come here, white, and Jim Crow me, black, from the day he sets foot off the boat. Also overcharge. He starts on top of my head so no wonder he gets on top of the world.” “Maybe, I ought to go to Europe and come back a foreigner.”

Author: ____________________________________________________

_____ 4. Bessie Smith _____ 5. Louis Armstrong

Jacob Lawrence Bessie Smith

Page 20

Louis Armstrong

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK ———— Chapter 18 ————

It’s A Brand New Deal!

A Quick Review For YOU! 1. The Great Depression had a widespread and severe impact on American

U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal used government programs to help the nation recover from the Depression. Franklin Roosevelt used the term “new deal” in 1932 when he accepted the Democratic nomination for president:

life. True or False?: _____________________________________

USII.6d - Demonstrate knowledge of the social, economic, and technological changes of the early twentieth century by identifying the causes of the Great Depression, its impact on Americans, and the major features of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. Correlates with USII.1b, USII.1c, and USII.1d.

2. During the Great Depression, more Americans were out of work than ever before. True or False?: _____________________________________

The Worst Of Times!

Evaluation Sample

“I pledge you, I pledge myself, to a new deal for the American people.”

3. Do you think the United States recovered from the devastating effects of the Great Depression? Yes or No?: _________________________________

The optimism that arose in the 1920s concealed problems in the American economic system and attitudes about the role of government in controlling the economy.

During his inaugural speech, President Roosevelt expressed confidence that the nation could solve its problems:

Essential Skills The Great Depression began in October 1929 and lasted into the 1930s. It was the longest period of high unemployment and low economic activity in modern times.

“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

What were the causes of the Great Depression? Mark all that apply with a $.

Major features of the New Deal included: • Social Security

_____ People bought expensive cars, but couldn’t pay for them. Causes of the Great Depression: • People overspeculated on stocks, using borrowed money that they could not repay when stock prices crashed.

_____ People “wheeled and dealed” for more stocks than they could afford. • Federal work programs (created jobs to build parks, schools, courthouses, bridges, dams, and other useful public works projects)

_____ Banks spent too much money on advertising. _____ The U.S. government starting printing money that was no good.

• The Federal Reserve failed to prevent the collapse of the banking system.

_____ When the banks were in trouble, the Federal Reserve failed to prevent the collapse

• High tariffs discouraged international trade. Results of the Great Depression: • A large number of banks and businesses failed.

• Environmental improvement programs (created jobs to complete conservation projects such as planting trees) • Farm assistance programs

of the banking system.

• Increased rights for labor

_____ Taxes on imports and exports choked international trade. _____ People got tired of working and quit their jobs.

• One out of four workers was without a job.

Essential Skills

• Farmers’ incomes fell to low levels.

Quick Quiz

• Large numbers of people were hungry and homeless.

Which sights to see in Virginia might have been created through the New Deal? Circle all that apply.

Check the correct statement:

A. Monticello

_____ The Great Depression was a good time for Americans.

B. Clinch Mountain State Park

_____ The Great Depression was a difficult time for Americans.

C. Natural Bridge of Virginia D. Williamsburg E. Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 101

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One More—Just For Fun! This handheld computer had a memory problem and lost its important info about Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal. Fill in the blanks so that the next person who uses it will have that information.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 102 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Quick Review 1. The Great Depression began in _____________________________ and lasted into the 1930s.

Why was the New Deal created?

Seection V

2. List three causes of the Great Depression. A. ____________________________________________________________

___________________________________

______________________________________________________________ Who developed the New Deal?

B. ____________________________________________________________

___________________________________

______________________________________________________________ C. ____________________________________________________________

Where did it happen? ___________________________________ When did it happen?

______________________________________________________________ 3. List four results of the Great Depression.

___________________________________

A. ____________________________________________________________

What were the major features?

______________________________________________________________

___________________________________

B. ____________________________________________________________

___________________________________

______________________________________________________________

___________________________________

C. ____________________________________________________________

___________________________________ ______________________________________________________________

___________________________________

D. ____________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________

World War II

4. U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt used __________________________________ to help the nation recover. The program became known as the __________________. 5. Social security, federal work programs, environmental improvement programs, ___________________________________________________________________, and _____________________________________________ were part of the New Deal.

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The Yanks Are Coming—Still! PAPU NEW

———— Chapter 19 ————

The Allied Powers were comprised of Democratic nations including the United States, Great Britain, and Canada. The Soviet Union (Russia) joined the Allies after being invaded by Germany. Leaders of the Allied Powers included U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and later, President Harry S. Truman; Winston Churchill of Great Britain; and Joseph Stalin of the Soviet Union.

A D N I

VIETNAM

MALAYSIA

KAMPUCHEA

THAILAND

MYANMAR

PAKISTAN

• Finally, to direct involvement in the war

COMOROS KENYA

TANZANIA DEM. REP. OF CONGO

RWANDA BURUNDI

UGANDA

CONGO

GABON

CAMEROON

EQUATORIAL GUINEA SAO TOME & PRINCIPE

Number the incidents below in the order in which they occurred to show how American policy changed toward involvement with events in Europe and Asia.

TH HEN ANGOLA

OMAN

YEMEN ERITREA

ETHIOPIA SUDAN

CHAD

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

NIGER

NIGERIA BENIN GHANA TOGO

MALI

BURKINA A

GAL

AU

GUINEA

MAURITANIA

IVORY COAST

ALGERIA nds

• To economic aid to Allies

SOMALIA

DJIBOUTI

U. A. E.

QATAR

SAUDI ARABIA

KUWAIT JORDAN

EGYPT LIBYA

TUNISIA MOROCCO

RN RA

LEONE

AFGHANISTAN

IRAN IRAQ SYRIA ISRAEL

CYPRUS LEBANON

TURKEY

INDIAN

INDIA

• From isolationism (Great Depression, legacy of World War I)

Special Civics Exercise

GREECE

PORTUGAL

As conflict grew in Europe and Asia, American foreign policy evolved from neutrality to direct involvement. The change was gradual:

SRI LANKA

BHUTAN

BANGLADESH

NEPAL

C H I N A KYRGYZSTAN

TAJIKISTAN TURKMENISTAN

UZBEKISTAN

KAZAKHSTAN UKRAINE SLOVAKIA CZECH

ARMENIA AZERBAIJAN

ITALY

SWITZ.

FRANCE

LUX.

MOLDOVA AUSTRIA HUNGARY SLOVENIA ROMANIA CROATIA BOSNIA YUGOSLAVIA BULGARIA MACEDONIA

GEORGIA

SOVIET UNION

BELARUS

LATVIA LITHUANIA

POLAND GERMANY

DENMARK

IRELAND

GREAT BRITAIN

NETH.

BELGIUM

FINLAND

ESTONIA

SWEDEN

NORWAY LAND

Map Skill Builder

List the causes of World War II:

Locate and circle the Axis Powers on the map.

Essential Skills

ALBANIA

The rise of fascism was another cause of World War II. Fascist dictators included Adolf Hitler of Germany, Benito Mussolini of Italy, and Hideki Tojo of Japan. These dictators led the countries that became known as the Axis Powers.

World War II

LAOS

MONGOLIA

fascism: a political philosophy in which total power is given to a dictator and individual freedoms are denied

SPAIN

Political instability and economic devastation in Europe resulting from World War I was one cause of World War II. Political and economic chaos was seen through worldwide depression, high war debt owed by Germany, high inflation, and massive unemployment.

Direct involvement in the war Isolationism Economic aid to allies NO OW

LIBERIA

Political and economic conditions in Europe following World War I led to the rise of fascism and to World War II. The rise of fascism threatened peace in Europe and Asia. Events in post-World War I Europe set the stage for World War II.

BRUNEI

O

N

E

S

I

PHILIPPINES

EAST TIMOR

JAPAN

TAIWAN

The World at War, Again, and How It All Began!

SOUTH KOREA

NORTH KOREA

USII.7a - Identify the causes and events that led to American involvement in World War II, including the attack on Pearl Harbor. Correlates with USII.1b, USII.1c, USII.1d, and USII.1f.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 106

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 107

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 108

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 21


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK ETHIOPIA

KENYA

TANZANIA

UGANDA

RWANDA BURUNDI

ANGOLA

DEM. REP. OF CONGO

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

CONGO EQUATORIAL GUINEA SAO TOME & PRINCIPE

IVORY COAST SIERRA LEONE

GUINEA GUINEA BISSAU

A. United States

______________

_____ 2. Benito Mussolini

B. Soviet Union

______________

_____ 3. Adolf Hitler

C. Great Britain

______________

_____ 4. Harry S. Truman

D. Japan

______________

_____ 5. Winston Churchill

E. Italy

______________

_____ 6. Joseph Stalin

F. Germany

______________

Quick Quiz

LIBERIA

BURKINA

BENIN GHANA TOGO

NIGERIA

CAMEROON

CHAD NIGER MALI MAURITANIA SENEGAL

GAMBIA

_____ 1. Franklin D. Roosevelt

An unexpected event, such as the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon that occurred on September 11, 2001, can cause a war to explode at any time.

_____ 7. Hideki Tojo

Special Civics Exercise Democracy can only lead to Communism. A dictatorship is the only way to save Germany from the threats of Communism and Jewish treason.

1. Political instability and economic devastation in Europe, and the rise of fascism were PERU

Causes

C. U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt

OCEAN

Adolf Hitler

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 111 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Number these events in the order in which they happened.

TH HEN United States declares war on Japan and Germany

Tactics of the Holocaust included:

UNITED STATES DROPS TWO ATOMIC BOMBS ON JAPAN

• Boycott of Jewish stores • Threats • Segregation • Imprisonment and killing of Jews and others in concentration camps

Germany INVADES POLAND, SETTING OFF WORLD WAR II Japan bombs Pearl Harbor

O C E A N

Hawai‘i

anti-Semitism: prejudice or cruel and unfair treatment against Jews The Holocaust is an example of prejudice Aryan supremacy: and discrimination taken to the extreme. AntiSemitism and Aryan supremacy were two elements belief that Germans represent of the terrifying Holocaust forced upon the Jews at the hands a superior form of humanity of Adolf Hitler. Hitler and his troops attempted to systematically rid Europe of all Jews.

D-Day

Allied forces liberated Jews and others in concentration and death camps.

Japan surrenders, ENDING WORLD WAR II

PAPUA NEW GUINEA

________________________________________________________________________

4. How did Hitler think the Germans could remain pure? ___________________________

________________________________________________________________________

GERMANY DECLARES WAR ON UNITED STATES SOVIET UNION DEFEATS GERMANY AT STALINGRAD

NO OW

The War Journal

December 20, 1943

_____ anti-Semitism

A. belief that Germans represent a superior form of humanity

_____ Aryan supremacy

B. prejudice or cruel and unfair treatment against Jews

What Drives Hitler’s Hatred? Hitler believes the Germans must stay “pure,” by avoiding marriage to Jews and Slavs. He blames Jews for the evils in the world and accuses them of polluting everything of ethical and national value. Those beliefs are coming from someone who is bombing the daylights out of Europe?

Question for Discussion How did Adolf Hitler convince the Nazi troops to carry out his plans to eliminate all the Jews in Europe?

Heinrich Himmler and Adolf Hitler

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 115

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 116

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 117

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Tokuno Shima

Okino Erabu Shima

s

Amami O Shima

________________________________________________________________________

d

A

True or False?: ____________________

3. Why did Hitler want to destroy the Jews? _____________________________________

n

Sea

Nagasaki

O D N I

East China

N E Dili

Kyushu

S

I

Shikoku

Hiroshima

Kita-kyushu Fukuoka

EAST TIMOR

Osaka

Kyoto Sakai-minato Pusan Taegu

Taejeon

Yellow Sea

A

SOUTH KOREA

RUNEI Incheon

NORTH KOREA

Seoul

Pyongyang

Dandong

Feng Cheng

TNAM Benxi

1. Who were the victims of the Holocaust? ___________________________________ 2. Hitler and his troops tried to eliminate all Jews in Europe through imprisonment and death.

Make A Match

Battle of Britain

Page 22

Port Moresby

Sendai Niigata

Honshu

Chiba Nagoya

Akita

Tokyo

(East Sea)

Manila S e a o f PHILIPPINESJ a p a n

J A P A N

Hokkaido

Sapporo

Vladivostok Liaoyuan

Fushun

A Quick Review for YOU!

________________________________________________________________________

UNITED STATES DEFEATS JAPAN IN Battle of Midway

O c e a n

P a c i f i c

Iturup

I s

l r i K

u

Yuzhno Sakhalinsk

Jilin

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Horrors Of The Holocaust

A Quick Review For YOU!

TAIWAN Jixi

Amur

C H I N A

Qiqihar

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 114

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Kunashir

l a

s d n Urup

Wake Isl.

Midway Islands

P A C I F I C Tokyo

JAPAN

Beijing

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 113

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 112

SOUTH KOREA Seoul

NORTH KOREA Pyongyang

Map Skills Builder—The War in the Pacific

nds

Ouargla

Casablanca MOROCCO

ALGERIA

TUNISIA

Naples Barcelona SPAIN Sevilla PORTUGAL

________ Allies

Circle the location of the turning point of the war in the Pacific. Next, circle where two atomic bombs were dropped, forcing Japan to surrender and ending the war.

JORDAN

SYRIA ISRAEL

CYPRUS LEBANON

Izmir ALBANIA

GREECE

BOSNIA YUGOSLAVIA BULGARIA MACEDONIA

FRANCE Toulouse Valladolid

Bayonne

Basra IRAQ

Bakhtara

ARMENIA AZERBAIJA

TURKEY Adana

Krasnodar

GEORGIA

Constanta

Frunze

UKRAINE

MOLDOVA ROMANIA

SLOVAKIA

CZECH

nd

BELGIUM LUX. y

AUSTRIA HUNGARY SLOVENIA ITALY CROATIA

Krakow Lviv GERMANY

SWITZ.

Voronez

Stalingrad

Saratov

Tol Yatti

Gorkiy

Orol

BELARUS Gdansk POLAND

Vologda

Jaroslavl

________Japan

Rostov

Novgorod

St. Petersburg

1. What country bombed the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii?

Porto

Quick Quiz

N or m a

The United States dropped two atomic bombs on Japan (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) in 1945, forcing Japan to surrender and ending World War II.

Nantes

American and Allied troops landed in Normandy, France, on D-Day to begin the liberation of Western Europe.

Cork

Germany invaded the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union defeated Germany at Stalingrad, marking the turning point of the war in Eastern Europe.

U. K.

The United States was victorious over Japan in the Battle of Midway. This victory was the turning point of the war in the Pacific.

IRELAND

The United States declared war on Japan and Germany.

Map Skills Builder—The War in Europe

After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Germany declared war on the United States.

DENMARK

Japan bombed Pearl Harbor.

NETH.

The United States gave Britain war supplies and old naval warships in return for military bases in Bermuda and the Caribbean. This was part of the Lend-Lease program, where the United States supplied large amounts of war material to the Allies during WWII.

Sunderland

Germany bombed London and the Battle of Britain began.

Ka

Kiro

Germany invaded France, capturing Paris.

LATVIA LITHUANIA

Germany invaded Poland, setting off war in Europe. The Soviet Union also invaded Poland and the Baltic nations.

ESTONIA

Despite initial Axis success in both Europe and the Pacific, the Allies persevered and ultimately defeated Germany and Japan. Major events and turning points of the war include:

Circle the location of the turning point of the war in Eastern Europe. Mark that circle with a T. Next, find and circle where American and Allied forces landed on D-Day. Mark that circle with a D.

How the War Was Won!

K

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

USII.7b - Demonstrate knowledge of the major causes and effects of American involvement in World War II by locating and describing the major events and turning points of the war in Europe and the Pacific. Correlates with USII.1c, USII.1d, and USII.1f.

the Titanic

Franklin D. Roosevelt

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 110

———— Chapter 20 ————

________ Axis Countries

Pearl Harbor

Harbin

Benito Mussolini ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

2. Who was glad when D-Day arrived?

False

Bay of Pigs

Changchung

PACIFIC

MEXICO

U. S. A.

C A N A D A

True

3. The United States declared war on Japan following the Japanese attack on:

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 109

________Germany

Results

2. During World War II, U.S. foreign policy evolved from neutrality to direct involvement.

Khabarovsk

COSTA RICA

ECUADOR

PANAMA

HAITI

NICARAGUA

___________________________________ of World War II.

B. Adolf Hitler of Germany

GUATEMALA EL SALVADOR

BELIZE

A Quick Review For YOU!

A. Benito Mussolini of Italy COLOMBIA

DOM. REP.

VENEZUELA

GUYANA SURINAME

BRAZIL

FRENCH GUIANA

Who made this statement? Circle the correct answer.

HONDURAS

JAMAICA

Match the following leaders with their countries. Identify the countries as Allied or Axis Powers.

True or False?: ______________________________________

OCEAN

WESTERN SAHARA THE BAHAMAS

CUBA

Quick Quiz

Rising tension developed between the United States and Japan because of Japanese aggression in East Asia. On December 7, 1941, Japan attacked the United States at Pearl Harbor without warning. The United States declared war on Japan. Germany declared war on the United States.

GABON

U. A

OM

SUDAN

EGYPT LIBYA ALGERIA

ATLANTIC

Canary Islands

COMOROS

SOMALIA

DJIBOUTI

QATA

YEMEN

SAUDI ARABIA

ERITREA

IRAQ

ARMENIA AZERBAIJAN

KUWAIT JORDAN

GEORGIA

TURKEY

SYRIA ISRAEL

TUNISIA MOROCCO

UKRAINE

CYPRUS LEBANON GREECE ALBANIA

SLOVAKIA CZECH

MOLDOVA AUSTRIA HUNGARY SLOVENIA ROMANIA CROATIA BOSNIA YUGOSLAVIA BULGARIA MACEDONIA

ITALY

SWITZ.

FRANCE

PORTUGAL

SPAIN

BELARUS

LATVIA LITHUANIA

POLAND GERMANY IRELAND

ICELAND GREENLAND

Locate and circle the names of the Allied Powers on the map.

Map Skill Builder

LUX.

DENMARK

GREAT BRITAIN

NETH.

BELGIUM

NORWAY

SWEDEN

ESTONIA

FINLAND

SOVIET UNION

The War In The Pacific

Evaluation Sample


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK ———— Chapter 21 ———— USII.7c - Demonstrate knowledge of the major causes and effects of American involvement in World War II by describing the impact of World War II on the home front. Correlates with USII.1b, USII.1c, and USII.1d.

Back On The Home Front! World War II affected every aspect of American life. American involvement in World War II brought an end to the Great Depression. Factories and workers were needed to produce goods to win the war.

The Slugger

December 20, 2008

Evaluation Sample

A Quick Review For You!

Rosie Plays Baseball, Too! When the men left to fight the war, women were glad to help out on the home front. Women not only worked in defense plants, they worked on baseball fields, too! The All-Girls Professional Baseball League consisted of several women’s teams who stepped up to the plate to keep America’s greatest game going!

The players were supposed to “look like women and play like men.” In 1992, director Penny Marshall honored these special women in a popular film. In the Quick Quiz below, beginning with the first, cross off every other letter to find out the name of the movie. Batter up! And remember: There’s no crying in baseball!

SA

BLQEHANGPURE

IOHF

_____

______________________

_______

Americans were asked to make sacrifices in support of the war effort and the ideas for which we fought. Americans at home were glad to support the war effort and help the Allied Powers win the war against the Axis Powers. Americans supported the war effort at home by conserving and rationing resources.

1. Americans were asked to make many sacrifices on the home front to support the war effort! One way that Americans at home helped win World War II was by ________________________________________________ and _____________________________________________________ resources. 2. Thousands of American women took jobs in defense plants to continue producing goods that were needed to win the war. TRUE

PTLHWEMISR

Thousands of American women took jobs in defense plants during the war. “Rosie the Riveter” became a beloved symbol for these American women.

POMWZN

_____________________

FALSE

3. ______________________________________________________ became the symbol for these hard-working American women.

__________

Rosie the Plumber

Rosie the Riveter

Rosie the War Hero

4. The All-Girls Professional Baseball League was formed because:

We’re All In This Together!

_______________________________________________________________________

The need for workers in areas such as defense plants temporarily broke down some racial barriers. However, not all effects on race relations in America were positive. Discrimination against African Americans continued. While many Japanese Americans served in the armed forces, others were treated with distrust and prejudice, and many were forced into internment camps, where they were kept from leaving the country.

Quick Quiz What would Rosie the Riveter say?

_____ We Can Do It! We can handle the tools and machines just like a guy!

5. The need for workers on the home front helped remove some racial barriers. TRUE

FALSE

6. Although many Japanese Americans served in the armed forces during World War II, others were treated with distrust and prejudice, and many were forced into:

Quick Quiz

_____ I’d rather stay home than work in a dirty old defense plant.

_______________________________________________________________________

Name two ways that Americans on the home front supported the war effort. _______________________________________________________________________

_____ Sign me up! I’m off to fight the Axis in Europe! I won’t come back till it’s over, over there!

1. ________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________ 2. ________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 119

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 118

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 120

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 22 ————

Seection VI

USII.8a - Demonstrate knowledge of economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of World War II and the present by describing the rebuilding of Europe and Japan after World War II, the emergence of the United States as a superpower, and the establishment of the United Nations. Correlates with USII.1a, USII.1b, USII.1c, and USII.1d.

A Time To Rebuild!

The War Journal

December 20, 2008

European Recovery After WWII The official name of the plan to rebuild Europe was the European Recovery Program. The United States sent about $13 billion in aid to Europe. U.S. aid included food, machinery, and other products, and ended in 1952.

Learning from the mistakes of the past, the United States accepted its role as a world superpower, helping to rebuild Europe and Japan, and taking the leading role in establishing the United Nations.

The plan was called the ____________________________ because Secretary of State George C. Marshall suggested it.

Map Skill Builder Check out the maps below. One represents Germany as it looked before the end of World War II. The other shows Germany as it looked after the war. Identify each map with “before” the war or “after” on the line above each map.

Rebuilding Postwar Europe Much of Europe was in ruins following World War II. Soviet forces occupied most of Eastern and Central Europe and the eastern portion of Germany. The United States felt it was in its best interest to rebuild Europe and prevent political and economic instability.

___________________________ 4˚ 56˚

12˚

Arhus

Kalundborg

___________________________

Hassleholm

Copenhagen

Lund Malmo

DENMARK

Roskilde Koge Slagelse Korsor Naestved Odense

16˚

Karlskrona

56˚

4˚ 56˚

12˚

Arhus

Hassleholm

Kristianstad

Helsingborg

Vejle Kolding Esbjerg

Kalundborg

Copenhagen

Lund Malmo

DENMARK

Roskilde Koge Slagelse Korsor Naestved

Odense

Ronne

Baltic Sea

nal

Mecklenburger Bucht

Kiel

Kie

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 121

A Quick Review For YOU!

Following its defeat, Japan was occupied by American forces. It soon adopted a democratic form of government, resumed self-government, and became a strong ally of the United States.

Quick Quiz This list describes Japan during (past) and after (present) World War II. Identify each phrase with past or present. __________ led by fascist dictator Hideki Tojo __________ democratic form of government __________

ally of the United States

__________

occupied by American forces

Japan North Korea

__________ attacked Pearl Harbor

1. After World War II, the United States realized the importance of its role as a worldleading superpower. True or False?: ___________________________ 2. The _________________________________________________ was established to promote world peace and human dignity.

The two main goals of the United Nations are to maintain world peace and human dignity. If fighting breaks out, the United Nations may be asked to step in and try to stop it. The United Nations may help work out the conflicts to prevent further fighting. The United Nations tries to deal with conflicts before they

lead to fighting. It seeks out the causes of war and works to eliminate them. The United Nations also helps to provide relief efforts, such as food, medicines, and shelter. It most often works alongside the American Red Cross in these types of operations.

e Rhin

Rhin

e

h Lec

AU S T R I A

Salzach

Innsbruck12˚

———— Chapter 23 ———— USII.8b - Demonstrate knowledge of economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of World War II and the present by describing the conversion from a wartime to a peacetime economy. Correlates with USII.1b.

Reasons for rapid growth of the American economy following the war include: • With rationing of consumer goods over, business converted from production of war materials to consumer goods. • Americans purchased goods on credit.

Number each event to show the order in which they occurred.

The United Nations was formed near the end of World War II to create a body for the nations of the world to try to prevent future global wars. December 20, 2008

Danube

48˚

Salzburg

Liezen

S 8˚ WITZERLAND

Following World War II, Americans prospered due to an expanding economy stimulated by America’s involvement in the war. What contributed to the prosperity of Americans following World War II?

Enrichment Exercise

European Recovery After WWII

Inn

GarmischPartenkirchen

Zurich Aare

We’re in the Money!

South Korea

The War Journal

Bodensee

Basel

Doubs

Besancon

4. Following the war, the United States occupied Japan and helped it adopt democracy and resume self-government. True or False?: ___________________________

__________ self-government Japan

Linz

Konstanz

e

3. The _______________________________ _________________, suggested by Secretary of State George C. Marshall, was created to rebuild Europe.

__________ ally of fascist Germany and Italy

United We Stand!

Passau Isar

Munchen

on Sa

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Rebuilding Japan

BAYERN

Augsburg

Freiburg Mulhouse

Dijon

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 123

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 122

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Danube

GERMANY

kar Nec Ulm BADENWURTTEMBERG

Canal de Rhone au Rhin

48˚

AU S T R I A Liezen

CZECH REPUBLIC Ceske Budejovice

Regensberg

WEST

Stuttgart

FRANCE Danube

48˚

Salzburg

Plzen

Nurnberg

Heilbronn

Strasbourg Linz

Inn

Hradec Kralove

Bamberg

va Vita

Passau Isar

Salzach

Innsbruck12˚

Neisse

BAYERN

GarmischPartenkirchen

S 8˚ WITZERLAND

16˚

Usti nad Labem

Prague

Cheb n

Heidelberg

Nancy

Danube

Augsburg

Munchen

Konstanz Bodensee

Zurich Aare

Decin

Chemnitz Zwickau

Hof Mai

Wurzburg Rhein-MainDonau-Kanal

Karlsruhe

Oder

Jelenia Gora

Dresden Jena Gera

THURINGEN

rta

52˚

Erfurt

Eisenach

a Fuld

Stuttgart kar Nec Ulm BADENWURTTEMBERG

Basel

Doubs

Besancon

Metz

Wa

Zielona Gora

Gorlitz

SACHSEN

Frankfurt Am Main

Mainz

Saarbrucken

se

Ceske Budejovice

Regensberg

Gorzow Wielkopolski

POLAND

Spree

Cottbus

Leipzig

Mannheim

SAARLAND Meu

se

Heilbronn

Freiburg Mulhouse Sa

HESSEN

Koblenz

Wiesbaden le sel Mo RHEINLANDPFALZ

Luxembourg

CZECH REPUBLIC

Bad Hersfeld

Siegen Bonn

Meuse

LUX.

Strasbourg Canal de Rhone au Rhin

e

on

Dijon

Cologne Aachen

Liege Charleroi

Halle Kassel

Werra

Hradec Kralove

Dortmund

NORDRHEIN-WESTFALEN

Brussels BELGIUM

16˚

Usti nad Labem

Prague

Plzen

va Vita

Meu

Nancy

FRANCE 48˚

Essen

Dusseldorf

Bamberg

Nurnberg

Heidelberg Karlsruhe

Decin

Chemnitz Zwickau

Cheb n

Gottingen

Duisburg

Maastricht

Jena Gera

THURINGEN

Mai

Wurzburg Rhein-MainDonau-Kanal

Saarbrucken Metz

Jelenia Gora

Dresden Erfurt

Eisenach

Hof

Frankfurt Am Main

Mainz

Mannheim

SAARLAND

West Germany

a Fuld

HESSEN

Koblenz

Wiesbaden

Werra

Bonn

le sel Mo RHEINLANDPFALZ

LUX.

G E RDessau MANY e Elb

Bad Hersfeld

Siegen Aachen

Liege Meuse

Luxembourg

ser

Cologne

Maastricht

Eindhoven Antwerpen

Gorlitz

SACHSEN

er

BERLIN

Magdeburg

SACHSEN ANHALT

Rh ine

s

Leipzig

Kassel

Bielefeld

Munster Maa

Frankfurt

EAST

Braunschweig

We

Halle

Rotterdam Oder

Potsdam

l na

Dortmund

NORDRHEIN-WESTFALEN

Brussels

Zielona Gora

Od

Berlin

tellan dk Mit a

Hannover

Enschede Arnhem

Utrecht

62˚

Cottbus Neisse

Essen

Amsterdam

Osnabruck 52˚

e Elb

Gottingen

Duisburg

Dusseldorf

BELGIUM Charleroi

ser

Eindhoven Antwerpen

Szczecin

NIEDERSACHSEN

POLAND

Spree

Dessau

Ha vel

BRANDENBURG

NETHERLANDS

rta

Frankfurt

Magdeburg

SACHSEN ANHALT

Rh ine

s

East Germany

Bielefeld

Munster Maa

Swinoujscie

Schwerin

Elb e

Bremen

Wittenberge

Wa

BERLIN

Braunschweig

We

Rotterdam

Potsdam

l na

• Germany was partitioned into East and West Germany. West Germany became democratic and resumed self-government after a few years of American, British, and French occupation. East Germany remained under the domination of the Soviet Union and did not adopt democratic institutions.

tellan dk Mit a

Hannover

Osnabruck Enschede Arnhem

Utrecht

Pomeranian Bay

Stralsund Rostock

MECKLENBURG-VORPOMMERN

Hamburg

BREMEN

Oldenburg er

Berlin

Ems

Ems

Amsterdam 62˚

Emden Groningen Gorzow Wielkopolski

Od

BRANDENBURG

GERMANY

Mecklenburger Bucht

Kiel

HAMBURG

Bremerhaven

Wilmhelmshaven Szczecin Ha vel

Wittenberge

George C. Marshall

nal

Lubeck

North Sea

Schwerin

Elb e

Bremen

NIEDERSACHSEN

l Ca

Swinoujscie MECKLENBURG-VORPOMMERN

Hamburg

BREMEN

Oldenburg

Pomeranian Bay

Stralsund Rostock

Lubeck HAMBURG

Emden

Sassnitz

Kiel Bay

h

l Ca

Bremerhaven

Wilmhelmshaven Groningen

NETHERLANDS

Rodbyhavn Gedser Puttgarden

SCHLESWIGHOLSTEIN

Lec

Kie

North Sea

Baltic Sea

Flensburg

Sassnitz

Kiel Bay

• The United States instituted Secretary of State George C. Marshall’s plan to rebuild Europe (the Marshall Plan), which provided massive financial aid to rebuild European economies and prevent the spread of communism.

Liife after World War II

Sonderborg

Rodbyhavn Gedser Puttgarden

SCHLESWIGHOLSTEIN

56˚

Ystad

Trelleborg

Ronne Sonderborg Flensburg

16˚

Karlskrona

Kristianstad

Helsingborg

Vejle Kolding Esbjerg

Ystad

Trelleborg

TH HEN The United Nations is formed

• The work force shifted back to men, and most women returned to family responsibilities. • Labor unions merged and became more powerful; workers gained new benefits and higher salaries. • As economic prosperity continued and technology boomed, the next generation of women re-entered the labor force in large numbers.

The Marshall Plan is instituted to rebuild Europe Quick Quiz

United States enters World War II

Check the consumer goods to indicate the shift in production following the war.

Axis Powers are defeated

_____ machine guns

_____ cars

Japan attacks Pearl Harbor

_____ shoes

_____ TVs

America declares war on Japan and Germany

_____ tanks

_____ planes

World War II ends

_____ books

_____ designer clothing

The Great Debate! The United States and other Allied Powers helped rebuild the world following World War II. One important step was the creation of the United Nations. Do you think the United Nations would have been created if Hitler and the Axis Powers

Japan becomes a strong ally of the United States

had won the war? _______________________________________________________

NO OW

Why or Why Not? ________________________________________________________

6710

______________________________________________________________________ ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 124

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 125

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 126

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 23


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK Special Economics Info

Enrichment

Following World War II, Americans began purchasing consumer goods on credit. Today, Americans use credit cards to purchase goods every day! Draw a credit card around each item that Americans would probably purchase “on credit.”

With the economy prospering and technology booming, women entered the work force in record numbers! What kinds of new job opportunities are now available for women in America? Identify each of the following occupations.

Evaluation Sample

———— Chapter 24 ———— USII.8c - Demonstrate knowledge of economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of World War II and the present by identifying the role of America’s military and veterans in defending freedom during the Cold War, including the wars in Korea and Vietnam, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the collapse of communism in Europe, and the rise of new challenges. Correlates with USII.1a, USII.1b, USII.1c, USII.1d, and USII.1f.

Conflicts in Ideology Create a “Cold” War! The United States and the Soviet Union emerged from World War II as world powers, triggering a rivalry over beliefs and national security.

How and Why Did It Start? The Cold War started because of the differences between the two superpowers—the United States and the Soviet Union— that included:

Quick Quiz Name two things workers gained after World War II as labor unions merged and became more powerful: 1. ______________________________________________________________________

Cold War: state of tension between the United States and the Soviet Union without actual • fighting; divided the world into Differences in goals and ideologies two camps between the United States and the Soviet Union. The United States was democratic and capitalist; the Soviet Union was dictatorial and communist.

High Tech Happens! Technology has exploded all over this classroom. List the differences in the two pictures to see what students today have that students in the past did not have.

2. ______________________________________________________________________

PRESENT

PAST

• The Soviet Union’s domination over Eastern European countries

One More—Just for Fun! Decorate this dollar bill with your own design!

• American policy of containment (to stop the spread of communism) • North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) versus Warsaw Pact

One Dollar ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 127

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 129

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 128

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Cold War Tensions Led to Hot Wars!

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 131

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 130

Challenges Continue!

Essential Skills Identify the post-World War II conflicts in which America has been involved.

A Quick Review For You!

1. The Cold War that occurred after World War II between the United States and the _____________________________________________ existed

2. The Korean War, Vietnam, and the ________________________________________ were the

TH HEN world war II Vietnam

korean war

10˚N

60˚W

GUYANA

65˚W

Puerto Ayacucho

70˚W COLOMBIA

Medellin

75˚W

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Georgetown

Ciudad Bolivar

Trinidad

80˚W 85˚W 95˚W

O c e a n

90˚W

• Evolving role of women (expected to play supporting role in the family, but increasingly working outside the home)

Essential Skills 1. During the Cold War, America fought the spread of communism. Today, we fight

• African Americans’ aspirations for equal opportunities

the spread of ___________________________________ that may infect and make people sick across the world. 2. As the events of September 11, 2001 have shown, today, America also fights the spread of

Page 24

Ciudad Guayana

Maturin

San Jose 10˚N

• Interstate highway system

• Role of Eleanor Roosevelt in expanding human rights

The Cold War was the central principle on which foreign affairs were organized for 40 years. However, in 1989, the Berlin Wall that had previously separated the city of Berlin into East (communist) and West (free), was torn down. The opening of the Berlin Wall symbolized the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. In 1991, the Soviet Union was broken up into independent countries and communist rule ended. So ended the reign of communism in Europe! So ended the Cold War!

co

Cumana

• “The Baby Boom,” which led to changing demographics

B._____________________________________________________________________

Communism Comes to a Close!

Rio Orino

Caracas

Barquisimeto

Valencia

• Greater investment in education

involvement in global affairs? ___________________________________

NO OW

V E N E Z U E L A

Maracaibo

Cucuta Monteria

Barranquilla

Panama

• Strong economy (healthy job market, increased productivity, increased demand for American products)

3. During which conflict was the division in America most openly expressed about U.S. military

A._____________________________________________________________________

cuban missile crisis

David PANAMA

Colon

major conflicts of the Cold War.

4. What two events signaled the collapse of communism in Europe?

World war i

COSTA RICA

Liberia

Puntarenas

P a c i f i c

Bluefields

L. Nicaragua

Granada

Rivas

Managua

Puerto Lempira

Puerto Cabezas NICARAGUA Matagalpa Leon

HONDURAS

Tegucigalpa

San Miguel

Puerto Barrios San Pedro Sula Coban

EL SALVADOR

GUATEMALA

Guatemala San Salvador

Quezaltenango

Gulf of Tehuantepec

15˚N

Changing patterns in American society at the end of World War II changed the way most Americans lived and worked. Many factors led to these changes in American lifestyles and included:

because of differences in goals and ideologies.

Put the conflicts in which the United States has been involved in the correct chronological order.

San Cristobal

15˚N

BARBADOS

Bridgetown Tobago

MARTINIQUE

SAINT LUCIA

St. Vincet

GRENADA

Port of Spain

Bonaire Curacao

L e s s e r

Willemstad

Maria – Galante

DOMINICA

Grenadines

Castries

Roseau

GUADELOUPE

SAINT VINCET AND THE GRENADINES

ARUBA

Oranjestad

NETHERLANDS ANTILLES

A n t i l l e s

Kingstown

St. George’s

20˚N

Grande – Terre

Antigua

ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA Barbuda St. Kitts

Basse –Terre

ANGUILLA

St. Barthelemy

St. Eustatius

Plymouth

Virgin Gorda Tortola St. John St. Martin

SAINT KITTS AND NEVIS Nevis MONTSERRAT

St. Croix

VIRGIN ISLANDS (U.S. & UK.) Anegada

St. Thomas

i r a C BELIZE Flores

Great Inagua

Baracoa Guantanamo

Camaguey

Gonaives

Esperanza

HAITI G r DOM. REP. Port-au-Prince e a San Juan t e JAMAICA r Santo A n PUERTO Kingston t i RICO l l Domingo e s b b e a n S e a

Cayman Brac

CAYMAN ISLANDS

Little Cayman

Grand Cayman

George Town Belize City

Merida

500 KM

Villahermosa

Campeche

Parallel scale at 20˚N 0˚ E Chetumal

Tuxtla Gutierrez

0

Pachuca Mexico City Puebla 20˚N

Cuernavaca

200 100 0

de

Chilpancingo Oaxaca

Caicos Islands

Mayaguana Acklins

Little Inagua

Samana Cay Crooked Island

San Salvador

Rum Cay

Long Island

Long Cay

Cat Island

Cabaiguan CUBA

300

400

500 Miles

Guane

Isla De La Juventud

THE BAHAMAS

Great Exuma

Eleuthera Abaco

New Providence

Nassau

Andros

Miami

Colon

Havana

Key West

o f

M e x i c o MEXICO

Ciudad Victoria 25˚N

USII.8d- Demonstrate knowledge of economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of World War II and the present by describing the changing patterns of society, including expanded educational and economic opportunities for military veterans, women, and minorities. Correlates with USII.1b, USII.1c, USII.1d, and USII.1h.

Changing Lifestyles!

3. ___________________________________________________________________

A Quick Review For YOU!

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 25 ————

The challenges continued after the Cold War ended. Today, the United States faces questions regarding its role in military interventions; environmental challenges; and global issues including trade, jobs, diseases, and energy.

1. ___________________________________________________________________ 2. ___________________________________________________________________

Turk Islands

TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS

n a e c O Grand Bahama

West Palm Beach

Melbourne

Florida

Fort Pierce

Fort Myers

Tampa

Sarasota

G u l f Corpus Christi Rio Gran

Nuevo Laredo

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 132

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Belmopan

25˚N

30˚N 60˚W 65˚W

c i

70˚W

t n a l t

75˚W

A 80˚W

Daytona Beach

Brunswick

Jacksonville

Orlando

Georgia

Albany

Valdosta

85˚W

Tallahassee New Orleans

90˚W

Houma

30˚N

Waco

The tension between the free world and the communist world caused division in the United States and abroad. This divisiveness was most intently seen during the Vietnam War in which thousands of Americans demonstrated to protest U.S. involvement.

Alabama Mississippi Hattiesburg Dothan Natchez Mobile Pensacola Biloxi Panama City

_______________________________________________________________________.

Louisiana Missi ssi Lake Charles ppi R.

3. One organization is still in existence. One organization disbanded in 1991. Which one operates today?

Baton Rouge

Domino Theory: theory developed by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower to warn of the spread of communism in Southeast Asia. Eisenhower stated that political events are interrelated and one can trigger a series of other events.

_______________________________________________________________________.

Nacogdoches

2. A treaty of Eastern European nations that held them in tight military control. The treaty was signed in 1955 and is known as:

Map Skills Builder—The Cuban Missile Crisis

_______________________________________________________________________.

Galveston

1. An international organization established in 1949 as a defense alliance. It was the primary Western alliance during the Cold War. This organization is known as:

• Vietnam: From 1965 to 1973, the United States intervened to stop the spread of communism into South Vietnam (Domino Theory). Americans were divided over whether the United States should be involved militarily in Vietnam. The conflict ended in a cease-fire agreement in which U.S. troops withdrew.

95˚W

Use the Internet or an encyclopedia to research NATO and the Warsaw Pact, then fill in the blanks.

U . S . A . Alexandria

• The Cuban Missile Crisis: occurred in 1962 when the Soviet Union placed missiles in Cuba. The Soviets removed the missiles in response to a U.S. blockade.

Scavenger Hunt!

Houston

• The Korean War: South Korea and the United States resisted Chinese and North Korean aggression. The conflict lasted from 1950 to 1953 and ended in a stalemate (a tie with no winner).

_____ 3. Differences in the way we live

Austin

The major conflicts and confrontations involving America since World War II include:

_____ 2. Differences in goals and beliefs

San Antonio

Since World War II, the United States has been directly involved in various conflicts that reflected the divisions created by Cold War tensions and hostilities.

Temple Texas

_____ 1. Differences in language

Rio Magdalena

What caused the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union?

In 1962, the Soviet Union placed missiles in Cuba. The world stood on the brink of war until the Soviets removed the missiles. Use the scale to determine how far the missile sites were from the United States Answer: ___________________

A Quick Review For YOU!

___________________________________ that may strike unexpectedly anywhere in the world.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 133

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 134

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 135

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK Baby Boomers Are Booming!

One More – Just for Fun!

Things are Looking Up!

Are you a baby boomer? _______________

Various new policies and government programs expanded educational and employment opportunities and included:

demographics: characteristics of a group of people including age, gender, occupation, and income

The period in U.S. history from 1946 through 1964 was called “The Baby Boom” because so many babies were born. People born during this time are known as “Baby Boomers” or just plain “Boomers.”

Are your parents baby boomers? _______________

• G.I. Bill of Rights gave educational, housing, and employment benefits to veterans

Are your grandparents baby boomers? _______________ There were about 76 million baby boomers born in the United States from 1946 to 1964. That’s 26 million more births than the same length of time before and 10 million more births than the same period after it. With the baby boom came the ’burb boom as families prospered, bought a car, and moved out of the cities to live in single family dwellings in the suburbs. The ’burb boom caused a great change in U.S. demographics.

Essential Skills Number these events in the order they occurred in U.S. history.

TH HEN Birth rate increases and babies boom Americans feel economically able to support children World War II ends United States’ economy prospers

Evaluation Sample

The National Historian

December 20, 2008

We ALL Have The Right! First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, worked to expand human rights. Her efforts helped create educational and employment opportunities for women and minorities, ncluding the millions of immigrants who came to the United States. In 1946, Eleanor Roosevelt was elected chairman of the United Nations Human Rights Commission and helped create the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The declaration was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948 and states that basic civil, economic, political, and social rights and freedoms belong to every person. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that all people are born free and equal in dignity and rights.

The declaration is meant to serve “as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations.”

People move from the cities to the suburbs U.S. demographics change greatly

• U.S. President Harry Truman desegregated the armed forces • Civil Rights legislation led to increased educational, economic, and political opportunities for women and minorities

Quick Review Which factors mentioned in this chapter so far do you think helped bring about the new educational and employment opportunities in the United States? __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________

Write About It! The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is the nation’s oldest and most successful African American education assistance organization. Members work to enhance the quality of education for African American students by providing financial assistance to deserving students and colleges and universities. “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.”

NO OW

What do you think this UNCF slogan means? Do you think it means everyone should have the same educational opportunities?

Quick Quiz Circle the correct answer. Which document declares equal rights for all people and all nations? Declaration of Independence

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Essential Skills

Check all the jobs you could apply for in the past (100 years ago) and the present.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 138

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Consider the positions you would be allowed to apply for as a woman, or as a minority—perhaps an immigrant.

___________________________________________________________________________________

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 137

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 136

Imagine yourself to be a woman, or a man from a minority group. Fill out the employment application to apply for a job.

___________________________________________________________________________________

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 26 ————

A Quick Review For YOU! True or False: Circle the correct answers below. 1. In 1900, women in the United States would have been expected to stay at home and take care of their families. Name: __________________________________ Date of Birth: ___/___/____ Gender: M / F Country of Birth: _________________________ Past

Jobs Teacher Servant

_____ _____ _____ _____

Politician Nurse

_____ _____ _____ _____

Business Owner Engineer Doctor

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Police Officer Minister Plant Manager Journalist Architect

Present

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Lawyer Store Clerk Office Worker

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Professional Athlete

_____ _____

TRUE

FALSE

Linking the World

2. Today, more women work outside the home than in 1900. TRUE

FALSE

3. Today, men are more involved in the care of the family than they were 100 years ago because women are also working outside the home. TRUE

FALSE

5. The period in U.S. history from 1946 through 1964 was called “Doom and Gloom.” TRUE

FALSE

6. During the “Baby Boom,” many families bought a car and moved to the suburbs. TRUE

FALSE

7. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt helped create the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. TRUE

FALSE

8. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that all people of all nations have equal rights and freedoms including basic civil, economic, political, and social rights. TRUE

FALSE

?? ?? ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 139 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 140

Integrated Societies Globalization is bringing about an increased integration of different societies. Since the end of World War II, communication systems have been improving, and as a result, communities are drawn together. Improved communication systems, such as the Internet, link people from all over the world. Integrated societies lead to increases in economic, social, and intellectual interactions among people of different nations.

globalization: the linking of nations through trade, information, technologies, and communication

interdependence: reliance on people in other places for information, resources, goods and services Globalization has impacted American life in a number of ways. One way is improvement in all forms of communication. Americans can fly to almost any place in the world within a day or two and communicate with people all over the world. Forms of telecommunication, such as the telephone, television, radio, and Internet link us to virtually any place in the world, and allow us to communicate in real time (that means right now!).

The Impact

With globalization and the opening of economic markets all over the world, Americans can enjoy a wide variety of international goods and services. A third impact of globalization on Americans is the outsourcing of jobs. To save money and to stay competitive in today’s global market, many companies are hiring people in other countries because they can pay them less money. This has resulted in many job losses here in the United States but has saved companies money.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 141 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 27 ————

A Quick Review For YOU!

1. Name three impacts of globalization on Americans. _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________

Seection VII

_________________________________________________________________________________ 2. What has improved the integration of different societies? Circle the answer. improvements in communication

Between the end of World War II and the present, the world has been marked by an increase in globalization and interdependence. Jet airplanes, telephones, the Internet and e-mail, as well as international business, are some of the factors responsible for more closely linking the nations of the world.

FALSE

4. Employment opportunities in America have not increased over the last 100 years for women and minorities. TRUE

USII.8e- Demonstrate knowledge of the economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of WWII and the present by describing how international trade and globalization have impacted American life. Correlates with USII.1f.

outsourcing of jobs

USII.9a - Demonstrate knowledge of the key domestic and international issues during the second half of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries by examining the Civil Rights Movement and the changing role of women.

We Will Overcome! The Civil Rights Movement resulted in legislation that ensured constitutional rights to all citizens regardless of race. The struggle for civil rights came after years of discrimination and segregation. Segregation was a system of laws used by whites to control African Americans and keep the two groups separated. Segregation had many negative effects including: RESTAURANT

• Separate educational facilities and resources for white and African-American students • Separate public facilities (including restrooms, drinking fountains, and restaurants)

Essential Skills As you read the impacts of globalization, write “P” if you think it’s a positive aspect and “N” if you think it’s a negative aspect.

• Social isolation of races The National Historian

____ Many service jobs in are being exported, which results in a loss of jobs in the United States. For example, call-center jobs have been exported to India to take advantage of their lower wages.

____ Overuse or misuse of natural resources can have devastating impacts on the environment. ____ Foreign investment stimulates the economy and creates jobs here in the United States and in other countries. ____ Many American workers are forced to find other jobs that often pay less money because their jobs are exported. ____ Competition keeps prices low. The economies of nations can grow.

December 20, 2008

Segregation Keeps Us Apart!

____ Living standards, especially for developing countries, rise. When a country specializes in producing a certain item, other countries will buy that item from them. The living standard will increase in a country because more money is coming in. ____ Open markets allow for innovation (new ideas) to enter world markets. Entrepreneurs stimulate the economy by inventing new products and services.

Whites Only

C i v i l R i g ht s a n d t h e Chang i ng R ol e of Women

African Americans were also denied voting rights when many states passed laws requiring voters to be able to read and write, own property, and pay a

poll tax. Without the power of the vote, African Americans could not stop discrimination in education, housing or public facilities.

Hard-To-Believe-But-True! Until the 1960s, many states had separate facilities for African Americans and whites. Signs that read “Whites Only” could be found in restaurants, movie theaters, hotels, restrooms, and even near drinking fountains. Signs that read “For Coloreds” could also be seen, as in the photo shown here (look in the window next to the woman’s head).

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 142

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 143

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 144

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 25


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK Essential Skills

Hard-To-Believe-But-True!

Fill in the blanks to list the negative effects of segregation.

Many schools refused to comply with the order to integrate. Public schools in Prince Edward County, Virginia were closed from 1958–1964 rather than allow African American students to attend.

1. Separate __________________________________________________________ and

Evaluation Sample

Quick Quiz Although the NAACP challenged segregation in Montgomery, Alabama, the organization did not make any progress, at that time, through the federal courts toward desegregation.

Although schools were integrated, many neighborhoods were not. Some districts began busing students to schools far from their homes.

True or False?: ___________________________

___________________________ for white and African-American students.

I Have a Dream!

The Great Debate 2. Separate __________________________________________________________ that included

Write your thoughts and then discuss them in class. What would it have been like to be an African-American student who had to be bused to an all-white school?

restrooms, drinking fountains, and restaurants.

Who would you hang out with? _______________________________________ 3. Social ____________________________________________ of races.

Opposition Becomes A Mass Movement!

What about activities like sports and music? Would you be able to participate? Could you stay after school for practice? Or, would you have to leave right after school to catch the bus and make the long ride home? _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________

The struggle for equality became a mass movement in America. Many Americans became involved in the fight for Civil Rights. The Civil Rights Movement had its beginnings in the late 1800s.

Would the white kids you didn’t know be glad to see you? ______________________

That’s My Seat! After achieving some success in integrating schools, the NAACP and other groups moved to challenge segregation in other areas. When Rosa Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man, the NAACP saw another chance to rally African Americans.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) used a legal strategy to challenge segregation in the courts beginning in 1910. In the 1950s, the NAACP was expanded to improve the condition of life for African Americans. The NAACP fought for equal education for all citizens and argued before the Supreme Court that having separate schools for African American and white children was not fair. Finally, in 1954, the Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that separate was not equal, and that segregation in education was unconstitutional.

Dr. King led marches and preached against discrimination around the country. He advocated peaceful actions to bring about change. Dr. King is famous for the speech he made on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963, in which he said:

“ I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Would the teachers be glad to have you in their classes? _________________________

In Plessy v. Ferguson, the U.S. Supreme Court decided in 1896 that separate but equal facilities were constitutional. Although the case dealt with segregated railroad cars, the results influenced other areas of life in America for African Americans.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a minister who became a national leader after his involvement in the Montgomery bus boycott. He encouraged passive resistance against segregated facilities through marches, demonstrations, and boycotts. Another method of protest was the sit-in, where African Americans would sit in “white-only” restaurants and wait to be served.

The boycott of Montgomery’s buses lasted more than a year. A federal court ordered that the buses be desegregated in 1956. The boycott also brought the issue of civil rights to the attention of many people outside the South.

Protests were not always peaceful. Freedom Riders traveled around the South in buses to see if a Supreme Court ruling was in effect. The decision was that segregation was illegal in bus stations. When the Freedom Riders reached Alabama, one bus was burned by a mob, and some riders were beaten. In Montgomery, more violence occurred. The U.S. government intervened when Alabama state officials refused to guarantee the safe arrival of the riders. In Jackson, Mississippi, the riders were arrested and put in prison.

SBURY

KING

boycott: a refusal to do business with an organization as an expression of protest

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 145

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 147

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 146

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

We Will Overcome, Too!

Essential Skills Match the legal decisions and laws with the correct results.

_____ 1. Brown v. Board of Education

A. Banned use of voter qualification tests

_____ 2. Civil Rights Act of 1964

B. Desegregated schools

_____ 3. Voting Rights Act of 1965

C. Ended segregation in public accommodations and discrimination in education and employment

What can we do to gain equal rights??

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibited segregation in public accommodations and discrimination in education and employment. In 1965, the Voting Rights Act was passed, banning the use of voter qualification tests.

Essential Skills

Women activists were inspired by the achievements of the Civil Rights Movement and took action to gain equality for themselves, particularly in the workplace.

State Your Case! You’re an attorney for NOW arguing for passage of the ERA. State two unfair disadvantages that women face in the workplace.

For many years in America, women were at a disadvantage in the workplace. They were discriminated against through unfair hiring practices. Women also received lower wages for doing the very same jobs as men.

1. _______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

2. ________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

Something had to be done! Organizations such as the National Organization for Women (NOW) were formed to improve the state of women in the workplace. Federal legislation forced colleges to give women equal athletic opportunities.

YES, no more tests!

Well, you did not win your case, but your efforts did draw attention to the problems women face in the workplace. The ERA created a focus on equal opportunity employment that opened up a: ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

Although the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) did not pass, it created a focus on equal opportunity employment that opened up a wider range of options and advancement for women in business and public service.

Quick Quiz

______________________________________________________________________

The Great Debate

1. The Civil Rights Movement brought about legislation that ensured constitutional rights

How do you feel about the Equal Rights Amendment? Do you believe it should have

to all Americans regardless of: _____________________.

been passed? ___________________________________________________________________

2. Through the efforts of the NAACP and other African-American leaders, the fight for equality became a mass movement involving many Americans.

______________________________________________________________________________

Quick Quiz

______________________________________________________________________________

True or False?: __________________________. As an activist for women’s rights, you were inspired by the efforts and achievements of the Civil Rights Movement!

3. Which came first? A. The Civil Rights Movement

B. World War II

TRUE

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 148

Unscramble the (words) to find the answers. 1. The Civil Rights Movement resulted in _____________________________ (noitalsigel) that ensured constitutional rights to all citizens regardless of race. 2. _____________________________ (gresegation) was a system of laws used by whites to control African Americans and keep the two groups separated. 3. The struggle for equality became a mass movement in the United States. Many Americans

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 150

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

A Quick Review For YOU!

FALSE

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

———— Chapter 28 ————

High-Tech Know-How! Which came first, second, and third? Identify the order in which these technological advances were invented.

USII.9b - Demonstrate knowledge of the key domestic and international issues during the second half of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries by describing the development of new technologies and their impact on American life. Correlates with USII.1b, USII.1c, and USII.1f.

The Wonderful World Of Modern-Day Technology! After World War II, Americans turned their energies to the development of peacetime technologies. New technologies in communication, entertainment, and business have dramatically affected American life.

became involved in the fight for ____________________ (vicil) rights. Industries that benefited most from new technologies included: 4. In Plessy v. Ferguson, the U.S. Supreme Court decided in 1896 that separate but equal facilities were _____________________________ (cntttoaosiuinl).

_________

_________

_________

• Airline industry—jet engines • Automobile industry and interstate highway system

5. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was organized to

• Entertainment and news media industry

____________________ (primove) the condition of life for African Americans.

• Exploration of space

Essential Skills Circle the positive impact that resulted from these technological advances:

• Computer industry

U S A

6. In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that separate was not equal, and that _____________________________ (gresegation) was

• Satellite system—telecommunications (pagers, cell phones, TV)

1. Jets A. Increased domestic and international travel for business and pleasure

_____________________________ (uncntttoaosiuinl). • Internet 7. Rosa Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. This led to a year-long ____________________ (cottboy) of Montgomery’s buses. 8. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a very important civil-rights leader who had a ____________________ (rdaem)!

B. Cheaper and more convenient means of communication

Did these new technologies have an important impact on life in America? You bet! 2. Cars and interstates

Now we have: • Increased domestic and international travel for business and pleasure

A. Greater access to news and other information B. Increased domestic and international travel for business and pleasure

• Greater access to news and other information

3. Computers ?

• Cheaper and more convenient means of communication 9. Women activists took action to gain ____________________ (qualitye) for themselves, especially in the workplace.

• Greater access to heating and air conditioning, which improved the quality of life and encouraged population growth in certain areas of the country • Decreased regional variation, resulting from nationwide access to entertainment and information provided by national television and radio programming, Internet services, and computer games

Page 26

150 165

S

195 210 225 240

Heading 200o

Speed 0 mph

POSITION N 41oo 56' 50.1" W 087 39' 19.8" WAYPOINT: "home plate" Dist Bearing 0.0 mi 0o Date Time 09-09-01 14:55:36(pm)

A. Greater access to news and other information B. Increased domestic and international travel for business and pleasure

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 153

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK One More – Just for Fun!

———— Chapter 29 ————

Think About It

Technology and You! 1. Have you ever seen or owned a record player?

Listed below are some of the technological advances you have learned about. List some of the positive and negative effects that they might have on the following:

__________________ 1. Automobiles and the environment:

2. Do you remember when TV only had 13 channels? __________________ Positive: ___________________________________________________________________________ 3. How did people stay in touch before they had cell phones?

Negative: __________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________

Can you think of some things the U.S. has done to reduce the problems caused by automobiles?

USII.9c - Demonstrate knowledge of the key domestic and international issues during the second half of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries by identifying how individual citizens from the time period influenced America scientifically, culturally, academically, and economically.

American Influences Throughout history, individual citizens have greatly influenced American life. The people below have influenced America scientifically, culturally, academically, and economically:

__________________________________________________________________________________

Scientific Influences:

4. What did people do before they had call waiting and answering machines on their phones?

__________________________________________________________________________________

• Charles Drew

_______________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

Charles Drew was an African American doctor known for his contributions to the collection of blood plasma for blood transfusions. In 1941, he was blood transfusion: named director of the blood the act of transferring blood bank for the National Research or blood products from one Council, collecting blood for person to another the U.S. military during WWII. His method of collecting and plasma: the liquid portion of blood storing blood for transfusions is still in use today by the American Red Cross.

__________________________________________________________________________________

• J. Robert Oppenheimer

_______________________________________________________________________ 5. Name one technological advancement that you can’t live without. _________________

2. Jet engines and increased travel around the world:

Why? __________________________________________________________________

Positive: __________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Negative: _________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Can you think of some things countries have done to reduce problems that might be caused by

6. Would you rather listen to music on a CD or through an iPod? 7. Can you imagine life without remote controls?

_________________

international travel? _________________________________________________________________

_____________________________

8. Why do so many kids like to send text messages on cell phones instead of talk? _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________

Evaluation Sample

3. The Internet and its widespread use: Positive: ___________________________________________________________________________ Negative: __________________________________________________________________________

Robert Oppenheimer was an American scientist and professor. He is best known for his role in the Manhattan Project, a World War II effort that developed the first nuclear weapons. He is remembered as “the father of the atomic bomb.” After the war, though, Oppenheimer worked to keep the nuclear arms race with the Soviet Union under control.

Can you think of ways people have tried to make the Internet safer to use? ______________________

Quick Quiz How do they compare?

__________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________

Write “D” for Drew and “O” for Oppenheimer next to the statement. If the statement applies to both, write both “D” and “O.” 1. _____ I am a doctor.

3. _____ I worked with the Manhattan Project team.

2. _____ I am an American.

4. _____ I improved blood transfusions.

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 154

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Cultural Influences:

Academic Influences:

Economic Influences:

• Frank Lloyd Wright

• Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

• Bill Gates

Frank Lloyd Wright was an American architect who designed different building types, churches, schools, and museums. His architecture was unique and influenced many architects that came after him. He is often called “the greatest American architect of all time.”

Henry Louis Gates, Jr., is a literary historian who has written many books on African American culture. He collects African American literature and has found many long-lost manuscripts. He strongly believes that African American stories should be a part of the “American fabric,” and that without their stories, America’s “literary heritage is not whole.”

Bill Gates is chairman and co-founder of Microsoft Corporation, founded in 1975. Bill Gates and his company developed software for personal computers that revolutionized the computer industry. Bill Gates played a major role in making personal computers part of our daily lives. • Ray Kroc

• Maya Angelou • Martha Graham Martha Graham was an American dancer who is regarded as a pioneer of modern dance. Her style was unique in that it expressed human experiences of passion, rage, and other emotions. In her 70 years of dancing, she received many honors in the United States and other countries.

Maya Angelou is an American writer who is an important figure in the American Civil Rights Movement. She is known for her autobiographies as well as her poetry. Now 80, Maya Angelou is owner of many awards autobiography: a and honorary degrees for her book about someone’s life work. She has been called written by that person “America’s most visible black female autobiographer.”

Ray Kroc is best known for taking a small chain of restaurants in the 1950s and making it into the most successful and well-known restaurant franchise in the world. What was his chain? McDonald’s, of course! With his innovative way of doing business, franchise: the right Ray Kroc helped launch franchising granted to an individual or and the fast food industry! a company to market its Franchising allows people to run their products or services in a own business. They are likely to be specific territory successful because the company has an established reputation.

Quick Quiz Below you will read phrases that state how the two artists above expressed themselves. Circle the words that describe Frank Lloyd Wright. Underline the words that describe Martha Graham.

unique types of architecture

unique style of dance

expressions of emotion

churches

schools

modern dance

Write About It Henry Louis Gates’ life work is to collect African American literature, including long-lost manuscripts. Why do you think this is important? __________________________________________________________________________________

A Quick Review for You!

__________________________________________________________________________________ 1. Whose contribution to the economy came first? (Circle the answer.) Bill Gates

A Quick Review for You! Unscramble the words to fill in the blanks. 1. Maya Angelou is an important figure in the American __________ _________ (VICLI) (STRIGH) Movement.

Raymond Albert Kroc

2. Match the man to what he is best known for. Bill Gates Ray Kroc

revolutionizing personal computer industry launching McDonald’s and franchising

2. Her autobiographies and __________ (OPTERY) are important to African American literature.

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 158

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———— Chapter 30 ————

Essential Skills What are these influential Americans remembered for? 1. Write the correct number next to the correct “claim to fame” in the second column. 2. Then, write the field in which each person excelled next to each name in the first column. Write “S” for scientific, “C” for cultural, “A” for academic, or “E” for economic, in the space after their names. Field

Claim to Fame

1. Martha Graham

___

___ writer of books on African American culture

2. Bill Gates

___

___ A pioneer of modern dance

3. Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

___

___ Famous American architect

4. Ray Kroc

___

___ co-founder of Microsoft Corporation

5. Frank Lloyd Wright

___

___ Collecting and storing blood for blood transfusions

6. J. Robert Oppenheimer

___

___ expanding the practice of franchising

7. Maya Angelou

___

___ “The father of the atomic bomb”

8. Dr. Charles Drew

___

___female African American poet and writer

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 159 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

USII.9d - Demonstrate knowledge of the key domestic and international issues during the second half of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries by examining American foreign policy, immigration, the global environment, and other emerging issues. Correlates with USII.1f.

Policies Affect Us All

Essential Skills Fill in the blanks to name three characteristics of terrorist groups. Use the Word Bank.

religious

violence

public

1. They use acts of _____________________ to bring about change.

American foreign policy, immigration policies, energy policies, and environmental policies affect both people in the United States and in other countries.

2. They are often motivated by extreme _______________________ beliefs. 3. They attack _____________________ places to create fear and panic.

Scare Tactics Terrorism uses extreme acts of violence to try to bring about political, cultural, or social change. There has been an increase in terrorist activities in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Most of these attacks were motivated by extreme religious and cultural beliefs. An extreme example of terrorism in the United States occurred on September 11, 2001 (known as “9/11”), when members of a group called Al Qaeda took over U.S. airplanes and flew them into the World Trade Center (Twin Towers) in New York and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. About 3,000 innocent people and children were killed in the attacks, underscoring the fact that terrorists will go to any extreme to send a message and spread fear! Terrorists create panic and fear by attacking public places and killing innocent people. These acts bring a sense of urgency on the part of governments and the international community to respond quickly. Foreign policies of nations are geared more and more towards holding terrorists responsible for their actions, which sends a message that acts of terrorism will not be tolerated and that terrorists are not above the law.

Taking a Stand Up until 9/11, Americans saw terrorism as something that could only happen on foreign soil. U.S. foreign policy has changed since 9/11. President George W. Bush set up the Department of Homeland Security, or DHS. Its job is to protect the United States from terrorist attacks.

Conflicts in the Middle East The U.S. has been and is still involved in conflicts in the Middle East:

• Persian Gulf War (1991) History: Iraq invaded Kuwait to take control of their oil fields and have access to the Persian Gulf, which would have given Iraq 40 percent of the world’s oil reserves. Iraqi troops, headed by Saddam Hussein, killed thousands of Kuwaitis and destroyed property.

0176

Action: As Iraq set to attack Saudi Arabia, U.S. President George W. Bush amassed a force of half a million troops from close to 30 countries and stopped Iraq’s invasion.

• War in Afghanistan (began in 2001) History: After 9/11, U.S. troops were sent to Afghanistan to defeat the Taliban, a terrorist group. Their leader Osama bin Laden is believed to be the mastermind behind the 9/11 attacks. Action: The Taliban was defeated, but their leader Osama bin Laden was not captured. A new government was set up in Afghanistan.

• War in Iraq (March 2003) History: Iraq was thought to have weapons of mass destruction (nuclear weapons), was believed to have strong ties with the terrorist group Al Qaeda, and was assumed to have a role in 9/11. Action: Coalition forces led by the United States defeated the Iraqi forces. Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein was arrested and put on trial.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 160

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 162

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 27


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK Quick Quiz Put the conflicts in the Middle East in chronological order. Then, in the space to the right of the conflict, write the year (1991, 2001, or 2003) in which they began.

❒ War in Afghanistan __________ ❒ Persian Gulf War ____________ ❒ War in Iraq _________________ Map Skill Builder: Circle each country and area involved in conflicts in the Middle East. Check off each item from the following list as you circle it. :

❒ Persian Gulf ❒ Saudi Arabia

❒ Iraq ❒ Afghanistan

❒ Kuwait

RUSSIA BULGARIA

TURKEY

CYPRUS

KAZAKHSTAN UZBEKISTAN

IRAN

AFGHANISTAN

IRAQ

SUEZ CANAL

KUWAIT PAKISTAN

Persian Gulf

1. Look at the consequences of the Iraq War below. Determine whether they were positive or negative, and whether they were intended or unintended. Check (✓) the appropriate boxes.

Consequence

Positive

Negative

Intended

Unintended

Prolonged presence of U.S. troops

QATAR Gulf of Oman

SAUDI ARABIA

Following World War II, U.S. foreign policy was directed mainly at building strong ties with Western European nations through NATO and with Japan to prevent the spread of communism by the Soviet Union. Today, China and India are gaining power both economically and politically. Both countries already have nuclear weapons, and this is one reason the U.S. is starting to expand its foreign relations with these and other emerging nations.

Think About It Why does the United States want to have good relations with countries that have nuclear weapons? _______________________________________________________________

Changing Immigration Patterns U.S. immigration policies have also changed in the last 50 years. These immigration policies affect people in the U.S. and other nations. By the end of World War I, mass immigration to the United States ended. These numbers remained low until 1965, when immigration policies changed and the flow of immigrants increased.

immigration: the movement of people among countries

More people want to immigrate to the United States than are allowed by law. About one million people legally immigrate to the U.S. every year. However, due to strict immigration control and waiting lists, permanent status is not allowed for the majority of those wishing to be citizens. This has led to a rise in illegal immigration. In fact, the number of illegal immigrants (mainly from Mexico) to the United States is higher than for legal immigrants!

Decreasing aid to terrorists Civil war situation in Iraq

BAHRAIN

EGYPT

The U.S. made a specific choice to invade Afghanistan and Iraq to fight against terrorism. As a result of the decision to attack Iraq, there were many intended consequences (overthrowing Hussein; setting up a democratic government; stopping some aid to terrorists) and unintended consequences (civil war situation in Iraq occurred and American forces needed to stay there longer than originally thought). People and nations responded positively (U.S. applauded for standing up against terrorism) and negatively (many Americans are against the war).

Overthrowing Hussein

SYRIA

STRIP

The United States’ relationship with other nations has changed during the second half of the 20th and early 21st centuries.

TURKMENISTAN

Caspian Sea

Mediterranean LEBANON ISRAEL Sea GAZA JORDAN

Changing Relationships with Nations

America’s foreign policy portrayed by the “War on Terrorism” has affected both people in the U.S. and in Iraq. In the U.S., the cost of war can be seen in the loss of life, but there have been no terrorist attacks on American soil since 9/11. In Iraq, many people were killed, but they now have a democratic government instead of a dictatorship.

Essential Skills Aral Sea

GEORGIA ARMENIA AZERBAIJAN

A Tug of War

_________________________________________________________________________________

KAZAKHSTAN

Black Sea

Evaluation Sample

U. A. E.

2. Name one positive and one negative response to the War in Iraq. Red Sea SUDAN

OMAN

Arabian Sea

ERITREA

+ _________________________________________________________________________________ – _________________________________________________________________________________

YEMEN 0

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

500 Miles

Gulf of Aden

SOMALIA

0

Background Check The U.S. has a very orderly immigration policy process with categories of priority. For example, being a relative is a priority, but there is a limit on the number of siblings that can immigrate in a given year. It is not uncommon for siblings to wait for more than 20 years before they can live permanently in the United States.

500 KM Parallel scale at 25˚S 0˚E

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 163

Quick Quiz Write T for True and F for False.

Protecting the Environment

U.S. Protection!

Protecting the environment has become an international partnership. Major international policies attempt to protect the environment. Some examples include:

The United States Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA for short, is in charge of making sure that U.S. citizens and the environment are protected.

• The Kyoto Protocol is an international agreement to control greenhouse gas emissions. ____ 3. More people want to come to the United States than immigration law allows. ____ 4. There is very little illegal immigration to the United States. ____ 5. Many illegal immigrants come to the U.S. from Mexico.

Where Are They Coming From? The 1990 U.S. Census revealed that the United States is made up of 215 ancestry groups— groups that took four centuries of immigration to form! The largest populations came from Germany, Ireland, England, and Africa. The 1965 law ended the pattern of mainly European immigration. In fact, more than 80 percent of total immigrants after 1965 came from Asia (Chinese, Filipinos, Koreans) and Latin America (Mexico and Central America)!

Read the arguments for and against immigration below. Decide whether the argument is for or against immigration. Write + for positive and – for negative aspects of immigration. ___ An exchange of cultural values

___ A burden on schools

___ Overcrowding

___ A burden on hospitals

___ Excessive use of natural resources

___ An increase in the security risk

___ New opportunities for immigrants

___ Competition for jobs

___ Spread of new diseases

___ Open global market

___ An increase in the crime rate

___ An exchange of new ideas

___ An exchange of knowledge about other cultures and peoples

___ A burden on the welfare system

Some other important international conservation treaties protect our earth’s wetlands, birds, wild animals and plants.

• The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change deals with climate change. • The Montreal Protocol is an international agreement between 150 countries that limits the production of substances that are harmful to the ozone layer.

Global Climate Change Earth’s climate has undergone many changes during its history. Natural occurrences, such as volcanic eruptions, have affected Earth’s climate. However, beginning in the 18th century, human activities are believed to have caused climate changes, too, beginning with the Industrial Revolution. For the past 200 years, fossil fuels, such as coal and oil, as well as deforestation (cutting down forests), are believed to have increased greenhouse gases that warm the earth. The gases trap the warmth from the sun, much like the glass of a greenhouse, and consequently heat up our atmosphere. The higher the concentration of the gases in the atmosphere, the more heat is trapped.

Conservation of Water and Other Natural Resources

Essential Skills

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~ This book is not reproducible. ~

____ 1. Immigration is the movement of products by ship across the ocean. ____ 2. More immigrants came to the U.S. after 1965 when immigration laws changed.

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 164

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Seventy percent of the earth is covered in water, yet only three percent of the water is fresh, and most of the fresh water is trapped in ice. All nations need fresh water for agriculture, industry, energy production, and to live. Experts report that people are consuming too much water, so conservation of water has become a major international priority. Tropical rain forests are being destroyed at an alarming rate. It is vital to protect them because of the millions of plant and animal species living there, the oxygen forests provide, and important forest products like lumber and medicines.

Quick Quiz The EPA is in charge of protecting U.S. citizens by protecting the environment. Circle the areas you think the EPA monitors. hazardous waste regulation

chemical regulations

air pollution prevention

car emissions

automobile designs

oil pollution prevention

pesticide regulation

insulating one’s home

food safety

World Health Issues Since we live in a global society where people travel from country to country every day, world health issues are a very important concern. In 1948, the United Nations launched the World Health Organization (WHO). This international organization deals with monitoring outbreaks of infectious diseases, such as such as influenza, malaria, smallpox, and AIDS. It supports programs for prevention and treatment of diseases, especially within developing nations. pandemic: an outbreak of an infectious Influenza is an example of a disease that has disease that has spread caused pandemics in the past. In 1918, for example, across a large region, such the Spanish Flu caused the deaths of 20 million people as a continent or throughout the world worldwide! The World Health Organization monitors influenza activity around the world. It works to prepare and distribute vaccines and develop health care plans in all countries in case of disease outbreaks.

Quick Quiz Decide if the statements below are fact or opinion. Write F for Fact and O for Opinion.

Think About It Using natural resources wisely is important to ensure that they will be available for future generations. Give your advice on how these resources could be conserved.

1. ____ A pandemic is an outbreak of an infectious disease that has spread across a large region.

1. fresh water ____________________________________________________________

2. ____ WHO stands for World Health Organization.

_______________________________________________________________________

3. ____ The World Health Organization is the most important organization established in the past 50 years.

2. forests ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

4. ____ Influenza is an example of a disease that has caused pandemics. 5. ____ Doctors in the United States are smarter than doctors in Europe.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 166

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 167 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

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Practice Test

Seection VIII

Practice Test 16. What were African Americans hoping to find during the Great Migration North? ❍ F Life free from violence ❍ G Life free from discrimination ❍ H Better paying jobs ❍ J All of the above

1. The Great Plains were once considered— ❍ A a “treeless wasteland” ❍ B a waste of valuable land ❍ C a great place to live ❍ D part of South America

6. After the Civil War, immigration— ❍ F decreased ❍ G increased ❍ H stopped ❍ J started

2. Following the introduction of many technological advances, how did people view the Great Plains? ❍ F A “treeless wasteland” ❍ G A waste of valuable land ❍ H A vast area to be settled ❍ J Part of South America

7. What did inventions such as lighting, electricity, and telephones lead to? ❍ A great change and industrial growth ❍ B big phone bills ❍ C big electric bills ❍ D electric cars

12. In 1898, the United States entered the Spanish American War as a result of a(n) ________________on the USS Maine. ❍ F argument ❍ G explosion ❍ H really bad meal ❍ J theft

17. Which war did the United States enter following the attack on Pearl Harbor? ❍ A World War I ❍ B World War II ❍ C Vietnam War ❍ D Korean War

13. Following the German attack on the Lusitania, Americans became more sympathetic toward England. What was one of their concerns? ❍ A Higher fares on passenger ships ❍ B Economic/political ties to Germany ❍ C Economic/political ties to England ❍ D Lack of transportation to Europe

18. Which plan is instituted to rebuild Europe following World War II? ❍ F Treaty of Paris ❍ G Warsaw Pact ❍ H New Deal ❍ J Marshall Plan

8. “Jim Crow” laws were designed to— ❍ F give equal rights to immigrants ❍ G give equal rights to African Americans ❍ H make segregation legal ❍ J legalize the selling of birds

9. Who was not a “captain of industry” in the early 1900s? ❍ A Captain James Hook ❍ B John D. Rockefeller ❍ C Andrew Carnegie ❍ D Henry Ford

4. In which region is Virginia located? ❍ F Southwest ❍ G Southeast ❍ H Midwest ❍ J Northeast

5. After the Civil War, new opportunities and technological advances led to— ❍ A more radios ❍ B higher pay ❍ C heavy debt ❍ D westward migration

Page 28

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11. Which movement worked to help the poor and control the size and power of big business in the early 1900s? ❍ A Men’s Movement ❍ B Women’s Movement ❍ C Progressive Movement ❍ D Poor and Big Business Movement

3. What linked resources, products, and markets? ❍ A Advances in communications ❍ B Advances in transportation ❍ C Advances by Native Americans ❍ D Advances by settlers

Ap ppendix

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 168

10. What led to the rise of organized labor and reforms in the workplace? ❍ F Communication ❍ G Dislocation ❍ H Organization ❍ J Industrialization

14. What contribution did Henry Ford make to industrial production? ❍ F Assembly lines ❍ G Expensive cars ❍ H Labor unions ❍ J High wages 15. Prohibition was the only amendment to be ________________ by Congress. ❍ A passed ❍ B tied ❍ C repealed ❍ D reported

19. What is the period in U.S. history from 1946 through 1964 called? ❍ A The Baby Room ❍ B The Baby Game ❍ C The Baby Boom ❍ D The Bebop Boom

20. Who has worked for equal rights for all people? ❍ F Civil Rights workers ❍ G Women’s Rights workers ❍ H Eleanor Roosevelt ❍ J All protesters

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 169

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 170

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 171

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 176 pages

USA II STUDENT WORKBOOK

Industrialization: adopting industrial methods of manufacturing and production

MARYLAND

FLORIDA

SOUTH CAROLINA

ALABAMA

TENNESSEE

KENTUCKY

LOUISIANA

ARKANSAS

0

600 Miles ALASKA

0

ARIZONA

UTAH

100

200 Miles

200 Miles 0

HAWAII

NEW MEXICO

TEXAS

OKLAHOMA

1890S

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18 892

Progressive Movement begins; horseless carriage introduced

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.virginiaexperience.com • Page 172

1877

1880S

Cheyenne and Sioux Reconstruction ends; Segregation laws defeat Lt. Col. Custer Chief Joseph and become known and his troops at the Nez Percé battle as “Jim Crow” laws Battle of Little Bighorn U.S.Army

MISSISSIPPI

INDIANA

1876

ILLINOIS WYOMING

COLORADO

NEBRASKA

KANSAS

IOWA

MISSOURI

WISCONSIN

Urbanization: the process of turning rural areas into cities

Reconstruction begins

GEORGIA

WEST VIRGINIA

DC

NORTH CAROLINA

CONN

NEW JERSEY

DELAWARE OHIO

MICHIGAN

Tenements: crowded apartment houses

Yellow journalism: a style of journalism that uses news stories sensationally or unethically to attract readers

PENNSYLVANIA

NEW YORK

Suffragists: person who worked for women’s right to vote

1867

Civil War Ends

CALIFORNIA

Ghettos: minority area of a city, usually crowded and poor

Repealed: to cancel; to do away with

18 865

NEVADA

Harlem Renaissance: an outpouring of art that revealed the freshness and variety of African-American culture

VT

NH

Strike: when workers stop working until certain demands (better wages and/or benefits, better working hours, better working conditions) are met

Fascism: a political philosophy in which total power is given to a dictator and individual freedoms are denied

MINNESOTA

Electrification: the process of electrifying or charging with electricity

NORTH DAKOTA

Reconstruction: period following the Civil War (1867 to 1877) in which Southern states were brought back into the Union

SOUTH DAKOTA

Domino Theory: theory developed by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower to warn of the spread of communism in Southeast Asia. Eisenhower stated that political events are interrelated and one can trigger a series of other events

MICHIGAN

Racial segregation: practice of forcing people of different racial groups to be separate, to live apart, go to separate schools, and use separate public facilities

MONTANA

Demographics: characteristics of a group of people including age, gender, occupation, and income

Prohibition: refers to the period in the United States from 1920 to 1933 when federal laws made the manufacture, transport, and sale of alcoholic beverages illegal

US SA

A Map of the United States

IDAHO

Cold War: state of tension between the United States and the Soviet Union without actual fighting; divided the world into two camps

Virginia

WASHINGTON

Big Business: activity of giant commercial organizations; or these giant organizations grouped together

OREGON

Aryan supremacy: belief that Germans represent a superior form of humanity

Progressive Movement: movement for economic, political, and social reform in the United States that began in the 1890s and ended as the United States entered World War I in 1917

MASS

Persecute: to treat in a cruel or harsh manner

Anti-Semitism: prejudice or cruel and unfair treatment against Jews

RI

MAINE

Glossary

Evaluation Sample

18 890 U.S. Bureau of Census declares a definite frontier no longer exists

1895

1898

Battle erupts at Marconi sends first USS Maine explodes Carnegie Steel radio signals & sinks; Spanish Company following American War labor strike occurs

1903

19 910

1915

1917

Wright Brothers ‘take off” from Kitty Hawk, North Carolina

African Americans begin the Great Migration to the North

Germany attacks the Lusitania; killing almost 2,000 people

United States enters World War I; Progressive Movement ends

1918

19 919

1920

1929

Central Powers surrender; World War I ends

18th Amendment passes (Prohibition)

19th Amendment passes (Women’s Suffrage)

Great Depression begins

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Index

tiimeline 1933

19 941

1945

1946

18th Amendment is repealed

Japan attacks Pearl Harbor; United States enters World War II

Axis Powers surrender; World War II ends

Baby Boomer generation begins

1949

19 950

1953

1955

North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is formed

Korean War begins

Korean War ends

Warsaw Pact is formed

1954

19 962

Supreme Court rules seg- Cuban Missile Crisis regation in education is occurs unconstitutional in Brown v. Bd. of Ed.

1964

1965

Civil Rights Act is passed

Voting Rights Act is passed; U.S. Involvement in Vietnam begins

1973

19 989

1991

2001

American involvement in Vietnam War ends

Berlin Wall falls

Communism comes to a close in Europe; Cold War ends

USA enters the 21st century

wh hat is in The USA’S future??

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Addams, Jane 47 African American 32-34, 36-37, 49, 51, 93-94, 97-98, 119, 135, 144-147, 156, 158 Allied Powers 78, 108, 118 Allies 108, 112 Anthony, Susan B. 62-63, 65 Armstrong, Louis 98 automobile 17-19, 82-83, 152 Axis 106, 112, 118 Baby Boom 135-136 barbed wire 10 Battle of Little Bighorn 40 beef cattle 10-11 Bell, Alexander Graham 46 Berlin Wall 133 Canada 108 Carnegie, Andrew 52, 59 Central Powers 74, 79 Chancellor Otto von Bismarck 79 Chief Joseph 40 child labor 58, 60 Churchill, Winston 108 Civil Rights 138, 144-146, 148-149, 158 Cold War 129, 131, 133-134, 172 Communism 122, 129, 131, 133, 165 Copland, Aaron 96 Cuba 69-72, 131, 133 Cuban Missile Crisis 131, 133 Czar Nicholas II 79 D-Day 112, 115 Detroit, Michigan 17 Dodge, Col. Richard Irving 8 Du Bois, W.E.B. 51 Edison, Thomas 46 Eisenhower, Dwight D. 131, 172 electricity 46, 88 electrification 88, 172 Ellington, Duke 98 Equal Rights Amendment 149 Fascism 106, 172 Fitzgerald, F. Scott 96 Ford, Henry 34, 75, 82-83 G.I. Bill of Rights 138 Germany 77-79, 106,108, 110, 112, 115, 122, 125, 166 Gershwin, George 96 ghettos 47,172 Great Britain 77-78, 108 Great Depression 100, 108, 118 Great Plains 8-13 Harlem Renaissance 97-98, 172 Hitler, Adolf 106, 116 Holocaust 116 Hughes, Langston 98 immigration 43-44, 47, 54, 161, 165-166 Industrialization 47, 55, 58-59 inventions 10, 43, 46-47, 54 Italy 106 Japan 106, 110, 112, 115, 122, 124-125, 165

Jim Crow Laws 33, 49 King, Jr., Martin Luther 147 Korean War 131, 133 Lawrence, Jacob 97 League of Nations 80 Long, Stephen H. 9 Lusitania 78-79 Marconi, Guglielmo 174 Marshall Plan 122 Midway 112 Mussolini, Benito 106 NAACP 145-146 NATO 129, 165 New Deal 102 New England 17 Newspapers 6, 12, 36, 70, 92 O’Keeffe, Georgia 96 organized labor 58-59 Parks, Rosa 146 Pearl Harbor 110, 112, 115, 125 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 16-17, 22, 44, 52 Progressive Movement 60, 62, 64, 172 Prohibition 64, 90-92 railroads 11, 12, 16, 52 Rockefeller, John D. 52 Roosevelt, Eleanor 135, 137 Roosevelt, Franklin D. 102, 108, 137 Rosie the Riveter 118-119 segregation 47, 116, 144-148, 172 Smith, Bessie 98 sod houses 10-11 Soviet Union 108, 112, 115, 122, 129, 131, 133, 156, 165, 172 Spanish American War 69-70, 72 Stalin, Joseph 108, 112 Stalingrad 112 steel industry 17 steel plow 10 Steinbeck, John 96 suffrage 62 technology 18, 46, 66, 82-83, 85, 126, 152 Temperance 64 Tojo, Hideki 106 Transcontinental Railroad 37 Truman, Harry 108, 138 United Nations 122, 124-125, 137, 167-168 urbanization 47, 172 USS Maine 70, 73 Vietnam War 131 Virginia 20 Warsaw Pact 129 Washington, Booker T. 51 wheat 10-11 Wilson, Woodrow 79 Women’s rights 149 World War I 52, 60, 65, 77, 80,106,165 World War II 106, 112, 115, 118, 122, 124-126, 129, 131, 135,141, 152, 156, 165

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These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 29


USA II Teacher Resource Book

Evaluation Sample

Table of Contents Section I - Geography and Westward Expansion . . . . . . . . page 4 Section II - Life in the United States after the Civil War . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 6 Section III - Spanish American War and World War I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 10

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Section IV - Technological Changes of the Early 20th Century . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 12 Section V - World War II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 16 Section VI - Life after World War II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 17 Section VII - Civil Rights and the Changing Role of Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 19 Print Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 23 Websites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 24

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Westward Ho!

Section I - Geography and Westward Expansion

Spell for Fun!

Railroads and Cattle Drives Think small! • Kids love miniatures, as do many adults these days. Students could create a little house on the prairie or a miniature of an early western town. Small items can be cut from magazines, or made from paper, foam, fabric, game pieces, and many other small items. A catalog of miniatures, such as used in doll houses or railroad train sets, can be useful for ideas. Fences can be made from popsicle sticks, for example. Cereal and other edible items used in making gingerbread houses add color and texture.

Geography is part of the daily equation of life. Help your students see that, just like the settlers who tamed the Great Plains, they will make decisions based on geography all their lives. In the early 1800s, people believed the area between the Missouri River and the Rocky Mountains was a Great American Desert. This “treeless wasteland” was thought to be incapable of sustaining life— especially life based on agriculture. Little did they know, but over the next 100 years or so, technological advances would completely change people’s perception of the Great Plains. The Great American Desert became abundant farmland and experienced explosive growth. Railroads were critical to the development of the last frontier. The Transcontinental Railroad was completed in 1869. On May 10, 1869, the Union Pacific and Central Pacific lines met at Promontory Point, Utah.

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Be creative! This too makes a great “show and tell” for parents, especially if the town just goes on and on and on!

Page 30

Have a class spelling bee. Then let your best spellers compete against other sixth grade classes at your school! 1.

continents

2.

satellites

3.

exploration

4.

technology challenges

6.

political

The expansion of the railroads to the West contributed to the rise of the cattle industry. Railroads shipped the cattle to markets in the East. By 1867, railroads extended to Abilene, Kansas—the first of the great western cattle towns.

7.

differences

8.

colonies

In 1867, more than 35,000 cattle arrived in Abilene. By 1871, the number of cattle arriving in Abilene grew to 600,000. Ranchers hired cowboys to drive their herds of cattle. The cowboys used the Chisholm Trail, the Western Trail, and other northern trails. Kansas cattle towns included Ellsworth, Newton, Wichita, Caldwell, and perhaps the best-known of all–Dodge City.

9.

revolution

10.

agricultural

Have your students learn about women and pioneer life by reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie series. Perhaps you can read a chapter a day aloud in class, or encourage your students to read it on their own!

Reconstruction The Reconstruction Period, which followed the Civil War, was an especially difficult time for the South. Help students understand that one of the consequences of war is the aftermath. Following the Civil War came the long, painful, and expensive clean-up operation when new state constitutions had to be written, new governments installed, battlefields repaired, transportation systems rebuilt, and so much more. The economy had to be rebuilt, and money was worthless. The human toll was incalculable as people tried to rebuild lives. The original intent of Reconstruction was to remake the South into a society based on equal rights and freedom rather than slave labor. President Andrew Johnson was less concerned with remaking the South than many Republican Congressmen. He was more lenient with former Confederates, only requiring that they take an oath of allegiance to the federal government.

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5.

The Great American Desert remained unsettled until the 1860s. But when the U.S. government gained control of Native American lands on the Plains, cattle ranchers and farmers moved in!

Section II – Life in the United States after the Civil War

Here are some things to discuss with your students:

• How did newly-freed slaves feel and cope with such drastic changes? They were free, but they had no place to live, nothing to eat, no shelter, and no one to help them. • How did the Freedmen’s Bureau begin to help newly-freed slaves? • How did sharecropping help both blacks and plantation owners?

Extra Credit: geographical 1. 2.

carpetbaggers

3.

constitution

• Why did so many rural Virginians begin to move to the cities after the Civil War? What did they hope to find? Did they find it? How did this demographic change, more than 100 years ago, affect Virginia and Virginians? How do these changes continue to affect us today?

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.gallopade.com/Page 4

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This book is not reproducible.

This book is not reproducible.

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 24 pages

USA II Teacher\ Resource Book

Remember the Maine! Hey, whose side are you on? Discuss conflict— causes and resolution. Check out a controversial historical or current issue. Discuss the contrasting viewpoints. Ask students to tell the class about a conflict they were involved in and how it was resolved.

Yellow Journalism Who hasn’t read a newspaper story or heard a TV or radio broadcast and wondered, “Did that really happen?” As one of the few sources of public information, newspapers had become quite influential in America by the late 1800s. When the USS Maine exploded in January 1898, U.S. newspapers seemingly had no doubt as to the cause of the explosion. Some even showed how Spanish saboteurs had attached an underwater mine to the ship and triggered the explosion from the shore. Hundreds of reporters, artists, and photographers went to Cuba looking for the “facts,” or a great story—one that would sell lots of newspapers. And a great story they did indeed find! Headlines read, “Spanish Cannibalism,” “Inhuman Torture,” and “Amazon Warriors Fight for Rebels!”

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Did that really happen? Have students write a

“very yellow” article about a current event.

Section III - Spanish American War and World War I

In response to an artist’s request to be recalled due to “no war,” William Randolph Hearst is reported to have said, “You furnish the pictures, I’ll furnish the war.”

Let’s Go for a Drive! Travel Agent…Help students create travel brochures for countries or states, with an emphasis on history. These can be produced by hand or on the computer. Encourage accuracy and creativity!

World War I

school. Students can select a culture and

research to find out about the language, clothing, food, traditions, family

At the beginning of the war, the United States had long avoided becoming involved in European conflicts. In April 1917 when the United States declared war on Germany, foreign policy changed from isolationist to fully armed and ready to fight.

structure, government, art,

U.S. President Woodrow Wilson led the charge, and by the fall of 1918, the Allies (United States, Great Britain, France, Russia, Serbia, and Belgium) were victorious over the Central Powers of Germany, AustriaHungary, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Empire!

literature, and music. Have each student present their report to the class. They can bring in a food dish or dress in clothing of the culture they represent.

Section IV - Technological Changes of the Early 20th Century The Automobile Not everyone liked the "horseless carriage," but most welcomed the new invention because it replaced horse-drawn carriages and changed life in America. The streets would no longer be littered with unsightly horse droppings, which created a nasty smell and brought diseasebearing flies. People would no longer be dependent on horses and forced to keep them. Travelers were no longer limited to short distances. Cars revolutionized life and changed living patterns in America. People living in rural areas no longer had to cope with the loneliness of country life. People were now free to choose where they wanted to live, work, and travel.

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Comparison and Contrast. . .Compare pictures or other images of inventors from the past. Discuss their inventions. How did they impact society?

It’s a small world: Have a multi-cultural day at

Evaluation Sample

Places We’ve Been. . . Using a map, students can identify places they’ve traveled to in a car. How is travel different now from 100 years ago? How far could their family have driven 100 years ago? How far can their family drive now?

The invention of the automobile produced tremendous changes in people's way of life. No other technological innovation has created greater or faster changes in our society. The United States, Canada, Japan, and Western European countries are among the leading car-owning countries in the world. Even in nations that have been slower to develop, more and more people are buying cars and clogging traffic on the streets of their big cities. Although the very beginnings of the automobile can be traced back to Europe, it was in the United States that the “horseless carriage” made its big splash! Henry Ford, Ransom E. Olds, and other pioneers in the automobile industry began mass producing these amazing vehicles, and they haven’t slowed down since!

• Have your students prepare a “graphic” timeline that shows the development of the automobile. Ask them to find pictures, photos, images of automobiles from the beginning to the present. What changes in engineering and design will the students see? Have the students research the changes that have been made to automobiles. Which changes do your students think are cosmetic improvements and which are technological advances? Be sure and have your students include the cost of cars in their research. They may be amazed at what folks paid for a brand-new car way back in the “good old days”!

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.gallopade.com/Page 10

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.gallopade.com/Page 12

This book is not reproducible.

This book is not reproducible.

Another Great War! We are the world: Have students draw a picture showing U.S. government leaders meeting with leaders from other countries. Students can also bring in a photograph from a newspaper or an image off the Internet. Which countries will most likely be pictured now and why?

Section V - World War II The War That Spanned the Globe More people were killed and more property was destroyed during World War II than during any other war in history. After the war, Western Europe was no longer the center of world power. The Soviet Union became a world power. The development of the atomic bombs opened the doors of the nuclear age. The battles of World War II covered nearly every corner of the world—from the magnificent cities of Europe to the steaming deserts of northern Africa to the tropical islands of the Pacific Ocean. The death toll will never fully be known. Best estimates indicate about 17 million military deaths. Civilian deaths were even higher because of starvation, bombing raids, epidemics, and massacres. By the end of the war, the Axis Powers included Germany, Italy, Japan, Albania, Bulgaria, Finland, Hungary, Romania, and Thailand. The United States, Great Britain, Canada, and the Soviet Union were the major Allied Powers. Through the course of the war, 50 nations fought together as Allies.

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Have the class compile the photos, images, and drawings and make a current-events collage.

A Family Portrait… Have students bring in photos of relatives who remember World War II. Did any of their family members fight in the war? Have them do some research and show the specific areas of combat on the classroom map or globe.

What were the causes of World War II? Political instability and economic devastation in Europe that resulted from World War I was one cause. The rise of fascism was another. Nationalism swept across Europe during the 1800s. This dramatic form of patriotism caused people to feel that the aims of their nation should be placed above any other—even at the expense of other countries. Nationalism led to a feeling of superiority and helped some nations justify their attacks on other countries and the unfair treatment of minorities in their countries. Nationalism was a cause of World War I and continued after the war was over. The movement continued and exploded into a violently nationalistic group in Germany called the Nazi Party. Adolf Hitler became the leader of the Nazi Party, and the rest is brutal, bloody history!

Section VII - Civil Rights and the Changing Role of Women

The Struggle to be Free!

Segregation African Americans have struggled to gain political equality since slavery was abolished. The first challenge was to overcome “Jim Crow” laws, the system of laws used by whites to control blacks and keep blacks and whites separate. Blacks had to use separate schools, transportation, restaurants, and parks, which were often inferior to the whites’ facilities. Blacks were also denied voting rights when many Southern states passed laws requiring voters to be able to read and write, own property, and pay a poll tax. Without the power of the vote, blacks could not stop discrimination in education, housing, or public accommodations. Segregated facilities were not as common in the North, but blacks there had to compete with recent European immigrants for jobs, and often they lost.

Ask your students to imagine what it must have been like to be a black student who had to go to a rundown, poorly-supplied school far from home.

Encourage your students to discuss equality and civil rights.

E L P M SA

Plessy v. Ferguson was a Supreme Court case dealing with segregated railroad cars. The Court decided in 1896 that separate but equal facilities for blacks and whites were constitutional. Unfortunately for African-American students, separate educational facilities were not always equal. Schools were falling apart, and there weren’t books or teachers to put in the schools. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) used a legal strategy to challenge segregation beginning in 1910. During the first half of the twentieth century, many African Americans moved out of the South and into urban areas in the North. There, they were able to use political pressure to convince politicians to support civil rights legislation.

Often children discriminate against each other because of their appearance, or because of other superficial reasons.

Ask kids if they have ever been treated unfairly because of the color of their skin, their gender, or other reasons How did it make them feel?

During both World War I and World War II, black soldiers fought alongside whites in Europe and demanded equal employment opportunities at home. The NAACP continued to fight for equal education for all citizens.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.gallopade.com/Page 16

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.gallopade.com/Page 19

This book is not reproducible.

This book is not reproducible.

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 31


ENRICHMENT PACK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5� x 11� • The complete package is 20 pages

Evaluation Sample

Living in the Wild, Wild West The few wooden buildings lining the dirt road didn’t look like much. They had signs like “General Store,â€? “Blacksmith,â€? and “Hotel.â€? The Wild West town looked more like a dusty row of barns than a bustling city‌ The towns of the Wild West may have been small and simple, but they were the center of a pioneer’s life. Just about every Wild West town had the same businesses that were important to pioneer life: Blacksmith and Stables: Since horses were the main type of transportation, each Wild West town needed a blacksmith who could make shoes for the horses, and a stable where horses were fed and watered. General Store: The general store provided the supplies pioneers needed for survival. The stores were usually very small—the size of an average classroom. They carried things like rugs, cooking stoves, candles,

E L P SAM

hammers, and children’s toys.

Church: The church was the center of town. It was a place where settlers could worship and talk with their neighbors. A pastor might have to travel to several different towns to preach–all in one day!

Hotel: The hotel was important for visitors. Since most pioneer houses were one-room log cabins, they did not have room for guests. The hotel room usually cost 50 cents per night, plus 50 cents for lunch and dinner! Lumberyard/Sawmill: Lumberyards were important in prairie towns where there weren’t many trees to cut down. Pioneers got wood from the lumberyard to build their log cabins. Sawmills were important because they cut wood much faster than pioneers could cut by hand. School: Wild West towns usually had small, one-room schoolhouses. Students from ages six to 16 would all learn together from one teacher. Their subjects included reading, writing, and arithmetic. To think about: If you could add one business to a Wild West town, what would it be?

Building the Transcontinental Railroad

Actual pages are in color!

It was a race to see who could be the fastest to the f inish i wer driven into line. Spikes were the ground; tracks were laid across mountains and plains. It was a project that would change America forever‌ The construction of the Transcontinental Railroad was one of the greatest technological accomplishments in America’s history. Construction started in 1864 as a way to connect onnect the East Eas to the West. Before the railroad, onths to travel it took f ive or six months across the United States, and one trip could cost over $1,000!

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Two companies es began building ding the railroad. railrooad. oad The Central Pacif ic started laying track from west to east, while the Union Pacif ic laid track from east to west. Both companies competed to see who could reach the ending point of the railroad in Promontory Point, Utah, f irst! Building the railroad was diff icult for both companies. The Central Pacif ic had to lay track through the Rocky Mountains. They blasted through rock with dynamite ific’s work was less challenging because they were able to build across fla t prairie land. Both railroad companies lay an average of one mile of railroad track a day. The competition finally ended on May 10, 1869, when the tracks laid by the Central Pacific and Union Pacific met at Promontory Point. The last spike nailed into the railroad was made of gold! News of the completion of the railroad spread quickly across the nation, and Americans celebrated the connection of the East and the West. The creation of the railroad changed the United States forever! Americans could travel east to west in only a few days rather than several months. It only cost $150 for the nicest seat on the train. Many towns were built near railroad stations. The “Wild Westâ€? became home to new settlers and bustling cities. To think about: had not been built in 1869? 7JSHJOJB&YQFSJFODFt64"**tÂŞ$BSPMF.BSTI(BMMPQBEF*OUFSOBUJPOBMttXXXHBMMPQBEFDPNt1BHF 

Page 32

7JSHJOJB&YQFSJFODFt64"**tÂŞ$BSPMF.BSTI(BMMPQBEF*OUFSOBUJPOBMttXXXHBMMPQBEFDPNt1BHF

When I Grow Up, I Want to Be a Cowboy Many former slaves left the South and moved west to work on ranches in Texas after the attle was a diffficult i w lonely, dirty, and sometimes dangerous. Civil War. Driving cattle job. It was Imagine how the “Help-Wanted� advertisement might have read...

Help Wanted: Cowboys $1 a Day Attention: Young Men, 15 to 25 years old Twelve cowhands are needed to herd 3,000 longhorn cattle. We’ll travel on horseback, 10 to 15 miles a day for two months. We’ll follow the Chisholm Trail. You must be a good rider and able to rope a calf while riding your horse. You must be willing to herd across deep water. The boss will provide lunch and dinner at the chuck wagon. Be prepared to take a two-hour turn each night watching the cattle. Singers and storytellers are encouraged to apply. Driving a herd of cattle was not easy! Keeping the cattle moving in the right direction could be dangerous. It didn’t take much to spook a Texas longhorn. A loud noise, like lightning, might cause a stampede. Imagine 3,000 cattle running on the open plain, trampling everything in their path! You’d have to round them up again. Sometimes you could keep them calm by singing.

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There were other dangers. hieves, and hostile til Indians I di topped top t ppedd the th list. li t A common cause cauuse off death d th for f Rattlesnakes, cattle thieves, a cowboy was being dragged by his horse after falling off. Most of the day, you would ride alongside the cattle alone. After the evening meal, you’d sit around the fi r shut-eye. Your buddy would wake you when it was your turn at watch. Hard to Believe But True! The business of cattle driving didn’t last that long–only about 20 years! The growth of the railroad meant the cattle didn’t have to be herded over long distances. Settlers began to use barbed wire fences, which blocked the trails crossing the Great Plains. 7JSHJOJB&YQFSJFODFt64"**tª$BSPMF.BSTI(BMMPQBEF*OUFSOBUJPOBMttXXXHBMMPQBEFDPNt1BHF

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


ENRICHMENT PACK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5� x 11� • The complete package is 20 pages

Evaluation Sample

Indian Reservations

The Weeping Time

It seemed like the perfect solution. If Indians would give up their land for white settlers, the United States would give them other land somewhere else. It was a win-win situation, or so they thought‌

How would you like to be sold, as if you were a mule? No one would, of course, but it happened‌ In 1857, on a racetrack in Savannah, avvannah, Georgia, the largest large sale of

As Americans began moving west and creating larger the East, they needed to fin d a way to move geer towns in th thee American In Indians to make room for more settlements.

slaves a ever held in the United States took aves place. a On two rainy March ddays, 436 men, ace.

Thee American government came up with a solution: the g reservation. s servation. A reservation was land specificall y set aside

woomen, and children were ssold to the women, ighest bidder.

for or Indians to llive on.

Pierce Butler, a plantation owner, had inheritance His land and had wasted his inheritance. bbuildings uuildings d gs were e e sold so d to pay some of his

The idea of reservations grew fast, and they were c created all over ov the United States. When American s wante to move onto new land, they would settlers wanted

bbills, but he still owed mor more money. The

force the American Indians living in the area to move to a reservation out West.

E L P M SA

groups’ homelands. Moving to a new reservation was a big change for Indians. They had to learn how to farm new land and live in a new environment. Many Indians died from the long, difficul t journeys to the reservations.

H owned 900 slaves, but he h gave half of He them to his brother. The rest were stuffed onto railway cars and steamships and brought to the racetrack. Many were kept in horse stalls. Some waited there for days or weeks until the sale began.

One observer said, “It is a dreadful affair‌.â€? Not all families were sold together. Parents and children were soon parted. So were brothers and sisters. He asked, “Can such a system [slavery] endure?â€? And yet he also said, “Slavery is better for them and for us‌.â€?

The United States government controlled reservations, which caused further problems for the Indians. As America’s population got bigger and bigger, Indian reservations got smaller and smaller. Since the land was owned by the government, they had the right to take it away. Land was often taken from the Indians to create more room for settlers.

Surely, the men, women, boys, and girls standing in the rain that day disagreed. Many tried hard to be purchased by “good� masters. They showed off their teeth or muscles. Others just sat sadly in the rain.

Today, Indian reservations still survive across the United States. The biggest Indian reservation is the Navajo Reservation located where Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah meet. All in all, there are 52.2 million acres of land in the United States set aside just for Indians. The land allows Indians to be American citizens but still practice their traditional tribal customs.

Interesting fact: More than half of American Indians live in Oklahoma, California, New Mexico, Arizona, and Washington.

Actual pages are in color!

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Who Wants to Be an American?

E L P M SA

only o property left to sell was w his slaves.

Although it seemed like the creation of Indian reservations was a nice gift, it turned out to be a bad situation for Indian groups. Most reservations were far from the Indian

States of America‌ I pledge allegiance to the fllag of the United State There are two simple ways a person can become a U.S. citizen. First, a person is a U.S. citizen if they are born anywhere in the United States. Second, a person is a U.S. citizen if at least one of their parents is a U.S. citizen. If you were not born in the U.S. and do not have American parents, you can still become a citizen of the U.S. The process of becoming a legal U.S. citizen in this manner is called “naturalization.â€? The fi rst step to becoming naturalized is to get permission to live in the United States. Then, you have to live in the U.S. for fi ve years. After fiv e years, you must meet the following standards to become a U.S. citizen:

E L P M SA ‹@V\T\Z[IL`LHYZVYVSKLY

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If you meet all the requirements to become a U.S. citizen, you must pledge allegiance to the United States. Also, you must commit to fi ght for America if the U.S. goes to war.

The last step to becoming an American citizen is passing a written test covering the politics, history, and government of America! To think about: Do you think it is a good idea for new citizens to take a test covering American history and government? Why or why not?

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What happened next? New owners and their new slaves left. Champagne bottle corks â&#x20AC;&#x153;poppedâ&#x20AC;? to celebrate the $303,850 made from the sale. One slave was sold for only $250. ;OLYHPUZ[VWWLK(MYPJHUZ^OV^LYLIYV\NO[HNHPUZ[[OLPY^PSS[V^VYRPU[OLĂ&#x201E;LSKZ  or do household chores, worked harder than ever. One day, the terrible practice of slavery would come to an end in America. But not on this day at a racetrack in Savannah.

Think about it: How might you have felt as the seller needing money? As a slave being forced to leave your family and friends forever? As someone just watching, and maybe wondering if there was a better way than this? 7JSHJOJB&YQFSJFODFt64"**tÂŞ$BSPMF.BSTI(BMMPQBEF*OUFSOBUJPOBMttXXXHBMMPQBEFDPNt1BHF

The Gospel of Wealth in the Gilded Age Imagine life without a telephone, electricity, refrigerators, canned food, steel, or carsâ&#x20AC;Ś Americans were proud of their success. They had good reason to be! Most of the inventions of the Gilded Age belonged to Americans. The country had many resources. Together, the inventions and rich resources helped the country grow. Industries took off like never before, and America became the leading industrial nation. A new class of powerful businessmen emerged. Large companies took over smaller ones. Some called the men who ran these businesses â&#x20AC;&#x153;captains of industry.â&#x20AC;? Others called them â&#x20AC;&#x153;robber barons.â&#x20AC;? John D. Rockefeller was the most famous of these businessmen. His company controlled 80 percent of the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oil refi ning! Another was Andrew Carnegie. He grew up poor, working in a textile mill. But he worked hard. He had a dream. He made the steel industry grow. He was a humble man. He used his money for public libraries and education.

E L P M SA

These large companies frightened Americans. an The men who ran them believed they were doing the Lordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work. Rockefeller once said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The good Lord gave me my wealthâ&#x20AC;ŚI believe it is my dutyâ&#x20AC;Śto use the money I make for the good of my fellow manâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? This kind of thinking became known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gospel of Wealth.â&#x20AC;? To think about: Â&#x2039;>HZ[OL¸.VZWLSVM>LHS[OšHNVVK^H`VM thinking?

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7JSHJOJB&YQFSJFODFt64"**tÂŞ$BSPMF.BSTI(BMMPQBEF*OUFSOBUJPOBMttXXXHBMMPQBEFDPNt1BHF

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 33


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11”

Additional Resources

Evaluation Sample

™ The Virginia Standards of Learning Reference Guide

™ The Virginia Standards of Learning Reference Guide

Experience

Experience

Archaeology Jamestown Rediscovery I by William M. Kelso, ©1995. Published by The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities. As the first book of a series, gives a good historical summary and research goals of the project. Covers excavations and discoveries of the project’s first year in 1994.

Virginians All by Carlo Uchello, ©1992. Published by Pelican Publishing Co., Inc. Twenty-nine brief biographies of famous Virginians past and present, including athletes, entertainers, writers, politicians, military figures, and Native Americans. An Inventory of the Contents of the Governor’s Palace Taken after the Death of Lord Botetourt: An Inventory of the Personal Estate of His Excellency, Lord Botetourt, Royal Governor of Virginia, 1768-1770, ©1981. Published by The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. At only 95 cents, a fun-to-read bargain with its older spellings and terminology and a room-by-room inventory that provides insight into 18th century usage.

Jamestown Rediscovery II by William M. Kelso, ©1996. Published by The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities. Describes and illustrates the major discoveries of the archaeological project’s second year, 1995. Jamestown Rediscovery III by William M. Kelso, Nicholas M. Luccketti, and Beverly A. Straube, ©1997. Published by The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities. Describes and illustrates in full color the major discoveries of the third season of the APVA Jamestown Rediscovery. Includes new information about discoveries from 1994-95 as well.

The Story of Old Glory by Albert I. Mayer, ©1970. Published by Regensteiner Publishing Enterprises, Inc. A good history of the flag from Betsy Ross to present day.

Civics Democracy Owner’s Manual, ©1994. Published by VOTE USA, Inc. A needed-byevery-citizen manual in easy-to-understand format defining all aspects of U. S. government including the Constitution, the election process, as well as how Congress, the White House, Supreme Court, and state and local governments work.

Indians

Civil War Civil War Sites in Virginia, A TOUR GUIDE by James I. Robertson, Jr., ©1982. Published by University Press of Virginia. A guide to scores of Civil War sites, most of which are free of charge to visit. In easy-to-follow form, the book divides Virginia into six geographic sections, with code numbers on map to correspond with numbers affixed to each locale or in the narrative. Each summary contains specific directions for how to get there via today’s highways. Civil War Parks, The Story Behind the Scenery by William C. “Jack” Davis, ©1984. Published by KC Publications, Inc. At only $7.95, a large, colorful, history of Civil War battlefields worthy of your coffee table. Good section on Manassas, Richmond National Battlefield Park, Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County Battlefields, and Gettysburg. Civil War! America Becomes One Nation by James I. Robertson, Jr., ©1992. Published by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. A compact and readable account of the causes, major battles, leaders, and effects of the Civil War; well-indexed with good map of battle sites. Brown Paper School USKids History: Book of the American Civil War by Howard Egger-Bovet and Marlene Smith-Baranzini, ©1998. Published by Little, Brown & Co. Filled cover-to-cover with vividly written accounts of the Civil War from the perspective of both the North and South, dramatic readings, poems, songs, speeches, and illustrations based on the ideas, foods, customs, and crafts of that time period.

Eastern Shore Indians of Virginia and Maryland by Helen C. Rountree and Thomas E. Davidson, ©1997. Published by University Press of Virginia. Written by anthropologists, this book is a thorough glimpse of the culture and history of Eastern Shore Indians from A.D. 800 until the last tribes disbanded in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. In addition to characteristics and traditions of each tribe, it includes plant and animal life native to each ecozone. The book includes animals and plants that were essential components of Indians’ habitat and diet, and explains how ecology influenced the way tribes interacted with white settlers. The Rise and Fall of the Powhatan Empire (Indians in Seventeenth-Century Virginia) by James Axtell, ©1995. Published by The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Describes the struggle between the Powhatan Indians and the English colonists to dominate Virginia’s Tidewater region and resources, from both the Powhatans’ perspective and that of the settlers. The Powhatan Indians of Virginia (Their Traditional Culture) by Helen C. Rountree, ©1989. Published by University of Oklahoma Press. A thorough, detailed historical reference of the Powhatan Indians and their influence on Chesapeake life before and after Jamestown’s founding. The Earth Shall Weep, A History of Native America by James Wilson, ©2000. Published by Atlantic Monthly Press. Written by a British author whose intent is to make known the Indian perspective on the past and present. Using native testimony and writings as well as conventional history, this is a very different narrative of American Indians since the arrival of European settlers.

©2002Carole CaroleMarsh/Gallopade Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.virginiaexperience.com/Page International/800-536-2GET/www.virginiaexperience.com/Page 6 4 ©2002

©2002 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.virginiaexperience.com/Page 7

- This book is not reproducible. -

- This book is not reproducible. -

20

23

Ye Olde Williamsburg Colonial Tavern Menu

TICK, TICK, TICK!

~Dinners~ - Deviled Crab Cakes: we make ‘em spicy with lots of hot seasonings!

- Smoked Ham & Red-eye Gravy (pan gravy made from fried ham)

~Side Items & Bread~

- Pork in Apple Cider - Chicken Smothered in Oysters

- Cauliflower Pickles - Roast Long Potatoes - Pickled Oysters - Winter Squash - Spoon Bread: a baked dish made of cornmeal, - Sweet Potato Pone eggs, and shortenin’ (butter or lard - in other words, FAT!)

- Hoppin’ John: a true Southern dish made with black-eyed peas, rice, and salt pork or bacon

- Shortenin’ Bread: crispy & flaky

- Succotash: a dish made of Corn and Beans

- Corn Pone: a loaf or oval-shaped bread or

(usually Lima beans, but we’ll use anything!) cake. This one’s got corn in it.

- Hand-Churned Butter

~Desserts~

- Peach Marmalade: jelly or preserves with small pieces of fruit or rind in it.

- Raspberry Fool: an English dessert made of crushed, cooked fruit mixed with cream or custard and served cold

~Soup & Salad~

- Plum Pudding with Hard Sauce (a topping made from creamed butter and confectioner’s (powdered) sugar)

- Parsnip or Clam Chowder: A thick, creamy soup, made with clams, vegetables, or whatever we can get.

- Peanut Soup

- Wet Bottom Shoofly Pie: a pie filled with a mixture of flour, butter, brown sugar, and molasses. We don’t put a crust on top.

- Oyster Soup

- Stewed Cabbage with Ham Hock (A pig’s - Burnt Sugar Cake: it’s only slightly burnt!

ankle - yummy!)

- “Salat” (Salad) Greens with Turnips

- Indian Pudding: cornmeal mush sweetened with molasses. Sometimes dressed up with sugar, eggs, raisins, and spices.

~Drinks~

- Molasses Fruitcake: as if it wasn’t sticky - Sassafras Bark Tea: Sassafras is a tree

enough, we put MORE molasses in!

that grows in these parts. We use the leaves, bark, and oil from the roots for flavor

- Ginger Cakes

- Apple Cider

- Apple Custard

- Hot Cranberry Punch

VS Fruits & Veggies

2

U1

Their goal? To persuade Parliament to change tax laws and trade rules, and to treat colonists the same as they did English citizens. When England did not respond, a Second Virginia Convention was held in Richmond. At this time, the words of Patrick Henry expressed how colonists felt. He said, “ . . . give me liberty or give me death!” War broke out between the colonists and British in April, 1775. (You remember!: Paul Revere’s famous ride, “The British are coming!” and the “shot heard ’round the world” when the war began in Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts). The Second Continental Congress organized an army and appointed George Washington George Washington commander-inrefused to accept chief. This payment for serving as Congress told the commander-in-chief each colony to of the Continental Army. act as an independent state. Only their common goal to be free from England tied them together, but this was common cause enough.

VU Seafood Chowder

A Slice of Pie?

paring f PreAction or

Healthy Stuff

Virginia H istory M ade N o M ystery!

15

A Sniper’s View

Is that the General?

at News? Wh

Little, I tty, B itty V irginia M akes f or B ig T ime L earning!

• Virginia Experience Product(s)

Virginia Penny Pocket Projects-HISTORY

• Virginia Experience Product(s) To Use With This Project

The Virginia Experience Book The Virginia Experience Fourth-Grade Workbook

• • • •

Requirements:

Classroom or hallway wall; work area; found materials

Requirements:

Large, sturdy table; found and collected materials

Time:

1 week - 1 month

Time:

1 week-1 month

The Project:

Bring Virginia history to life for students.

The Project:

Create a part of Virginia in miniature.

The Pizzazz!:

Think out-of-the [Jello] box! Tie history to geography, to math, and to everything else!

• • • •

The Pizzazz!:

Kids love miniatures, and so do many adults these days. The more detail you can add, the better: be ambitious, in a big little way!

Here’s How:

There are 30 projects on this poster. If all are done, your classroom can end up with the following to show for your students’ efforts: a classroom museum; an historic fort; a state history library; a video of current event news reports, a debate; a poll; a state family tree; a giant timeline; a wall quilt; 60 historical hands; a topographic state map made of Jello, and much, much more!

Here’s How:

Using a large table top, have students create a miniature village of Jamestown, the colonial capital of Williamsburg, the entire state, or whatever you select. For a month before you begin this project, have students collect small objects such as drinking straws, buttons, spools, game pieces, popsicle sticks, and anything else possibly usable in this project. Be creative! Make tiny cardboard houses with shredded wheat “thatched” roofs, for example. Gray ribbon can make good roads; a narrow yellow ribbon makes a good centerline. Popsicle sticks make good fences. Paper, foam, cut-outs from magazines, and other materials can be used. The more items the merrier! You’re not looking for perfection, but for students to elaborate on the scene you have selected with as much detail as possible. Add “life” to your miniature scene with “lost, now found” animals and people from childrens’ toy sets.

Tip:

Good aids are magazines or catalogs devoted to the world of “miniatures.” Visit a miniature “collectible” shop of doll houses or railroads, for example, for excellent ideas. The most amazing thing I’ve ever seen was a complete miniature circus at the 1982 World’s Fair in Knoxville, Tennessee. It was on a table larger than the total square feet of the apartment I lived in at that time!

To Use With This Project

Just One Example:

JELLO GEOGRAPHY Geography has played an important part in Virginia’s history. Have students make a basic topographic state map out of different colors of Jello. Make red Jello for earth, green for grass, blue for water, and the new whitish [carbonated Champagne] Jello for sand. Students can make a flat map, showing the different regions and bodies of water, or, they can make a side, cutaway view of the state. Add whipped cream snow to the mountaintops, or as whitecaps on the ocean waves. Map skill-building can be fun, delicious, and mostly low calorie!

Page 34

It was bound to happen. Colonists across the land were exasperated with strict English rules. They were especially angry about an increase in taxes. In 1773, people in Boston got particularly upset over the tax on tea. Disguised in Indian dress, they stole 342 chests of English tea and threw them into Boston Harbor in protest! A second protest in 1774 caused the British to close the port. Virginia burgesses supported the colonists by denouncing Parliament’s actions and setting aside June 1 as a day to fast and pray. Lord Dunmore, Virginia’s royal governor, responded by dissolving the House of Burgesses! The burgesses, however, kept meeting as private citizens. When they held the First Virginia Convention, colonists came from all over. Seven were elected delegates to what would be the First Continental Congress. Patrick Henry, George Washington, and Richard Henry Lee of Virginia attended the First Continental Congress, held in Philadelphia. Peyton Randolph of Virginia was named president of the convention.

Tip:

Video or photograph activities in progress and run them on a monitor during parent night. Serve Jello for refreshments!

©/2000 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.virginiaexperience.com/Page 8

©/2000 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.virginiaexperience.com/Page 21

This book is not reproducible.

This book is not reproducible.

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


TEST PREP CD

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected screen shots

Evaluation Sample

T hese all new comprehensive test-prep quizzes help kids score high on Virginia’s SOL test! Each must-have CD includes more than 750 practice test questions that thoroughly cover all social studies standards for Virginia. Features of this excellent new series include: • Tests include both factual and analytical questions • Tests include both positive and negative choice format questions • Tests cover all grade-level content • Questions are separated into corresponding standards so teachers can assess student knowledge and focus follow-up teaching efforts to meet individual student needs. • Bonus section of study/review materials provides facts and essential content that students can study to prepare for practice tests and/or review problem areas after practice tests. These Virginia Test Prep CDs pinpoint each individual student’s areas of understanding and competency, and identify areas where additional study is needed. Patterned after our successful, straightforward, comprehensive Virginia Experience series of workbooks, these programs are designed to help raise student comprehension based on the Virginia Standards of Learning, and as a result, this software will raise student test scores!

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 35


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 176 pages

TEACHER’S EDITION STUDENT WORKBOOK

Evaluation Sample

It’s All in the Name of Progress! The United States government played a major role in the development of the Great Plains. The Homestead Act offered 160 acres to settlers who would move to the Great American Desert and establish homes. The government gave railroads free land to develop rail line routes out West. Towns were established to provide water and other necessities for the rail lines. To recover some of their expenses, the railroads offered this land for sale and advertised in eastern newspapers to encourage settlers to move west. Railroads transported settlers and goods to the Great Plains. They provided a way for farmers and ranchers to transport cattle and crops raised on the Great Plains to markets in the East with buyers hungry for beef and grains.

Essential Skills

E L P M SA

Complete the information under the photographs showing the technological advance and the challenge it overcame. The first one has been done for you!

Sod houses _______________________

Barbed Wire _______________________

Lack of wood _______________________

lack of wood _______________________

windmills _______________________

steel plow _______________________

lack of water _______________________

tough prairie soil _______________________

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.gallopade.com • Page 12 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Quick Review

One More – Just for Fun!

1. The Great Plains were once considered a __________________________ treeless

1. In the late 1800s, railroads were the most important source of transportation for people and products crossing America. True or False: Today, railroads are outdated and no longer serve as a major source of transportation in the United States.

wasteland ________________________________________.

False _______________

2. According to Colonel Richard Irving Dodge, when he was a schoolboy, his map of

2. Factories in Detroit began producing automobiles in the early 1900s. True or False: Factories in Detroit still make automobiles today.

the United States showed The Great American Desert located between the

Missouri River ______________________________________________________________ and the Rocky Mountains _____________________________________________________________________.

True _______________

prairie soil 3. Steel plows cut through the tough ________________________________________

Map Skill Builder

of the Great Plains.

Label each of the following places on the map with its assigned number:

E L P M SA

R.

1 Detroit, Michigan

Lake Huron

____________________ for their families and crops to survive. water

160 acres 5. The Homestead Act offered ______________________________________________

e nc re w La St

Lake Ontario

2 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

3

Lake Michigan

1

3 New England

(if you need a little help, see page 21!)

6. What did the railroads do with the free land that the U.S. government had provided

Write the products each manufacturing

offered land for sale and advertised on which to build rail lines? ________________________________________________ in eastern newspapers ______________________________________________________________________

area produces in the space below.

ke La

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to families who would move to the Great American Desert and establish homes.

o R.

E L P SAM

4. Windmills and mechanical well-drilling machines allowed farmers to get enough

Lake Superior

2

no longer 7. In 1890, the Bureau of the Census reported that a definite frontier ________________

o R.

Ohi

1. Detroit

automobiles _________________________________________

2. Pittsburgh

steel products _________________________________________

3. New England _________________________________________ textiles

existed ______________________________________________________________________. On your classroom globe, find the region in the United States that contains these manufacturing areas. It’s known as the:

Page 36

O __ R __ T __ H E __ A __ S __. T N __

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.gallopade.com • Page 15

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.gallopade.com • Page 19

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 176 pages

TEACHER’S EDITION STUDENT WORK BOOK One More—Just For Fun!

Evaluation Sample

The War Journal

December 20, 2008

European Recovery After WWII

This handheld computer had a memory problem and lost its important info about Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal. Fill in the blanks so that the next person who uses it will have that information.

Why was the New Deal created?

to help U.S. come out the Great ___________________________________ Depression

The official name of the plan to rebuild Europe was the European Recovery Program. The United States sent about $13 billion in aid to Europe. U.S. aid included food, machinery, and other products, and ended in 1952.

The plan was called the

Marshall Plan ____________________________ because Secretary of State George C. Marshall suggested it.

Who developed the New Deal?

Franklin D. Roosevelt ___________________________________ Map Skill Builder

Where did it happen?

Check out the maps below. One represents Germany as it looked before the end of World War II. The other shows Germany as it looked after the war. Identify each map with “before” the war or “after” on the line above each map.

United States ___________________________________ When did it happen?

1929-1930s ___________________________________

E L P M SA

___________________________ before 4˚ 56˚

___________________________________ environmental improvement programs,

12˚

Arhus

farm assistance programs, increased ___________________________________

Copenhagen

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16˚

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56˚

4˚ 56˚

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DENMARK Odense

___________________________ after

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Helsingborg

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Meu

Luxembourg

Leipzig

Erfurt

THURINGEN

r

Bielefeld

er es W

Bad Hersfeld

Siegen Aachen

Ode

Od

Berlin

tellan dk Mit a

Hannover

Enschede Arnhem

Utrecht

62˚

Rotterdam

se Neis

Halle Kassel Eisenach

Amsterdam

Cottbus

be El

Dortmund

Werra

se

l na

Essen

Dusseldorf NORDRHEIN-WESTFALEN

Cologne

Maastricht

Dessau

Gottingen

Duisburg

Antwerpen

52˚ Zielona Gora

Ha ve l BRANDENBURG

Osnabruck

Magdeburg

SACHSEN ANHALT

e

Szczecin be

NIEDERSACHSEN

POLAND

Frankfurt

Spree

in

Brussels BELGIUM

Braunschweig

Rh

as

Eindhoven

er es W

Munster Ma

Charleroi

Bielefeld

Swinoujscie

MECKLENBURG-VORPOMMERN

Schwerin

El

Bremen

NETHERLANDS

rta Wa

Berlin

Potsdam

BERLIN

Enschede Arnhem

Utrecht Rotterdam

tellan dk Mit a

Hannover

Rostock

Wittenberge

Gorzow Wielkopolski

er

Hamburg

BREMEN

Oldenburg Od

Ems

GERMANY

NIEDERSACHSEN

Osnabruck 62˚

Emden Groningen

Ha ve l BRANDENBURG

NETHERLANDS

Bremerhaven

Wilmhelmshaven Szczecin

be

Wittenberge

Amsterdam

HAMBURG

Schwerin

El

Bremen

Oldenburg

Pomeranian Bay

Stralsund

Lubeck

MECKLENBURG-VORPOMMERN

Hamburg

BREMEN

Groningen

Baltic Sea

Mecklenburger Bucht

Kiel

Ca

Swinoujscie

HAMBURG

Sassnitz

Kiel Bay

l na

el

Lubeck

North Sea

Ronne

Rodbyhavn Gedser Puttgarden

SCHLESWIGHOLSTEIN

Pomeranian Bay

Stralsund

ch

Mecklenburger Bucht

Kiel

ne

___________________________________

Flensburg

Sassnitz

Kiel Bay

l

na Ca

Le

SCHLESWIGHOLSTEIN

el Ki

Sonderborg

Baltic Sea

Flensburg

56˚

Ystad

Trelleborg

Ronne

Sonderborg

labor rights ___________________________________

16˚

Karlskrona

Kristianstad

Helsingborg

Copenhagen

DENMARK

Trelleborg

Rhi

E L P M SA What were the major features?

___________________________________ Social security, federal work programs,

S 8˚ WITZERLAND

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.gallopade.com • Page 103

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.gallopade.com • Page 123

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Salzach

Innsbruck12˚

Practice Test

Essential Skills State Your Case! You’re an attorney for NOW arguing for passage of the ERA. State two unfair disadvantages that women face in the workplace.

discriminated against through unfair hiring 1. _______________________________________________________________ practices ______________________________________________________________________ lower wages for same job as men 2. ________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

E L P AM

Well, you did not win your case, but your efforts did draw attention to the problems women face in the workplace. The ERA created a focus on equal opportunity employment that opened up a:

wider range of options and advancement for ______________________________________________________________________

S

women in business and public service ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

The Great Debate How do you feel about the Equal Rights Amendment? Do you believe it should have been passed? ___________________________________________________________________ answers will vary ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.gallopade.com • Page 150 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

11. Which movement worked to help the poor and control the size and power of big business in the early 1900s? ❍ A Men’s Movement ❍ B Women’s Movement ● C Progressive Movement ❍ D Poor and Big Business Movement

16. What were African Americans hoping to find during the Great Migration North? ❍ F Life free from violence ❍ G Life free from discrimination ❍ H Better paying jobs ● J All of the above

12. In 1898, the United States entered the Spanish American War as a result of a(n) ________________on the USS Maine. ❍ F argument ● G explosion ❍ H really bad meal ❍ J theft

17. Which war did the United States enter following the attack on Pearl Harbor? ❍ A World War I ● B World War II ❍ C Vietnam War ❍ D Korean War

E L P M SA

13. Following the German attack on the Lusitania, Americans became more sympathetic toward England. What was one of their concerns? ❍ A Higher fares on passenger ships ❍ B Economic/political ties to Germany ● C Economic/political ties to England ❍ D Lack of transportation to Europe 14. What contribution did Henry Ford make to industrial production? ● F Assembly lines ❍ G Expensive cars ❍ H Labor unions ❍ J High wages 15. Prohibition was the only amendment to be ________________ by Congress. ❍ A passed ❍ B tied ● C repealed ❍ D reported

18. Which plan is instituted to rebuild Europe following World War II? ❍ F Treaty of Paris ❍ G Warsaw Pact ❍ H New Deal ● J Marshall Plan

19. What is the period in U.S. history from 1946 through 1964 called? ❍ A The Baby Room ❍ B The Baby Game ● C The Baby Boom ❍ D The Bebop Boom

20. Who has worked for equal rights for all people? ❍ F Civil Rights workers ❍ G Women’s Rights workers ● H Eleanor Roosevelt ❍ J All protesters

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.gallopade.com • Page 171 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.

Page 37


Evaluation Sample

TERRIFIC TIMELINES 30 Student Reference Timelines: 3 Packs of 10

Actual Size 3.5” x 17”

Big Wall Timeline

Actual Size 11” x 8’

DAY ONE: LESSON PLANS Vocabulary Start the week by discussing the Timeline terms on page 22. Then distribute the matching activity for students to complete. History Ask each student to choose one person from the Timeline to research, and then write a timeline with 10 entries for that person. Explain which events are most important to include and why (birth, school, career, death, etc.). English Pick 10 random events on the Timeline. List the 10 subjects and the 10 verbs of these events on the blackboard. Then give your students 15 minutes to write a creative story with each of the subjects and verbs given. Read the stories aloud to the class! Math Pass out a worksheet with math problems that use the Timeline like: 1. How many entries are listed on the Timeline? 2. How many years are between two events on the Timeline? 3. Divide the Timeline into 5 sections. How many entries are in each section? 4. How many people names are on the Timeline? How many place names are on the Timeline? 5. Pick a university, business or other site from the Timeline. How many years has it been operating? Art Each student chooses a building on the Timeline to recreate. Distribute balsa wood pieces and wood glue for building, and embellish with additions like a porch, dome, windows, etc. Use toy objects, pipe cleaners, dowels, ribbon, etc. Add detail with black marker. Students should label buildings with the name, owner, location, and date.

More Class Activities!

Cause & Effect

● Ask students to add several imaginary watershed events to the Timeline that they wish would happen to change the course of history.

Every event on your Timeline happened for a reason. The reason is sometimes called a cause. A cause produces an effect, or in this case, an event. Some events occur because of several causes, and a single cause can spark several different events.

● Give each student an event from the Timeline. Draw a map with marker on a wood base or other sturdy material. Use white labeled flags to mark the locations where each event occurred. Date each flag, and then organize them into chronological order with a piece of ribbon to show the passage of time!

Write 8 significant events, such as a war or major invention, from the Timeline. Then use the Timeline, library, the Internet, and other resources to research the cause for each event.

● Cut 3x5” index cards into thirds, and punch a hole in the short end of each section. Ask students to illustrate six events from the Timeline on the cards. String the cards on yarn to make a Timeline Necklace! Let the students wear their necklaces all week! ● Let each student make a timeline of his or her life. Use the activity on page 17.

EFFECT (EVENT)

CAUSE

1. ____________________

_____________________________________________

2. ____________________

_____________________________________________

3. ____________________

_____________________________________________

4. ____________________

_____________________________________________

5. ____________________

_____________________________________________

6. ____________________

_____________________________________________

7. ____________________

_____________________________________________

8. ____________________

_____________________________________________

Notes:

Have you ever wondered why we haven’t been eaten yet?

Because we taste bad!

“Time is…Time was… Time is past.” – Robert Greene ©Carole Marsh • Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.gallopade.com • Terrific Timeline Tools for Teachers • Page 4

Page 38

©Carole Marsh • Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.gallopade.com • Terrific Timeline Tools for Teachers • Page 18

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed.


NOTES

P.O. Box 2779, Peachtree City, GA 30269 • t. 800-536-2438 • f. 800-871-2979 • www.virginiacurriculum.com

Page 39


Thank You For Your Consideration! Please let us know if there is anything we can do to help you with your decision to purchase any of our books.

Co n t a c t u s a t : P. O. B ox 2 7 7 9 , Pe a c h t r e e C i t y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 tel (800)536-2438 â&#x20AC;˘ fax (800)871-2979 w w w. v i r g i n i a c u r r i c u l u m . c o m


2013 Virginia Experience for USA II Evaluation Kit