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E VA L U AT I O N K I T


Table of Contents Dear Educators Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Company Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Customer Testimonials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Classroom Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Sample Pages: Student Workbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Sample Pages: Teacher’s Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Sample Pages: Enrichment Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Sample Pages: Blackline Masters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Sample Pages: Color Overhead Transparencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Sample Pages: Interactive Write-in Readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Sample Pages: 20 Ways to Teach the GPS with Pizzazz . . . . . . . . . . .29 P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2


Dear Georgia Educators, Gallopade International is pleased to offer you the Georgia Experience, the finest curriculum program available for grades K-8. Every Georgia Experience product is 100% comprehensive and 100% correlated with the Georgia Performance Standards and is fully integrated with Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies. Each grade’s comprehensive Student Workbook provides interactive lessons, including grade-level skill development and mastery. Each standard is covered, using “small bites” of instruction and reinforcing hands-on activities, skill practice, and other involvement of the student to make complicated topics interesting and understandable. The Student Workbook is supplemented with Teacher Resources, Test Prep CDs, cross-curricular Enrichment Packs and other resources to provide a comprehensive, effective, enriching solution. This Evaluation Kit provides an overview of each product, giving you an opportunity to preview a sample of the entire Georgia Experience curriculum program. The program covers exactly what Georgia students are required to know in order to pass the CRCT and its design is unique and effective, helping your students to both truly understand the material and enjoy learning. Gallopade International, a Georgia business and proud Partner in Education, has been in business for more than 30 years and is dedicated to creating products and tools that help educators like you achieve academic success! Founder and CEO Carole Marsh is passionate about supporting Georgia educators and students, and we are confident the Georgia Experience program will exceed your expectations! Sincerely,

The Gallopade Curriculum Team

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 3


Gallopade International, Inc. Company Profile • Founded in 1979 by Georgia native, Carole Marsh • Woman-owned and family-operated business located in Peachtree City, GA • Publisher of over 15,000 educational products, including over 200 items about Georgia • Products include books, maps, software, decoratives, games, and more • Named Publisher’s Weekly fastest growing small publisher in 2000 • Recipient of the NSSEA Advance America Award in 2002 • Winner of the Teacher’s ChoiceTM Award in 2002 for state series, available for all 50 states • Winner of the 2003 National School Supply and Equipment Association’s Excellence in Education Award • Winner of the Teacher’s ChoiceTM Award for the Family in 2004, Carole Marsh MysteriesTM series • Carole Marsh named Georgia Author of the Year for mid-level readers in 2007 • Winner of the 2013 Teacher’s Choice™ Award for the Classroom for Georgia Digital Readers

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 4


Customer Testimonials: The Gallopade social studies materials are a dream come true! This is my fourth year using the 5th Grade Social Studies United States History book. It covers the standards and it allows the teacher to supplement as she sees fit. The students love it because it is not the usual boring text to read and memorize. It is interactive. The students read short passages and then they have activities to do. It has made teaching social studies much more enjoyable. If it is enjoyable for me, then I can make it enjoyable for the students. – Joi Kinnett, Ben Hill County I wanted to let you know that I have truly enjoyed using your workbook with my students. I have recommended your products to countless teachers. The students look forward to working with this kid-friendly format and I love teaching from it. As a school, we have gone through so many different texts, but your workbook remains a staple in my class. – LaShawna McCoy, Roswell North Elementary My students scored so well. I had 86% pass rate! This is awesome! Gallopade is the best thing that's happened for Georgia social studies. – Lesia English, Screven County Middle School The Georgia Experience covers material that is not adequately discussed in the adopted textbooks. These materials will help teachers as they present the standards to students. – Stephanie Starks, Sequoyah Middle School HATS OFF to Gallopade International! My teachers love the Georgia Experience materials. Not only are they friendly to use, they are correlated to our Georgia Performance Standards. Every famous person in our standards has a matching biography that lets teachers integrate reading with social studies…true teaching. It is wonderful to find expert materials that enable teachers to create exceptional lessons that engage students. Thank you! – Rena Beasley, Coffee County Schools 2010 Screven County Middle School (Before using Social Studies CRCT Scores for GA Experience Pilot Group Using Gallopade as a pilot, we were immediately GA Experience) 100% able to bring Screven County Middle School up 90% 2011 from a dismal score of 30 to 71. My individual 80% (After using pass rate was 90%! Thanks so much Gallopade for 70% GA Experience) making social studies interesting and easy to 60% 50% understand. My students and I absolutely loved it. 40% – Lisa English, 6th Grade Social Studies Teacher, 30% Screven County Middle School, Screven County Data provided 20% 10% 0%

Pass Rate

Exceeds Rate

by James A. Thompson IV, Principal, Screven County Middle School

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 5


Youn g Jimm y

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Jimmy’s father taught him how to fish, swim, and hunt. Jimmy was very close to his father. Jimmy sold peanuts from his wagon to help his family when he was 6. The Carters worked hard to keep their farm during the Great Depression. The Great Depression was a tough time when many people lost their jobs and farms.

Interactive lessons result in effective learning.

HOW IT

Write a J for the senten ces Jimmy Carter would say. Write a T for the sentences a boy today might say. ______ My house does not have electricity or plumbing. ______ My house has cable TV and interne t.

A Life Devo ted

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of the greatest civil rights leaders in history. Dr. King devoted his life to working for equal rights for all Americans. His contributions helped end segregation. Fill in the blanks.

______ I go to school and play a lot. ______ I plow the fields by hand every morning . ______ I sell peanuts from my wagon for my family. ______ I like to play video games.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s greatest contrib ution was his work as a _______________ __ _______________ __ leader. The positive citizenship traits of Dr. King include d liberty, civility, and compassion.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a ,b,c,d,e;

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade of • www.gallopade.com • Page International ia Insti~tute 72 This book is not reproducible. ● He worked for equal at the Georg went to ~ rights because of his Jimmy studied ol. Then he belief in liberty for all people nd. after high scho . apolis, Maryla Technology Ann in y e. ● His nonviolent demon Academ he was ther U.S. Naval strations were based while the h Smit on his belief Rosalynn in civility. Jimmy married ● His struggle to help U.S.S. people was a result ned to the of his compassion. first He was assig develop the the Navy. He helped Jimmy joined battleship. Lieutenant. Fill in the blanks with It was an old promoted to was the correct citizenship He y. Wyoming. Nav traits demonstrated arine for the subm ic by Dr. King. atom pride. uniform with He wore his The right of freedom is also known as _____ Navy. _____________. time in the Treating people politel te to Jimmy’s y and with respect is ______________.le the words that rela lieutenant Caring about other Circ peanuts people is __________ marine _______________. atomic sub y arm alynn

Th e Na vy

ONLINE EBOOK SUBSCRIPTIONS SS2CG3

Home and school access offers instructional delivery through technology solutions.

Ros

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2 a,b,c,d,e; ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade

SS2CG3

International • www.gallopa

~ This book is not reproducible .~

de.com • Page 70

to see him. went home nt sick, Jimmy t was importa er became s about wha When his fath ed long talk family and run the his family shar e the Navy Jimmy and leav to decided in life. Jimmy ns. business in Plai Circle where to Jimmy decided ing live after talk er. with his fath

96 Pages

H1a,b; s with SS2 Correlate

d,e; SS2CG3

SS2G2a,b,c,

llopade.com • Page

73

ional • www.ga

allopade Internat

©Carole Marsh/G

~ This book

cible. ~

is not reprodu

TEACHER’S EDITION Complete student workbook enriched and organized with supplemental materials related to each lesson.

y Hones t and Trust worth his leadership of Jimmy Carter are ions The greatest contribut Human rights are basic and human rights work. should s that every person rights and freedom free food, a home, equality, have. The rights to rights. of religion are human speech, and freedom honesty and his are p traits Two important citizenshi t because he is the moral presiden called is He trustworthiness. hy. honest and trustwort

DEFINE IT! ULARY BOOKS: CRCT VOCAB honest trustworthy

PROJECT IT!ARENCIES: COLOR TRANSP

DO IT!

SHARE IT! PACK: ENRICHMENT

Color the picture of Jimmy Carter.

page 9

S: page 18

BLACKLINE MASTER

page 12

READ IT!

1000 READERS:

#107 Jimmy Carter

DO IT!

You ng Jim my

20 WAYS TO TEACH

honesty: truthful, not lying, stealing, or cheating

Jimmy’s fathe r taught him was very close how to fish, swim, and hunt. to his fathe r. Jimmy Jimmy sold peanuts from his wagon to was 6. The Carters worke help his family d hard to keep when Great Depr ession. The their farm during he Great Depr many peop the ession was a le lost their tough time jobs and farms when . Write a J for the sente nces Jimmy Carter would say. Write a T for the sentences a boy today might say.

_____ J _ My house does not have electricity or plumbing. T _ My house _____ has cable TV and internet. T _ I go to _____ school and play a lot. J _ I plow _____ the fields by hand every morning. J _ I sell _____ peanuts from my wagon for my family. T _ I like _____ to play video games.

Correlates

with SS2H1 a,b;

SS2G2a,b,c,d

,e; SS2CG 3

©Carole Marsh/Gallo

pade Internationa

~ This book

trustworthiness: honest d and can be depende upon

SHARE IT!

Everyday Food

Life

In the secon d which to explograde standards there re the cultu is a wide span topic from re of food. Tomochich Students will of time in i, the Cree the enviro study k nment, to present-da Yamacraw chief who the fast food y Georgians and micro lived off waveable who have foods. access to Some of the Creek India food. Ogle ns began thorpe and trading with crops. Sequ his group the colon arrive ists for oyah farme did most peop d and raised d to plant and grow new livestock to le of that time. provide food as Jackie Robin son and Marti more like n Luther King, ours Jr. grew dinners and today. But they still did not have up in homes the like. Jimm was a boy fast y Carter is his a great exam food, frozen family lived mother cooked on ple. When a wood burni on he and that was a farm that provided ng stove. The less much than of their own changes in 100 years food – ago! Just the culture looking at lifetime is the an excellent and history of food in Jimmy Carte illustration. r’s •Walk your stude Carter’s home nts through the steps of a . Waking meal in youn the livesto up at 4:00 ck. g Jimmy a.m. every on the stove Tending to the crops morning to . Chopping feed ! Not quite frozen dinne the same as running firewood to cook r to pop in to the groce the micro wave! ry for a

l • www.gallop

ade.com • Page

is not reproducib

71

,c,d,e; SS2CG3 SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b Correlates with ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade

• 2nd Grade

is not reprod ucible. • ©Carol e Marsh/Gallop page 71 ade Interna tional • www.g

History 1A History 1B–Part 1 History 1B–Part 2 1 Geography 2A–Part 2 Geography 2A–Part Geography 2B Geography 2C - 2E Geography 2C

~

The Story of Jimmy Carter & Leadership and Humanity

le. ~

Teacher’s Edition • This book

• Page 78

TEST PREP

al • www.gallopade.com opade Internation • ©Carole Marsh/Gall is not reproducible. Edition • This book • 2nd Grade Teacher’s page 78 Georgia Experience

Appalachian Plateau

Georgia Experi ence

International • www.gallopade.com

~ This book is not reproducible.

: page 21

THE GPS WITH PIZZAZZ

QUIZ IT!ONLINE:

Ridge & Valley

e Ridg Blue ntains Mou

Piedmont

allopade.com

Jimmy Carter was born in Plains, Georgia in 1924. His father was a peanut farmer. Jimmy grew up with no electricity or indoor plumbing. His mother cooked on a woodburning stove. Circle Plains, Georgia in blue on the map.

Plains Coastal Plain

DEFINE IT! CRCT VOCABULARY BOOKS: humanitarian

PROJECT IT!

COLOR TRANSPARENCIES: page 4

VISIT IT! •Jimmy Carter National Historic Site, Plains (See Plains High School, the Carter family farm, and the boyhood home of President Jimmy Carter)

SHARE IT!

CRCT VOCABULARY BOOKS 60 grade-specific word definitions and lessons prepare students for standardsbased content.

ENRICHMENT PACK: page 17

Answer the question.

Answers will vary.

Jimmy Carter grew up on a peanut farm in the Coastal Plain. Are there peanuts in your region?

yes no

As a boy, Jimmy woke up at 4 a.m. to work in the fields when he was a boy. He planted and plowed by hand because there were no tractors yet! Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

SAY IT! Famous Foods

Georgia is famous for the following delicious foods! •Pork Chops •Roasted Peanuts •Stewed Apples •Sweet Potatoes •Peach Cobbler •Pecan Pie •Fried Chicken

•Claxton Fruitcake

•Fried Green

•Sweet Tea

•Vidalia Onions

Tomatoes

•Brunswick Stew

•Boiled Shrimp

•Fried Catfish

•Barbeque

•Deviled Crab

•Black-eyed Peas

•Girl Scout Cookies

•Scrambled Eggs

•Collard Greens

•Grits with Butter

•Biscuits and Gravy

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • www.gallopade.com • Page 70 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

• ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • www.gallopade.com Georgia Experience • 2nd Grade Teacher’s Edition • This book is not reproducible. page 70

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 6


WORKS!

COLOR “TRANSPARENCIES” ON CD BLACKLINE MASTERS Reproducible activities reinforce essential content. C it iz en sh ip T ra it s

See if you can figure out the Wh Fortune puz eel of zles below. Use the wor of citizenship d bank trai ts.

H

N

C

M C

E

L

S

B A

T

18

Y

P V

Color graphics to print or project help students visualize key concepts.

L

I

R

T

I

O

C

honesty civility

compassion

patience

liberty

Correlation: SS2CG3

©Carole Marsh/

Gallopade Interna tional ● www.g

allopade.com

SS2H1 The student will read about and describe the lives of historical figures in Georgia history. a. Identify the contributions made by these historic figures: Jimmy Carter (leadership and human rights)... b. Describe how everyday life of these historical figures is similar to and different from everyday life in the present.

ENRICHMENT PACK “Story Cards” are great for individual and small group discussion.

INTERACTIVE WRITE-IN READERS Stories of historic figures combine with fun activities to boost reading and comprehension skills.

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 7


2 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

Coastal Plain Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blueuntains Mo Ridge & Valley

Piedmont

Fall

Locate the Coastal Plain on the map and color it orange. Trace the coastline in blue.

e

Lin

Coastal Plain

Coas tlin

E L P M SA

e

The Coastal Plain region is the southern region in Georgia. This region borders the Atlantic Ocean.

Atlantic Ocean

The Coastal Plain is the warmest part of Georgia. Peanuts, cotton, and vegetables are grown in the Coastal Plain. The coastline is at sea level and is Georgia’s lowest point.

Circle the pictures that best show the Coastal Plain.

Correlates with SS2G1.a ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 10 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Down South Trace the region where you live on the map in yellow. Trace where the Creek Indians lived in blue.

Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blueuntains Mo Ridge & Valley List two ways your region is different from where the Creek Indians lived.

Piedmont

E L P M SA l Fal

e

Lin

Creek

2. ____________________

The Creek and Cherokee Indians had to work with the land they lived on. They depended on their local resources for everything. Local resources are plants, animals, and materials that are available nearby.

Cherokee

1. ____________________

Use What You Got

Coastal Plain

List two ways your region is the same as where the Creek Indians lived. 1. ___________________________

The Creek and Cherokee Indians used their local resources to: ● build their homes ● make their tools ● make their clothes ● provide their food

E L P M SA

Fill in the blanks with resources for each item like in the example.

Indians

Today

deer meat and corn

Food

_______________________

stone and stick

Tools

_______________________

animal hides

Clothes

_______________________

logs, bark, clay

Homes

_______________________

2. ___________________________ Correlates with SS2H2a,b and SS2G2a,b,c,d,e

Correlates with SS2H2a,b and SS2G2a,b,c,d,e

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 15

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 18

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 8


2 STUDENT WORKBOOK

Evaluation Sample

It’s Official!

James Oglethorpe, Tomochichi, and Mary Musgrove lived in the Coastal Plain region.

Sequoyah taught hundreds of Cherokees in Tennessee and Arkansas to read and write. They, in turn, taught others. The Bible was translated into Cherokee and missionaries learned the language in 1824. Sequoyah was given a special medal in 1825. His alphabet was officially adopted by the Cherokee Council.

Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blueuntains Mo Ridge & Valley

Trace the Coastal Plain region in red.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 96 pages

South Carolina Piedmont

Fall

Trace the your region in yellow.

Circle the words that are related to Sequoyah’s Cherokee alphabet.

e

Lin

first

Yamacraw Bluff

syllabary

newspaper

E L P SAM

E L P SAM Coastal Plain

unfinished

The Costal Plain region has a warm climate.

Bible

200 letters

medal

The Cherokee Council published the first Native American newspaper in history at their capital in New Echota, Georgia in 1828. It was called the Cherokee Phoenix.

Answer the question. The Coastal Plain region has a warm climate. Does your region Yes No have a warm climate? Tennessee

The Coastal Plain region has a coastline. Does your region No have a coastline? Yes

Oklahoma

Arkansas

Trace Sequoyah’s travels from Tennessee to Arkansas to Oklahoma.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Sequoyah retired to Oklahoma in 1829. He had faced many hardships, but he never gave up! He had devoted his whole life to creating the Cherokee alphabet.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 35

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 51

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Don’t Give Up!

Boycott

Jackie returned to sports after the Army. He became a shortstop for a Negro Baseball League team in Kansas City. Jackie was asked to play in the all-white major league in 1947. Many whites gave him a hard time. Some players made fun of Jackie and threatened him. They spat on him and tried to hurt him with the spikes on their shoes.

In 1955 Rosa Parks, a black woman in Montgomery, refused to give up her bus seat to a white man. She was arrested and taken to jail. Dr. King and other black leaders organized a bus boycott. This means people did not ride the bus and the bus company lost money. Circle the correct phrase.

Solve the code to find out the name of the major league ball team Jackie played on.

A ✹ N ✿

B ❁ O ✫

C ✣ P ✦

D ♣ Q ✡

E F G H I J K L M ➸ ❤ ❢ ✲ ✄ ✆ ☛ ✈ ✉ R S T U V W X Y Z ✐ ❦ ☎ ✒ ✙ ✖ ✍ ✠ ✓

E L P M SA

During the bus boycott, ______________ did not ride the bus. enemies of civil rights people who believed in civil rights

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Jackie would not stop playing for the Dodgers. His manager and teammates supported him. Jackie was named Rookie of the Year in the major leagues in 1947! That means he was the best new player!

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Jackie Robinson stole home 19 times during his baseball career including three times in 1947 when he was only a rookie.

E L P M SA

The boycott lasted for over a year while protesters were threatened, arrested, and discriminated against. The house where Dr. King lived was bombed! Finally the Supreme Court ruled against segregation and ordered that it stop. Write True or False for the following statements.

____ Protesters were treated nicely during the boycott. ____ The Supreme Court ruled against segregation. ____ Black people had to sit in the front of the bus. ____ Black people can sit anywhere on the bus today. Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 57

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 65

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 9


2 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

Carole Marsh Georgia Titles The Georgia Experience™ Curriculum Series: Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade Eighth Grade Georgia Experience Reference Guide 20 Ways to Teach the GPS with Pizzazz!

Georgia Experience Kindergarten Readers:

Evaluation sample of student workbook.

RE008

Martin Luther King, Jr.

RE060

Jackie Robinson

RE107

Jimmy Carter

RE128

Second Grade Curriculum: 2nd Grade Student Workbook 2nd Grade Student Workbook, Teacher’s Edition 2nd Grade Teacher’s Resource Guide 2nd Grade Georgia Blackline Master Set 2nd Grade Georgia Color Overhead Transparencies Set Set of 9 Historical Figures Reproducible Sheets Georgia Regions Map Activity Pack Georgia Rivers Map Activity Pack Capitals and Capitols Map Activity Pack

Sequoyah

RE170

Tomochichi

RE171

Mary Musgrove

RE172

James Oglethorpe

RE197

George Bush

Georgia State Stuff: Georgia Stickers Georgia Experience Poster/Map Georgia Biography Bingo Game Georgia Facts & Factivities! CD-ROM Georgia Geography Bingo Game Let’s Discover Georgia! CD-ROM Georgia History Bingo Game The BIG Georgia Reproducible Activity Book Georgia State Stuff Bookmarks My First Book About Georgia! Georgia Millionaire GameBook Georgia Jeopardy!: Answers and Georgia Wheel of Fortune GameBook Questions About Our State Georgia Survivor GameBook Georgia “Jography!”: A Fun Run Georgia BIG State Wall Timeline Through Our State Georgia State Student My First Pocket Guide: Georgia Reference Timeline The Georgia Coloring Book

Shown page-by-page.

Other Series: African American Heritage Series Native American Heritage Series Hispanic Heritage Series

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 3 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

A Word From the Author

Georgia’s Regions There are five regions in Georgia. Each region has a different kind of geography. Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blueuntains Mo Ridge & Valley

Dear Students, Georgia is a great state! You are very fortunate to live here. From this book, you will learn some interesting things about your state, your country, and the world!

The smallest region in Georgia is the Appalachian Plateau. It covers Dade County in the northwestern corner of Georgia.

Piedmont

You’ll learn about how people lived in the past. You’ll compare that to how we live today. It’s a big world out there, and you’ll find out about other cultures, too. Many people have made our nation a special place. You will learn about some of those people in this book. You will also study geography and see how people continually change the environment around them. This book also shows you how important it is to make good choices. Your time and money are very valuable. It is always best to use them wisely! This book will also help you become a good citizen in your school and community. It will show you that what you do affects others. Have a great time! I hope you enjoy your Georgia Experience.

Fall

e

Lin

Coastal Plain

Locate the Appalachian Plateau on the map and color it yellow.

The Appalachian Plateau has lots of mountains and woods. Lookout Mountain is in the Appalachian Plateau. Circle the picture that best describes the Appalachian Plateau.

Carole Marsh

Ridge and Valley Next to the Appalachian Plateau is the Ridge and Valley region in north Georgia.

Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blueuntains Mo Ridge & Valley

Piedmont

Locate the Ridge and Valley Region and color it brown.

Fall

e

Lin

Coastal Plain

There are several mountain ridges with valleys between them in the Ridge and Valley region. Mining and farming are done in this region of Georgia. Circle the picture that best shows the Ridge and Valley region.

Correlates with SS2G1.a

Correlates with SS2G1.a

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 4

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 5

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • 800-536-2GET • www.georgiaexperience.com • Page 6

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Blue Ridge Mountains

Carole Marsh Georgia Titles

The Blue Ridge Mountains region is in north Georgia. The southern tip of the Appalachian Mountains is in the Blue Ridge Mountains region. The highest point in Appalachian Plateau e Georgia is Brasstown Bald. It is in the Blue Ridg Blueuntains Mo Ridge Mountains region. It is 4,784 feet Ridge & Valley high! Find the Blue Ridge Mountains region on the map and color it blue.

Piedmont

Fall

e Lin

Coastal Plain

There are many forests in the Blue Ridge Mountains region. The first gold rush in the United States started in the Blue Ridge Mountains region in 1828. Circle the words that apply to the Blue Ridge Mountains region.

north

mountains

beaches

highest point

south

gold

The Georgia Experience™ Curriculum Series: Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade Eighth Grade

Georgia Experience Kindergarten Readers: RE008

Martin Luther King, Jr.

RE060

Jackie Robinson

RE107

Jimmy Carter

RE128

Sequoyah

RE170

Tomochichi

RE171

Mary Musgrove

RE172

James Oglethorpe

RE197

George Bush

Georgia Experience Reference Guide 20 Ways to Teach the GPS with Pizzazz! Second Grade Curriculum: 2nd Grade Student Workbook 2nd Grade Student Workbook, Teacher’s Edition 2nd Grade Teacher’s Resource Guide 2nd Grade Georgia Blackline Master Set 2nd Grade Georgia Color Overhead Transparencies Set Set of 9 Historical Figures Reproducible Sheets Georgia Regions Map Activity Pack Georgia Rivers Map Activity Pack Capitals and Capitols Map Activity Pack

Fall Line The fall line is a geological division in the earth that runs across Georgia. The fall line separates the Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions of Georgia. Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blueuntains Mo Ridge & Valley

There are waterfalls along the fall line. The waterfalls are created by the different surface levels. Major cities formed at the fall line. It was difficult to boat upstream of the fall line.

Piedmont

Fall

e

Lin

Coastal Plain Georgia State Stuff: Georgia Stickers Georgia Experience Poster/Map Georgia Biography Bingo Game Georgia Facts & Factivities! CD-ROM Georgia Geography Bingo Game Let’s Discover Georgia! CD-ROM Georgia History Bingo Game The BIG Georgia Reproducible Activity Book Georgia State Stuff Bookmarks My First Book About Georgia! Georgia Millionaire GameBook Georgia Jeopardy!: Answers and Georgia Wheel of Fortune GameBook Questions About Our State Georgia Survivor GameBook Georgia “Jography!”: A Fun Run Georgia BIG State Wall Timeline Through Our State Georgia State Student My First Pocket Guide: Georgia Reference Timeline The Georgia Coloring Book

Locate the fall line and trace it in red.

The fall line is a geological boundary. There are different soils and rocks on each side. There are also different plants and animals on each side of the fall line! Circle the picture of what you find along the fall line.

Other Series: African American Heritage Series Native American Heritage Series Hispanic Heritage Series

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2 STUDENT WORKBOOK Major Rivers …

iv

eR

he

oc

ho

Augusta

an

Griffin

West Point Lake

Macon

r

eR

ive

Savannah

r

R i ve

Alta m

r

ah

aR i

r ve

The St. Marys River is a part of the southeast boundary of Georgia. Trace the St. Marys River in orange.

i ve

ulge

Columbus

F li n t

The Altamaha River runs across southeastern Georgia and into the Atlantic Ocean. Trace the Altamaha River in purple.

Albany Waycross

Lake Seminole

Valdosta

River

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Indians in Georgia American Indians lived in Georgia. Different tribes lived in different parts of the state. Two of the most important Native American tribes that lived in Georgia were the Cherokee and the Creek.

Indian Capitals

The Creeks in Georgia lived in southern Georgia. Most of the Creeks lived along the fall line. European traders gave the Creeks their name because they lived by rivers, streams, and creeks. Match the Native American to the words that best describe him.

Cherokee

north south principal people rivers and streams fall line mountains

Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blueuntains Mo Ridge & Valley

Appalachian Plateau

Ridge & Valley

Blue Ridge Mountains

New Ech ota

List two ways your region is different from where the Creek Indians lived.

Piedmont Circle the Creek capital in red.

l Fal

Coweta

e

Lin

Cussita

Coastal Plain New Echota was the Cherokee capital. It was in the Ridge and Valley region of Georgia. The Cherokee Indians traveled throughout northern Georgia. Creek

Down South Trace the region where you live on the map in yellow. Trace where the Creek Indians lived in blue.

Coweta was the Creek capital. It was on the Chattahoochee River near the Georgia fall line. Coweta and Cussita were the most important towns to the Creeks. The Creek Indians traveled along the fall line and south.

The Cherokees lived in the mountain areas of northern Georgia. They called themselves the principal people.

Circle the Cherokee capital in green.

Cherokee Piedmont

Fall

1. ____________________

e

Lin

Creek

2. ____________________

Coastal Plain List two ways your region is the same as where the Creek Indians lived. 1. ___________________________ 2. ___________________________

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Up North Trace the region where you live on the map in yellow. Trace where the Cherokee Indians lived in green.

Town Square

hR

ee R

Dublin

Ocm

The Oconee River runs from the north of Georgia to the Altamaha River. Trace the Oconee River in red.

na

La Grange

r

Circle the picture of what you find along the fall line.

The Ocmulgee River runs down through the center of the state and into the Altamaha River. Trace the Ocmulgee River in orange.

Ch

C h a t t a h o o c h e e R iv e

The fall line is a geological boundary. There are different soils and rocks on each side. There are also different plants and animals on each side of the fall line!

The Flint River begins below the Chattahoochee River and runs to the southwest corner of Georgia. Trace the Flint River in yellow.

iver

Coastal Plain

Strom Thurmond Lake

Athens

Oc o n

Locate the fall line and trace it in red.

er

Atlanta

St. Marys

e

Lin

The Savannah River forms part of Georgia’s eastern border. Trace the Savannah River in blue.

Lake Lanier

v

Fall

Lake Hartwell Rome

ta

Piedmont

of Georgia

The Chattahoochee River forms part of the western border of Georgia. Trace the Chattahoochee River in green.

Sa

There are waterfalls along the fall line. The waterfalls are created by the different surface levels. Major cities formed at the fall line. It was difficult to boat upstream of the fall line.

Evaluation Sample

at

Fall Line The fall line is a geological division in the earth that runs across Georgia. The fall line separates the Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions of Georgia. Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blueuntains Mo Ridge & Valley

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

Use What You Got

The Cherokee and Creek Indians built towns along rivers and waterways. Their towns had central plazas. A plaza was like the public town squares we have today.

The Creek and Cherokee Indians had to work with the land they lived on. They depended on their local resources for everything.

The Cherokees built seven-sided temples where they held ceremonies. They built circular council houses around the plaza. A council house was like the county courthouses we have today.

Local resources are plants, animals, and materials that are available nearby.

Appalachian Plateau e List two ways your Ridg Blueuntains region is different Mo Ridge from where the & Valley Cherokee Indians lived.

Cherokee

Piedmont

1. __________________ ____________________

Fall

2. _____________________ ____________________

The Creeks built council houses and public storehouses around their plazas. The storehouses held grain grown by all the families for everyone to share.

e

Lin

Creek

Both the Cherokee and Creek Indians built palisades around their towns. Palisades are walls of logs built for protection.

Coastal Plain

List two ways your region is the same as where the Cherokee Indians lived.

Match the Indian building to the building today.

1. ________________________________ 2. ________________________________

central plaza council house palisades temple

town square security wall courthouse place of worship

The Creek and Cherokee Indians used their local resources to: ● build their homes ● make their tools ● make their clothes ● provide their food Fill in the blanks with resources for each item like in the example.

Indians

Today

deer meat and corn

Food

_______________________

stone and stick

Tools

_______________________

animal hides

Clothes

_______________________

logs, bark, clay

Homes

_______________________

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2 STUDENT WORKBOOK Home Sweet Summer Home The Creek and Cherokee Indians both built summer homes. The Creek summer homes were rectangular. They had no walls so breezes could keep them cool. The Cherokee summer homes had clay walls. They were large, long houses where many people could sleep. Both had roofs made of bark or straw. Circle the words that describe Indian summer homes. Underline the words that describe homes today.

air conditioning

straw roof

shingle roofs

no walls

clay walls

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

Home Sweet Winter Home The Creek and Cherokee Indians both built winter homes. The Creek winter homes were rectangular. They had walls made of clay and moss. They had roofs made of bark and grass covered with clay. These were called “hothouses.” The Cherokee winter homes were round. They were built over a pit dug in the earth. They had cone shaped roofs made of poles and dirt. The Cherokee winter homes were also used as sweathouses. Write S if your home is the same as the Indian homes. Write D if your home is different.

Indians

Today

Walls made of clay and moss

___________

Roofs made of bark and grass

___________

Round with cone shaped roof

___________

Warm in the winter

___________

Cool in the summer

___________

Evaluation Sample

Let’s Play! The Cherokees played stickball and a game called “chunkey.” The Creeks also played chunkey. They built ballparks near their plazas so everyone could watch the games.

Chunkey Two people at a time played chunkey. One started by rolling a smooth stone disk down the court. Both players would run after it. They carried eight-foot poles flattened at the ends. They would throw the stick as close as possible to where they thought the disk would stop. The player whose stick was closest received one point. If the disc touched his stick he received two points. Circle the Indian child, today’s child, or both. I’m going to watch the ball game. My favorite game is Chunkey! I like to play video games. I like to play games for fun! Can you think of a game you play today that is similar to Chunkey? _________________________________

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Fashion Fur The Cherokee and Creek Indians used animal skins for their clothing. They softened the skins of deer, bear, and beaver for their clothes. The Creeks made colorful cloaks or blankets from animal skins. Men and women wore these over their shoulders and to their knees. Cherokee men wore buckskin breechcloths when it was warm. These were flaps made of deerskin worn from their waists. Cherokee women wore buckskin skirts. When it was cold the Cherokees wore buckskin leggings (pants), moccasins and capes. Match the clothes to the person.

Cherokee

Let’s Eat!

Tool Time!

The Creek and Cherokee Indians had plenty of food. They hunted bear, deer, turkey, and buffalo. They used bows and arrows for larger animals. They used blowguns for smaller animals. The Cherokee Indians sometimes wore a whole deerskin as a disguise to lure animals. The Cherokee and Creek Indians used spears, traps and hooks to catch fish and mussels. They grew corn, squash, beans, and tobacco. They ate wild berries and nuts they found in the woods. People today eat many of the same foods the Indians ate. Circle the picture that shows how people today get their food.

The Cherokee and Creek Indians used tools to survive. They had to make all of their tools by hand. They did not have electric tools like we do today. They had axes to cut wood for homes, canoes, and other tools. They had canoes with oars for traveling on streams and rivers. They had bows and arrows, blowguns, and spears for hunting and protecting themselves. They had snares, traps, and hooks to catch animals and fish. They had fire drills, hoes, baskets, and many more tools to help them grow crops and live their everyday lives. Circle the Native American tools in red. Circle tools we use today in blue.

Creek Circle the pictures that show foods the Indians ate. Underline the pictures that show foods we eat today.

Person Today Correlates with SS2H2a,b and SS2G2a,b,c,d,e

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Get a Job!

Jobs Past and Present

The Cherokee and the Creek Indians had many occupations. They had to do their jobs to survive. occupation: a way to make a living; a job Some of the jobs of the Cherokees and Creeks were hunting, fishing, protecting their homes, farming, and cooking. Match the job to the job description. JOBS

JOB DESCRIPTION

Fisherman

Hunted for deer and beaver

Farmer

Protected the homes and land

Hunter

Caught fish for food

Many of the jobs of today are different from the jobs Georgia Indians did in the past. But there are some jobs that are similar. Match each Indian job with a similar job today.

Warrior Cook Medicine Man

Accomplishments The Cherokee and Creek Indians had many skills. Today we still use some of the skills they taught us.

Chef Doctor Soldier

● ● ●

ARTS Created beautiful art Baskets and pottery Silver jewelry FARMING Used soil and tools to grow many crops

There are also jobs today that Indians were never able to have. Circle the jobs that were not available to Georgia Indians of the past.

STORIES Passed down stories and legends

RESPECT FOR NATURE Taught us to take care of nature: water, earth, air, animals, and plants

Which of these accomplishments have you seen, heard, or done?

Warrior

Prepared meals

List them below.

Cook

Planted crops

1. __________________________________________________________ 2. __________________________________________________________

The Cherokees and the Creeks had to work with the land they lived on. It was all they had. They had to do all these jobs to help the whole group survive.

3. __________________________________________________________ 4. __________________________________________________________

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PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

2 STUDENT WORKBOOK Creek Pride When people or groups join together for a certain reason it can be called a confederacy. Many Creek Indian tribes joined together throughout the South in a confederacy. The greatest accomplishment of the Creek Indians was the creation of the Creek Confederacy. Their confederacy made them a larger and stronger tribe.

Complete the sentences using the word bank.

accomplishment stronger

confederacy larger

The Creeks’ greatest _____________________________ was the Creek Confederacy.

This _______________________________

The Story of . . . The Founding of Georgia

Cherokee Pride The greatest accomplishment of the Cherokee Indians was the invention of the Cherokee alphabet. The Cherokee alphabet was the first Native American alphabet in history!

James Oglethorpe and 35 families left England to come to America in 1732. They crossed the ocean in a ship called Anne.

The Cherokee printed the first Native American newspaper in 1828.

The settlers came to America to begin a new colony called Georgia. Reasons why settlers came to America: ● People would not be put in jail for being poor in America. ● Poor people would be given land in America. ● People could have freedom of religion in America.

Solve the code to find out what the name of the newspaper was.

A ✹ N ✿

B ❁ O ✫

C ✣ P ✦

D ♣ Q ✡

E F G H I J K L M ➸ ❤ ❢ ✲ ✄ ✆ ☛ ✈ ✉ R S T U V W X Y Z ✐ ❦ ☎ ✒ ✙ ✖ ✍ ✠ ✓

James Oglethorpe was a compassionate citizen. He cared about people. He helped settlers find new and better homes in America.

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

joined many tribes together. This made them a

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ ______________________ and ______________________ tribe.

Evaluation Sample

English woman early 1700s

Match the sentence to the person.

American woman today

“I was put in jail because I had no money” “I can got to any church, temple, or mosque I want.” “I can’t own any land to build a home.”

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James Meets Mary James Oglethorpe and the settlers arrived in South Carolina. James met Mary Musgrove. Mary was the daughter of a white trader and a Creek Indian princess. Mary was born in the Creek capital of Coweta on the Chattahoochee River. The Creek Indians could not read or write. Mary’s father lived in South Carolina. She was taken to South Carolina to learn how to read and write when she was ten years old. She was taught Christianity. Mary learned how to live as a Creek Indian and as a Settler.

Colonel John Musgrove was sent from South Carolina to make a treaty with the Creek Indians. He met Mary and fell in love. They married and started a trading post near Yamacraw Bluff. Mary was important to the Creeks and the settlers. Reasons Mary was important: ● Mary could speak and understand English. ● Mary knew the Muskogee language the Creek Indians spoke. ● Mary understood how both the Creeks and the settlers lived. When James Oglethorpe met Mary he asked her to be his interpreter. She worked for him for ten years! Write M for Mary, C for Creek Indian, or T for a person today for each sentence.

Write a letter to Mary. Tell her how her life as a child was different from your life today.

_____ I speak Muskogee. I can’t read or write.

Dear Mary,

_____ I speak Muskogee and English and I can read and write!

James Meets Tomochichi Tomochichi was the chief of a tribe of Creek Indians from Yamacraw Bluff. Yamacraw Bluff was a high area of land overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. James Oglethorpe chose Yamacraw Bluff as the site to build the first city in the Georgia Colony. He met with Tomochichi to see if they could come to an agreement. Mary Musgrove interpreted for Oglethorpe and Tomochichi. Tomochichi agreed to allow the settlers to build their city at Yamacraw Bluff. Oglethorpe and Tomochichi became friends. This means he welcomed the settlers to his land. Starting with the letter J, cross out every other letter to learn the positive citizenship trait of Tomochichi.

J C U I W V K I M L A I X T N Y _____________________________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

civility: showing of kindness or thoughtfulness

_____ I can read and write. I can talk on the telephone and send emails on the computer. _____ I understand how the Creeks and the settlers live.

Circle the words that describe Oglethorpe and Tomochichi.

war

friends

enemies

peace

brothers

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James Oglethorpe chose Yamacraw Bluff as the site to build the first city in the Georgia Colony. He chose it because it was high and easy to protect. The city would be named Savannah. Tomochichi lived in Yamacraw Bluff in the Coastal Plain region of Georgia. Mary Musgrove’s Trading Post was near Yamacraw Bluff. It was in the Coastal Plain region. Circle Yamacraw Bluff in red. Circle where Savannah would be in blue.

A Man with a Plan

James Oglethorpe, Tomochichi, and Mary Musgrove lived in the Coastal Plain region.

The settlers had a charter to start their colony. This charter was a plan. The charter stated:

Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blueuntains Mo Ridge & Valley

Trace the Coastal Plain region in red.

South Carolina Piedmont

Fall

Trace the your region in yellow.

e

Lin

Coastal Plain

Yamacraw Bluff

The Costal Plain region has a warm climate.

● ● ● ●

There would be no alcohol in the new colony. Each family would receive land to farm. There would be no slaves in the new colony. There would be religious freedom.

The charter had a design for the city of Savannah. Oglethorpe designed Savannah in England. It is one of America’s first planned cities. Savannah started as four central squares. The settlers added twenty more squares. Most of them are still there today!

Answer the question. The Coastal Plain region has a warm climate. Does your region Yes No have a warm climate? The Coastal Plain region has a coastline. Does your region No have a coastline? Yes

Answer the question. How many squares were built for Savannah?

20 + 4 = ____ squares

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2 STUDENT WORKBOOK More Plans James Oglethorpe brought the settlers to their new home at Yamacraw Bluff.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

James Oglethorpe and the settlers were from England. They knew nothing about the land in the Georgia Coastal Plain. They had to learn how to live on their new land. The settlers brought enough belongings with them to help them through the first year.

A work plan was made:

Evaluation Sample

The Settlers and You Settlers often read the Bible or told stories in front of a fire to relax after a hard day. What do you do for recreation or to relax?

● Older men, women, and children would grow crops. ● Younger men would build and form an army. ● Everyone had to work! ● Each family was given fifty acres of land to farm. Match the job to the settler. John Jones Jr., a child

growing crops

Mary Jones, a young woman

army, building homes

John Jones, a young man

growing crops

James Jones, a grandfather

growing crops

Each colonist brought: ● A coat ● A gun ● Some food ● Hatchets, hammers, shovels, saws, hoes, and knives

read

play games

Do people today make their own bricks and cut their

The settlers had to grow and hunt their own food. They had to live in tents until they built their own houses. Circle the pictures that best show the new lives of the first settlers in America.

watch TV

Settlers had to build their own homes by cutting down trees for wood and making their own bricks.

yes

own wood to build their home?

Settlers had to eat what they could find, hunt and grow. Where do most people get their food today?

woods

Indian trading post

grocery store

Women settlers wore long, full skirts. The men wore waistcoats and high boots. List 3 things that most people wear today.

How much land did each family receive? _____________ acres

1. _______________

2. _______________

3. _______________

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Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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Survival The first year was difficult for the settlers. They struggled to build their city and begin farming. Many settlers died. Fresh water was hard to find. Some of their crops would not grow in the region. Some of the settlers did not want to work in the fields. Oglethorpe and the settlers were lucky to have Tomochichi and Mary Musgrove as friends. Tomochichi and Mary helped the settlers. The South Carolina Colony also helped the settlers.

Friends

Let’s Take A Trip

James Oglethorpe traveled west and south of Savannah to make sure those areas were safe and protected. South Carolina was in the north and they were already friends. Other areas needed protection.

James Oglethorpe went back to England in a ship to tell the king about the Georgia Colony. He took Tomochichi with him. The English liked Tomochichi. Tomochichi decided to trust the English and their plans for America.

North _______

Write safe for the directions that were safe.

West _______

The settlers struggled but they liked their new rights and freedoms. The colony survived. Soon more settlers came from England. They brought more help and supplies. Savannah was growing! Complete the to-do lists by filling in the blanks. Settlers

People Today

build house

call contractor

____________________

fill water pitcher from sink

work in fields

____________________

____________________

buy groceries at store

Tomochichi and Oglethorpe returned to explore the colony and define its boundaries. They negotiated peace treaties with other Indian tribes. Tomochichi was a true friend to the Georgia Colony. He was given an English military funeral to honor him when he died. Trace Tomochichi and Oglethorpe’s path to England.

South _______ Write protect for the directions that needed forts for protection. Oglethorpe built four forts surrounding Savannah. He built the forts to protect the new Georgia Colony from the Spanish, French, and hostile Indians.

Europe United States

Atlantic Ocean

Circle the transportation we use today in blue.

More and more settlers were arriving in the Georgia Colony. They were welcomed and given new areas to build and settle. The Georgia Colony was growing!

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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That Settles It! The Georgia Colony was settled and mapped. In 1752 it became a Royal English Colony.

The Story of Sequoyah and the Alphabet

James Oglethorpe was a dependable citizen. He led the settlers to new homes in America. He helped them establish a new colony and build a new city. The settlers depended on Oglethorpe and he never let them down!

Sequoyah was named Tsis-kwa’ya which means “the sparrow.” Later, he became lame in one leg. He was called Sequoyah, which means “the lame one.”

James Oglethorpe’s greatest contribution was founding Georgia. With the help of Tomochichi and Mary Musgrove he established the Georgia Colony in America!

His mother was from a well-respected Cherokee family, the Red Paint clan. His father was a unaka, or white man. It is believed that his father was Nathaniel Gist, but no one knows for sure. Sequoyah grew up without a father. He was called a halfbreed. He did not have the citizenship rights of a white man. He was sometimes called George Gist.

Fill in the blanks.

Tomochichi Savannah difficult grew Mary Musgrove James Oglethorpe

Georgia was founded by ______________________________ with the help of ___________________________ and ___________________. The first year was ___________________ but the new colony ___________________. ____________________________ was the first city in Georgia.

Finish this sentence James Oglethorpe might have said. “You can depend on me because I’m d __ p __ n __ a __ l __ !

no

Sequoyah grew up in a small log cabin in the Tennessee woods and mountains. His cabin was like cabins the settlers lived in.

Starting with J, cross out every other letter. The remaining letters will spell out the Cherokee name for their tribe.

J T R S E A Z L I A U G S I _____________________________ Match the Cherokee words to their meanings.

Tennessee

Unaka

sparrow

Tsis-kwa’ya

white man

Sequoyah’s home was ________ the settlers’ homes. like not like Sequoyah’s home was ____________ our homes today. like not like Sequoyah usually walked wherever he went, occasionally riding in canoes for longer trips down the river. Circle the picture that shows how you usually travel in the present. Draw a square around the pictures that show how people traveled in the past.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 14


2 STUDENT WORKBOOK Sequoyah liked to draw rather than play war games. He enjoyed painting and woodworking. He was good with his hands. Match Sequoyah to the things he did for recreation.

comic book drawing baseball woodworking bicycle Sequoyah was a good storyteller. Native Americans told stories because they did not have an alphabet to read and write.

Settle Down!

Sequoyah did not have the citizenship rights of a white man. Some citizenship rights are the right to vote and the right to organize and direct community affairs.

Sequoyah built a house and settled on the Coosa River in Alabama. He married a Cherokee woman named Utiya. Sequoyah’s business was good and he was well-respected.

Do your parents have citizenship rights?

At age 39 Sequoyah found a new interest. This was the “talking leaves” of the white man. These were the pieces of paper with written words the white man used to communicate.

yes no

Sequoyah raised his own livestock and grew his own vegetables for food. Livestock are cattle, pigs, and other animals raised on a farm.

Circle the things that are “talking leaves.”

birthday cards magazines

yes no

Do you grow your own vegetables?

yes no

Sequoyah wore traditional Cherokee clothing made from deer skin and fabric hand woven on looms. Are your clothes made the same way as the Cherokee’s?

yes no Sequoyah became a skilled silversmith. He traveled around North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, and Georgia selling his silver work. He was a good trader.

Evaluation Sample

Sequoyah and You

Do you raise livestock?

Write a C beside the way the Cherokee communicated. Write a T for the ways we communicate today.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

Circle the clothes you wear.

jeans leggings moccasins capes tennis shoes t-shirts

radios letters

CDs

Sequoyah’s discovery of the white man’s “talking leaves” changed his life. It changed the lives of every Cherokee. Sequoyah wanted his children to have a Cherokee alphabet so they could read and write. Color the picture of Sequoyah. Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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A,B,C

It Worked!

It’s Official!

First Sequoyah tried to invent a symbol for each word. There were too many words. Then he decided to invent a symbol for each sound. Sequoyah spent years listening to the Cherokee language and finding the separate sounds. Finally, he found 86 sounds that made up all the words.

The years that Sequoyah worked on his alphabet were difficult. His wife and village thought he was practicing witchcraft. They did not understand his work and were afraid of it. His wife burned his work and the villagers burned his home.

Sequoyah taught hundreds of Cherokees in Tennessee and Arkansas to read and write. They, in turn, taught others. The Bible was translated into Cherokee and missionaries learned the language in 1824. Sequoyah was given a special medal in 1825. His alphabet was officially adopted by the Cherokee Council.

Next Sequoyah designed a symbol for each of these sounds. He carved his “letters” on the smooth insides of slabs of bark. Sequoyah had invented a syllabary. A syllabary uses symbols to represent sounds. Design a symbol to represent a sound.

Sequoyah left and went to Arkansas with his daughter. He finished his alphabet. He tested it on his daughter and it worked! Sequoyah showed his work to the Cherokee Council. At first they doubted him, but Sequoyah proved his syllabary worked. The Cherokee could now read and write in their own language! Complete the sentences correctly.

worked Arkansas

fire wife

alphabet Cherokee Council

Circle the words that are related to Sequoyah’s Cherokee alphabet.

first unfinished

syllabary Bible

medal

The Cherokee Council published the first Native American newspaper in history at their capital in New Echota, Georgia in 1828. It was called the Cherokee Phoenix.

Sequoyah’s ___________ and village set his work on ______. Sequoyah moved to __________ to keep working on his alphabet. He taught his ___________to his daughter and it Sequoyah spent 12 years perfecting his work. It was so well done that most of his students learned it in just a few days!

newspaper

200 letters

Tennessee

Oklahoma

Arkansas

___________! Then he showed it to the ________________.

Sequoyah retired to Oklahoma in 1829. He had faced many hardships, but he never gave up! He had devoted his whole life to creating the Cherokee alphabet. Trace Sequoyah’s travels from Tennessee to Arkansas to Oklahoma.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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It Takes Time! Sequoyah is called Father of the Cherokee alphabet. He spent 12 years creating and writing the alphabet. This was his greatest contribution to his people and history. Sequoyah was a great Cherokee citizen and displayed positive citizenship traits in his life. He showed great patience in creating the Cherokee alphabet. He honored his people with his invention.

Young Jackie

The Story of Jackie Robinson & Civil Rights Jackie Robinson was born near Cairo, Georgia in 1919. Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blue ntains Mou Ridge & Valley

Find Cairo on the map of Georgia. Circle it in red. What region was Jackie born in? ________________________

Sequoyah is known as the __________________ of the ________________________

_______________________.

Circle the words that describe Jackie’s childhood.

rich

e

Lin

Jackie and his family used a railroad in Cairo to move to California.

Coastal Plain

Do people in your region use the

Cairo

railroad to travel?

yes

The Cherokee syllabary remains in use today!

patience: the ability to put up with trouble, delay, or boredom

neglected

loved

mother

Life was difficult for Jackie and other African Americans. America was segregated. Segregation is forcing people of different races to live separately. Jackie could not eat in white restaurants. He had to go to black movie theaters. He could only use the YMCA recreation center on black days.

no

Trace Jackie’s trip from Georgia to California.

honor: to show great respect

poor

Piedmont

Fall

Fill in the blanks to complete the sentence.

Jackie grew up poor. His mother washed clothes and cleaned for rich white people. She gave Jackie love and attention. Jackie’s mother taught him the importance of self-confidence, self-respect, and believing in advancement in life.

Jackie was the grandson of a slave and the son of sharecroppers. Jackie’s father left when he was a baby. His family moved by train to California to live with his uncle.

Write a P in the box near the picture that shows segregation in the past. Write a T in the box near the picture that shows life today. When young Jackie started to get into trouble, a neighbor and his minister encouraged him to get involved in sports.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 15


2 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

School Rules

You’re In the Army Now

Don’t Give Up!

Jackie was athletic from the beginning. He played marbles, soccer, tennis, golf, baseball, and basketball! He won honors through high school and Junior College. Jackie went to the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA).

Jackie Robinson was drafted into the United States Army in 1941. He applied for Officers Candidate School. He was refused because he was an African American. Boxing Champion Joe Louis and other African Americans helped him get accepted into the officer training school. Jackie graduated as a lieutenant in 1943. He was proud to wear his uniform.

Jackie returned to sports after the Army. He became a shortstop for a Negro Baseball League team in Kansas City. Jackie was asked to play in the all-white major league in 1947. Many whites gave him a hard time. Some players made fun of Jackie and threatened him. They spat on him and tried to hurt him with the spikes on their shoes.

Jackie did not have enough money to finish college. He had to quit and get a job. Jackie joined the National Youth Administration and worked with disadvantaged children. Pretend you are writing a letter to Jackie. Tell him how your life today is like his. Tell him how your life today is different from his. Dear Jackie, My life is like yours because ______________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ My life is different than yours because _____________________ _______________________________________________________

Circle the words that describe Jackie in the army.

African American

cook

officer

lieutenant

Jackie was told to sit in the back of the bus because he was an African American. Jackie refused. He went to a military trial. The charges were dropped. Jackie left the Army soon after that. Place a check by the true statements. ___ Jackie’s father left his family when he was very young.

_______________________________________________________

___ Jackie graduated from UCLA.

Sincerely,

___ Jackie was drafted into the U.S. Army.

_____________________________________________

___ Jackie had to sit in the back of the bus.

Solve the code to find out the name of the major league ball team Jackie played on.

A ✹ N ✿

B ❁ O ✫

C ✣ P ✦

D ♣ Q ✡

E F G H I J K L M ➸ ❤ ❢ ✲ ✄ ✆ ☛ ✈ ✉ R S T U V W X Y Z ✐ ❦ ☎ ✒ ✙ ✖ ✍ ✠ ✓

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Jackie Robinson stole home 19 times during his baseball career including three times in 1947 when he was only a rookie.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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Hall of Fame

After Baseball

Jackie and You

Jackie Robinson was the first African American baseball player in the major leagues. His courage and actions helped bring about opportunities for all African Americans. Today African Americans play in all professional sports.

After he retired from baseball, Jackie became a businessman and a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

When Jackie was growing up he could not eat in white restaurants.

baseball basketball soccer football

Jackie was named the National League’s most valuable player in 1949. He helped make the Brooklyn Dodgers one of the best teams in baseball.

Could Jackie eat anywhere he wanted today?

● He promoted African American businesses and the YMCA in New York City’s Harlem.

When Jackie and his family moved into a house the neighbors threatened to burn the house because they did not want black people living there.

● He led 10,000 students in a Youth March for Integrated Schools in Washington, D.C. ● He served as a special assistant for civil rights to Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York.

New York leader

Harlem civil rights

Jackie was a __________________ in the _______________ _________________ movement. Jackie helped businesses in the _________________ neighborhood. He became a

Color the picture of Jackie Robinson.

yes no

● He was president of the Chock Full O’ Nuts coffee company and restaurant.

Use the words in the word bank to fill in blanks correctly. Jackie retired from baseball with a career batting average of .311. In 1962 he was inducted to the National Baseball Hall of Fame—the first African American to be awarded this honor.

special assistant for civil rights in _________ ____________.

Can people live wherever they want today?

yes no

When Jackie was a boy he traveled by railroad. Many people did not have cars. How do you travel today? ________________________________

Jackie wore a uniform in the army and as a baseball player. As a businessman he wore a suit. Do people dress the same today?

yes no

Actions speak louder than words. Jackie “spoke” for civil rights through his work as a baseball player and a businessman. Do you “speak” through your actions sometimes?

yes no

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Free for All! As a citizen, Jackie believed in his right to liberty. He believed all Americans had the right to liberty. Jackie spent his life pursuing freedom and equality for all African Americans.

The Story of Martin Luther King, Jr. & Civil Rights Martin Luther King, Jr. was born in 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia.

Complete the sentence. One of Jackie Robinson’s most important positive citizenship traits was his belief in _________________.

Find Atlanta on the map below and circle it in red. What region is Atlanta in? __________________________ Color the region blue.

Jackie struggled for civil rights all of his life as an athlete and businessman. His greatest contribution was his work for civil rights.

Appalachian Plateau e Ridg Blue ntains Mou Ridge & Valley ta

The Georgia capital is in the Piedmont region. Is the capital in your region?

Atlan

yes no

Piedmont

Martin grew up in a big city. Circle the words that best describe Jackie Robinson’s greatest contribution.

inventor

civil rights

army general

Jackie would not stop playing for the Dodgers. His manager and teammates supported him. Jackie was named Rookie of the Year in the major leagues in 1947! That means he was the best new player!

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Circle the professional sports that African Americans play in today.

Fall

e

Lin

Is there a big city in your region?

yes no

Coastal Plain

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

No Prejudice Here Martin Luther King, Jr. became aware of prejudice and inequality as a black child in the South. His father openly showed his dislike of segregation. He taught his son that no one, and no race, was better than any other. Circle the things Martin grew up with in the past.

equal rights segregation family slavery

religion prejudice

liberty

Underline the things you grow up with today. Martin went to Booker T. Washington High School. It was the first black public high school in Atlanta. He was an excellent student. Martin entered Morehouse College in Atlanta when he was only 15! First he wanted to be a lawyer. Then he graduated with a degree in sociology. Finally Martin decided to follow in his father’s footsteps. Circle the profession young Martin chose.

pastor Civil Rights: the rights of all citizens to freedom and equal treatment liberty: being free, independent

Martin grew up surrounded by the church, religion, and family. His father was the pastor at a popular church in Atlanta called Ebenezer Baptist Church.

police officer

doctor

prejudice: dislike or distrust of people because they are a different race or religion

Correlates with S2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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2 STUDENT WORKBOOK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

Dr. King

Boycott

A Leader

Martin Luther King, Jr. preached his first sermon at his father’s church with great success. He was ordained and became an associate pastor at Ebenezer Church.

In 1955 Rosa Parks, a black woman in Montgomery, refused to give up her bus seat to a white man. She was arrested and taken to jail. Dr. King and other black leaders organized a bus boycott. This means people did not ride the bus and the bus company lost money.

The successful non-violent bus boycott made Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. a civil rights leader.

Words that have nearly the same meaning as others are called synonyms. Circle the synonym for the word pastor.

lawyer

minister

sharecropper

Martin went to Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania to earn his degree in divinity. He was awarded “most outstanding student.” He then went to Boston University in Massachusetts to earn his doctoral degree. He met Coretta Scott in Boston. They were married. Martin and Coretta moved to Montgomery, Alabama where Martin became a preacher at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. He was now Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Color the picture of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Number the following events 1-4 in the order in which they happened. ____ Martin married Coretta Scott.

Circle the correct phrase.

____ Martin preached his first sermon.

During the bus boycott, ______________ did not ride the bus. enemies of civil rights people who believed in civil rights

____ Martin entered college at the age of 15.

The boycott lasted for over a year while protesters were threatened, arrested, and discriminated against. The house where Dr. King lived was bombed! Finally the Supreme Court ruled against segregation and ordered that it stop. Write True or False for the following statements. ____ Protesters were treated nicely during the boycott. ____ The Supreme Court ruled against segregation. ____ Black people had to sit in the front of the bus. ____ Black people can sit anywhere on the bus today.

____ Martin organized the Montgomery bus boycott. Five churches were bombed in Montgomery. Martin continued the struggle for civil rights. Many people and students became involved. In 1960, four African American students sat at a lunch counter and refused to leave until they were served. Many more peaceful sit-ins followed. There was a sit-in at Rich’s Department Store in Atlanta. Dr. King was arrested and thrown in jail several times. He continued to lead peaceful civil rights movements in the South.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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Life Ended Too Soon

A Man With A Dream

MLK and You

Martin organized and led a national peaceful protest in 1963. The March on Washington was a huge success. Over 250,000 people from all over the country attended to protest discrimination. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech at the March on Washington.

As a baby Martin liked to eat southern food including sweet potato fries and beef stew. They did not have fast food when Martin was young.

Use the words in the Word Bank to read part of Martin’s character color speech.

skin

What is your favorite food? __________________________

● Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964. ● He was the first black American to be named Time Magazine’s Man of the Year! ● In 1965 a voting rights bill was passed protecting African Americans’ right to vote.

Trace the path to Washington, D.C. where the March on Washington took place.

dream

nation

Write a T if the sentence is true today. Write a P if the sentence was true in the past. ______ I had to go to a black school.

I have a ____________ that my four little children will one day live in a _______________ where they will not be judged by the ___________ of their ___________ but by the content

When Martin was a young man he liked to dress up in a suit and tie and go dancing. What do you like to do for fun today? ____________________

of their ___________________.

President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act in 1964. It stated that people could not be discriminated against because of their color, race, national origin, religion or whether they are a man or a woman. Much of what Dr. King and many others had been struggling for was becoming a reality!

______ I can sit anywhere on the bus. ______ The country is segregated. ______ I can’t vote because I’m black. ______ I have civil rights.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave many speeches and wrote many letters. He talked on the telephone. Do you write letters?

yes no yes no

Do you talk on the telephone?

Dr. King was shot and killed in Memphis, Tennessee in 1968. People all over the world mourned Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s death. He had devoted his life to working for equal rights. Congress signed a bill making January 20 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, a federal holiday.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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A Life Devoted Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of the greatest civil rights leaders in history. Dr. King devoted his life to working for equal rights for all Americans. His contributions helped end segregation.

The Story of Jimmy Carter & Leadership and Humanity Appalachian Plateau

Fill in the blanks.

Ridge & Valley

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s greatest contribution was his work as a _________________ _________________ leader. The positive citizenship traits of Dr. King included liberty, civility, and compassion. ● He worked for equal rights because of his belief in liberty for all people. ● His nonviolent demonstrations were based on his belief in civility. ● His struggle to help people was a result of his compassion. Fill in the blanks with the correct citizenship traits demonstrated by Dr. King. The right of freedom is also known as __________________. Treating people politely and with respect is ______________. Caring about other people is _________________________.

e Ridg Blue ntains Mou

Piedmont

Jimmy Carter was born in Plains, Georgia in 1924. His father was a peanut farmer. Jimmy grew up with no electricity or indoor plumbing. His mother cooked on a woodburning stove.

Plains Coastal Plain

Circle Plains, Georgia in blue on the map.

Young Jimmy Jimmy’s father taught him how to fish, swim, and hunt. Jimmy was very close to his father. Jimmy sold peanuts from his wagon to help his family when he was 6. The Carters worked hard to keep their farm during the Great Depression. The Great Depression was a tough time when many people lost their jobs and farms. Write a J for the sentences Jimmy Carter would say. Write a T for the sentences a boy today might say. ______ My house does not have electricity or plumbing. ______ My house has cable TV and internet.

Answer the question.

______ I go to school and play a lot.

Jimmy Carter grew up on a peanut farm in the Coastal Plain. Are there peanuts in your region?

yes no

As a boy, Jimmy woke up at 4 a.m. to work in the fields when he was a boy. He planted and plowed by hand because there were no tractors yet!

______ I plow the fields by hand every morning. ______ I sell peanuts from my wagon for my family. ______ I like to play video games.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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2 STUDENT WORKBOOK The Navy

Work, Work, Work

Jimmy joined the Navy. He was assigned to the U.S.S. Wyoming. It was an old battleship. He helped develop the first atomic submarine for the Navy. He was promoted to Lieutenant. He wore his uniform with pride. Circle the words that relate to Jimmy’s time in the Navy. army

atomic submarine

peanuts

lieutenant

When his father became sick, Jimmy went home to see him. Jimmy and his family shared long talks about what was important in life. Jimmy decided to leave the Navy and run the family business in Plains.

Jimmy decided to run for state senate and won in 1962. Jimmy worked to improve education in Georgia. He built a reputation for being honest and trustworthy. He ran for Governor. He lost the first time but he won the second time! As Governor of Georgia, Jimmy worked for equality. Use the Word Bank to answer the questions.

Plains

Jimmy’s supporters wore golden peanut pins. Jimmy thought the peanut would explain his simple and moral values. Trace Jimmy Carter’s path from Georgia to the White House on the map.

Jimmy Carter was born in _________________.

___ ___ ___ ___

Jimmy Jimmy Jimmy Jimmy

Carter Carter Carter Carter

was in the Army. was Governor of Georgia. had good moral values. ran for president of the United States.

As a senator he worked to improve education in ___________. As governor, he worked for equality in _________________.

moral: good and honest

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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Jimmy for President

Caring for Others

Jimmy Carter and You Jimmy grew up in a house with no plumbing or electricity.

Jimmy accomplished many things while he was president. He asked Americans to save energy because America was having energy problems. Jimmy set up a new Department of Education.

Do you have electricity in your home?

yes no

When Jimmy was a boy, his mother cooked family meals on a wood-burning stove.

Fill in the letters for the kind of problem America was having.

E ____ e ____ g ____

Does your mother cook on a wood-burning stove?

yes no

1. ________________________

2. ________________________

Circle the 2 countries that Jimmy Carter helped keep peace.

Israel

Iraq

Egypt

Circle what Jimmy Carter asked the Former Soviet Union to stop making.

sandwiches

Draw a line from each of the kinds of help the Carters offer to the group of people.

nuclear weapons

medicine

food

fur coat

TV shows

human rights

homes

List two ways most people travel today.

Jimmy Carter wore pants and shirts and suits.

Soviet Union

Jimmy Carter continued to work as a humanitarian after his presidency. He built the Carter Center in Atlanta, Georgia. The Carter Center fights for human rights causes around the world. It also provides food and medical care for poor people. Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter work with Habitat for Humanity. They help build houses for people who are poor.

When Jimmy was in the Navy he was on a battleship. When he was president he rode on Air Force One.

Jimmy Carter worked with leaders from Israel and Egypt. He helped them agree to keep peace between their nations. They still do! Jimmy asked the former Soviet Union to stop making as many nuclear weapons.

cars

Jimmy decided to run for President of the United States. At first people ignored him. Jimmy kept speaking to voters across the country about things he thought were important. People started to listen.

Write T next to true statements and F next to false statements.

Georgia

He ran the family peanut farm in _________________. Circle where Jimmy decided to live after talking with his father.

Evaluation Sample

Jimmy for President

Jimmy ran the family peanut farm in Plains. He taught Sunday School. He chaired the school board. He raised four children with Rosalynn.

Jimmy studied at the Georgia Institute of Technology after high school. Then he went to the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Jimmy married Rosalynn Smith while he was there.

Rosalynn

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

Do people dress this way today?

yes no

Circle ways that President Carter communicated. Underline the ways that you communicate.

Jimmy Carter continues to help different countries end their disagreements. He won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work toward peace and humanity in 2002. He is a great leader.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

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Honest and Trustworthy The greatest contributions of Jimmy Carter are his leadership and human rights work. Human rights are basic rights and freedoms that every person should have. The rights to food, a home, equality, free speech, and freedom of religion are human rights. Two important citizenship traits are his honesty and trustworthiness. He is called the moral president because he is honest and trustworthy.

Government Rules! Governments protect the rights of citizens. Governments provide order and rules to make sure citizens are safe. What does government do? ● Makes

laws and makes people obey them.

● Provides

leadership to the people.

● Provides

services like fire protection.

● Solves

Match the beginning to the end of each sentence.

Match the job of government to the example. Government Job a. Makes Laws

trustworthiness: honest and can be depended upon

There are good consequences when rules are followed. People are safer. More work gets done! When rules are violated there can be bad consequences. A child might get hurt. There might be a punishment. A person might get fired from his or her job.

arguments between people in court.

Color the picture of Jimmy Carter.

honesty: truthful, not lying, stealing, or cheating

Follow the Rules! Rules are necessary to keep things orderly and keep people safe.

b. Provides Leadership c. Provides Services d. Solves Arguments

Example _____ The mayor tells people what to do after a bad storm. _____ Firemen will come if you have a fire. _____ There are laws against speeding. _____ The judge decides who is right.

1. If you get to work late every day

_____ A. you will learn what she is teaching the class.

2. If you listen while the teacher is talking

_____ B. you might get fired from your job.

3. If you help your brother clean his room

_____ C. you might crash into someone and get hurt.

4. If you run down the school hall

_____ D. your parents will be proud of you.

Correlates with SS2H1a,b; SS2G2a,b,c,d,e; SS2CG3

Correlates with SS2CG1

Correlates with SS2CG1

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2 STUDENT WORKBOOK Our Leaders There are leaders in our city, state, and country. The leader in the city is the mayor. The state leader is the governor. The leader of our nation is the president.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

Capitals

Capitols

Washington, D.C. is the capital of the United States.

Mayor

Draw a red circle around the star for Washington, D.C.

The United States Capitol Building is in Washington, D.C. It is the center of the United States government. The U.S. Capitol has a white dome. Its dome is bigger than the Georgia Capitol building. The stairs to the White House are on both sides of the front.

Government leaders are elected by the people. This means that each leader is chosen by a vote of the people.

Write the name of the building on the line next to the picture.

Match the leader to what he or she might say. ____ A. mayor

Evaluation Sample

1. “I am proud to be the leader of the United States of America.”

____ B. governor

2. “I am going to make some changes in this town!”

____ C. president

3. “This state has a lot to be proud of.”

__________________________________ The state of Georgia Capitol building is in Atlanta, Georgia. The Georgia Capitol building has a gold dome. It also has a large triangle over the front porch. This is called a pediment. The stairs to the Georgia Capitol are in the center of the building.

Atlanta is the capital of the state of Georgia. Draw a blue circle around the star for Atlanta.

Write the name of Georgia’s Governor.

Remember! The capitol building is spelled with an “o.” The capital city is spelled with an “a.”

Write the name of the building on the line next to the picture. _______________________________

Correlates with SS2CG4a,b

Correlates with SS2CG2

Correlates with SS2CG4a,b

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Economic Choices Resources are a supply of something such as money, people, or equipment. We use resources to meet our needs. People must make economic choices because resources are limited. Limited resources means scarcity of resources. Scarcity is not being able to meet all the wants at the same time. You have limited money. Money is your scarce resource. You have only enough money to buy a toy OR to save it.

You only have one dollar so you have to choose between a toy or candy. Circle your choice.

$1.00

$1.00

Choices for consumers

Money

Go to ball game or have pizza

Time

Go to movie or go skating

Tokens

Play game or get candy

Space

Get bunk beds or king-sized bed

What would you choose?

Price is a way to allocate. If the price is low, many people can buy the good or service. If the price is high, few people can buy it.

$5.00 The thing that you didn’t choose is what you gave up. If you chose a toy, you gave up candy to have the toy. What you gave up is your opportunity cost. Draw a square around your opportunity cost.

Here are some more choices for you to make.

Getting Goods Allocating goods and services means getting them to people. There are different ways of allocating.

Match the people who can afford the good with the price.

BUY TOY

Circle your SAVE choice below.

Limited Resources

Opportunity Costs When you have to make economic choices because of scarcity, there are opportunity costs.

Circle your choice in the center column on the chart below. Write the opportunity cost in the last column. Limited Resources

Choices for consumers

Money

Go to ball game or have pizza

Time

Go to movie or go skating

Tokens

Play game or get candy

Space

Get bunk beds or canopy bed

Opportunity Cost

$100.00 Another way to allocate is majority rule. Whatever way the most people choose is how it is done. Circle the picture that shows majority rule.

Correlates with SS2E1

Correlates with SS2E1

Correlates with SS2E2

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Allocations and …

More Allocations Match the allocation to the picture.

Command

Who gets a good or service can be decided by contests. Whoever wins the contest gets the good!

Force is a way of deciding who gets something. Force means that whoever is strongest takes it.

Draw a line from the type of allocation to its description.

contests

force

Sharing is a friendly and peaceful way to allocate goods. If there are only 6 ice creams for 12 people, each person gets half and everyone gets some!

sharing

lottery

A lottery is usually similar to a drawing. One way is for people to put their name in a basket. Whoever’s name is pulled out gets the good.

Allocating goods and services by command means that whoever is in charge decides who gets what. In a kingdom, the king would decide which people get what thing or nothing!

First-come, first-served First-come, first-served allocating means that whoever gets there first or is first in line is who gets the good or service.

Personal Characteristics Allocating by personal characteristics means that people get a good or service based on something about them. Maybe all tall people get the good, or all sick people get the service. Maybe all second-graders!

Others Can you think of other ways to allocate goods and services? ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

I’ll Trade you For It! Long ago, before there was money, people traded with each other. They exchanged goods and services with other people for what they needed. This kind of trade is called barter. People get goods and services through bartering. Farmers and craftspeople couldn’t use everything they grew or made. And they couldn’t grow or make everything they needed. So, they bartered wheat for cloth. They bartered eggs for pottery. Which is an example of bartering? Write your answer here. _____ What if you didn’t A. paying money for a candy bar have any money? If B. using a credit card to buy shoes you had to barter for C. exchanging a bottle of milk everything you for some tools needed, what goods or services would you trade? Write your answer here. __________________________ ________________________________________________________

Correlates with SS2E2

Correlates with SS2E2

Correlates with SS2E3a

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2 STUDENT WORKBOOK

Project Managers: Michele Yother Sherry Moss Senior Editor: Cecil Anderson

G

_____ Money can’t be used to buy services. _____ Money is a medium of exchange.

Costs and Benefits A benefit is a way something is good for you. A cost is what you give up for something. If you decide to save your allowance for a month you could have a lot of money. That is the benefit of saving. The cost of saving was the candy or toy you gave up for a month to save all the money! You have five dollars. You decide to save the five dollars instead of buying a CD. Circle your benefit. Draw a square around your cost.

TM

800-536-2GET www.gallopade.com

When you go to the store, you don’t have to worry about what to barter for the toy you want. You can read the price and trade that amount of money for it!

_____ People work at jobs to earn money.

ISBN 978-0-635-02587-6

Note to Teachers

©2007, 2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without written permission from the publisher.

The Answer Key for this workbook is included in the Teacher's Edition Student Workbook. If you did not purchase the Teacher’s Edition Student Workbook, and need to order one, please call 800-536-2438 and we will be glad to help!

Your friend also has five dollars. Your friend decides to buy a CD with the five dollars. Circle your friend’s benefit. Draw a square around your friend’s cost.

Gallopade is proud to be a member of these educational organizations and associations:

_____ Money can buy goods.

Correlates with SS2E4

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The Georgia Experience for Second Graders Practice Test Fill in the correct answer. 1. James Oglethorpe is known for founding ❍ A. North Carolina. ❍ B. Georgia. ❍ C. Washington, D.C. ❍ D. The Confederate Army.

6. The Cherokee lived in ❍ A. north Georgia. ❍ B. south Georgia. ❍ C. east Georgia. ❍ D. west Georgia.

2. Sequoyah developed the ❍ A. Creek alphabet. ❍ B. Greek alphabet. ❍ C. Cherokee alphabet. ❍ D. Colonial alphabet.

7. Tomochichi was ❍ A. a Creek Indian Chief ❍ B. a teacher ❍ C. an Englishman ❍ D. a settler

3. Jackie Robinson was a ❍ A. football player. ❍ B. actor. ❍ C. politician. ❍ D. civil rights leader.

8. Georgia has ________ regions. ❍ A. three ❍ B. four ❍ C. five ❍ D. six

4. Jimmy Carter was a great ❍ A. president. ❍ B. Republican. ❍ C. Supreme Court Judge. ❍ D. baseball player.

9. The Chattahoochee River runs along Georgia’s ❍ A. northern border. ❍ B. southern border. ❍ C. eastern border. ❍ D. western border.

5. Martin Luther King, Jr. won the ❍ A. United Nations Award. ❍ B. U.S. Presidency. ❍ C. Nobel Peace Prize. ❍ D. Civil War.

10. The founders of Georgia came from ❍ A. France. ❍ B. Spain. ❍ C. England. ❍ D. Mexico.

Evaluation Sample

Published by

Money makes trade easier than bartering.

Write T for the true statements about money and F for the false statements.

am Te

r a d e Two C u r r i c aG ulu rgi m o e Editor: Kyle Rose G

Th e

Money $$$ Money solves many of the problems of bartering. Money has a set value. People can trade money for goods and services. Money is called a medium of exchange. That means you can trade money for what you need or want.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 96 pages

11. Georgia’s southern region is the ❍ A. Piedmont. ❍ B. Blue Ridge. ❍ C. Valley and Ridge. ❍ D. Coastal Plain.

17. When you trade without money it is called ❍ A. illegal. ❍ B. monetary exchange. ❍ C. barter. ❍ D. stealing.

12. The first city in Georgia was ❍ A. Atlanta. ❍ B. Savannah. ❍ C. Dahlonega. ❍ D. Charleston. 13. The leader of our nation is the ❍ A. mayor. ❍ B. governor. ❍ C. president. ❍ D. king.

Charter: an official paper defining certain rights given by a government or principles of a group

18. Which of the following is a form of allocation? ❍ A. barter ❍ B. benefit ❍ C. sharing ❍ D. opportunity cost

Confederacy: a union of people, groups, or states for a certain purpose

19. Because of scarcity, people must make ❍ A. more money. ❍ B. choices. ❍ C. more resources. ❍ D. benefits.

Humanitarian: helping to improve the lives of people

Consequence: a result or outcome

14. The capital of Georgia is ❍ A. Atlanta. ❍ B. Savannah. ❍ C. Dahlonega. ❍ D. Charleston. 15. Washington, D.C. is the capital of ❍ A. North America. ❍ B. Canada. ❍ C. The United States. ❍ D. England. 16. Scarcity means there is ❍ A. too much. ❍ B. not enough. ❍ C. always enough. ❍ D. something scary.

Glossary

20. Which of the following is NOT a positive citizenship trait? ❍ A. wealthy ❍ B. honesty ❍ C. liberty ❍ D. civility

Missionary: a person sent out by a church to spread its religion in another place Negotiate: to discuss in the hope of reaching an agreement Ordain: to appoint as a minister, priest, or rabbi

You’re finished! You did an outstanding job!

Poverty: the condition of being poor Silversmith: a skilled worker who makes or repairs silver objects Skirmish: a brief conflict or encounter

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2 TEACHER RESOURCE

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

E L P SAM

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2 1


2 TEACHER RESOURCE

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 96 pages

Evaluation Sample

E L P M SA

E L P SAM

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2 2


ENRICHMENT PACK

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 20 pages

Evaluation Sample

E L P SAM

Actual pages are in color!

E L P M SA

E L P M SA

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2 3


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 22 pages

BLACKLINE MASTERS

Evaluation Sample

Very Important Georgians!

1

James Oglethorpe brought colonists to Georgia from England. Mary Musgrove helped him talk to the Indians. Tomochichi was an Indian chief who became a friend of James.

E L P M SA

A

B

C

Read the statements below. Decide if James, Mary or Tomochichi said it. Write the correct letter next to each statement. ____I think I will let the settlers live near my tribe. ____I can help the settlers talk to the Indians. ____I hope my colonists like their new home. ____I am very tired. It has been a long trip over the ocean. ____My people are part of the Creek Indian tribe. ____I run a trading post. I am successful because I can talk to the Indians and the white men. Correlation: SS2H1

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

Moving with Jackie!

3

Martin Luther King, Jr.

4

Jackie Robinson moved around the United States during his life. He was born in Georgia. He grew up in California. He played major league baseball in New York. He led a march to integrate schools in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. worked for equal rights for all Americans. His dream was to make African Americans “free at last.” He believed in peaceful protest. He had to be strong because many people did not agree with his views.

Color the state where Jackie was born in yellow. Color the state where he grew up in orange. Color the state where he played major league baseball in green. Circle the place where he led a march in blue. Draw arrows to show how he moved across the country!

Circle the words below that describe Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Washington D.C.

g

peaceful

organized

smart

good speaker

sleepy

California

wise

E L P M SA

determined

New York

angry

rin

b

rave

ca

E L P M SA

lazy

boring

leader

Georgia

Correlation: SS2H1

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

Correlation: SS2H1

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2 4


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 22 pages

BLACKLINE MASTERS Amazing Native Americans!

Evaluation Sample

Helping Hands!

7

6

President Jimmy Carter started the Carter Center in 1982. It is in Atlanta.

You can make an acrostic poem about the Creek and Cherokee Indians in Georgia! Next to every letter, write a word or phrase that describes Native American people. The first letter is done for you. Now it’s your turn!

The Carter Center helps people around the world. One program is called Habitat for Humanity. Workers build houses for poor and homeless people.

N atural and pure!

Build a house for someone who needs one! In the space below, draw a picture of a house. Color it for the new owner! You can also draw the family who will live in it.

A _______________________________________________ T _______________________________________________ I _______________________________________________

E L P SAM

V _______________________________________________

E L P SAM

E _______________________________________________ A _______________________________________________ M _______________________________________________ E _______________________________________________ R _______________________________________________ I _______________________________________________ C _______________________________________________ A _______________________________________________ N _______________________________________________ S _______________________________________________ Correlation: SS2H2

Correlation: SS2H1

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

A River Runs Through It!

C 3

D 4

E 5

F 6

G 7

H 8

I 9

Match each person to the way they would travel.

__ 8 __ 3 __ 1 __ 12 __ 21

E L P M SA __ 1 __ 15 __ 22 __ 9 __ 23

__ 20 __ 14 __ 1 __ 14 __ 1

__ 20 __ 5 __ 14 __ 20 __ 14

__ __ __ __ __ 1 8 15 15 3 __ 5 __ __ __ 14 1 8

__ __ 14 5

__ 8

__ 5

Native American race car driver

J K L M 10 11 12 13

child

N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 __ 3 __ 15 __ 19 __ 6 __ 19

13

Methods of transportation have changed over time!

Use the chart below to find names of Georgia rivers. Come on–let’s wade right in!

B 2

Getting There!

11

The state of Georgia is blessed with many rivers, lakes, springs, and even a swamp! Many of them have Indian names!

A 1

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

colonist __ 5

astronaut pilot

E L P M SA

__ 5 Correlation: SS2G1b

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

Correlation: SS2G2

©2005 Carole Marsh/Gallopade International ● 800-536-2GET ● www.georgiaexperience.com

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2 5


COLOR TRANSPARENCIES

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 12 pages

Evaluation Sample

E L P SAM

Actual pages are in color!

E L P M SA

E L P M SA

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2 6


COLOR TRANSPARENCIES

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 12 pages

Evaluation Sample

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Actual pages are in color!

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P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 2 7


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete book is 12 pages

Interactive Write-in Readers 8 different Reader Packs include 30 copies of 1 Reader.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Jackie Robinson Jimmy Carter Sequoyah Tomochichi Mary Musgrove James Oglethorpe Barack Obama

Native American Linguist

Sequoyah invented the first written Cherokee alphabet. In fact, his was the first of any written Indian languages! He overcame many obstacles, worked many years, and ignored great opposition to achieve his goal. And he did it!

Carole Marsh

About the Author. . . Carole Marsh is the creator of the and author of many books on History, Geography, and Biography. She is also the creator of The 50 State Experience Series, which includes books, workbooks, software, stickers, maps, and other products for all 50 States and Canada. You can write to her at carolemarsh@gallopade.com. You can submit requests for new readers online at www.1000readers.com! Editorial Assistant: Jenny Corsey Graphic Designer: Cecil Anderson ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International. This book is not reproducible. Published by

These readers will leave kids filled with heartfelt amazement and admiration for the heroes and heroines portrayed in them. Totally non-intimidating, and the exact opposite of so many traditional, boring biographies written for kids!

Se quoyah

A Word From the Author!

members of

International Reading Association National Association for Gifted Children The National School Supply and Equipment Association The National Council for the Social Studies The Museum Store Association The Association of Parks and Public Lands

Sequoyah was born in the 1770s in a Tsalagi village in Tennessee. His father abandoned him as a baby. Some say this man was called Nathaniel Gist, a white explorer. But Tsalagi society was based on the mother’s family, and Sequoyah’s mother had descended from Sequoyah a line of chiefs. also had an English name,

Design a picture to represent a word and a symbol to represent a sound.

Starting with J, cross out every other letter. The remaining letters will spell out the European name for the Tsalagi Indians.

Page 5

The name “Sequoyah” means The Lame One in Cherokee.

After being injured in a hunting accident, Sequoyah had this for the rest of his life. Circle the correct answer.

Headaches

J C U H W E K R M O A K X E N E

Blackouts

Europeans called the Tsalagi Indians by the name: ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___. Page 1

Limp ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.1000readers.com This page is not reproducible.

Page 2

Glossary civilized: a culturally, morally, and technically advanced community

Pop Quiz! 1.

Who did Sequoyah teach first? his wife his mother his daughter

2.

What was the original name for Sequoyah’s tribe? Okee Tsalagi Cheers

3.

oral tradition: telling stories to pass down history to future generations

What were Sequoyah’s “talking leaves”? magic leaves with words loud trees pieces of paper with written words

4.

original: the first version of a work, by which copies can then be made

Which obstacle did Sequoyah NOT overcome? unsupportive family, friends, and tribe blindness caused by a hunting accident injured leg that was lame for life

5.

Sequoyah’s invention helped the Europeans to see the Cherokee Indians as: weird heathens civilized and intelligent illiterate savages

descend: to come from a family or ancestry handicap: a physical disability illiterate: not able to read and write linguist: a person who studies languages literate: able to read and write

suspicious: to question, doubt, or not trust something or someone ©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.1000readers.com This page is not reproducible.

As a boy, Sequoyah injured his leg in a hunting accident. He suffered a lame leg for the rest of his life. Despite this handicap, Sequoyah later fought Creek Indians at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. As Sequoyah grew up among the Cherokee people, he learned their ways. He loved drawing, painting, building, woodworking, athletics, hunting, and storytelling.

George Gist.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.1000readers.com This page is not reproducible.

Sequoyah thought of what the ability to read and write could do for his people. Most Cherokee Indians were illiterate because English was difficult to learn and there was no written Cherokee language. First, Sequoyah created a picture to represent each word in the Cherokee language. But there were too many words! Instead he decided to make Pictures stand for words in the a symbol for every sound. Chinese language.

Evaluation Sample

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.1000readers.com This page is not reproducible.

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©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International/800-536-2GET/www.1000readers.com This page is not reproducible.

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 28


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING: • These are selected pages • The actual size is 8.5” x 11” • The complete package is 23 pages

20 WAYS TO TEACH

Evaluation Evaluation Sample Sample DAY

Hodge Podge Collage! The Project Requirements Time Here’s How

4

Make collages that celebrate the lives of heroes!

Stack of old magazines, catalogs, newspapers, old postcards, calendars, ads, etc. 1 class period In advance, ask each student to choose and read about a famous hero for homework. Make sure students get an understanding of the person’s struggles, personality, likes/dislikes, strengths, instincts, circumstances, accomplishments, etc… anything that will make your students feel like they know this person. Then direct each child to cut out pictures and words that describe this person. Let them paste the cut-outs onto large, brightly-colored paper. Tell the students that they may also bring in other materials to describe their hero, such as dried flowers, bark, tiny stuffed animals, ribbons, seeds, or a book cover. Inspire creativity and imagination!

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Students could also design a “mirror” collage by describing themselves on one half and the hero on the other half.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • www.gallopade.com • Page 7 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

DAY

DAY

7

Classroom Cooking Fun!

The Project

Create yummy treats from long ago, then scarf them up today!

19

Create a Mini Colonial Fort!

The Project Requirements

Requirements

Access to basic kitchen appliances and utensils, paper plates, napkins, and ingredients

Time Here’s How

Time Here’s How

1 class period Cooking in the classroom can be fun or disastrous. Make it fun by making something simple! Teach students about how food is an important part of culture and heritage!

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Recipe for Peanut Pals

3/4 cup peanut butter (creamy or crunchy) 1 package of graham crackers 2 tablespoons powdered sugar chocolate syrup

Crush the graham crackers in a zipper-seal plastic bag. Empty into a bowl, mix in peanut butter and powdered sugar, and add only enough chocolate syrup to hold the mixture together. Roll into small balls, set on waxed paper, and refrigerate until set.

Variations

Depending on your schedule, you could cook one dish for the class to share or an entire meal (complete with decorations) to enjoy with parents or even the principal, teachers, and school board.

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • www.gallopade.com • Page 10 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

Create a table-top mini version of a colonial fort. Large, sturdy table; found and collected materials 1 day Choose a colonial fort. Sketch out the "fort" on graph paper to determine the approximate project size. Ask students to bring in various small objects during the month prior to the project launch. Collect spools, straws, ribbon, pipe cleaners, game pieces, twigs, shoelaces, buttons, cardboard, bark, grass, etc. Nearly anything will work! First, create the types of dwellings that soldiers manning the fort lived in. Paper, foam, magazine cut-outs, and newspaper can also be used. To make the walls, encircle the fort with a little roll of clay, etc., to stick popsicle sticks into. Unique and specific touches to the fort are great, and are a good way to teach about a certain fort. Crinkled brown paper strips make good dirt paths. Tiny toy people and animals from longforgotten game sets (think garage sale!) add life to your scene. The more the merrier! Don’t forget the gates, watchtowers, and fields outside the fort, if appropriate. Remember that your class may not make a perfect model, but it can definitely be cool!

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Make an edible fort! Use shredded wheat for thatched roofs, graham crackers for walls, pretzel sticks for logs, broccoli for forests of trees, and blue Jell-O for rivers– with gummy fish! Invite another class over to help demolish the project in a grand feast of fun!

©Carole Marsh/Gallopade International • www.gallopade.com • Page 22 ~ This book is not reproducible. ~

These pages are provided for evaluation purposes only. No reproduction or classroom use of any materials is allowed. Page 29


NOTES

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 3 0


NOTES

P. O . B O X 2 7 7 9 , P E A C H T R E E C I T Y, G A 3 0 2 6 9 • T E L ( 8 0 0 ) 5 3 6 - 24 3 8 • FA X ( 8 0 0 ) 8 7 1 - 2 9 7 9 • W W W. G E O R G I A C U R R I C U L U M . C O M PA G E 3 1


Thank You For Your Consideration! Please let us know if there is anything we can do to help you with your decision to purchase any of our books.

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Georgia Experience Second Grade Evaluation Kit