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Table of Contents Dear Educators Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Company Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Customer Testimonials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Classroom Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Sample Pages: Student Workbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Sample Pages: Teacher’s Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Sample Pages: Enrichment Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Sample Pages: Blackline Masters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Sample Pages: Color Overhead Transparencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Sample Pages: Test Prep CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Sample Pages: Interactive Write-in Readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Sample Pages: 20 Ways to Teach the GPS with Pizzazz . . . . . . . . . . .30 P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2


Dear Georgia Educators, Gallopade International is pleased to offer you the Georgia Experience, the finest curriculum program available for grades K-8. Every Georgia Experience product is 100% comprehensive and 100% correlated with the Georgia Performance Standards and is fully integrated with Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies. Each grade’s comprehensive Student Workbook provides interactive lessons, including grade-level skill development and mastery. Each standard is covered, using “small bites” of instruction and reinforcing hands-on activities, skill practice, and other involvement of the student to make complicated topics interesting and understandable. The Student Workbook is supplemented with Teacher Resources, Test Prep CDs, cross-curricular Enrichment Packs and other resources to provide a comprehensive, effective, enriching solution. This Evaluation Kit provides an overview of each product, giving you an opportunity to preview a sample of the entire Georgia Experience curriculum program. The program covers exactly what Georgia students are required to know in order to pass the CRCT and its design is unique and effective, helping your students to both truly understand the material and enjoy learning. Gallopade International, a Georgia business and proud Partner in Education, has been in business for more than 30 years and is dedicated to creating products and tools that help educators like you achieve academic success! Founder and CEO Carole Marsh is passionate about supporting Georgia educators and students, and we are confident the Georgia Experience program will exceed your expectations! Sincerely,

The Gallopade Curriculum Team

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Gallopade International, Inc. Company Profile • Founded in 1979 by Georgia native, Carole Marsh • Woman-owned and family-operated business located in Peachtree City, GA • Publisher of over 15,000 educational products, including over 200 items about Georgia • Products include books, maps, software, decoratives, games, and more • Named Publisher’s Weekly fastest growing small publisher in 2000 • Recipient of the NSSEA Advance America Award in 2002 • Winner of the Teacher’s ChoiceTM Award in 2002 for state series, available for all 50 states • Winner of the 2003 National School Supply and Equipment Association’s Excellence in Education Award • Winner of the Teacher’s ChoiceTM Award for the Family in 2004, Carole Marsh MysteriesTM series • Carole Marsh named Georgia Author of the Year for mid-level readers in 2007 • Winner of the 2013 Teacher’s Choice™ Award for the Classroom for Georgia Digital Readers

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 4


Customer Testimonials: The Gallopade social studies materials are a dream come true! This is my fourth year using the 5th Grade Social Studies United States History book. It covers the standards and it allows the teacher to supplement as she sees fit. The students love it because it is not the usual boring text to read and memorize. It is interactive. The students read short passages and then they have activities to do. It has made teaching social studies much more enjoyable. If it is enjoyable for me, then I can make it enjoyable for the students. – Joi Kinnett, Ben Hill County I wanted to let you know that I have truly enjoyed using your workbook with my students. I have recommended your products to countless teachers. The students look forward to working with this kid-friendly format and I love teaching from it. As a school, we have gone through so many different texts, but your workbook remains a staple in my class. – LaShawna McCoy, Roswell North Elementary My students scored so well. I had 86% pass rate! This is awesome! Gallopade is the best thing that's happened for Georgia social studies. – Lesia English, Screven County Middle School The Georgia Experience covers material that is not adequately discussed in the adopted textbooks. These materials will help teachers as they present the standards to students. – Stephanie Starks, Sequoyah Middle School HATS OFF to Gallopade International! My teachers love the Georgia Experience materials. Not only are they friendly to use, they are correlated to our Georgia Performance Standards. Every famous person in our standards has a matching biography that lets teachers integrate reading with social studies…true teaching. It is wonderful to find expert materials that enable teachers to create exceptional lessons that engage students. Thank you! – Rena Beasley, Coffee County Schools 2010 Screven County Middle School (Before using Social Studies CRCT Scores for GA Experience Pilot Group Using Gallopade as a pilot, we were immediately GA Experience) 100% able to bring Screven County Middle School up 90% 2011 from a dismal score of 30 to 71. My individual 80% (After using pass rate was 90%! Thanks so much Gallopade for 70% GA Experience) making social studies interesting and easy to 60% 50% understand. My students and I absolutely loved it. 40% – Lisa English, 6th Grade Social Studies Teacher, 30% Screven County Middle School, Screven County Data provided 20% 10% 0%

Pass Rate

Exceeds Rate

by James A. Thompson IV, Principal, Screven County Middle School

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STUDENT WORKBOOK Interactive lessons result in effective learning.

HOW IT

Free For All In the 1860s, Preside nt Abraham Lincoln asked Frederick Douglass to recruit black soldiers for the Union army in the Civil War. Frederi suggested he free slaves ck who fought in the war. In 1863 Lincoln issued Emancipation Proclam ation and freed the slaves! Lincoln and Dougla the remained friends. ss

Chapter 6

Correlates with SS3H2a,

Frederick’s home was a station on the Underg round Railroad. Frederi fought for black voting ck rights. In 1870 the 15th Amendment was which gave American ratified, men of any color the right to vote!

b; SS3G2a-e; SS3CG2

Frederick Douglass

Frederick Bailey was born a slave in Tuckah oe, Maryland in 1817. His mother was a black slave who died when he was young. His father was a white man he never knew. Frederick was often hungry and suffere d many beatings. Frederick was sent to Baltimore to be a house slave. He how to read. It was wanted to learn against the law to teach that slaves would want a slave to read. It was feared their freedom if they became educated. learned to read in secret! When his Frederick master found out he Frederick knew that beat Frederick. he must keep learnin g. Quick Quiz Write T for true and F for false for each sentence. _____ Frederick was very close to his father. _____ Frederick’s mother helped educat e him. _____ Frederick’s master beat him when he caught him learnin g to read. _____ Frederick never did learn to read.

One More - Just For Fun! Describe a way Frederi ck was affected by his environment. __________________ __________________ __________________ ___________ __________________ __________________ __________________ ___________ __________________ __________________ __________________ ___________ nvictions inst and eCo a way Frederick adapte king out aga CourageDescrib d to his environ as his life to spea rightsment. s dedicated his work in civil Douglas ____________ ion was______ Frederick ______ ribut______ __________________ greatest cont _________________ slavery. His ______ __________________ ist. lition wanted an __________________ an abo ____________ : person who nist es ___________ litio abo __________________ the United Stat ____________ ery in ______ __________________ end to slav ___________ ger, pain

to face courage: able

dan

s influenced

Enrichment

ristic ical characte following phys Which of the

International • www.gallopad

~ This book is not reproducible.

Home and school access offers instructional delivery through technology solutions.

Hard To Believe But True! out fear or trouble with Frederick’s British friends helped buy his freedom r .trait of tive characte posi a was what he did essioenInternational ©Carole expr Marsh/Gallopad believed in and truly .com • www.gallopade • Page 32 conscience Frederick ~ This book is not reproducible. Freedom of means that ~ glass. This Frederick Dou his heart. from e spok and

Think About It Why were people afraid slaves would were educated? want to be free if they ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade

ONLINE EBOOK SUBSCRIPTIONS

e.com • Page 28

Frederick’s

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©Carole Marsh/G

96 Pages

~ This book

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is not reprodu

TEACHER’S EDITION Free For All

Complete student workbook enriched and organized with supplemental materials related to each lesson.

to Frederick Douglass Abraham Lincoln asked Frederick In the 1860s, President in the Civil War. for the Union army Lincoln issued the recruit black soldiers in the war. In 1863 slaves who fought Douglass suggested he free slaves! Lincoln and tion and freed the Emancipation Proclama remained friends. Frederick und Railroad. a station on the Undergro Amendment was ratified, 15th Frederick’s home was rights. In 1870 the right to vote! fought for black voting men of any color the which gave American Fun! One More - Just For environment. was affected by his Describe a way Frederick _ vary.________________________ s will ________ Answer ________ ________ _ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ _ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ent. adapted to his environm _ Describe a way Frederick vary. ________________________ s will________ ________ Answer ________ _ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ _ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________ ________ ________________

DEFINE IT! ULARY BOOKS: CRCT VOCAB Civil War adapt

SHARE IT! PACK: ENRICHMENT

page 11

SHARE IT! Bondage

part of the ip of land were were and private ownersh Bans on slavery trustees. These laws trade was up by the Georgia original laws set changed and slave and in 1750, were very unpopular, allowed. plantation owners owned slaves, some ists were farmers Abolition all not labor. While slave their farms with people could only enlarge rebelled. Some Over time, slaves und Railroad, a against slavery. slavery on the Undergrolive freely. could helped blacks escape states where they route to the northern to the Civil War. led rights and states’ The issues of slavery t issued by U.S. Presiden ation Proclamation, still under In 1863, the Emancip in areas freed the slaves Abraham Lincoln, Confederate control.

Of Human

True! Hard To Believe But his freedom. friends helped buy Frederick’s British ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade

International • www.gallopade.com

~ This book is not reproducible.

Georgia Experience

Chapter 6

Correlates with

e; SS3CG2

Quick Quiz Write T for true and F for false for each F Freder _____ sentence. ick was very close to his father . F Freder _____ ick’s mother helped educate him. T Freder _____ ick’s master beat him when he caught him learnin F _____ Freder g to read. ick never did learn to read. Think About It Why were people afraid slaves were educated? would want to be free if they ©Carole Marsh/Gallop

ade International

~ This book is

• www.gallopade.com

not reproducible.

READ IT!

Why Am I a

Slave

These were Enrichment the my thoughts, perplexing questions which began and to exerci Use the Word Bank to complete the sentence. now to claim was still but se the weak a child, and knew less than powers of my mind, for in the free states I speak childre . As my questi anti-slavery society and began to ___________ only put to joined an _______________ Frederick same age ons concerning n of the children a little these things myself, I was older, and little were not means I learne rapid in reaching a solid better inform slavery in the United States. ed _____________ than d from these footing. By against made everyb some inquiries, that ody; and that “God, up masters and in the sky,” mistresses, and he made white peopl speak anti-slavery slavery e to be black peopl e to be slaves Once, howev . er, engaged finding out in the inquiry Frederick traveled and spoke in the United States and several countries in the ,I crime, not God,true solution of the matte was not very Europe. long in He spoke about his difficult times as a slave in the Southeast. He r. It was not but man, that the existence color, but afforded the to support the anti-slavery movement. Many people of true explanasked the audience important truth, slavery; nor was I long ation want of to hear, but Frederick stood firm in his convictions. He was in finding out didn’t viz: what man another can make, honest about the realities of slavery. man can unma I could not ke. have been more I began to make this subjec than seven or eight years old, when woods and t my study. fields; along It was with Question for Discussion me in the the boyish wand erings led me; shore of the river, and wherever my quite ignora Why didn’t people want to hear about the realities of slavery? nt of the existen and although I was, at that time, remember ce of the free being, even states, I then, most idea of being strongly impre distinctly a ssed with the was an inborn free man some day. This cheering dream of my assurance Word Definition to slavery—an human nature d one which conviction: a strong feeling or belief to silence or all the powe —a constant menace extinguish.” rs of slavery were unabl e —from The Narrative of the Life Douglass, of Frederick 1845 International • www.gallopade.com • Page 30

SHARE IT! ENRICHMENT PACK: page 8

WRITE IT!

20 WAYS TO TEACH THE GPS WITH PIZZAZZ: page 20

READ IT! Son of Frederick

“WHEN FREEDOM COME, folks left home, out in the streets, crying, praying, singing, shouting, yelling, and knocking down everything. Some shot off big guns. Then come the calm. It was sad then. So many folks done dead, things tore up, and nowheres to go and nothing to eat, nothing to do. It got squally. Folks got sick, so hungry. Some folks starved nearly to death. Ma was a cripple woman. Pa couldn’t find work for so long when he mustered out.”

—Lewis Douglass, son of Frederick Douglass

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade

• Page 28

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~

Teacher’s Edition

Frederick Douglass attended the Massachusetts AntiSlavery Society. He spoke about his experiences and ideas speaking skills.

? at meetings. Everyone was impressed by his “Why are some people slaves The society asked Frederick to travel and lecture about slavery. ever a time , and others when this was commence? not so? How masters? Was there did the relatio n

Georgia Experie

nce • 3rd Grade

al • www.gallopade.com opade Internation • ©Carole Marsh/Gall is not reproducible. Edition • This book page 32

Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

SS3H2a,b; SS3G2a-

Frederick Doug lass

Frederick Bailey was born a slave in 1817. His in Tuckahoe, mother was a Maryland black slave who was young. His died when he father was a white man he Frederick was never knew. often hungry and suffered many beatings. Frederick was sent to Baltimo re to be a house how to read. It was against slave. He wanted to the law that slaves would learn want their freedo to teach a slave to read. learned to read It was feared in secret! When m if they became educat ed. Frederick Frederick knew his master found that he must out he beat keep learning. Frederick.

• Page 32

~

• 3rd Grade Teacher’s

• This book is

not reproducible. page 28

• ©Carole Marsh/G

• ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • www.gallopade.com Georgia Experience • 3rd Grade Teacher’s Edition • This book is not reproducible. page 30

allopade Interna tional • www.ga llopade.com

TEST PREP ONLINE LICENSE Learn! Review! Assess! Comprehensive assessment for use at home and school.

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 6


WORKS!

COLOR “TRANSPARENCIES” ON CD BLACKLINE MASTERS Reproducible activities reinforce essential content. Se lf -M ad e M an !

Color graphics to print or project help students visualize key concepts.

6

Frederick Dou glass was an He never gav amazing man e up! He ! was born a Maryland. slave in He had a ver y hard life he learned as a child, to read so but he could mak bet e his life speeches aga ter. He escaped slav ery, and beg inst slavery an . wrote a boo He started to make k about his his own new life. spaper and What kind of character traits and skill like Freder ick Douglas s do you nee s? Circle that describ d to be the words in e him. the box belo w

HARD WOR KER BAD SPELLER LAZY MEAN HONEST DETER MINED SMART B R AV E COMPASSIONATE GOOD W RITER SLEE PY ORGANIZED GOOD SPE AKER Correlates with SS3 H2

©Carole Marsh/

Gallopade Interna tional G www.g

allopade.com

SS3H2 The student will discuss the lives of Americans who expanded people's rights and freedoms in a democracy. a. Frederick Douglass (civil rights)... b. Explain social barriers, restrictions, and obstacles that these historical figures had to overcome and describe how they overcame them.

ENRICHMENT PACK “Story Cards” are great for individual and small group discussion.

CRCT VOCABULARY BOOKS 60 grade-specific word definitions and lessons prepare students for standardsbased content.

INTERACTIVE WRITE-IN READERS Stories of historic figures combine with fun activities to boost reading and comprehension skills.

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 7


3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

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Evaluation Sample

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3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

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3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

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Evaluation sample of student workbook. Shown page-by-page.

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3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 11


3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 12


3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 13


3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 14


3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 15


3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 16


3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 17


3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 18


3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

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3 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 7.5” x 9” • The complete book is 96 pages

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3 TEACHER EDITION

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P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2 1


3 TEACHER RESOURCE

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ENRICHMENT PACK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 20 pages

Evaluation Sample

Mountain Culture Mountain life is beautiful. But living off the land is especially difficult in the remote mountains of Appalachia. Appalachia is the name of the region where the Appalachian Mountains lie. Appalachians have a lively culture with a rich and unique heritage. English, German, Irish, and Scottish immigrants settled in these mountains. Many American Indians still live there. This diverse blend of cultures comes together to create a new Appalachian culture. Appalachian culture is well known for folk songs and hand-made crafts. There is not much contact with outside influences. The culture has remained the same for many years.

E L P SAM

The Appalachian people are known for being very independent. They must often face the hardships of mountain life without help or resources. But they always help a friend in need. They have a closeknit community. New people who move to Appalachia find it hard to fit in. They are coal miners and farmers. They live off the land. Because they are isolated from the rest of the country, Appalachians are not well educated and many of them are very poor.

Facts about Appalachia:

The 56 Signers of the Declaration of Independence

Actual pages are in color!

Their feather pens scratched across the parchment paper of the Declaration of Independence. These 56 men had willingly signed their lives away… The Declaration of Independence is one of the most important documents in U.S. history. It announced to England that America would fight for its independence. But this document was more than a political statement. Every person who supported it was considered a traitor by the English government. They could be arrested and punished! Fifty-six brave men took this risk. They signed their names on the document. Many would face consequences. These men were educated and respected. Some were even judges and lawyers. Many had beautiful homes and precious families. Still, they knew their country came first. Of the 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence, five were captured as traitors and killed. Twelve of them had their homes destroyed by British soldiers. Two of them lost children in the Revolutionary War. Two more had sons captured by British soldiers. Nine of them died in the war. Many ended up alone and poor. But in the end, America won the war. We became an independent nation. Without the Declaration of Independence, America would not have gained its freedom. These signers risked everything for their country! That’s true patriotism!

E L P M SA

Declaration of Independence signature facts: • John Hancock’s signature is the biggest one on the Declaration of Independence. You can’t miss it! •

Three men from Georgia signed the Declaration of Independence. They each have a county named after them: Hall, Gwinnett, and Walton.

Benjamin Franklin was the oldest person to sign the Declaration—he was 70!

Two future presidents, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, signed the Declaration of Independence.

Georgia Experience • 3rd Grade • ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2438 • www.gallopade.com • Page 6

Booker T. Washington, Dolly Parton, Ashley Judd, and Don Knotts are all from the Appalachian Mountains.

50 percent of counties in Central Appalachia have only one hospital and some do not have a hospital at all.

20 percent of the people in Appalachia live in poverty.

Georgia Experience • 3rd Grade • ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2438 • www.gallopade.com • Page 3

Susan B. Anthony Can you imagine being arrested—for voting? Susan B. Anthony was born on February 15, 1820. Unlike most girls of that time, Susan and her three sisters had an advanced education. Her father believed in equal treatment for boys and girls. Susan worked very hard to become a teacher. Susan’s whole family worked to end slavery, stop the sale of alcohol, and further women’s rights. But her life’s mission became the fight for the equal rights of women in America and the right of women to vote. She dedicated over 50 years of her life to this important cause. Using her organizational talents, she created a plan to get people’s support. She founded the National Woman’s Suffrage Association in 1869 with her friend Elizabeth Cady Stanton. She went on to found groups that brought international attention to women’s rights. Susan published a weekly newspaper called “The Revolution” in support of the movement. In 1872, she was put on trial and fined—for voting! But Susan continued to lead the only nonviolent revolution in the history of the United States. For 45 years, she traveled all over the country and gave 75 to 100 speeches a year. In 1878, she wrote the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. In 1920, it became the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.

E L P M SA

Sadly, Susan did not live to see the passage of the amendment. She died in 1906, 14 years before the 19th Amendment was passed. Her words, “Failure is impossible,” continued to rally the cause.

To think about: Susan B. Anthony was the first woman to appear on a United States coin. The Susan B. Anthony $1 coin was first minted in 1979.

Write about it! How do you think things would be different in our country if people like Susan B. Anthony had not fought for equal rights for women?

Georgia Experience • 3rd Grade • ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2438 • www.gallopade.com • Page 14

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2 3


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 22 pages

BLACKLINE MASTERS

Evaluation Sample 1

It’s the Law!

Athens had courts with trial by jury. Juries were much larger than today. They had several hundred members. After listening to the evidence, jurors voted by placing metal discs into one of two jars. One was for “Guilty.” The other was for “Not Guilty.” Punishments were decided by the court. Circle the correct answers. 1. In Ancient Athens jurors _______________ voted

never voted

whether a person was innocent or guilty.

E L P M SA

2. Jurors _____________ the evidence. listened to

never heard

3. In ancient Athens, punishments were decided by _________________. court

jurors

4. Mykonos was accused of stealing a necklace. Three witnesses said they saw Mykonos steal. Mykonos had the necklace in his house. Which jar are you going to place your metal disc in? GUILTY

NOT GUILTY

Correlates with SS3H1

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

2

It’s a Democracy! A new way of government was invented in Athens. It was “rule by the people.” We call it “democracy.” Any man with full citizen rights could speak and vote freely in the assembly. Public debates decided how the city was run. Fill in the blanks.

1. What form of government was invented in Athens? ______________________________________________________

Midnight Ride! Paul Revere was a true patriot! A poem was written about his famous midnight ride. Read part of the poem, and then answer the questions.

2. In a democracy people speak and ___________ freely. 3. Democracy means _____________________________________________________.

E L P M SA

Mark your ballot!

Your class is electing a class president. Two people are running for the office. Ryan says he will let the class vote on class rules. Ashley says that if you elect her she will make all the rules. Who will you vote for? Mark your ballot.

Ryan Ashley

Correlates with SS3H1

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

3

Excerpt from “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Listen my children and you shall hear Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere, On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five; Hardly a man is now alive Who remembers that famous day and year. He said to his friend, “If the British march By land or sea from the town to-night, Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch Of the North Church tower as a signal light,— One if by land, and two if by sea; And I on the opposite shore will be, Ready to ride and spread the alarm Through every Middlesex village and farm, For the country folk to be up and to arm.”

E L P M SA

Answer the questions below!

1. How many lanterns were to be used if the British were coming by sea? ___________________ 2. Who was Paul Revere trying to warn? _____________________________________________________ 3. Would you make a “midnight ride” to warn your friends of trouble? _____________________________________________ Correlates with SS3H2

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

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BLACKLINE MASTERS What is Equality?

5

Americans want equality in their country. Everyone should be treated equally without discrimination. What does equality mean to you?

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 22 pages

Evaluation Sample 6

Rights for Women!

Susan B. Anthony worked to get women the right to vote. She walked in protest marches to let people know how much women wanted the right to vote. Make a Protest Sign! Pretend you are marching for women’s rights. Make a sign to carry in the march! Tell people what you want!

Using each letter of the word “equality,” write a word or phrase that describes equality.

E is for EVERYONE! Q is for ______________________________________________ U is for ______________________________________________ A is for _______________________________________________ L is for _______________________________________________ I is for _______________________________________________ T is for ______________________________________________ Y is for ______________________________________________

E L P SAM

E L P SAM

Correlates with SS3H2

Correlates with SS3H2

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

Good Jobs!

8

President Franklin Roosevelt started the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) as part of the New Deal program. The CCC hired men to conserve natural resources. They planted trees, fought forest fires, made paths in national forests and parks, and built dams. They helped protect the environment. We conserve natural resources today, too! Match the ways to conserve with the pictures. A. Shut off lights, computers, and the television when not in use. B. Recycle newspapers or reuse glass and plastic containers. C. Adjust the temperature on the furnace or air conditioner. D. Join an Adopt-a-Highway program in your area. E. Walk or ride a bike instead of driving. F. Plant a tree and take care of nature.

E L P M SA

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

9

One Busy Lady!

Eleanor Roosevelt accomplished many things in her life. She helped her husband Franklin after he contracted polio. As First Lady, she traveled to many places, gave speeches, and even wrote for a newspaper. She helped create the National Youth Administration to give young people jobs. After Franklin died, she became a delegate to the United Nations! Help Eleanor get to her position at the United Nations.

Finish

E L P M SA Start

Correlates with SS3H2

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

Correlates with SS3H2

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

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COLOR TRANSPARENCIES

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 12 pages

Evaluation Sample

Mary McLeod Bethune

2

E L P SAM • • • • •

Scholar Teacher Started Bethune-Cookman college Founded National Council of Negro Women Advisor to 4 presidents

Mary spent her life helping African Americans. Correlates with SS3H2

Actual pages 4are in Rollin’ on the River color!

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

Citizenship Act makes every American Indian a U.S. citizen.

1948

President Truman issues executive order outlawing segregation in U.S. military.

1954

U.S. Supreme Court declares school segregation unconstitutional in Brown v. Board of Education.

THE BAHAMAS

1924

G u l f o f M e x i c o

Nineteenth Amendment gives women the right to vote.

A t l a n t i c O c e a n

1920

Ohio R.

Congress passes Civil Rights Act granting equal rights in public accommodations and jury duty.

R.

io

1875

Hudson Ontar

The Fourteenth Amendment guarantees “equal protection under the law;” citizenship is given to African Americans.

Lake

1868

rie eE Lak

President Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation freeing “all slaves in areas still in rebellion.”

5

Mississippi R.

1964

Congress passes Civil Rights Act declaring discrimination based on race illegal.

iss M

MEXICO

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivers “I Have a Dream” speech at March on Washington.

U. S. A.

Hawaii

1963

Bear Lake

CANADA

Cordova

Unalaska

Anchorage

Barrow

Fort Yukon

Alaska Fairbanks Nome

P a c i f i c O c e a n

RUSSIA

Correlates with SS3H2

Prince Rupert

Freedom Rides begin from Washington, D.C. into southern states.

Gra

.

1961

e

nd

Rio

oR rad

Rosa Parks refuses to give up bus seat, boycott follows and bus segregation is declared unconstitutional.

E L P M SA Colo

1955

CANADA

E L P M SA

iss ipp

iR

.

1863

Lake Huron

Thomas Jefferson writes: “ . . . all men are created equal . . .”

Lake Superior

1776

Lake Michigan

A Timeline of Rights

Correlates with SS3G1a

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

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PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 12 pages

COLOR TRANSPARENCIES

90º 0º

Lake Michigan

180º

180º

Bear Lake

60º 30º

Correlates with SS3G1b

Correlates with SS3G1c

Actual pages 8are in Productive Resources color!

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

Government Levels

30º

60º

CANADA

Prince Rupert

Cordova

Unalaska

Anchorage

Barrow

Fort Yukon

Nome

RUSSIA

P a c i f i c O c e a n

Alaska Fairbanks

Hawaii

ky Mountains

90º

90º

MEXICO

U. S. A.

CANADA

60º

30º 60º 90º

THE BAHAMAS

G u l f o f M e x i c o

ains

ntario

A t l a n t i c O c e a n

unt

e Lak

Mo

O Lake

ian

Erie

ch

Lake Huron

pa la

Lake Superior

Ap

E L P M SA

E L P M SA Roc

7

30º

Globetrotting

6

Mountain Majesties

Evaluation Sample

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

10

National/Federal • Highest Authority • Powers from the United States Constitution • Coins money, declares war, conducts foreign relations and oversees interstate and international trade

State • Authority below the national government • Powers not given to the national government in the United States Constitution are reserved for the states

E L P M SA

• Ratifies amendments, manages public health and safety, develops educational systems, oversees intrastate trade

Local • Authority below the state government • Powers come from the state • Governs cities, counties, and special districts including administering elections and auto licenses Correlates with SS3CG1

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

E L P M SA

List 2 human resources used:

__________________________ __________________________ List 2 capital resources used: __________________________ __________________________ List 2 natural resources used: __________________________ __________________________ Correlates with SS3E1

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

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ONLINE TEST PREP SUBSCRIPTION

Evaluation Sample

T hese all new comprehensive test-prep quizzes help kids score high on Georgia’s CRCT test! Includes more than 650 practice test questions that thoroughly cover all social studies standards for Georgia. Features of this excellent new series include: • Tests include both factual and analytical questions • Tests include both positive and negative choice format questions • Tests cover all grade-level content • Questions are separated into corresponding standards so teachers can assess student knowledge and focus follow-up teaching efforts to meet individual student needs. • Bonus section of study/review materials provides facts and essential content that students can study to prepare for practice tests and/or review problem areas after practice tests. The Georgia Test Prep pinpoints each individual student’s areas of understanding and competency, and identify areas where additional study is needed. Patterned after our successful, straightforward, comprehensive Georgia Experience series of workbooks, these programs are designed to help raise student comprehension based on the Georgia Performance Standards, and as a result, will raise student test scores!

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 28


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 5.5” x 8.5” • The complete book is 12 pages

Interactive Write-in Readers 9 different Reader Packs include 30 copies of 1 Reader.

Susan B. Anthony Paul Revere Thurgood Marshall Franklin D. Roosevelt Cesar Chavez Frederick Douglass Eleanor Roosevelt Mary McLeod Bethune Lyndon B. Johnson A Word From the Author…

The National School Supply and Equipment Association The National Council for the Social Studies The Museum Store Association Suppliers of the Association of Parks and Public Lands

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I’m sure you will!

2. What did Mary do for African American girls? A. started a school B. started a club C. started a choir

mission: a place where missionaries live and work role model: a person who carries out their function or duty in a positive way

3. How many girls did Mary’s first school have? A. 15 B. 5 C. 25

tuition: money a person pays for being taught in a private school

I finished polishing the glossary!

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5

4. What organization did Mary start? A. National Organization for Women B. National Girl Scouts C. National Council of Negro Women

Golly! It sure is a glossy glossary!

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3

1. Mary was the first child in her family to be born: A. in a hospital B. free C. at night

institute: a school for special study in a specific area of knowledge

Tolerance!

Mary founded the National Council of Negro Women. She worked for African American women to have the right to vote. Mary advised four presidents. She was a leader, teacher, speaker, businesswoman, and a tireless worker. Mary McLeod Bethune was a great American woman and role model!

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Pop Quiz!

council: group of people that meet together to plan or decide something

Integrity

I hope I can contribute as much during my life!

1

GLOSSARY

Perseverance

Mary needed more money for the school. She asked the owner of the Proctor and Gamble Company to help. James Gamble donated money. He supported the school until he died. Mary’s school and a boy's school, the Cookman Institute, joined together. They became Bethune-Cookman College. Mary was president of the college until 1942. She was a trustee until her death in 1955.

Mary went to stores and asked for boxes and crates. She used them as desks and chairs. She crushed berries for ink. She used charcoal for pencils.

Tolerance!

, member of:

Truth

Published by

The mission school grew. Mary wanted to do something for African American girls. She decided to start a school for them! Mary moved to Daytona. She had no money. Mary stayed with a local woman while she looked for a building. She found a house to use as the school.

Accomplishment!

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International. This book is not reproducible.

When Mary was about 11, a nearby church opened a school. The school was just for African American children. Mary knew her family was very poor. She wanted to get an education to help them. A woman offered to pay for one child to go to a special school. Mary was a good student. She was chosen to attend Scotia Seminary in North Carolina.

local jail. She wanted to do more to help people. A minister asked Mary to start a mission school in Palatka, Florida. She started the school. She taught there too. Mary sold insurance in her spare time. She had to make money for her family. To get to the top!

Integrity

About the Author. . . Carole Marsh is the creator of the and author of many books on History, Geography, and Biography. She is also the creator of The 50 State Experience Series, which includes books, workbooks, software, stickers, maps, and other products for all 50 States and Canada. You can write to her at carole@gallopade.com.

Mary McLeod was born in South Carolina in 1875. Her parents were former slaves. Mary was one of 17 children. Some of the children had been sold into slavery. Mary was the first child in her family to be born free. Her parents saved money to buy farmland. Mary worked on the farm with her parents. They wanted their children to get the education that they did not have.

Respect

—Carole Marsh

These readers will leave kids filled with heartfelt amazement and admiration for the heroes and heroines portrayed in them. Totally non-intimidating, and the exact opposite of so many traditional, boring biographies written for kids!

Perseverance!

Mary McLeod Bethune started the first school for African American girls. She had only five students and no money, but that didn’t stop her. Mary was an advisor to presidents. She was a businesswoman and an author. She worked hard to see that all blacks and all women had equal rights. Mary was one of the greatest educators in the United States!

Evaluation Sample

11

5. Mary is mostly known for her achievements in: A. education. B. politics. C. business 12

Pop! Goes the ladybug! Ha-ha!

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These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 29


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 23 pages

20 WAYS TO TEACH DAY

1

Evaluation Evaluation Sample Sample

Giant Georgia Special Topic History Timeline!

The Project

Products To Use With This Project Requirements

Make a three-dimensional special topic timeline— Georgia style—to encircle your classroom and enthrall your parents! Georgia BIG Wall and Student Reference Timelines My First Pocket Guide: Georgia Georgia Biographies Book Georgia Experience Reference Guide Long wall space, oversize white paper, markers/crayons/chalk

E L P M SA

Time Here’s How

Variations

1 day

Think gigantic! Use every inch of space available to create your Georgia special topic timeline (2 feet tall and as long as possible). Choose a topic related to your class’ studies like transportation, the Civil War, Native Americans, African Americans, agriculture, etc. Draw large blank squares (1 foot) along the top edge of the paper with large markers. Assign each child three events to cover. Students will research each event and write a title, brief paragraph, and date on the timeline. Students will also color a picture that describes or represents their event in history, inside the blank squares. Write the date and title under the picture square with big letters that any student can read from across the room. Add descriptive paragraphs in smaller writing underneath. Begin with early items, and continue on through time. Don’t forget to include events in the last decade! Georgia is amazing! Here’s your chance to show students the breadth and depth of a particular part of Georgia’s history! Make the timeline travel around all four walls! Leave part of the last wall for events in the coming months. The class can keep adding to the timeline all year.

©2004 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 4 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

DAY

9

Pass the Discussion Please!

The Project Products To Use With This Project Requirements Time Here’s How

Discuss current Georgia events and contemporary Georgia with your class! 1000 Readers Series Georgia Experience Reference Guide

13

Scavenger Hunt!

The Project Requirements

Send your class on a wild scavenger hunt through the library! "A boring day in the neighborhood," scavenger hunt list copies, library or other resource center, and Internet access (if possible)

Student access to news media, round circle of chairs

Time 1 class period Assign students a half-hour of news watching, reading, and listening every night for a week. Students need to write notes about each night’s news. Then discuss the week’s news. Ask whether students think the news was reported fairly. Which networks chose which stories and why? Which words made stories more interesting, more sensational? Did students hear more fact or more opinion? Explain objectivity and bias in journalism. Discuss the issues as well as how they were reported. Ask and answer questions. Encourage opinion and debate! Talk about how Georgians are viewed by the media. What stereotypes can be seen? Which news mediums seem more like entertainment?

E L P M SA Variations

DAY

Here’s How

1 morning or afternoon Brainstorm a list of fun things for kids to find in the library or on the Internet. For example, if you are studying Native Americans, hunt for names of tribes that begin with C, D, or another letter. If you are studying presidents, hunt for names of their wives or children. If you are studying the Civil War, hunt for animals that became soldiers’ pets or mascots.

E L P M SA

Variations

Hunts can be general, or pertain to specific fields or subjects to coordinate with a lesson or unit. Just think of something fun!

Give every student one newspaper page. Ask students to cross out (with red pens) words or sentences that make an article too long, too opinionated, too dull, too sensational, or just not accurate. Think of a recent school event and ask your students to write a short news article. Explain the 5 Ws (who, what, when, where, and why) and the inverted pyramid (more important facts first, lesser important facts gradually further down). Perhaps you can ask each child to "report" on their news event to the class – live on camera!

©2004 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 12

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • www.gallopade.com • Page 16

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 30


NOTES

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 3 1


Thank You For Your Consideration! Please let us know if there is anything we can do to help you with your decision to purchase any of our books.

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Georgia Experience Third Grade Evaluation Kit