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2009 CALENDAR

Resource Guide from the Anti-Defamation League Mountain States Regional Office in Cooperation with the Mizel Museum

SEE INSIDE


MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN JANUARY In Your Community • Distribute Positive Impact! calendars in your neighborhood, or to your homeowner’s association. Contact ADL (303-830-7177) for FREE copies of Positive Impact!

ABOUT THIS GUIDE

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• Participate in Denver’s Martin Luther King Jr. Marade on January 19, 2009 which begins in City Park.

In Your School

n 2007, 20 Colorado teens participated in ADL’s Robert B. Sturm Youth Leadership Mission and visited the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., to learn about the Holocaust and the ultimate consequences of hatred and bigotry. Motivated by their experience, and wanting to help others find ways to explore the rich diversity in our communities, the students designed insulating coffee cup sleeves printed with ADL’s logo and a message explaining what “Valuing Diversity is…”. 55,000 coffee sleeves were distributed to local coffee houses in the fall of 2008. By challenging us to think about our differences and helping to create a community that embraces, respects and accepts our diversity, these teens have made a Positive Impact!

• Create a calendar with significant cultural or religious holidays and important school events (exams, sporting events, concerts, etc.) to ensure there are no conflicts.

Vow to make a Positive Impact! in your school and community.

In Your Home

For the past 96 years nationally, and 68 years in the Mountain States Region, the Anti-Defamation League has been leading the fight to stop the defamation of the Jewish people, to secure justice and fair treatment for all, and to put an end to unjust and unfair discrimination. Unfortunately, our work is not done. Now you can help change our world by acting individually, or as part of a group, to create an environment where diversity is respected and hatred is rejected. Use Positive Impact! and its specific ideas and activities to create homes, schools, houses of worship, workplaces and communities that embrace and celebrate our diversity! We look forward to hearing about how you made a Positive Impact! in your community! Bruce H. DeBoskey ADL Regional Director

Karen Steinhauser ADL Regional Board Chair

• Participate in No Name-Calling Week on January 26-30, 2009, which focuses attention on the problem of name-calling in schools and provides students and educators with the tools and inspiration to continue an ongoing dialogue about ways to eliminate name-calling in their communities. For more information, go to www.nonamecallingweek.org. • Organize a group to attend and participate in the 16th Annual Cherry Creek Diversity Conference on January 31, 2009. Check out www.cherrycreekdiversity.org for more information and 2010 dates.

• Take advantage of the free programs and speakers offered by your local public library, university and college. • Be an ally — speak out against jokes and slurs that target people or groups. • Volunteer for a community organization. Teach members of your family the value of donating skills, time and money to organizations that can benefit from such generosity.

To find 101 Ways to Make a Positive Impact! go to: www.adl.org/mountain-states

PROUDLY DONATED BY


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“To speak ill of anyone is to speak ill of yourself.”

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Christmas (Armenian Orthodox Christian)

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New Year’s Day Temple Day (Buddhist)

—Afghan proverb

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Ashura (Islamic) Epiphany (Christian)

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Makar Sankranti (Hindu)

Mahayana New Year (Buddhist)

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Birthday

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26 Lunar New Year (Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese)

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No Name-Calling Week January 19-23

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HOW YOUR SCHOOL CAN BECOME DESIGNATED

NO PLACE FOR HATE®

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he No Place for Hate campaign is a year-long commitment that empowers schools to promote respect for individual and group differences while challenging prejudice and bigotry. ®

Upon completion of all five steps below, a school will be designated a No Place for Hate® campus. • Create a coalition to oversee the implementation of the anti-bias programs and projects in your school. • Sign ADL’s Resolution of Respect (found inside the back cover of Positive Impact! Calendar). • Complete three or more activities listed in ADL’s 2009 Positive Impact! Calendar or visit ADL’s Web site: www.adl.org/mountain-states for a complete list of 101 Ways to Make a Positive Impact in Your Community. • Participate in one of the A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE® Institute training programs (programs designed for 30-35 student participants or 30-40 adult participants). • Document all steps and activities by submitting the necessary forms to ADL, available online at www.adl.org/mountain-states. For more information on how you can make your school No Place for Hate® visit our Web site: www.adl.org/mountain-states or contact ADL’s office at 303-830-7177 ext. 212.

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN FEBRUARY In Your Workplace • Generate a lunchtime “brown-bag” dialogue that discusses current issues, interesting articles or books, and/or invite speakers to present on issues of diversity. • Encourage your organization to offer brochures, advertisements, services and other forms of communication in two or more languages.

In Your School • Recite the Resolution of Respect (inside back cover of calendar), or a similar pledge against prejudice created by your student body, at a school-wide assembly. Display a poster-size version of the pledge in a prominent area of your school and encourage people to sign it. • Learn more about the First Amendment, civil rights, hate crimes and other legal aspects of the fight against prejudice — invite an ADL staff member to speak to your school.

In Your Home • Visit ADL’s Question Corner (www.adl.org/education/miller) for ideas on how to support young children’s curiosity about diversity in our world. • Create a regular family movie night and pick movies or documentaries that are about diverse cultures and issues that provoke discussion.

In Your Place of Worship • Plan a monthly community service project which would expose your religious community to a different religious, ethnic, or social community or issue. • Turn a bulletin board into a display space (newspaper articles, cartoons, etc.) depicting current events related to different forms of religious persecution or human rights violations.

ALSO SUPPORTED BY: UNDERWRITTEN BY

The Chotin Foundation Heyman & Mordecai Family Polk Majestic Travel Group Wells Fargo The Melvin & Elaine Wolf Foundation


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Race Relations Sunday

Tu B’Shvat (Jewish)

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Susan B. Anthony’s Birthday

President’s Day

National Freedom Day

Valentine’s Day

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National Brotherhood/Sisterhood Week February 15-21

Nirvana Day (Buddhism)

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Shrove Tuesday (Western Christian)

Ash Wednesday (Western Christian)

“How wonderful it is that no one need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” —Anne Frank

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FEBRUARY 2009


A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE® INSTITUTE

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very day we make choices. We can choose to let antiSemitism, racism and other forms of bigotry go unchallenged and potentially escalate, or we can choose to confront the bias that we see in our workplaces, homes, schools and communities. As our world becomes smaller and our communities more diverse, it is more critical than ever to actively build bridges of cross-cultural understanding and mutual respect. As a leading provider of anti-bias education and diversity training programs, the Anti-Defamation League’s A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE® Institute recognizes that attitudes and beliefs affect actions, and that each of us can have an impact on others, and ultimately, on the world in which we live. Customized to meet the changing needs of a wide range of audiences, programs are available to schools, universities, corporations and communitybased organizations throughout the United States and abroad. The Institute’s programs and resources are designed to help participants: • recognize bias and the harm it inflicts on individuals and society; • build understanding of the value and benefits of diversity; • improve intergroup relations; • and confront racism, anti-Semitism and all other forms of bigotry.

Our Programs A CLASSROOM OF DIFFERENCE™ is at the heart of the Institute, developed to address diversity issues in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade school communities. A CLASSROOM OF DIFFERENCE™ includes: • Teacher Training Programs • Student Programs • The Miller Early Childhood Initiative A CAMPUS OF DIFFERENCE™ helps college administrators, faculty members and students learn to examine stereotypes, expand cultural awareness and combat bigotry. A COMMUNITY OF DIFFERENCE™ offers diversity training programs to parents and families, non-profit and community organizations, afterschool and youth service organizations and civic leaders to enhance intergroup relations. A WORKPLACE OF DIFFERENCE™ provides businesses, non-profit organizations and government and law enforcement agencies with programs and resources that help manage diversity successfully and create more productive, respectful and inclusive work environments. Please contact our office for more information: 303-830-7177 or Denver@adl.org or visit us on the Web at www.adl.org/mountain-states.

PROUDLY DONATED BY

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN MARCH In Your School • Survey the colleges in your area about diversity and affinity clubs at their schools. Invite a panel of representatives to speak to the senior class about “Prejudice on the College Campus: What To Look For, What To Do.” • Invite a recognized civil or human rights leader to address an all-school assembly. Publish an interview with the speaker in school and local newspapers.

In Your Community • Call or write your state and U.S. senators and representatives and ask them to support and promote anti-prejudice and pro-diversity themes in public policies. • Think globally, act locally! Visit the Colorado Coalition for Genocide Awareness and Action’s Web site, www.ccgaa.org, and get involved. • Evaluate alternative accessibility routes such as ramps, stairs and elevators in your community and invite speakers into your school and community groups to talk about such initiatives. • Meet with community librarians and local bookstores to discuss ways to highlight different types of literature that are representative of all cultural groups.

Diversity at Ball Corporation means valuing the perspectives and approaches to work that each individual brings. We promote an inclusive environment where the desire to learn from differences and the value of different perspectives is shared and encouraged. Our goal is to recruit and retain a wide range of high-quality diverse candidates, to enrich our work environment with new dimensions of thought and experience.


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Clean Monday (Eastern Christian)

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International Women’s Day

Milad Al-Nabi (Islamic)

Purim (Jewish)

Magha Puja (Buddhist) Holi (Hindu)

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St. Patricks Day

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Cesar Chavez Day

Vernal Equinox

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International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

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MARCH 2009

“The eyes are of little use if the mind is blind.” —Arab proverb


By Andrew Reed (2007 Robert B. Sturm Youth Leadership Mission Delegate)

I can eat fifty pounds of rice in ten minutes. I can see through walls. I can lift jet planes. I can herd caribou across the icy tundra of Alaska. I can catch lightning. I can build skyscrapers out of toothpaste (either Colgate or Crest). I can stop time. I can control zombies. I can jump a mile into the sky. I can take a nap on the sun. I can win sumo tournaments in Japan. I can light candles by winking. I can hold my breath for a year. I can shrink down to the size of an ant. I can grow to the size of an elephant. I can train a cat. I can surf twenty meter waves. I can listen to fish and tell their stories. I can paint a masterpiece with only water. I can ride mosquitoes. I can run around the earth in a day at most. I can have imaginary friends who can perform neurosurgery. I can swim in the Arctic Ocean. I can play Jai alai with leprechauns and win. I can do the hustle with Vladimir Putin. I can remember Napoleon, he owes me ninety francs. I can sail to Angola in a straw boat. I can avoid traffic jams in Mexico City. I can picnic with dinosaurs. I can stop trains by sneezing.

I cannot be a bystander.

INCLUSIVE By NatUrE 11x1.5_ADLCalendar_Dec08.indd 1

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN APRIL In Your Community • Attend ADL’s Mountain States Regional Office’s 27th Annual Governor’s Holocaust Remembrance Program, in Denver on April 21, 2009. Free tickets are available by calling ADL (303-830-7177) or visiting www.adl.org/mountain-states.

In Your School • Learn about current immigration issues and then compare current-day debates with historical debates and immigration policies. Invite a speaker that recently went through the immigration process to speak about his or her experience. • Participate in the National Day of Silence®, April 19, 2009, a student-led day of action where those who support making anti-LGBT bullying and harassment unacceptable in schools participate in events to recognize and protest the discrimination and harassment—in effect, the silencing—experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students and their allies. For more information, go to www.dayofsilence.org.

In Your Home • Document your family’s history. Ask an older relative to either write or record their story so you have a permanent history to share with future generations. • Be mindful of your language — avoid stereotypical remarks.

We are committed to creating and sustaining a motivated and diverse workforce and are proud to support today’s youth in becoming future leaders in the energy industry. If you would like to find out more about our career opportunities, visit xcelenergy.com.

©2008 Xcel energy Inc.

I CAN

12/8/08 9:50:04 AM


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Rama Navami (Hindu)

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Palm Sunday (Western Christian)

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Easter (Western Christian)

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Theravada New Year (Buddhism)

Good Friday (Western Christian)

Holy Thursday (Western Christian)

Passover/Pesach (Jewish) April 9-16

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Holy Thursday (Eastern Christian)

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Holy FRIDAY (Eastern Christian)

Passover/Pesach (Jewish) April 9-16

Palm Sunday (Eastern Christian)

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Yom Hashoah (Jewish)

Pascha (Eastern Christian)

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“You cannot shake hands with a clenched fist.”—Indira Gandhi

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DEVELOPING A COMMON LANGUAGE Spanish version available on May calendar page ABLEISM is prejudice and/or discrimination, either personal or institutional, against persons with mental and/or physical disabilities. AGEISM is prejudice and/or discrimination, either personal or institutional, against people because of their real or perceived age. ANTI-BIAS is a term used to describe active commitment to challenging prejudice, stereotyping and all forms of discrimination. ANTI-SEMITISM is prejudice and/or discrimination, either personal or institutional, against Jews. AntiSemitism can be based on hatred against Jews because of their religious beliefs, their group membership (ethnicity). BIAS is an inclination or preference either for or against an individual or group that interferes with impartial judgment. BIGOTRY is an unreasonable or irrational attachment to negative stereotypes and prejudices. CLASSISM is prejudice and/or discrimination, either personal or institutional, against people because of their real or perceived social and economic status. CULTURE is the patterns of daily life learned consciously and unconsciously by a group of people. These patterns can be seen in language, governing practices, arts, customs, holiday celebrations, food, religion, dating rituals and clothing, to name a few examples. CYBERBULLYING is using the computer or other electronic medium to send mean, hurtful or threatening messages or images about another person, to post sensitive, private information about another person, to pretend to be someone else in order to make that person look bad and/or to intentionally exclude someone from an online group. DISCRIMINATION is the denial of justice and fair treatment by both individuals and institutions in many arenas, including employment, education, housing,

banking and political rights. Discrimination is an action that can follow prejudicial thinking. DIVERSITY means different or varied. The population of the United States is made up of people from many different races, cultures and places. HETEROSEXISM is prejudice and/or discrimination, either personal or institutional, against people who are or are perceived to be lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. HOMOPHOBIA is the irrational fear of people who are believed to be lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. ISLAMOPHOBIA is prejudice and/or discrimination against people who are or who are perceived to be Muslim or of Arab descent, and a fear or dislike of Islamic culture. PREJUDICE is pre-judging, making a decision about a person or group of people without sufficient knowledge. Prejudicial thinking is based on stereotypes. Prejudice is a feeling or attitude. RACISM is prejudice and/or discrimination, either personal or institutional, based on the social construct of “race.” Differences in physical characteristics (e.g., skin color, hair texture, eye shape) are used to support a system of inequities. SEXISM is prejudice and/or discrimination, either personal or institutional, based on gender. STEREOTYPE is an oversimplified generalization about a person or group of people without regard for individual differences. Even seemingly positive stereotypes that link a person or group to a specific positive trait can have negative consequences. XENOPHOBIA is prejudice and/or discrimination against anyone or anything that is perceived to be foreign or outside one’s own group, nation or culture. Xenophobia is commonly used to describe negative attitudes toward foreigners and immigrants.

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN MAY In Your School • Research the Sand Creek Massacre, which occurred in Kiowa County, Colorado, and visit the site. • Ask your librarian to collect samples of popular teen magazines or comic books from around the world and request a special corner be set aside for them in the periodical room.

In Your Place of Worship • Organize an interfaith retreat for youth to increase understanding of each other’s beliefs and build lasting friendships.

In Your Home • Stop email bigotry at your computer. Forward no more. Don’t forward unwanted and derogatory “joke” emails. Either break the chain and delete it, or reply to sender and explain why you found the email offensive, the impact of the language used and the harm that so-called “jokes” can cause.

In Your Community • Provide law enforcement with anti-bias, extremism and hate crime trainings. Visit www.adl.org/learn for information and resources.

PROUDLY DONATED BY


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MAY 2009

—James Baldwin

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World Press Freedom Day

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Mother’s Day

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International Worker’s Day

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Cinco de Mayo

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“The world is before you, and you need not take it or leave it as it was when you came in.”

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Ascension Day (Eastern Christian)

SHAVUOT (Jewish)

SHAVUOT (Jewish)

Lag B’Omer (Jewish)

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World Day for

Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development

Ascension Day (Western Christion)

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Pentecost (Western Christian)

Memorial Day

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LISTA DE DEFINICIONES ABLEISM* Prejuicio y/o discriminación, ya sea personal o institucional, contra personas con una discapacidad mental o física. AGEISM* Prejuicio y/o discriminación contra las personas a causa de su edad. ANTI-SESGO es un compromiso activo de enfrentar el prejuicio, los estereotipos y todas las formas de discriminación. ANTISEMITISMO Prejuicio y/o discriminación contra los Judíos. El antisemitismo puede apoyarse en el odio hacia los judíos motivado por sus credos religiosos, sus características étnicas. SESGO es una inclinación o preferencia a favor o en contra de un individuo o grupo que interfiere el criterio imparcial. INTOLERANCIA es un apego irracional a estereotipos y prejuicios negativos. CLASISMO es un prejuicio y/o discriminación contra las personas a causa de su posición económica real o percibida. CULTURA son los modelos de vida cotidiana aprendidos consciente e inconscientemente por un grupo de personas. Estos modelos pueden verse en el lenguaje, artes, costumbres, fechas conmemorativas, alimentación, religión, ropas, para dar algunos ejemplos. CYBERBULLYING* (no existe una definición en Español) es usar la computadora o medio de computación para mandar cualquier tipo de mensajes o imágenes de odio o amenazantes contra alguien, publicar información sensible o privada de otra persona, pretender ser otra persona para poner a alguien en mal o intencionalmente excluir a alguien de un grupo en la línea de Internet. DISCRIMINACIÓN es la negación de la justicia y tratamiento equitativo por los individuos e instituciones en muchas áreas, incluidos el empleo, educación, vivienda, operaciones bancarias y derechos políticos. La discriminación es una acción que puede ir a continuación del pensamiento sesgado por el prejuicio.

DIVERSIDAD significa diferente o variado. La población de los Estados Unidos está compuesta de personas de diversas razas, culturas y procedentes de diversos lugares. HETEROSEXISMO Prejuicio y/o discriminación contra las personas que son o se perciben como lesbianas, homosexuales o bisexuales. Homofobia es el temor irracional de las personas lesbianas, homosexuales o bisexuales. HOMOPHOBIA es un temor irracional hacia personas que son o se creen ser lesbianas, homosexuales, bisexuales o personas con identidades sexuales intercambiantes entre ambos sexos. ISLAMOFOBIA Un odio o temor irracional hacia personas que son, o se creen ser Musulmanes o de origen Árabe. PREJUICIO es prejuzgar o tomar una decisión respecto a una persona o grupo de personas sin tener el conocimiento suficiente. Frecuentemente el pensamiento sesgado por el prejuicio se basa en estereotipos. RACISMO Prejuicio y/o discriminación que se apoya en la construcción social de “raza.” Las diferencias en las características biológicas (por ejemplo, color de piel, textura del cabello, forma de los ojos) se utilizan como respaldo de un sistema de inequidades. SEXISMO Prejuicio y/o discriminación basados en el género. ESTEREOTIPO Es una generalización exageradamente simplificada acerca de una persona o grupo sin atender a las diferencias individuales. Hasta los estereotipos aparentemente positivos que vinculan una persona o grupo a una tendencia positiva pueden tener consecuencias negativas. XENOFOBIA es un prejuicio y/o discriminación contra alguien que es percibido como extranjero o una persona de afuera de nuestro círculo, nación o cultura. Xenofobia es comúnmente usado para describir actitudes negativas contra extranjeros o emigrantes. * Sin equivalente en español.

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN JUNE In Your Community • Go to the City of Denver’s website to find local festivals, parades and cultural events to attend or participate in: http://www.denvergov.org/ specialevents/PermittedEventsDenver/tabid/428857/ Default.aspx.

In Your Workplace • Be understanding and supportive of coworkers when they are observing religious and/or cultural holidays. • If a co-worker makes an insensitive racial, ethnic or religious comment, respond by respectfully pointing out that he or she made a remark that perpetuates stereotypes.

In Your Home • Encourage your children to read books that promote understanding of different cultures and abilities as well as books written by authors of diverse backgrounds. Visit www.adl.org/bibliography/ for recommendations.

In Your Place of Worship • Attend services of faiths different from your own and visit different houses of worship. Get permission where and when needed.

To find 101 Ways to Make a Positive Impact! go to: www.adl.org/mountain-states

PROUDLY DONATED BY

The Jonas Family


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Anne Frank Day

Pentecost (Eastern Christian)

Loving Day

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FLAG Day

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Juneteenth

World Refugee Day

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All Saints Day (Eastern Christian)

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Summer Solstice (First day of Summer)

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Father’s Day

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JUNE 2009

“Inaction may be the biggest form of action.” —Jerry Brown


2008 POSITIVE IMPACT! AWARD RECIPIENT

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DL’s Mountain States Regional Office created the Positive Impact! Award to recognize groups or individuals whose work reflects ADL’s mission to fight bigotry and secure fair and just treatment for all. In 2008, ADL recognized Barb Figg, Mullen High School Teacher, for her commitment to inclusion, respect for diversity, and efforts to combat bigotry. Barb Figg, Teacher Mullen High School Barb Figg has taught in the state of Colorado for almost 40 years, 30 years in public school and for the past 7 years at Mullen High School. Barb’s lifetime of teaching has included practically every subject area, with particular focus on social studies, U.S. and World History. In 2002, she connected with ADL, particularly through ADL’s Holocaust education programs. She was selected to participate in the 2002 class of Bearing Witness, a program which provides Catholic school educators with training and resources to teach about the historical relationship between Jewish and Catholic communities, particularly exploring the history of antiSemitism, the role of the Church during the Holocaust, and practical strategies for teaching students about the Holocaust. In 2005, Barb was selected to participate in ADL’s first Advanced Bearing Witness, which took Catholic educators to Israel to continue their course of study of the relationship between the Jewish & Catholic communities. In 2006, Barb was one of the first teachers in the state to receive and use ADL’s Holocaust curriculum Echoes & Reflections. She also attended ADL’s first Echoes & Reflections Summer Teacher Institute in NY.

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN JULY In Your Community • Visit Amache, Colorado, the site of the Granada Relocation Center Site, an important landmark in the United States’ history of internment of the Japanese Americans during WWII. • Organize a “Get to Know Your Neighbors” night, BBQ or potluck in your neighborhood.

In Your Home L-R: Tara Raju, ADL Assistant Director, Education; Barb Figg; Paula Brown, ADL Assistant Director, Education Barb teaches a 9-12 week Holocaust Course at Mullen High School, and she uses every resource that she has available to her, including pairing her students with Israeli students through the International Book-Sharing Project. In 2007, she was a Yad Vashem fellow and studied in Israel for three weeks with the experts and in 2008 she was accepted as a U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum fellow. She has also co-authored a chapter in a new textbook for high school and college aged students, titled “THE CALL OF MEMORY: LEARNING ABOUT THE HOLOCAUST THROUGH NARRATIVE.” Barb’s passion, energy, commitment to diversity and dedication to Holocaust education has and continues to inspire hundreds if not thousands of students and adults to learn about themselves and the world around them. We are grateful for her continued relationship with ADL and to the students of Colorado.

• Travel to a new part of your city, state, United States or a new country.

In Your Workplace • Offer professional development workshops that help all employees understand and respect individual work and communication styles. • Provide the opportunity for employees to attend local cultural events and exhibits.

In Your Place of Worship • Reach out to diverse religious communities to cosponsor festivals and holiday observances that highlight and celebrate our common humanity. • Explore texts, teachings and basic themes of a religion different from your own religion.

To find 101 Ways to Make a Positive Impact! go to: www.adl.org/mountain-states

PROUDLY DONATED BY

Heyman & Mordecai Family


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4 Independence Day

“While language is a gift, listening is a responsibility.”— Nikki Giovanni

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Dharma Day (Buddhist)

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ADA Day

Americans with Disabilities Act

Tisha B’Av (Jewish)

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I DIDN’T MEAN IT LIKE THAT Challenging Your Own Biases Spanish version available on September calendar page

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veryone, even those who may make sincere efforts to be aware of their use of language, may find themselves inadvertently using language or making insensitive comments that hurt others. While the intent may have been benign or even neutral, the impact of the words may deeply affect the listener enough for him or her to respond. In such situations, it is easy to get defensive and to say, “That’s not what I meant” or “You’re taking it the wrong way.” However, recognizing that all people have developed biases, consciously and unconsciously, through socialization, education and media exposure, this can be an opportunity to “unlearn” bias and to check the stereotypes or misinformation being held. Below are some guidelines if you are accused of prejudicial language. 1. Acknowledge your own feelings. Note how being accused makes you feel. Accusations of prejudice can bring up a variety of emotions including hurt, frustration, anger, resentment and guilt. Take time to explore and address your feelings before taking action. 2. Acknowledge the person’s comments and feelings. Making sure the person feels heard is the first step to effective communication about the issue at hand: “I understand that you feel my words were prejudiced or unfair, and that concerns me.”

Gather information. Ensure that you understand the person’s perception. Whether or not the perception is based on reality, it is important to remember that it feels real to the person and needs to be addressed. Remember that the effects of prejudice are cumulative. It may be that the person had multiple experiences over time that were perceived as being prejudiced and is reacting to you based upon this cumulative experience. 3. Assess the situation. Based on your observations and conversations, determine the person’s underlying needs. Respond with respect. Understand that even though your behavior may not have been intended as biased, it was perceived as biased. Try to avoid becoming defensive since defensiveness can block communication. Use the conflict as an opportunity to clarify any misunderstandings. 4. Do not immediately dismiss the accusation. Look at the situation and yourself honestly. If it turns out that your behavior was consciously or unconsciously prejudicial or unfair, allow yourself to reflect on the incident. Be willing to acknowledge what happened and modify your behavior accordingly. Remember that all people have biases. Being willing to admit when you are wrong is a powerful strategy to promote a respectful, inclusive environment.

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN AUGUST In Your Community • When anti-Semitic or racist graffiti appears, organize a community response effort promptly after the police have concluded their investigation. Showing your support to rid the community of hateful vandalism is deeply appreciated by the targeted groups.

In Your Home • Be knowledgeable; educate yourself on current domestic and international issues. • Start a social issues book club with your family and friends, choosing diverse authors and topics that will create conversations on current issues.

In Your Place of Worship • Urge your leaders to use the pulpit to condemn all forms of bigotry.

In Your Workplace • Set a “not in my work space” rule. Prohibit offensive jokes or other forms of bigotry in your cubicle, office or whatever other boundaries define your work space. • Once a week, eat lunch with a different coworker until you have met everyone.

To find 101 Ways to Make a Positive Impact! go to: www.adl.org/mountain-states

PROUDLY DONATED BY


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International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

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International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave TraDe and its Abolition

Ganesh Chaturthi (Hindu)

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Krishna Jayanti (Hindu)

International Youth Day

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Nisf Shabaan (Islamic)

Raksha Bandhan (Hindu)

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Ramadan (Islamic) August 22-September 20

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ESO NO FUE LO QUE QUISE DECIR

Enfrentando sus propios prejuicios

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odos, aun aquellos que con sinceridad se esfuerzan por tener presente qué tipo de vocabulario usan, pueden verse usando vocabulario inapropiado o haciendo comentarios que le hacen daño a otros sin querer. Aun cuando las intenciones hayan sido benignas o inclusive neutrales, el impacto de sus palabras puede que hayan afectado a la otra persona suficiente como para que ella responda. En dicha situación, es muy fácil ponerse a la defensiva o decir: ‘Eso no fue lo que quise decir’, o ‘Usted lo tomo a mal.’ Aun así, hay que reconocer que, consciente o inconscientemente, toda la gente adquiere prejuicios a través de la socialización con otros, la educación o por estar expuestos a los medios de comunicación. También, esta puede ser una oportunidad para cambiar el prejuicio y rechazar los estereotipos o información incorrecta que se ha aprendido. A continuación hay algunos pasos si usted es acusado de usar vocabulario prejuiciado. 1. Reconozca sus propios sentimientos. Tenga presente cómo se siente usted después de haber sido acusado. Ser acusado de comportamiento prejuiciado puede traer una variedad de emociones incluyendo ser herido, frustración, enojo, resentimiento y culpabilidad. Tome un rato para explorar sus sentimientos y enfrentarlos antes de tomar ninguna acción. 2. Tome en cuenta los comentarios y sentimientos de la otra persona. Asegurarse de que la otra persona se sienta escuchada es el primer paso para una comunicación

efectiva: ‘Yo entiendo que usted sintió que mis palabras fueron prejuiciadas e injustas y esto me preocupa.’ Recoja información. Asegúrese de que usted entiende la percepción de la otra persona. No importa si la percepción es basada o no en la realidad, es importante entender que es real para esta persona y debe ser enfrentada desde este punto de vista. Recuerde que los efectos del prejuicio son acumulativos. Puede que esta persona haya tenido múltiples experiencias a través del tiempo que han sido percibidas como prejuiciadas y su reacción es basada en una experiencia acumulativa. 3. Estudie la situación. Basado en sus observaciones y conversaciones, determine las necesidades de la otra persona. Responda con respeto. Entienda que aunque su comportamiento no haya sido prejuiciado intencionalmente, fue percibido de esa forma. Evite ponerse a la defensiva ya que esto puede impedir la buena comunicación. Use este conflicto como una oportunidad para clarificar cualquier mal entendido. 4. No descuente la acusación inmediatamente. Vea a la situación y a usted mismo con honestidad. Si resulta que su comportamiento fue prejuiciado o injusto consciente o inconscientemente, permítase reflexionar sobre el incidente. Esté dispuesto a reconocer lo que pasó y a modificar su comportamiento de acuerdo a ello. Recuerde que todos tenemos prejuicios. Estar dispuesto a admitir cuando usted no esta en lo correcto es una estrategia muy ponderosa para promover el respeto y un ambiente inclusivo.

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN SEPTEMBER In Your School • Support the diverse representation of students on every school board, committee, group, publication, and team. • Create a buddy system that assists new students of all backgrounds to feel welcome when joining the student body. • Be an ALLY — speak out against jokes and slurs that target people or groups. It is not enough to refuse to laugh. • Report cyberbullying to a teacher, parent or other adult. Say no to name-calling, gossip, offensive forwarded emails or other forms of bullying over the Internet (cyberbullying). • Start an annual film festival which highlights films and documentaries from around the world. Invite community groups and local theaters to be co-sponsors.

In Your Community • Get Involved! Attend your local city council, homeowner’s association and local school board meetings, and ask them to support and promote pro- diversity themes. • Sign up for a docent-led tour to learn about history, nature and the environment at Babi Yar Park (located at Yale and Havana Streets in Southeast Denver). Contact the Mizel Museum (303-394-9993) or visit their Web site www.mizelmuseum.org. The museum’s location is 400 S. Kearney St., Denver, CO 80224.

PROUDLY DONATED BY


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Ulambana (Buddhist)

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Labor Day

International Literacy Day

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Rosh Hashanah (Jewish)

Eid Al-Fitr (Islamic)

Autumnal Equinox (First day of Autumn)

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Native American Day Dassera (Hindu) Yom Kippur (Jewish)

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Citizenship Day/ Constitution Day

Navaratri (Hindu)

Laila Al-Qadr (Islamic)

Rosh Hashanah (Jewish)

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National Hispanic Heritage Month September 15-October 15

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SEPTEMBER 2009

“Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it .” —George Santayana


RESPONDING TO BIGOTED WORDS Spanish version available on November calendar page

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hallenging bigoted and offensive remarks is critical to ensuring dignity and respect for all people. Below are step-by-step strategies that can assist you if you find yourself in situations where such remarks are made.

Think Explore your understanding of the situation. Take a moment to reflect on what was said and why you consider it to be prejudicial: What was just said? Do an emotional check-in. Consider your own emotions and if you can respond effectively immediately or if you need to take time to do so effectively. Ensure your safety. Is this something to which you can safely respond to immediately or do you need to walk away and address the matter in another way? Do you need to seek assistance or support from someone else to intervene? Personal safety is of utmost importance. Be clear about what you want to accomplish. Know what your intentions are, as they will influence the outcome of any responses: Is this a “teachable moment”? Do I want this person to understand the impact of those words? Try to start from an assumption of good will. Be aware that some people are acting out of ignorance and will respond defensively when told their words have been perceived as prejudicial.

ACT Address your concerns. Whether done immediately or later, in public or in private, consider letting the person know that the words he or she used were hurtful or offensive: What

did you mean by what you said? That sounded to me like a stereotype. Do you understand why that was so hurtful? Engage in respectful dialogue. Particularly when you’re talking to someone you know, people tend to listen better and be more open when they know that they matter to the person who is speaking. Begin the conversation by communicating that you value and are committed to your relationship with the person. Communicate your concerns without accusation or attacks. Assist the person in understanding that jokes, slurs and demeaning words are not minor incidents to the person who is on the receiving end. Listen respectfully to the person, but do not minimize the impact of the situation: I want to speak to you, because your friendship is important to me. I want to let you know that what you said hurt me. I do not like such words around me because I think they are offensive and demeaning.

MAINTAIN DIGNITY Hold people accountable. Sometimes people need to hear more than once that their words are not acceptable. Remind them of previous conversations if they resume their behavior. However, recognize too that there is a line to be drawn, and if necessary, let them know that their actions have consequences, in the form of lost friendships or reports to school administrators, supervisors or other authority figures. Remember your “rights.” Although you do not have the right to dictate other people’s sense of humor or how they speak, you do have the right to request that this type of humor not be used in your presence.

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN OCTOBER In Your School • Apply or encourage students to apply to ADL’s 2010 Robert B. Sturm Youth Leadership Mission to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC (contact ADL for applications, 303-830-7177, available October 2009). • Learn to understand other cultures through literature, the arts and other media by participating in traveling exhibitions such as Mizel Museum’s Mythical Mask of Many Cultures or The Immigrant Adventure (www. mizelmuseum.org 303-394-9993). • Contact ADL to learn more about hate on the Internet, including hate group web sites and recruitment and cyberbullying (303-830-7177).

In Your Home • Explore holidays from different cultures that are not your own. Research their meanings and celebrate the traditions and rituals that occur during the holiday. Start by consulting the Calendar of Observances at the back of this calendar. • Take a conversation course in a language different from your own that is spoken in your community.

To find 101 Ways to Make a Positive Impact! go to: www.adl.org/mountain-states PROUDLY DONATED BY

The Heyman Family Fund The GHP Financial Group


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“Peace cannot be kept by force. It can only be achieved by understanding.” —Albert Einstein

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Shemini Atzeret (Jewish) Sukkot (Jewish) October 3-9

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Simchat Torah (Jewish)

Columbus Day

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Diwali (Hindu) International Day for the Eradication of Poverty

Coming Out Day

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COMO RESPONDER A PALABRAS PREJUICIADAS

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nfrentar comentarios prejuiciados y ofensivos es crítico para asegurar la dignidad y el respeto para todas las personas. A continuación hay estrategias paso a paso que pueden ayudarlo si usted alguna vez se encuentra en una situación donde estos comentarios se hacen.

Piense Explore su entendimiento de la situación. Tome un momento para reflexionar en lo que fue dicho y en por qué usted considero el comentario como prejuiciado: ¿Que acaba de decirse? Evalué sus emociones. Considere sus emociones y piense si usted puede responder efectivamente en ese momento o si debe esperarse para poder hacerlo efectivamente. Cerciórese de su seguridad. ¿Es esta situación algo a los que usted puede responder sin comprometer su seguridad o necesita usted alejarse de la situación y enfrentarla de otra forma? ¿Necesita usted asistencia o apoyo de otra persona que intervenga? La seguridad es lo más importante. Tenga muy claro lo que usted quiere lograr. Sepa bien cuáles son sus intensiones ya que esto va a influenciar el resultado de cualquier respuesta: ¿Es este un momento para enseñar? ¿Quiero yo que esta persona entienda el impacto de esas palabras? Trate de empezar por asumir buenas intenciones de parte de la otra persona. Entienda que algunas personas actúan por ignorancia y van a responder a la defensiva cuando se les dice que en sus palabras se percibe prejuicio.

Actúe Enfrente sus inquietudes. Ya sea que lo haga inmediatamente o después, en público o en privado,

considere decirle a la otra persona que sus palabras fueron ofensivas y dañinas para usted: ¿Qué quiso decir usted? Eso me sonó a mí como un estereotipo. ¿Entiende usted por que esto fue tan ofensivo? Participe en un dialogo respetuoso. Particularmente cuando usted está hablando con alguien que conoce, la gente tiende a escuchar mejor y estar más abierta cuando sabe que es importante para la otra persona. Empiece la conversación diciendo que usted valora a esa persona y tiene un compromiso con esa relación. Comunique sus sentimientos sin acusaciones ni ataques. Ayúdele a esta persona a entender que los chistes, apodos y palabras condescendientes no son incidentes pequeños para la persona que los está recibiendo. Escuche a la persona respetuosamente pero no minimice el impacto de la situación:Yo quiero hablar con usted porque nuestra amistad es importante para mí. Quiero que sepa que sus palabras me ofendieron. No me gusta que se hagan esos comentarios en frente mío porque son ofensivos y denigrantes.

Mantenga la Dignidad Responsabilice a la las personas. A veces la gente necesita oír mas de una vez que sus palabras no son aceptables. Recuérdeles de otras conversaciones anteriores si vuelven a exhibir el mismo comportamiento. Pero reconozca también que hay que parar situaciones y de ser necesario, déjeles saber que sus acciones tienen consecuencias como amistades perdidas o reportes a la administración de la escuela, supervisores o figuras de autoridad. Recuerde sus derechos. Aunque usted no tiene el derecho de decirles a otros que sentido del humor ellos deben o no tener o cómo hablar, usted tiene el derecho pedir que este tipo de humor no se use en su presencia.

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN NOVEMBER In Your Community • Collect traditional family recipes from local residents for a community cookbook. Solicit ads to support the cost of reproducing and distributing the book as part of a “welcome wagon” program for new residents.

In Your School • Set up a school exchange that matches students from different schools to bring youth of differing backgrounds closer together. • “MIX IT UP.” Organize a Mix It Up at Lunch Day. Visit www.mixitup.org. • Create a STAND chapter. STAND is the student led division of the Genocide Intervention Network and is building a movement to end genocide. Visit www.standnow.org. • Construct a multimedia display that examines how today’s media perpetuates stereotypes. Consider current films, television sitcoms, music, and advertising campaigns, in addition to newspapers, magazines and books.

In Your Workplace • Make respect for diversity a core value in your organization and articulate it as such in your handbook or employee manual.

To find 101 Ways to Make a Positive Impact! go to: www.adl.org/mountain-states

PROUDLY DONATED BY

The Curtiss-Lusher Family


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All Saints’ Day (Western Christian)

All Souls’ Day (Christian)

Election Day

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Kristallnacht

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Veterans’ Day

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American Education Week November 16-22

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“Tell me, I forget. Show me, I remember. Involve me and I understand.” —Chinese Proverb

Transgender Day of Remembrance

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28 Eid Al-Adha (Islamic)


THE CHOICES WE HAVE By a 2006 Robert B. Sturm Youth Leadership Mission Delegate

You think…

You don’t have a choice No words or voice No opinion and no solution You don’t have the right To stand up and fight To believe in the just To do what is must To step out of line To stop the vine

But I know…

You so have a choice Words and a voice An opinion and solution You do have the right To stand and fight To believe in the just To do what is must To step out of line To stop the vine

There are no amount of others to do what needs to be done To stand up for the weak and have a little fun There’s only one that can see “who” Who needs the help, and that “one“ is you From the simple act of stopping the joke And taking the added pinch or poke Only we have the power to understand That the next generation knows more than a dunce We only have one chance to break the hate Because unlike others there’s no second date

What we have to use is now It’s our responsibility to figure out how.

MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN DECEMBER In Your Workplace • Conduct an audit of your workplace to ensure it is easily accessible to all people with disabilities.

In Your School • Encourage the yearbook staff and editors to devote a section to incorporate pro-diversity and anti-prejudice themes throughout, such as using quotes, headlines, photos, etc. • Learn about the history and current occurrence of genocide throughout the world. Contact the Mizel Museum, 303-394-9993 ext. 3, about bringing the Genocide Exhibition to your school in conjunction with Holocaust Awareness Week, or any time of year. • Invite the local lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) center, theater group or other speaker to visit your school. • Connect the lessons of the Holocaust with contemporary issues of bias, hate and genocide with Echoes and Reflections: A Multimedia Curriculum on the Holocaust. Visit www.echoesandreflections.org for lesson plans and resources. • Assess your school’s accessibility for people with physical disabilities. Report your findings to school administrators and advocate for any necessary improvements.

In Your Home • Be proactive. Before house guests arrive, ask if they have any dietary restrictions or other needs and share any household traditions or practices you have that may affect them.

PROUDLY DONATED BY

The Joseph Family Fund Judy Joseph & Michael Smith Michelle & Doug Striker


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World Aids Day

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International Day of Disabled Persons

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Bodhi Day (Buddhist)

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Our Lady of Guadalupe (Christian)

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Muharram (Islamic)

Bill of Rights Day Chanukah (Jewish) December 12-19

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Winter Solstice

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Christmas (Western Christian)

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Wounded Knee Day Kwanzaa December 26-January 1

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“Honest disagreement is often a good sign of progress. ” —Mahatma Gandhi


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“The greatest sin of our time is not the few who have destroyed but the vast majority who have sat idly by.”

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—Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Christmas (Armenian Orthodox Christian)

Christmas (Eastern Christian)

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Birthday

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No Name-Calling Week January 18-22

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27 UN Holocaust Memorial Day

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Mahayana New Year (Buddhist) Tu B’Shvat (Jewish)


CALENDAR OF OBSERVANCES

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he increasingly pluralistic population of the United States creates diverse communities, student bodies and employees. To enhance mutual understanding and respect among the various religious, ethnic and cultural groups, the Anti-Defamation League offers this Calendar of Observances as a tool to increase awareness and sensitivity about religious obligations as well as ethnic and cultural festivities that may affect students, colleagues and neighbors. The calendar includes significant religious observances of the major faiths represented in the United States. Thus, it can be used as a resource when planning school exam timetables and school activities, or when scheduling workplace festivities and community events. In addition, the calendar notes U.S. holidays that are either legal holidays or observed in various states and communities throughout the country. A third component is the inclusion of important national and international observances that may be commemorated in the U.S. The dates of secular holidays are based on the Gregorian calendar, which is commonly used for civil dating purposes. Many religions and cultures follow various traditional calendar systems that are often based on the phases of the moon with occasional adjustments for the solar cycle. Therefore, specific Gregorian calendar dates for these observances will differ from year to year. In addition, calculation of specific dates may vary by geographical location and according to different sects within a given religion. Jewish and Islamic holidays begin at sundown the previous day and end at sundown on the date listed.

ADA (AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT) DAY • Commemorates the 1990 signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which guarantees equal opportunity for people with disabilities.

AMERICAN EDUCATION WEEK • Celebrates public education and honors individuals who are making a difference in ensuring every child in the U. S. receives a quality education.

ADVENT (Christian) • Advent is a season of spiritual preparation in observance of the birth of Jesus. In Western Christianity, it starts on the fourth Sunday before Christmas. In Eastern Christianity, the season is longer and begins in the middle of November.

ARMENIAN MARTYRS’ DAY • Memorializes the extermination of some 1.5 million Armenians between 1915 and 1923 in Turkey.

ANNE FRANK DAY • Birthday of young Jewish girl whose diary describes her family’s experiences hiding from the Nazis through assistance of gentile friends. ALL SAINTS DAY (Eastern Christian) • Observed on the first Sunday after Pentecost, it commemorates all known and unknown Christian saints. ALL SAINTS’ DAY (Western Christian) • Commemorates all known and unknown Christian saints. Eastern Christianity observes it on the first Sunday after Pentecost. ALL SOULS’ DAY (Christian) • Commemoration of all faithful Christians who are now dead. In Mexican tradition it is celebrated as Dia de los Muertos between October 31 and November 2, and is an occasion to remember dead ancestors and celebrate the continuity of life.

ASCENSION DAY (Eastern Christian) • Celebrated 40 days after Pascha, it commemorates the ascension of Jesus into Heaven. ASCENSION DAY (Western Christian) • Celebrated 40 days after Easter, it commemorates the ascension of Jesus into Heaven. ASH WEDNESDAY (Western Christian) • The first day of Lent for Western Christian churches, a 40-day period of spiritual preparation for Easter, not counting Sundays. ASHURA (Islamic) • A day of fasting observed on the 10th day of the month of Muharram to celebrate Moses’ exodus from Egypt. For Shi’a Muslims, it also marks the climax of the ten-day Remembrance of Muharram, which started on December 29, 2008. On Ashura, Shi’ites mourn the martyrdom of Hussein, the son of Ali and grandson of Muhammad, at the Battle of Kerbala in 680 CE. ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH • Recognizes the contributions and celebrates the culture of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

AUTUMNAL EQUINOX • The date when night and day are nearly of the same length. It marks the first day of fall. BILL OF RIGHTS DAY • Commemorates the signing into law of the ten original amendments of the United States Constitution in 1791. BLACK HISTORY MONTH • Celebrates Black History and African-American culture in the United States. BODHI DAY (Buddhist) • Also known as Rohatsu, it observes the spiritual awakening (bodhi) of founder Siddharta Gautama, the Buddha, ca. 596 BCE. Celebrated on the eigth day either of December or the 12th month of the lunar calendar. BROTHERHOOD/SISTERHOOD WEEK • Designated by the National Conference of Community and Justice to emphasize the importance of brotherhood and sisterhood. BUDDHA DAY (Buddhist) • Also known as Vesak or Visakha Puja, it marks the occasion of the birth, spiritual awakening and death of the historical Buddha. CESAR CHAVEZ DAY • Honors Mexican American farm worker, labor leader and activist Cesar Chavez (1927–1993) who was a nationally respected voice for social justice.


CHANUKAH (Jewish) • Eight-day “Festival of Lights,” celebrating the rededication of the Temple to the service of God in 164 BCE. Commemorates the victory of the Maccabees over the Greek King, Antiochus, who sought to suppress freedom of worship. CHRISTMAS (Armenian Orthodox Christian) • Armenian Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus on Epiphany, except for Armenians living in Israel, who celebrate Christmas on January 19th. CHRISTMAS (Eastern Christian) • Most Orthodox churches celebrate Christmas 13 days later than other Christian churches based on their use of the Julian rather than the Gregorian version of the Western calendar. CHRISTMAS (Western Christian) • Commemorates the birth of Jesus. CINCO DE MAYO • In 1862 Mexican forces defeated French occupational forces in the Battle of Puebla. CLEAN MONDAY (Eastern Christian) • The beginning of Great Lent for Eastern Christian churches, which starts 40 days before Orthodox Easter (Pascha), counting Sundays. COLUMBUS DAY • Marks Christopher Columbus’s landing at San Salvador on October 12, 1492. Known as Día de la Raza, “Day of the Race”, in Spanish-speaking countries and communities. COMING OUT DAY • Encourages honesty and openness about being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. Commemorates October 11, 1987, when 500,000 people marched on Washington, DC, for gay and lesbian equality.

CONSTITUTION DAY AND CITIZENSHIP DAY • Commemorates the ratification of the United States Constitution in 1787. Also honors all who have become U.S. citizens. DASSERA (Hindu) • Anniversary of the day when Rama killed the evil demon Ravana. Also known as Durga Puja, which celebrates the goddess Durga. DAY OF SILENCE • Students take a daylong vow of silence to protest the actual silencing of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students and their straight allies due to bias and harassment. DHARMA DAY (Buddhist) • Also known as Asala Puja, it commemorates the historical Buddha’s first discourse following his spiritual awakening. DIWALI (Hindu) • Also called Deepavali, “Festival of Lights,” it celebrates the victory of good over evil, light over darkness and knowledge over ignorance. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.’S BIRTHDAY • The birthday of civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is celebrated on the third Monday in January.

EPIPHANY (Christian) • Known as Theophany in Eastern Christianity, it celebrates the manifestation of Jesus as Christ. In addition, the Western Church associates Epiphany with the journey of the Magi to the infant Jesus, and the Eastern Church with the baptism of Jesus by John. FATHER’S DAY • Children of all ages show appreciation for their fathers. FLAG DAY • Anniversary of the adoption of the Unites States flag by Congress in 1777. GANESH CHATURTHI (Hindu) • Celebrates the birthday of Ganesha, the elephantdeity. GOOD FRIDAY (Western Christian) • Observed the Friday before Easter, it commemorates the Crucifixion of Jesus. Known as Holy Friday in Eastern Christianity. HALLOWEEN • The eve of All Saints’ Day. HOLI (Hindu) • Also called Holaka or Phagwa, this festival celebrates spring and commemorates various events in Hindu mythology.

EASTER (Western Christian) • Celebrates the resurrection of Jesus. Known as Pascha in Eastern Christianity.

HOLY FRIDAY (Eastern Christian) • Observed the Friday before Pascha, it commemorates the Crucifixion of Jesus. Known as Good Friday in Western Christianity.

EID AL-ADHA (Islamic) • The “Feast of Sacrifice” concludes the Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca), and is a three-day festival recalling Ibrahim’s willingness to sacrifice his son in obedience to God.

HOLY THURSDAY (Eastern Christian) • Celebrated on the Thursday before Pascha commemorating the Last Supper, at which Jesus and the Apostles were together for the last time before the Crucifixion.

EID AL-FITR (Islamic) • The “Feast of the Breaking of the Fast” marks the end of Ramadan, the holy month of fasting from dawn until dusk.

HOLY THURSDAY (Western Christian) • Also known as Maundy Thursday, it is celebrated on the Thursday before Easter commemorating the Last Supper, at which Jesus and the Apostles were together for the last time before the Crucifixion.

ELECTION DAY • A day set by U.S. law for the election of public officials.

HUMAN RIGHTS DAY • On this day in 1948 the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. INDEPENDENCE DAY • Anniversary of the United States Declaration of Independence in 1776. INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE ELIMINATION OF RACIAL DISCRIMINATION • Call to action to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination worldwide. INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE ERADICATION OF POVERTY • Call to action for the eradication of poverty and destitution worldwide. INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE REMEMBRANCE OF THE SLAVE TRADE AND ITS ABOLITION • Memorializes the tragedy of the transatlantic slave trade, coinciding with the anniversary of the uprising in Santo Domingo (today Haiti and the Dominican Republic) that initiated its abolition. INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR TOLERANCE • Emphasizes the dangers of intolerance and is a call to action for the advancement of human welfare, freedom and progress everywhere, as well as a day to encourage tolerance, respect, dialogue and cooperation among different cultures and peoples. INTERNATIONAL DAY OF DISABLED PERSONS • Raises awareness about persons with disabilities in order to improve their lives and provide them with equal opportunity. INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE WORLD’S INDIGENOUS PEOPLES • Celebrates the richness of indigenous cultures and recognizes the challenges indigenous peoples face today, ranging from poverty and disease to dispossession, discrimination and denial of basic human rights.


INTERNATIONAL LITERACY DAY • Call to action for universal literacy. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY • Celebration of the economic, political and social achievements of women worldwide. INTERNATIONAL WORKER’S DAY • Also known as May Day, it celebrates the social and economic achievements of workers worldwide. The day commemorates the Haymarket Riot of 1886 in Chicago, in which police and protesters clashed following a workers’ strike for an eight-hour work day. INTERNATIONAL YOUTH DAY • Celebrates young people and the integral role they play in helping to create a world fit for children. JUNETEENTH • Originally commemorating the announcement of the abolition of slavery in Texas in 1865, it is now celebrated throughout the U.S. to honor African-American freedom and achievement.

LAILA AL-QADR (Islamic) • “The Night of Power” marks the night in which God first revealed the Qur’an to the Prophet Muhammad. Often fixed as the 27th day of the Islamic month of Ramadan, Sunnis may also observe it on the 21th, 23rd, 25th or 29th. Shi’ites observe it on the 19th, 21st or 23rd of Ramadan. LGBT HISTORY MONTH • Marks and celebrates the lives and achievements of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the United States. LGBT PRIDE MONTH • Commemorates the anniversary of the June 28, 1969 Stonewall riot in New York City, the incident that initiated the modern gay rights movement in the United States. LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) Pride Day is the last Sunday in June. LOVING DAY • Observes the anniversary of the 1967 United States Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia which struck down the miscegenation laws remaining in 16 states barring interracial marriage.

KRISHNA JAYANTI (Hindu) • Celebrates Krishna’s birthday, Vishnu’s eighth incarnation on earth.

LUNAR NEW YEAR • On this day Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese New Year are celebrated.

KRISTALLNACHT • Commemorates the 1938 pogrom against Jews throughout Germany and Vienna.

MAGHA PUJA (Buddhist) • Also known as Sangha Day, it commemorates the spontaneous assembly of 1,250 arahants, completely enlightened monks, in the historical Buddha’s presence.

KWANZAA • A seven-day celebration honoring African-American heritage and its continued vitality. “Kwanzaa” means “first fruits (of the harvest)” in Swahili. LABOR DAY • Celebrated the first Monday in September in recognition of U.S. workers. LAG B’OMER (Jewish) • Celebrates the end of a divine-sent plague and/or Roman occupation during Rabbi Akiva’s lifetime (died c. 135 CE).

MAHA SHIVARATRI (Hindu) • Also called Shiva Ratri, it is the Great Festival of Shiva. MAHAYANA NEW YEAR (Buddhist) • In Mahayana countries, the New Year starts on the first full moon day in January. MAKAR SANKRANTI (Hindu) • Seasonal celebration recognizing the increasing length of days.

MEMORIAL DAY • Initiated originally to honor the dead of the Civil War, this observance now pays homage to the dead of all U.S. wars. MILAD AL-NABI (Islamic) • Celebrates the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad, founder of Islam. Shi’a Muslims celebrate it five days later than Sunni Muslims. MOTHER’S DAY • Children of all ages show appreciation for their mothers. MUHARRAM (Islamic) • The month of Muharram marks the beginning of the Islamic liturgical year. The first day of the month, al-Hijra, remembers the migration of Muhammad and his followers from Mecca to Medina in 622 CE. It also marks the beginning of the ten-day Shi’ite Remembrance of Muharram, a period of intense grief and mourning of the martyrdom of Hussein, the son of Ali and grandson of Muhammad. NATIONAL AMERICAN INDIAN HERITAGE MONTH • Celebrates and honors the history and culture of Native Americans in the United States. NATIONAL DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH • Recognizes the contributions of workers with disabilities. NATIONAL FREEDOM DAY • Commemorates the signing of the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery in 1865. NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH • Celebrates the contributions, heritage and culture of Hispanic and Latino Americans. NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH • Honors women as significant agents of historical change. NATIVE AMERICAN DAY • Celebrates Native American history and culture.

NAVARATRI (Hindu) • Nine-day festival celebrating the triumph of good over evil. It worships God in the form of the universal mother commonly referred to as Durga, Devi or Shakti, and marks the start of fall. NEW YEAR’S DAY • The first day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, commonly used for civil dating purposes. NIRVANA DAY (Buddhist) • Celebrates the day when the historical Buddha achieved Parinirvana, or complete Nirvana, upon the death of his physical body. Sometimes celebrated on February 8. NISF SHABAAN (Islamic) • “Night of Repentance” in preparation for the fast of Ramadan. Fixed as the 15th day or middle (nisf) of the eighth month of Shabaan in the Islamic calendar. NO NAME-CALLING WEEK • Annual week of educational activities aimed at ending name-calling and bullying of all kinds. OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE (Christian) • Celebrates the apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary (by her title, Our Lady of Guadalupe, the Patroness of Mexico and the Americas) before Juan Diego, an indigenous convert to Roman Catholicism, on the Mexican hill of Tepeyac in 1531. PALM SUNDAY (Eastern Christian) • Observed the Sunday before Pascha to commemorate the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem. PALM SUNDAY (Western Christian) • Observed the Sunday before Easter to commemorate the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem. PASCHA (Eastern Christian) • Celebrates the resurrection of Jesus. Known as Easter in Western Christianity.


PASSOVER/PESACH (Jewish) • The eightday “Feast of Unleavened Bread” celebrates Israel’s deliverance from Egyptian bondage. PENTECOST (Eastern Christian) • The seventh Sunday after Pascha commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles and women followers of Jesus. Marks the birth of the Christian Church. PENTECOST (Western Christian) • Also known as Whitsunday, the seventh Sunday after Easter commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles and women followers of Jesus. Marks the birth of the Christian Church. PRESIDENTS’ DAY • Honors all past presidents of the United States of America. PURIM (Jewish) • The “Feast of Lots” marks the salvation of the Jews of ancient Persia from extermination. RACE RELATIONS SUNDAY • Created in 1922 by the National Council of Churches in recognition of the importance of interracial relations and learning. RAKSHA BANDHAN (Hindu) • Also called Rakhi, this festival celebrates the protective relationship between brothers and their sisters. RAMADAN (Islamic) • A month of strict fasting from dawn until dusk in honor of the first revelations of the Qur’an to the Prophet Muhammad. RAMA NAVAMI (Hindu) • Celebrates the birthday of Rama, king of ancient India, hero of the epic Ramayana, and seventh incarnation of Vishnu. REFORMATION DAY (Christian) • Commemorates the beginning of the Protestant Reformation in 1517.

ROSH HASHANAH (Jewish) • Beginning of the Jewish New Year and first of the High Holy Days, which marks the beginning of a ten-day period of penitence and spiritual renewal. SHAVUOT (Jewish) • The “Feast of Weeks” celebrates the covenant established at Sinai between God and Israel, and the revelation of the Ten Commandments. SHEMINI ATZERET (Jewish) • “The Eighth (Day) of Assembly” is observed on the day immediately following Sukkot. SHROVE TUESDAY (Western Christian) • A day of penitence as well as the last chance to feast before Lent begins. Also known as Mardi Gras. SIMCHAT TORAH (Jewish) • “Rejoicing in the Torah” celebrates the conclusion of the public reading of the Pentateuch and its beginning anew. ST. PATRICK’S DAY (Christian) • Feast day of the patron saint of Ireland. In the U.S., a secular version is celebrated by people of all faiths through appreciation of all things Irish. SUKKOT (Jewish) • The week-long “Feast of Booths” commemorates the 40-year wandering of the Israelites in the desert on the way to the Promised Land. SUMMER SOLSTICE • In the northern hemisphere, the longest day of the year. It marks the first day of the season of summer. SUSAN B. ANTHONY DAY • Birthday of Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), a pioneer in the Women’s Rights Movement. TEMPLE DAY (Buddhist) • Many Buddhists of all traditions pay their respects and pray for good fortune for the new year at the temple.

THANKSGIVING DAY • Following a 19th century tradition, it commemorates the Pilgrims’ harvest feast in the autumn of 1621. THERAVADA NEW YEAR (Buddhist) • In Theravada countries, the New Year is celebrated on the first full moon day in April.

VETERANS’ DAY • Honors the U. S. Armed Services and commemorates the war dead. WINTER SOLSTICE • In the northern hemisphere, the shortest day of the year. It marks the first day of the season of winter. WORLD AIDS DAY • International day of action on HIV and AIDS.

TRANSGENDER DAY OF REMEMBRANCE • Memorializes those who were killed due to anti-transgender hatred or prejudice.

WORLD DAY FOR CULTURAL DIVERSITY FOR DIALOGUE AND DEVELOPMENT • Recognizes cultural diversity as a source of innovation, exchange and creativity, as well as the obligation to create a more peaceful and equitable society based on mutual respect.

TU B’SHVAT (Jewish) • New Year’s Day for Trees, and traditionally the first of the year for tithing fruit of trees. Now a day for environmental awareness and action, such as tree planting.

WORLD PRESS FREEDOM DAY • Serves as an occasion to inform the public of violations of the right to freedom of expression and as a reminder that many journalists brave death or jail to bring people their daily news.

ULAMBANA (Buddhist) • Buddhist Ghost Festival. The unsettled spirits of dead ancestors are calmed with chanting and offerings to enable them to pass peacefully into the next world.

WORLD REFUGEE DAY • Raises awareness about the plight of refugees and displaced persons.

TISHA B’AV (Jewish) • Mourning of the destruction of the First and Second Temples in Jerusalem in 586 BCE and 70 CE.

UN HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY • Annual International Day of Commemoration in memory of the victims of the Holocaust coinciding with the anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz death camp in 1945. UNITED NATIONS DAY • Commemorates the founding of the world organization in 1945. VALENTINE’S DAY • Celebrates the idea of romantic love. VERNAL EQUINOX • The date when night and day are nearly the same length. It marks the first day of the season of spring.

WOUNDED KNEE DAY • On December 29, 1890, more than 200 Lakota Sioux were massacred by U.S. troops at Wounded Knee in South Dakota. YOM HAATZMA’UT (Jewish) • “Israel Independence Day” celebrates the establishment of the State of Israel on May 14, 1948. It is fixed as the fifth day of the Hebrew month of Iyar. YOM HASHOAH (Jewish) • “Holocaust Remembrance Day” memorializes the heroic martyrdom of six million Jews who perished in the Nazi Holocaust. YOM KIPPUR (Jewish) • The “Day of Atonement” marks the end of the Ten Days of Penitence that begin with Rosh HaShanah.


ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE

INFORMATION Glen S. Lewy National Chair Abraham H. Foxman National Director

Karen Steinhauser Mountain States Region Board Chair Bruce H. DeBoskey Mountain States Regional Director

Kenneth Jacobson Deputy National Director Barry Curtiss-Lusher Chair, Development Committee Cliff Schechter Director of National Development Ginny MacDowell Chair, Regional Operations Committee Bob Wolfson Associate National Director of Regional Operations David J. Millstone Chair, Education Committee Dr. Ed S. Alster Director of Education

Joyce Rubin Senior Associate Director Nina Sundell Associate Director Tara Raju Assistant Director, Education Paula M. Brown Assistant Director, Education Amy M. Stein Boulder Community Coordinator Anthony Hodes Development Director Noelle DeLage Associate Director, Development Sandy Mandel Volunteer Coordinator Michele W. Ross Office Manager Debbie Cole Education Assistant Brittany Saia Community Services Assistant Kelly Greengard Development Assistant Beth Yohe Assistant Director, Training & Curriculum, National Education Division

MISSION STATEMENT Since 1913: “to stop the defamation of the Jewish people… to secure justice and fair treatment to all.”

Download copies of this calendar at

www.adl.org/mountain-states

This calendar was prepared by the Anti-Defamation League’s Mountain States Regional Office in conjunction with the ADL’s National Education Division. © 2008 Anti-Defamation League. All rights reserved. No part of this calendar may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by an information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the ADL. ADL Mountain States Regional Office (303) 830-7177 Fax: (303) 830-1554 Email: Denver@adl.org Website: www.adl.org/mountain-states Special thanks to: Hal Aqua, aquastudio.net, PI! designer A. Barry Hirschfeld, National Hirschfeld Gareth Heyman & Steven Shapiro, ADL Board Members, Positive Impact! Sponsorship Co-Chairs Sam Jonas & Marvin Levy, ADL Board Members, Positive Impact! Committee Victoria Miller, Translator Bruce DeBoskey, Tara Raju, Joyce Rubin, Nina Sundell, Beth Yohe, PI! content


RESOLUTION OF RESPECT I pledge from this day forward to do my best to combat prejudice and to stop those who, because of hate or ignorance, would hurt people or violate their civil rights. I will try at all times to be aware of my own biases and seek to gain understanding of those I perceive as being different from myself. I will speak out against all forms of prejudice and discrimination. I will reach out to support those who are targets of hate. I will think about specific ways my community members can promote respect for people and create a prejudice-free zone. I firmly believe that one person can make a difference and that no person can be an “innocent� bystander when it comes to opposing hate. I recognize that respecting individual dignity, achieving equality and promoting intergroup harmony are the responsibilities of all people. By signing this pledge, I commit myself to making a Positive Impact! in my community. ______________________________

______________________________

My Signature

Witness Signature

______________________________ Date

Š 2009 Anti-Defamation League

www.adl.org/mountain-states


Resolución de Respeto Yo me comprometo de hoy en adelante, a hacer todo lo posible para combatir el prejuicio y detener a aquellos que por razones de odio o ignorancia, le hagan daño o le nieguen los derechos civiles a alguien. Yo trataré en todo momento de estar consciente de mis propios prejuicios. Además, trataré de entender a aquellas personas que yo percibo como diferentes a mí. Yo trataré de enfrentar todo tipo de prejuicio y discriminación. Yo trataré de alcanzar y respaldar a aquellas personas que son víctimas del odio. Yo pensaré en formas específicas en las que los miembros de mi comunidad pueden promover el respeto mutuo y crear una zona libre de prejuicio. Yo creo firmemente que una persona puede hacer la diferencia y que nadie debe ser un testigo espectador cuando se trata de oponerse al odio. Yo reconozco que el respetar la dignidad individual, alcanzar igualdad y promover la armonía entre los diferentes grupos es la responsabilidad de todos. Al firmar esta promesa, yo me comprometo a tener un impacto positivo en mi comunidad.

______________________________

______________________________

Mi Firma

Firma del Testigo

______________________________ Fecha

© 2009 Anti-Defamation League

www.adl.org/mountain-states


The MDC/Richmond American Homes Foundation respects the differences of all Americans. We believe in building the American Dream for all families… and in building understanding and diversity in our communities as well.

Anti-Defamation League 1120 Lincoln Street, Suite 1301 • Denver, Colorado 80203-2140 • 303-830-7177 • www.adl.org/mountain-states • www.adl.org Boulder Office: 1630A 30th Street, #271 • Boulder, Colorado 80301-1045 • 303-449-2607 • Boulder@adl.org


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