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Citizen’s Report

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Gainesville: Innovation City


Dear Citizen:

L etter

from your

C ity M anager

As your city manager, I am always pleased when city government and community groups partner to create successful initiatives that meet or exceed our goals. I am pleased to report that in 2012, such collaborations increasingly became the norm. British writer Ian McEwan once wrote, “The beginning is simple to mark.” Years from now, this may be the point in time that defined a new era of achievement for Gainesville. Our city is experiencing accelerated progress in developing an innovation economy and appears ready to shift into a higher gear. In the 2011 Annual Citizen’s Report, I challenged those of us in city government to keep pace by finding better ways to do our jobs. The good news is that across the board, our organization responded and is becoming better by innovating the ways in which we provide high-quality, cost-effective government services to you, our citizens. This new way of looking at municipal service provision goes beyond traditional ways of conducting government business. By actively collaborating with community institutions, businesses and engaged residents, neighbors and friends, together we are creating a new vision and future for Gainesville, one success story after another. Prioria Robotics, a local high-tech manufacturer of unmanned aerial vehicles, was faced with the need to rapidly expand operations. City staff worked to eliminate bureaucratic roadblocks and helped the company to stay and grow in Gainesville’s Power District. Additionally, when the multinational computer software company MindTree was looking to relocate its main corporate headquarters from India to the U.S., city staff collaborated with UF and the Chamber of Commerce to navigate regulatory issues and helped make the UF Innovation Square near campus and downtown Gainesville the obvious choice. Stories like these and others are repeating themselves throughout our downtown and across our city. They are sparking quiet optimism that our community is priming the pump on an economic engine with unlimited potential. Along with optimism, there is also a renewed sense of shared community purpose, pride and determination to map our own unique course toward economic prosperity. Your city government seeks to reflect this sentiment by continually performing at peak efficiency, so that you can live, work and play in a top-ten mid-sized city. It is this same spirit that is captured in the photograph that graces the cover of the City of Gainesville 2012 annual report. The “Double Helix” Southwest 13th Street overpass and nature trail is designed to evoke a DNA strand and to symbolize Gainesville’s bridging connection between technology and nature, as well as campus and community. As we move forward, our community connections must be maintained and nurtured, so that no one is left behind or excluded from sharing in this exciting journey we are embarked upon. This report is intended to show how successful city government has been in providing services to our community during the past year. I’m convinced we’ve done well, but we need your help to do even better. As always, I look forward to receiving your comments about this report of city services for 2012. Please email them to gainesvillepio@cityofgainesville.org or call 352-334-5017. With appreciation,

2

City Manager Russ Blackburn


T able

of contents

Gainesville: Your City 2 4 5 5 5 6 7 8 9

Letter from Your City Manager Letter from Your Mayor Your City Your Government Voting Districts Map Your City Commission Organization Chart Citizen Engagement Strategic Management Framework

Fiscal Sustainability 32

Public Services 10 15 20 22 23 27 29

Your Charter Officers Neighborhood Improvement Public Safety Growth Management Improved Quality of Life Community Infrastructure Increased Effectiveness

Responsible Fiscal Policy

Contacts

back cover

City Contact Information

The grand prize winner from the Fourth Annual Gainesville Photography Contest is shown at right and is titled “Eye of the Sun,” by Josh Milliken. This photograph and others will be shown at a photography exhibition at the Hippodrome State Theatre from Jan. 21-Feb. 18, 2013. This report was prepared by the City of Gainesville Communications Office to inform residents about the City of Gainesville, its operations, services, programs and financial condition. It is suitable for readers that prefer an overview or summary of city government activities. The following pages provide brief descriptive information about your government’s organizational structure and how that structure relates to the services provided to Gainesville residents. We hope this report will give you a better understanding of the services provided by the city, its accomplishments and its overall financial condition. We welcome your comments and suggestions for improving this report. The photograph on the cover of this report is the first place winner of the Fourth Annual Gainesville Photography Contest, “Gainesville’s DNA,” by Cary Ader. This photograph is of the new Southwest 13th Street bicycle/pedestrian overpass, which has been dubbed the “Double Helix,” and symbolizes Gainesville’s bridge between technology and nature.

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Dear Gainesville Citizen:

L etter

from your

M ayor

On behalf of my colleagues on the Gainesville City Commission, thank you for the opportunity to work for the betterment of our city each and every day. Gainesville is experiencing positive changes that emphasize our best qualities as a community. Increasingly, we are known for supporting vibrant, innovative high-tech industries and entrepreneurial business development. Together with our partners at the University of Florida, Santa Fe College and the extended business community, we are taking the steps to make the promises of Innovation Gainesville a reality. New, high-quality development is occurring between the University of Florida and downtown, in downtown itself and on Gainesville’s east side. This will have a ripple effect benefiting citizens of all educational levels. Earlier this year, for example, Silver Airways announced that they were moving their maintenance facility to the Gainesville Regional Airport, where they have provided local travelers with additional options for flights and brought more than 100 maintenance jobs to our city. At City Hall, we have also sought to be flexible and innovative. Thanks to sound policy decisions by the City Commission and cutting-edge management by city staff, we ended another successful year within budget. The City Commission was also able to approve the FY13-14 budget without increasing the millage beyond the rollback rate. Our community’s regulatory framework was re-examined this year with an eye toward balancing growth and our unique natural environment. In the planning department, the first steps are underway to implement a form-based code that will ensure the type of high-quality development Gainesville citizens deserve, while also increasing flexibility for those who are willing to make long-term investments in our community. There is still more work to do, but I am proud of the increasingly collaborative spirit that is being embraced by staff members throughout city government. We also benefit from the ability of departments to continue to plan for future economic prosperity. The Gainesville Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) continues its revitalization of many areas in our city, from the restoration of the historic railroad building at Depot Park, to the beautiful new rails-to-trails overpass on Southwest 13th Street. Another area in which consistency was our ally is Gainesville’s commitment to providing a high quality of life for our citizens. Access to our community’s natural wonders can—and will continue to—coexist alongside cultural amenities that rival cities much larger than our own. In an increasingly global marketplace, our community’s quality of life gives us a substantial competitive edge. The expertise and years of experience built up in our city departments will help guard this advantage for future generations. I am confident that our city will continue moving forward in the coming year, and that we will benefit from lower crime rates, excellent emergency response, state-of-the-art traffic management, and our beautiful parks and amenities. Thank you for the honor of serving as your mayor.

Craig Lowe, Mayor

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G ainesville : Y our C ity

Your City, Your Government

The City of Gainesville, Florida is the county seat and the largest city in Alachua County. The city was founded in 1854 and incorporated in 1869. As of 2012, there are 62.93 square miles of land inside the corporate boundaries of the city. As of April 2012, the city’s population was estimated at 123,903 by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research at the University of Florida. Gainesville is home to the University of Florida, the state’s leading research institution, and Santa Fe College, a provider of excellent professional and vocational education. Gainesville has one of the largest medical communities in the southeastern United States, and is a center for commerce, art and culture in north central Florida. Your government has operated under a Commission-Manager form of government since 1927. The City Commission is responsible for enacting the ordinances and resolutions that govern the city. The City Manager, who is appointed by the City Commission, is responsible for the operations and management of all departments of city government, except those controlled by other charter officers. The City Manager implements the policy directives of the City Commission. The current organizational structure is depicted on page 7. Gainesville provides its residents with a wide variety of municipal services, including police and fire protection, comprehensive land use planning and zoning services, code enforcement and neighborhood improvements. Construction and maintenance of the city’s infrastructure are significant, ongoing services, as well as the planning 121

CR 237

SR 231

City of Gainesville Voting Districts

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City of Gainesville Voting Districts District 1

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SR 121

District 2 44

District 3

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NW

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Prepared by the Planning Department, GIS Division September 2012

53 Ave

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G ainesville : Y our C ity and operation of the traffic engineering systems. Cultural opportunities, nature trails, parks and recreation improvements (including a championship golf course) help make Gainesville one of the most livable cities in the nation. Gainesville provides refuse removal and recycling services, and owns and operates a regional transit system that serves the community, the University of Florida and a portion of Alachua County. The city also provides administrative services to support these activities. These services are accomplished through various departments under the direct supervision and leadership of the City Manager. Gainesville owns and operates regional electric, water, wastewater, natural gas and telecommunication systems. The General Manager of Utilities oversees utility operations. The city’s financial statements are organized on the basis of funds, each of which is considered a separate accounting entity. Government resources are allocated to, and accounted for, in individual funds. Funds are based upon the purposes for which they are to be spent and the means by which spending activities are controlled. The city’s funds can be divided into three categories: governmental funds, proprietary funds and fiduciary funds. The following pages provide descriptive information about the major services and programs of each city department, as well as an overview of the city’s fund structure and the resources that finance those services and programs.

“Century Tower by Night” by Jesse Summers, photo contest finalist.

Your City Commission

During fiscal year 2012 (FY12), your City Commission was comprised of six elected commissioners and the elected mayor. Four commissioners are elected from single-member districts. The mayor and two at-large commissioners are elected citywide. The City Charter prohibits consecutive service on the City Commission for more than two, three-year terms. A map of the city’s voting districts, as of Sept. 30, 2012, is included on page 5. The City Commission adopts the city’s budget, sets the millage rate and adopts local laws and policies. The City Commission is ultimately responsible to the residents of Gainesville. The City Commission appoints the city’s six charter officers, whose functions are described on the following pages. The City Commission previously identified a number of goals at their annual strategic planning retreat. Each department has initiatives that help align their department with the City Commission goals. In FY12, your City Commission was committed to the following goals: public safety, economic development and redevelopment, human capital, governance, infrastructure and transportation, neighborhoods and environment and energy.

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G ainesville : Y our C ity

City of Gainesville FY13 Adopted Organization Chart Gainesville Police Department Gainesville Citizens

City Attorney

City Commission

Fire Rescue Assistant City Manager

elect the

Communications Office

Parks, Recreation & Cultural Affairs

City Auditor Innovation Gainesville & Economic Citizens Development

hires the

Public Works

City Manager Human Resources Community Redevelopment Agency

Clerk of the Commission Assistant City Manager Equal Opportunity

General Manager for Utilities

General Services

Neighborhood Improvement Planning & Development Services

Administrative Services

Budget & Finance Risk Management

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G ainesville : Y our C ity

Citizen Engagement: Advisory Boards and Committees

City of Gainesville Advisory Boards and Committees are comprised of citizens with an interest, or expertise, in a specific issue or program. They advise and are appointed by the Gainesville City Commission. Volunteering countless hours, the diverse citizenry of our Citizen Advisory Boards and Committees provide valued input, insight and assistance to staff and the City Commission in addressing important issues to our city. The following is a listing of current Citizen Advisory Boards and Committees. You can learn about the duties of these boards and committees, as well as any current openings, on our website. •• Art in Public Places Trust (5 members: 3 city, 2 county) •• Bicycle/Pedestrian Advisory Board (12 members: 4 city, 4 county and 4 MTPO) •• Board of Adjustment (5 members: City residency required) •• Board of Trustees of the Consolidated Police Officers’ and Firefighters’ Retirement Plan (5 members: City residency required for the two appointed by the City Commission) •• Citizens’ Advisory Committee for Community Development (15 members) •• City Beautification Board (15 members) •• City Plan Board (7 members: City residency required) •• Development Review Board (7 members: City residency required) •• Fire Safety Board of Adjustment (5 members) •• Gainesville Code Enforcement Board (7 members: City residency required) •• Gainesville Energy Advisory Committee (9 members) •• Gainesville Enterprise Zone Development Agency (9 members) •• Gainesville Housing Authority (5 members) •• Gainesville Human Rights Board (7 members: City residency required) •• Gainesville/Alachua County Cultural Affairs Board (15 members: 10 city, 5 county) •• Gainesville/Alachua County Regional Airport Authority (9 members) •• Historic Preservation Board (9 members: City residency required) •• Nature Centers Commission (12 members) •• Pension Review Committee (5 members: Successful investment and advisory experience required) •• Public Recreation and Parks Board (9 members) •• Regional Transit System Advisory Board (9 members: 6 city, 3 county. City residency required for city appointees) •• Student Community Relations Advisory Board (7 members: City residency required) •• State Housing Initiatives Partnership (11 members: City residency required) •• Tree Advisory Board (5 members) •• Tree Board of Appeals (3 members) Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) - Citizen Advisory Boards: To the extent possible, members of each redevelopment advisory board should reside or work in the area. Members are appointed by the Community Redevelopment Agency. •• College Park/University Heights Redevelopment Advisory Board (9 members) •• Downtown Redevelopment Advisory Board (7 members) •• Eastside Redevelopment Advisory Board (7 members) •• Fifth Avenue/Pleasant Street Redevelopment Advisory Board (7 members)

8


G ainesville : Y our C ity

Strategic Management Framework: How We Plan

Residents The City of Gainesville recognizes the importance of aligning all levels of the organization with the goals of the community.

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Goals drive executive level strategic planning.

Municipal service priorities and the city’s vision, mission and values guide the employee’s workplan.

9


City Manager

Y our C harter O fficers

The City Manager is the administrative officer of the city government, responsible for the operation of all departments, except those under the direction of other charter officers. The City Manager’s Office oversees all General Government programs and services; enforces all city laws, ordinances and policies; acts as purchasing agent for the city; prepares the budget and performs other duties as assigned by the City Commission. These tasks are accomplished through the selection and supervision of the Assistant City Managers, Administrative Services Director, Planning and Development Services Director and Chief of Police. The two Assistant City Managers oversee assigned operational departments and serve as project managers to specialty teams.

City Attorney

The Office of the City Attorney is committed to protecting the legal interests and assets of the City of Gainesville with the highest level of professionalism, ethics and dedication. This office provides legal counsel to the City Commission, the charter offices, all city departments including Gainesville Regional Utilities, 42 city boards and committees and the Gainesville Community Redevelopment Agency. The office protects the legal interests of the city in the conduct of its day-to-day business and in the prosecution and defense of legal challenges. The transactional division of the office interprets “The Hipp at Night” by Farol Tomson, photo contest finalist. and applies state and federal statutory law, case law, the City Charter and Code of Ordinances; researches legal authority; negotiates, drafts and reviews ordinances, resolutions, contracts, bonds and other legal instruments and provides legal counsel to the City Commission, its board and committees. The litigation division of the office defends and settles all legal challenges filed on behalf of or against the city. This includes challenges to city ordinances, development approvals, employment actions, civil rights actions, torts, tax liability issues, foreclosure of city liens and mortgages and the prosecution of municipal ordinances. In 2012, after 31 years of service, City Attorney Marion Radson retired from the city and was recognized with two of the most prestigious awards that a municipal lawyer can receive, the Lifetime Achievement Award presented by the Florida Municipal Attorneys Association and the Charles S. Rhyne Lifetime Achievement Award presented by the International Municipal Lawyers Association.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Drafted 101 ordinances, including major revisions to natural and archaeological resource protection, subdivision and development review processes and the Butler Plaza Planned Development.

••

Drafted Memoranda of Understanding and/or leases for the development of the Power District Catalyst Project, the branch library at Cone Park and the Cade Museum.

•• ••

10

Provided legal support to the Citizen Election District Review Committee in its mandated redistricting. Represented the city in evaluating more than 160 claims and lawsuits, including the resolution of a case that


Y our C harter O fficers spanned over two decades and arose out of the City Commission’s denial of an extension of time to develop property; and resolution with the School Board of Alachua County concerning stormwater utility fees.

City Auditor

The City Auditor’s Office works to promote honest, effective and fully accountable city government. This is accomplished by providing the public and the City Commission with timely, objective, accurate information about what city departments and programs are doing and how they could improve. By providing this information, the City Auditor’s Office helps hold our government accountable for the stewardship of public resources and continually focuses on ensuring that city operations are utilizing limited resources effectively and efficiently to provide quality services to the citizens of Gainesville.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Completed an audit of GRU Capital Project contracts in order to evaluate the process for monitoring these

contracts, for which more than $148 million was budgeted in FY11. Based on the results of the office’s review, recommendations related to improving the contract management process and reporting on the status of GRU capital projects were provided to GRU staff.

••

Audited the effectiveness of management controls over revenues collected at Ironwood Golf Course. The office provided recommendations related to strengthening internal controls over receipting and recording Ironwood revenues, improving the timeliness of cash reports and deposits, strengthening green fee surcharge collections, improving internal controls over gift cards and complimentary rounds, as well as updating operating policies and procedures.

••

Completed an audit of GRU Information Technology (IT) Disaster Recovery in order to evaluate the adequacy of GRU policies, procedures and plans related to IT disaster recovery and data backup. Based on the results of the office’s review, it was reported that the GRU IT Disaster Recovery process has strong internal controls in place and uses sound approaches to help ensure that GRU will be able to recover data and resume operations timely in the event of a disaster. Recommendations were provided regarding implementing classroom or functional exercises, improving documentation regarding visitor activity in data centers and completing incomplete Data Recovery Plan elements, in order to help strengthen management controls in this area.

••

Monitored agenda items submitted to the City Commission, recalculating financial impacts and monitoring compliance with purchasing policies and procedures.

••

Operated a whistleblower hotline, focused on helping to prevent and detect fraud, waste or abuse in government activities.

••

Reviewed the city’s adopted general fund budget in order to provide an independent assessment of whether data, methods and assumptions used by management to forecast revenues were reliable and reasonable.

Clerk of the Commission

The Office of the Clerk of the Commission records meetings, prepares agendas and minutes and provides administrative support to the Mayor and members of the City Commission. The Clerk of the Commission attends all City Commission meetings and serves as parliamentarian during the proceedings. The office maintains the city’s vital records, ordinances and resolutions and is custodian of the City Seal. The office also publishes the city’s notice of public meetings, facilitates appointments to the City Commission advisory boards and committees, publishes legal notices,

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Y our C harter O fficers records official documents and provides research for information requests for public records. The Clerk’s Office continued to administer the Lobbyist Registration Act, which requires lobbyists who communicate with City Commissioners or Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) board members to encourage the passage or defeat of any matter presented for a vote before the City Commission or CRA, to register with the office prior to engaging in lobbying. Additionally, the office continued to administer the Domestic Partner Program for the City of Gainesville.

Equal Opportunity Director

The Office of Equal Opportunity works to promote equality and opportunity, while ensuring all residents, employees and visitors to the City of Gainesville have access to, and are able to enjoy, all that Gainesville has to offer. The office accomplishes this by resolving discriminatory complaints through efficient enforcement of equal opportunity laws and policies. The Office of Equal Opportunity is responsible for receiving and investigating complaints of discrimination alleging unlawful practices in employment, housing, credit and public accommodations within Gainesville’s city limits.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Investigated internal and external complaints of discrimination, and continued to provide diversity training to the entire workforce.

••

Continued small business development, encouraging all city departments to learn about the importance of the development of local minority and small businesses, and the diversification of goods and services provided by such businesses.

••

Developed an Affirmative Action Plan, which targeted recruitment of minorities and women for employment with the City of Gainesville.

••

Continued to hold study circles, a community wide viewing and action forum as a part of the Dismantling Racism Initiative, where citizen groups engaged in intimate discussions regarding the pertinent and personal aspects of race and racism and an eventual call to action.

••

Held the Third Annual Employment Law Seminar, in collaboration with the Alachua County Equal Opportunity Office, providing comprehensive training to business and government employers regarding equal opportunity workplace laws, and facilitated workshops for citizens in the Gainesville community regarding fair housing practices.

••

Participated in, and distributed materials at, several community festivals, including the Avenue Cultural Arts Festival, Annual Pride Parade and Festival, Heart of Florida Asian Festival, UF Hispanic Latino Collegiate Forum, Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration and Downtown Latino 2012 Gainesville Hispanic Festival.

••

Sponsored the Annual ADA Workshop, which educated individuals on the recent revisions to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

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Y our C harter O fficers ••

Held the Annual Job Fair, with the first ever participation of non-city entities, giving job seekers an opportunity to speak directly with department representatives and business owners about present and future job openings.

••

Facilitated the Small Business Workshop, an event focusing on educating minority and women business owners on the available resources and business opportunities available to their companies.

••

Hosted the City of Gainesville’s inaugural Youth Summit, an event that catered underserved high school students in an effort to prepare them for college.

••

Collected more than 400 books and distributed them to children during the R.E.A.D.Y (Reading Excites and Develops Youth) Initiative.

General Manager for Utilities

The General Manager for Utilities oversees the operations of the city’s utilities system, Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU), with a mission to provide safe, reliable, competitively priced utility services in an environmentally responsible manner to enhance the quality of life in our community. GRU provides electric, natural gas, water, wastewater and telecommunications services to more than 93,000 residential and business customers. GRU provides the critical backbone of infrastructure to support our strong health care and technology industries, which have helped insulate Gainesville from the extremes of economic volatility. 2012 marked 100 years of public power in Gainesville. The utility “University of Florida” by Mikell Ogle, photo contest participant. has provided a century of well-paying, stable jobs to generations of men and women right here in north central Florida. Gainesville’s City Commission serves as the board of directors for GRU, and a portion of GRU’s revenues are transferred to the city’s general fund to support vital city services. Over the past 100 years, GRU has transferred $743 million to the city.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Energy prices have remained stable over the past three years. For the third year in a row, residential electric

customers with average usage received a price reduction. GRU’s natural gas customers also received lower prices.

••

GRU participated in several community events to celebrate 100 years of service to Gainesville and the surrounding community. Events included the North Central Florida Home Show, the Florida Lineman’s Rodeo and Eastside Operations Center Open House, the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce Business Showcase, Fanfares & Fireworks, the UF Homecoming Parade and the City of Gainesville Holiday Tree Lighting.

••

GRU is pre-installing all utilities within the Innovation District and constructing a central energy plant, called the Innovation Energy Center, to help the businesses operate more efficiently. GRU is also improving the existing water, wastewater and natural gas infrastructures so customers’ needs will continue to be met as the district grows. Additionally, GRUCom, GRU’s telecommunications division, is offering gigabit broadband connections up to 100 times faster than standard DSL or cable services.

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Y our C harter O fficers ••

When Gainesville adds biomass in 2014, more than 20 percent of GRU’s energy will come from local, renewable sources. Currently, almost twothirds of the energy GRU produces is fueled by coal, and 25 percent comes from natural gas. The biomass plant will protect customers from rising costs in any one fuel type by providing a new, local fuel source. While renewable energy is more expensive to produce today than fossil fuel options, using wood waste to produce energy is quite competitive over the long-term, as coal and natural gas prices are projected to rise. The biomass facility will provide a $31 million boost to the regional economy annually from ongoing operations.

••

GRU staff moved into the Eastside Operations Photograph courtesy of Matt Stamey, The Gainesville Sun Center (EOC), consolidating the functions of several units which were previously located throughout the city. Additionally, relocating the many large service trucks from downtown Gainesville to the EOC will help improve response times. GRU won a City Beautification Board Award for the EOC, and the U.S. Green Building Council granted prestigious LEED Certifications to several buildings at the EOC for being environmentally-friendly. Five buildings received Gold LEED Certification while three others earned Silver. Additionally, GRU purchased, restored and preserved 100 acres of wetlands adjacent to the site.

••

GRU is serious about its responsibility for the water of and tomorrow. Florida has a limited fresh water supply and future availability depends on preserving it. That is why GRU uses reclaimed water to recharge the aquifer – about 70 percent of the water taken out is reclaimed and returned to the aquifer.

••

Construction began on the Paynes Prairie Sheetflow Restoration Project. GRU is working with the City of Gainesville Public Works Department to improve water quality in the Alachua Sink and restore more than 1,300 acres of wetlands in Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park.

••

GRU worked with the city to hold a Small Business Workshop and a Small Business Vendor Forum. The events taught local business owners, particularly women and minorities, how to become certified vendors for the GRU and City of Gainesville purchasing departments.

••

The utility’s Low-income Energy Efficiency Program, known as LEEP, helped 199 customers make home improvements through GRU’s partnering contractors, which resulted in significant long-term savings. On average, participants see a 13 percent energy reduction.

••

GRU is invested in its Adopt-A-School program, which offers employee mentoring for students, and raises funds for a local elementary school. Another program, “Brighter Tomorrow,” awarded scholarships to students in the Gainesville area who plan to pursue engineering careers through the University of Florida and Santa Fe College. Educational opportunities for local students were also fostered through EngiNEAR You and Full S.T.E.A.M. Ahead (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math).

••

GRU, along with other public agencies, bought a conservation easement of 7,000 acres of forest and wetlands surrounding the Murphree Water Treatment Plant well field. This easement will prevent future development, which could potentially threaten the water supply.

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N eighborhood I mprovement

Code Enforcement

The 17-member Code Enforcement Division diligently works, both proactively and reactively, to ensure compliance with the city’s zoning, housing, commercial and dangerous building/hazardous land ordinances.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Investigated nearly 5,000 city ordinance

violations, including more than 1,500 proactively identified violations.

••

Issued 3,914 landlord permits in FY12. Throughout the year, 213 landlord permit point warning letters were issued to landlords informing them that continued noncompliance could result in landlord permit revocation. Both landlords and tenants have become more aware of the landlord permit point system and have made efforts to abide by the ordinance.

••

Continued program enhancements successfully in FY12. This includes improvements to the landlord permit program, such as a new tier of late fees which reduces the previous initial late fee; a prorated landlord permit fee for new applications received after the initial six months of the annual permit cycle; a new method for delinquent fee collection and the addition of criteria for compliance with the landlord permit ordinance. Additionally, staff implemented a review process for liens placed on properties that may be limiting their ability to be bought, sold or otherwise be put into productive use by the owner.

••

Joined forces with GPD, the Solid Waste Division and the UF Office of Off Campus Life to visit rentals in the College Park, Hibiscus Park, Palm Terrace, University Village, Golfview and Forest Ridge neighborhoods for the annual neighborhood welcome in August 2012. Residents were welcomed, given welcome packets which included informative handouts and introduced residents to city ordinances. Public feedback for this program has been very positive.

••

Continued to provide outreach to the community by attending neighborhood meetings, monthly neighborhood walks with the Chief of Police and residents, public service announcements on Community 12TV and on the division’s Web pages.

Community Redevelopment Agency

The Gainesville Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) strives to bring vitality and economic diversity and prosperity back into Gainesville’s downtown communities. The CRA operates in four Community Redevelopment Areas: Eastside, Fifth Avenue/Pleasant Street, Downtown and College Park/University Heights. Redevelopment projects in these areas all share a central purpose: to alleviate urban blight and improve economic conditions within the community.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Completed a slate of ambitious projects along the Southwest 13

Street corridor. The cornerstone project is a striking reconstruction of the 13 Street bike/pedestrian overpass, which has been dubbed the “Double Helix.” This piece of public art recalls the bridge’s past as a rail corridor, with the rail features twisting into an architectural th

th

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N eighborhood I mprovement interpretation of a DNA strand’s double helix, and represents the community’s emerging innovation economy. Additionally, a series of newly constructed plazas will provide new access between the Rail-Trail and the 13th Street corridor. These improvements will complement an array of additional CRA projects including 13th Street streetscaping, median improvements and RailTrail enhancements.

••

Oversaw the rehabilitation of the Historic Depot Building, which plays a significant role in Gainesville’s past and is poised to re-emerge as a prominent site in the community’s future. The building, which is the gateway into Depot Park, has been under construction for approximately the past year. The core and shell renovation is nearly complete and the interior buildout is scheduled for 2013.

••

Constructed Phase 1 of Depot Park in FY12, in conjunction with the rehabilitation of the Depot Building. The first phase of park development includes approximately two acres surrounding the Depot. This area will serve as the “front door” into the park and reflects both the history of the site (as both a rail corridor and an industrial area), as well as the property’s future as the city’s premier urban greenspace. Additionally, much progress has been made regarding the Cade Museum: a memorandum of understanding was executed identifying the Cade lease site at Depot Park, and the museum launched a national architectural competition to identify its design team.

••

Facilitated the ongoing construction of the Catalyst Project – the first redevelopment site within the Power District. The Catalyst site – a 22,000 sq. ft warehouse – is being renovated and will become the corporate headquarters of Prioria Robotics, a locally grown, high-tech company that produces unmanned aircrafts. The project is a great example of public/private partnerships and the marriage of redevelopment and economic development goals.

••

Launched two new economic development programs in FY12, the High-Wage Job Creation Incentive and the Company Relocation Incentive. These programs provide direct assistance to businesses that wish to start up, grow or move into a community redevelopment area. The new incentive programs are part of a wide slate of economic development financing offered by the CRA.

••

Oversaw the interior buildout of the CRA’s Hawthorne Road Café, and Southern Charm Kitchen is now open at the property. The much anticipated restaurant is now up and running, serving a delicious modern twist on traditional southern cooking. Completed construction of three new Model Block homes, a project that was conceived to help address issues of vacant and abandoned properties in the Fifth Avenue/Pleasant Street Redevelopment Area, and has been quite successful in transitioning these properties to homeownership. The latest three houses are updated versions of the traditional bungalow architecture. Closing for one house was held in August 2012, and the final two Model Block homes, which are blocks from Innovation Square, are currently for sale.

••

Continues to play a critical role in the redevelopment of Innovation Square and the larger iDistrict by coordinating public and private efforts to ensure that the full economic development potential of the area is maximized. Efforts in the past year have included a comprehensive

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N eighborhood I mprovement infrastructure study, utility master planning and development of construction documents for two new public roadways which will bisect the former Alachua General Hospital site. The new corridors are Southwest Third Avenue and Southwest Ninth Street. Third Avenue will provide major infrastructure connections to the iDistrict, while Ninth Street will be the signature boulevard throughout the iDistrict. The streets will include “green“ design features, innovative stormwater treatment and cutting-edge functional and aesthetic features. Redevelopment efforts at Innovation Square have been honored by the Florida Redevelopment Association (FRA), which awarded the CRA the “Out of the Box” award for work on this initiative, as well as the 2012 President’s Award, which is the FRA’s highest honor for redevelopment across the state.

General Services

The General Services Department includes Fleet Management, Facilities Management and Capital Projects involving vertical construction. The department is responsible for the administration, repair and maintenance of more than 100 cityowned buildings and the city’s fleet of 1,467 vehicles for GRU and General Government. The department also provides custodial and construction management services to General Government facilities. General Services is a vital component of the Neighborhood Improvement Department, as the city works to be a good neighbor in its many facilities.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Continued to focus on energy efficiencies, and expanded upgrades to several other buildings and facilities. •• Continued efforts to purchase more fuel-efficient vehicles as applications are more closely matched with vehicle fuel consumption.

••

Increased the number of “battery pack” operated aerial devices in the fleet to 27, which will be a major contributor to the goals of reducing fuel consumption and our carbon footprint.

••

Continued work on the Gainesville Police Department and Regional Transit System (see rendering above) projects, which have reached the 60 percent and 40 percent design status respectively. Site work has begun on the Centralized Garage project.

••

Achieved LEED Gold Certification on Fire Station no. 8 and the City of Gainesville/Alachua County Senior Recreation Center.

••

Met preventative maintenance compliance and completion requirements at 90 percent and 100 percent respectively on all city vehicles.

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Housing & Community Development

N eighborhood I mprovement

The mission of the Housing & Community Development Division (HCD) is to provide housing and community development opportunities by providing leadership in the preservation, revitalization and improvement of neighborhoods for the benefit of citizens of the Gainesville community. The HCD receives federal, state and local grant program funding designed to encourage innovative and constructive approaches to improve physical, economic, social and housing conditions. The HCD provides Gainesville with a broad range of housing, community development, public services and public infrastructure programs. The neighborhood planning portion works with individual neighborhoods to develop and assist in implementing neighborhood action plans.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Community Development Block Grant

(CDBG) and HOME funds were allocated in the amount of $2,067,468 to 26 nonprofit agencies and three city departments to provide housing programs, senior services, youth programs, job training opportunities, food distribution programs, homeless programs, child care programs, child abuse prevention programs, medical assistance programs and public infrastructure services.

••

More than 76,005 low and moderate income persons received assistance through the various programs and services funded through the CDBG and HOME programs. The overall low to moderate income benefit was 100 percent of CDBG funds expended.

“Brown Clipper at Butterfly Rainforest” by Dana Moser, photo contest participant.

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Oversaw the Northeast Complex restroom project, installing prefabricated public restrooms at the MLK Multipurpose Center, near the recreation complex’s multipurpose sports field, utilizing CDBG and Wild Spaces-Public Places funding.

••

The Community Grant Program awarded small grants totaling $96,000 to 42 Gainesville nonprofit organizations. These grants were used for a variety of projects including nutritional programs, temporary shelter, supplemental utility payments, and tutoring and mentoring programs.

••

In partnership with Alachua County, total funding in the amount of $23,362 was provided through the Emergency Shelter Services Program to assist 1,382 homeless persons during the coldest winter months (temperature below 45 degrees) with temporary shelter and other services. Additionally, total funding in the amount of $72,000 was provided to continue services through the Office on Homelessness to oversee and implement the 10-Year Plan to End Homelessness.

••

In partnership with the U.S. Department of HUD and the North Central Florida Continuum of Care, the city sponsored two agencies to provide transitional housing services through the Supportive Housing Programs totaling $203,947 to assist 41 homeless veterans and mentally disabled persons and families.

••

The city continued its partnership to fund Homeward Bound Program in the amount of $10,000. The program is administered by the St. Francis House to assist homeless persons seeking to reunite with family or friends in other communities. A total of 45 homeless persons were assisted to reunite with their families.

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N eighborhood I mprovement ••

Assisted 74 income-eligible homeowner families through the city’s comprehensive Housing Program: - 25 through the Homeowner Rehabilitation Program; - 18 through the Roof Program and two through the House Replacement Program; - 15 first-time homebuyers received down payment assistance; - nine first-time homebuyers received assistance to purchase a new home in the Southeast Gainesville Renaissance Initiative (SEGRI) area; - one first-time homebuyer purchased a new city-owned home in the Duval area neighborhood; - three homeowners received assistance to help save their homes from foreclosure and -provided a homeownership opportunity for one very low-income, first-time homebuyer, through a unique partnership with Santa Fe College and Alachua Habitat for Humanity.

••

More than 293 families received housing counseling assistance through the Housing Counseling Program, which is designed to expand homeownership opportunities, prevent homelessness and improve access to safe, stable and affordable housing.

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The city partnered with Alachua County, Shands, North Florida Medical Center, St. Francis House and several other nonprofit organizations to implement a pilot Medical Respite Care Program for homeless residents. The pilot program is funded jointly by the city and county, and allows homeless persons discharged from the hospital to recover in a safe, sanitary, restful environment, rather than “on the street.” Through the first six months of the program, 18 people were assisted with recovery services based on their medical needs.

••

The city partnered with the University of Florida Family Data Center to assist in the development of a prototype Children and Families Report Card for Alachua County.

••

Through the Neighborhood Planning Program, the Fifth Avenue Neighborhood was assisted with improvements to their Community Garden which included upgrading perimeter fencing, new soil and installing decorative plants.

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Gainesville Police Department

P ublic S afety

The Gainesville Police Department (GPD) continues to be dedicated to its mission - “Together as a community we foster order, safety and freedom.” GPD works toward the city’s strategic initiative of developing and continuing programs to reduce the causes of crime. In FY12, GPD addressed this initiative by strengthening communication with the community, launching a three-year strategic plan and introducing new crime reduction strategies. In addition, GPD continued to keep an open line of communication with the public, enhancing our relationship with the citizens of Gainesville. This collaborative effort resulted in a 3.5 percent reduction of crime since January 2012.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Reduced serious crime by 3.5 percent

compared to last year. Significant cases investigated and cleared with arrests included a home invasion murder, a large food stamp fraud operation and several countywide home invasion robberies targeting the elderly.

••

Created the Crime Reduction Manager position, whose duties include supervising of the crime analysts, conducting tactical briefings, the coordination of tactical response and crime prevention, quality control, coordinating efforts of the Public Information Officer, information exchange with other agencies and facilitating information exchange amongst our bureaus.

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Completed a three-year strategic plan. Members of GPD participated, as well as citizens, during several community forums. The plan provides a clear vision for the agency with measurable goals.

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Unveiled the targeted police response plan as the crime reduction strategy for GPD. The plan brings structure to how the fundamental philosophies of community policing, crime prevention and information-led policing affect the suspect, opportunity and the victim.

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Partnered with Kangaroo, Target and Firehouse Subs, which led to the acquisition of two additional K-9s, automated external defibrillators, the “Shop with a Cop” program and items presented to at-risk children.

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Tasked the gang intervention unit with a graffiti initiative, leading to the identification and charging of numerous taggers. This was the first initiative of such a large scale and involved many community stakeholders.

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The Police Chief was selected to serve on the Federal Juvenile Justice Advisory Council, which advises the President and Congress on matters related to juvenile justice.

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Coordinated with the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) which conducted a staffing study of GPD. The Police Chief remains committed to appropriate staffing levels of uniformed police officers performing the primary

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P ublic S afety function of front line service delivery. Emphasis was placed on equipping and training GPD personnel to the highest degree possible, and as such, PERF noted the departmental training as a “best practice.” 

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Created the Brave Overt Leaders of Distinction (BOLD) program for young men who need assistance in becoming re-established in our community. BOLD offers anger management skills, individualized case plans and ensures that members comply with probation conditions. The program assists members with furthering their educational goals and provides employment referrals and job assistance.

Gainesville Fire Rescue

In 2012, Gainesville Fire Rescue (GFR) celebrated more than 130 years of service to the citizens and visitors of the City of Gainesville and Alachua County. GFR personnel are trained and equipped to provide services for fire suppression, emergency medical incidents, rescue situations, hazardous materials spills and releases and aircraft rescue and firefighting events. GFR is seeking accreditation from the Commission on Fire Accreditation International and completed the first edition of its Integrated Risk Management Plan: Standards of Cover in September. GFR continues to seek innovative ways to meet their goal, “To be prepared to meet the challenge of future service delivery.”

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Conducted GFR’s first Citizens’ Fire Academy with 20 participants. The next program is planned for March 2013.

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Received feedback from the community through the Gainesville Fire Rescue 2011 Citizen Survey, which was conducted by the Florida Survey Research Center in November 2011.

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Reduced costs and increased time efficiency through Internet-based training and meetings.

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Hosted the Sixth Annual Screaming for Safety and 10th Annual Junior Fire Academy.

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Scored second out of seven Advanced Life Support (ALS) teams from across Florida in the ShandsCair ALS competition in May 2012.

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Received a $77,000 grant to complete a comprehensive community risk assessment in FY13.

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Replaced a 1989 air and light truck that no longer met minimum requirements for air delivery.

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Educated firefighters, paramedics and EMTs by completing more than 35,000 hours of fire suppression, hazardous materials and emergency medical training.

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Planning and Development Services

G rowth M anagement

Planning and Development Services is comprised of the Planning Department and Building Inspection. Planning is responsible for all current and long-range city planning, including the Geographic Information Systems and Historic Preservation Program. From a strategic perspective, the department participates in economic development, and works to facilitate urban development and redevelopment citywide. Building Inspection promotes public safety in construction activities by enforcing applicable building, electrical, plumbing, mechanical, fire prevention and life safety codes citywide. The department also manages the First Step Development Assistance Center, which is designed to provide a convenient one-stop location for review of applicable code requirements for prospective projects.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Finalized of the Natural and Archaeological Resources Protection Ordinance, which provides a comprehensive strategy for the conservation of significant environmental and archeological resources.

•• •• ••

Adopted the changes to the Urban Mixed Use-2 zoning district to accommodate the Urban Village. Heard 64 Plan Board petitions during FY12, along with ten informational items.

Adopted the updates to the following comprehensive plan elements: recreation, capital improvements, intergovernmental coordination, stormwater management and potable water/wastewater.

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Facilitated amendments to the land use designation and zoning to support the Power District and move of Prioria Robotics into a building, formerly occupied by GRU.

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Facilitated the approval of the following major projects through the development review process: - Council on Aging, Infusion Center, Stadium Club, Esplanade at Butler Plaza, Super Wal-Mart, Parks, Ford, Lincoln & Hyundai, Eastside UF and Shands Family Medical Complex and Gainesville Nissan.

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Continued to participate collaboratively in the Innovation Square meetings which are designed to provide support for buildout of the Innovation Square project.

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Completed extensive work on the city’s Form-Based Code effort and staff coordinated all internal work and work with external stakeholders.

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Worked to implement recommendations initiated in the Community Development Review Committee regarding improved development process review and activity.

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Worked with Gainesville Regional Airport staff to secure federal grants for airport improvements.


I mproved Q uality

Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs

of

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The mission of the Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs (PRCA) is to meet the community’s need for diverse recreational, cultural and environmental education opportunities through professionally managed programs and services, stewardship of natural resources and maintenance of our public landscape. Through its services, programs and facilities, the department continues to work closely with the city’s established strategic goals and initiatives throughout all levels of its operations, particularly in the development and delivery of programs and services for youth and seniors, as well as in the infrastructure and transportation areas with its capital projects at parks and land acquisition.

PRCA Administration PRCA recruited 3,474 volunteers who provided 33,227 hours of volunteer services valued at $498,416. Marketing efforts expanded as the department reorganized and created a department-wide marketing team that supported almost 100 departmental press releases, designed more than 110 pieces of marketing materials such as posters, rack cards, fliers, ads, newsletters and created the department’s first monthly electronic and poster size PRCA newsletter “Community Connections,” which highlights the many programs provided to the Gainesville community. PRCA’s administrative functions were reorganized and centralized across the entire department, creating the first cross-functional administrative support team for the department. This team was recognized for its success by being the recipients of the 2012 citywide TEAM Award.

Cultural Affairs •• Completed 11 Art in Public Places project installations: three at the new GRU Eastside Operations Center facility, four at the new Senior Recreation Center and single projects at Firehouse no. 1, Firehouse no. 8, Fire Rescue Headquarters and the new tennis hut at Albert “Ray” Massey Westside Park.

••

Continued to provide affordable studio space for regional artists at the Tench Building. The Wilhelmina Johnson Community Center and its programming partner, the Cultural Arts Coalition, continued to be a vital resource for citizens in its historic neighborhood. In FY12, the Union Academy/Rosa B. Williams Recreation Center welcomed its new programming partner, YOPP!, Inc., which has built an exemplary reputation providing arts education for young audiences.

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Administered approximately $750,000 in city and county grant awards to arts and cultural organizations on behalf of the City of Gainesville-Alachua County Cultural Affairs Board and the Alachua County Visitors and Convention Bureau.

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Held the 2011 Downtown Festival & Art Show, which was an outstanding success, and is hailed as north central Florida’s premier fall festival of the arts. Sunshine Artist magazine placed the show at 13th on its list of the best art festivals in the nation, and Greg Lawler’s Art Fair SourceBook ranked the show 27th in its list of the nation’s top 100 fine art festivals. The poster image from the 2011 show was also selected for the front cover of the Yellow Pages companion book.

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Provided more than 7,800 people an elegant, low-cost option for their special event by hosting more than 100

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I mproved Q uality

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private rental events at the Historic Thomas Center. The Thomas Center also hosted more than 4,500 guests at nearly 70 cultural events such as plays, readings, concerts and recitals. The annual Holiday Tree Lighting Celebration at the Thomas Center set the holiday in December with holiday music, carriage rides, Santa and, of course, the illumination of the giant holiday tree.

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Held the Hoggetowne Medieval Faire, hosting more than 52,000 attendees, with more than 57 percent of those attending the faire from outside the county, helping to stimulate our local economy.

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Packed the Bo Diddley Community Plaza “Untitled” by Ken Stearns, photo contest participant. with thousands of attendees each week with another successful season of the “Free Fridays” Concert Series. Additionally, more than 2,000 merrymakers attended the Downtown Countdown to ring in the new year at the plaza with great live music, noisemakers and confetti cannons.

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Invited the local theatre company, The Fable Factory, to perform a reprise of their musical production of The Wizard of Oz, which played throughout April at the outdoor Grace and Sidney Knight Children’s Theatre as part of the Thomas Center Theatre for Young Audiences.

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Produced the fourth Heart of Florida Asian Festival, which took place in October 2011 at the Historic Thomas Center and Gardens, attracting audiences of all ages to enjoy the rich arts and entertainment of many diverse Asian cultures.

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Presented 13 featured exhibitions at the Thomas Center Galleries, including Region4: Transformation Through Imagination, which was partially funded by the State of Florida Division of Cultural Affairs; the Alachua County Public Schools Visual Art Program Student and Teacher Showcases; the Gainesville Fine Arts Association Annual Showcase, as well as featured shows by leading regional artists.

Ironwood Golf Course Ironwood renovations were completed in November 2010, and its conditions have positioned Ironwood as one of the best courses in north central Florida. Under the greens, drainage was installed which makes our greens some of the most consistent putting surface in the region. Residents and visitors are encouraged to play a round at Ironwood, and enjoy the improvements. New pricing options provide great flexibility, and online registration makes setting up tee times simple and convenient.

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Continued to host more than 50 civic and charity fundraising golf tournaments each year. High school golf teams from across the county use the facility for their practices, matches, district and regional championships. Ironwood also continues to serve as a venue for Special Olympics golfers and their companions.

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Continued to charge a $5 surcharge per round, which has easily recovered the $98,000 in debt service over the two years since the course renovations. This allowed the renovation project to be fully funded without using any tax dollars.

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I mproved Q uality

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••

Adjusted rates in September 2012 to be more in line with courses throughout north central Florida. A new ninehole rate at the end of the day, and walking rates throughout the day have been lowered to encourage exercise and allow customers to get in a quick nine holes after work or on an extended lunch hour.

••

Awarded an Audubon Certification for its conservation of water use and for the natural wildlife at the course. Ironwood has maintained this designation since 1999.

Nature Operations •• Treated over 200 acres of invasive exotic plants at our nature parks. •• Completed prescribed burns on more than 25 acres. •• Documented more than 150,000 visitors to the department’s nature parks, utilizing trail counters at ten locations.

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Completed a number of nature park improvements (see Capital Projects section), working carefully with nearby community residents to minimize disruption to park users and adjacent neighborhoods.

•• ••

Completed the installation of a new playground at Ring Park.

Worked closely with the Planning Department to develop new land development regulations to protect natural resources.

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Planted more than 264 trees through the Tree-mendous Gainesville program and secured the planting of more than 407 mitigation trees for tree removal permits to replenish Gainesville’s urban forest. In addition, the team reviewed development plans that proposed the removal of 1,181 trees, the replanting of 1,719 trees and the donation mitigation of nearly $3,100 trees to the city’s tree fund.

••

Worked toward completing land acquisitions, totaling more than 240 acres of newly-conserved nature parks, using Wild Spaces-Public Places funds:

- Hogtown Creek Floodplain, closed December 2011, 39.15 acres, $333,285.71. - Flatwoods Addition, closed October 2011, 87 acres, $426,593.58. - Cone Park Southwest Additions, partially closed in July 2012, 75 acres, $610,000. - Addition to Morningside Nature Center, closed April 2012, 40 acres, $205,000. - 29th Road Park Addition, one closed August 2012, 2.25 acres, $35,000.

Recreation •• Saw attendance at the three city pools increase more than five percent during FY12, from 100,954 in summer

2011 to 106,075 in summer 2012. In addition, revenue from aquatics programs increased from $205,549 in the summer of 2011 to $233,019 in 2012, a 13 percent increase. Over the last three years, pool attendance has increased 42 percent, while revenue has increased 37 percent.

••

Hosted the fifth annual Summer Heatwave Basketball league and “Operation Respect Yourself” events during summer 2012, serving more than 350 participants in the basketball program and 1,111 participants in the “Operation Respect Yourself” program.

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Served more than 250 children in the 2012 recreational summer camp program, increasing participation levels from 2011 to 2012.

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I mproved Q uality

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Continued adult softball, a popular adult activity, filling two seasons with Men’s and Coed leagues in the fall and spring. Pop Warner Football, Cheerleading and Coed Youth Basketball served several hundred youth during the fall and winter, keeping them involved in positive activities.

••

Reached nearly 11,000 community members who benefited from environmental and cultural history educational and interpretive programs, including school and outreach programs, special events, public programs and Earth Academy Day Camps.

Capital Improvement Projects PRCA continues to develop and complete capital projects funded by the citizens of Gainesville and Alachua County with the Wild Spaces-Public Places (WSPP) half-cent surtax initiative. Collections ended on December 31, 2010, and the department anticipates completion of all WSPP-funded projects by the end of 2013. PRCA continues to participate in the citizen advisory board meetings of the Wild Spaces-Public Places Citizens Oversight Committee, which reviews all Alachua County expenditures of WSPP funds. Some WSPP capital projects completed during FY12 include: •• Completed the Fred Cone Park Track and Field, including equipment for events such as the long jump, shot put and discus throw; an outdoor restroom; a picnic shelter; benches; trash cans; parking lot; landscaping and two basketball courts.

•• ••

Completed renovations of the Depot Park Building.

Renovated the T.B. McPherson Recreation Center interior, the center’s exterior restroom, removed the racquetball court and added benches and trash cans.

•• •• ••

Added sensory indoor/outdoor lights and energy-efficient interior/exterior lighting at several neighborhood parks. Improved the parking lots and repaired and/or replaced the boardwalks at several nature parks.

Coordinated the development of the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Master Plan, which is expected to be complete in November 2012.

•• •• ••

Completed the installation of the prefabricated restroom building at the Northeast Complex. Renovated the restrooms at Greentree Park.

Made improvements to Northside Park including new park furniture, new disc golf amenities, restroom renovations and signage.

••

Added new step lights in the Grace and Sidney Knight Children’s Theatre and a new irrigation at the gardens of the Historic Thomas Center.

••

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Utilized WSPP funding for some improvements completed at Hogtown Creek Headwaters Park.


Public Works

C ommunity I nfrastructure

The Public Works Department maintains the city infrastructure, including streets, sidewalks, stormwater systems and traffic signs/signals; provides engineering services, including implementation of capital improvement program, development review and the Clean Water Partnership Program; provides parking management services; delivers mosquito control services; manages solid waste and recycling collection, including disposal services and delivers public transportation services through the Traffic Management System and the Regional Transit System (RTS), the top transit service provider in the state of Florida in ridership per capita.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Diverted more than 12,000 tons of waste

from the landfill, including 25 tons of electronic waste, through the residential recycling program, and recycled 8,829 lbs of aluminum signs and 1,256 lbs of aluminum tubing – returning approximately $5,000 credit with the city’s traffic sign vendor.

••

Launched www.gvilleparking.com and an associated Facebook page for promoting and marketing the city’s parking programs.

••

Converted lighting in the parking garage to the more energy-efficient LED technology.

“Takin’ Care of Business” by Cary Ader, photo contest participant.

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Responded to 300 calls for service for traffic signals – a reduction from previous years due to newer technology and remote diagnostics capabilities associated with the Traffic Management System. Public Works staff also continued monitoring and changing traffic signal timings along the major corridors in the Gainesville Urban Area, and managed approximately 70 traffic incidents through the Traffic Management System.

••

Oversaw the reconstruction of Northeast 25th Street from University Avenue to Northeast Eighth Avenue, which was completed using federal transportation funds.

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Completed the Porters Connections to the Sixth Street Rail-Trail using recycled glass pervious pavement and solar powered lighting, and the construction of new sidewalks along Northwest 15th Street between Northwest Eighth Avenue and Northwest Fifth Avenue.

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Completed the reconstruction of the North Second Street/39th Avenue intersection to improve the efficiency of the signal operations and reduce travel delays along North 39th Avenue.

••

Picked up litter along 314 miles of city rights of ways, street swept 13,668 miles of roadway and mowed 1,600 acres of right of way.

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C ommunity I nfrastructure ••

Resurfaced approximately seven miles of roadway, replaced 5,620 linear feet of roadside curb and gutter and installed 41 new ADA curb ramps for ADA accessibility. Staff also restriped 7.9 miles of roadway center and edge lines to ensure sufficient retro-reflectivity for the motorists.

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Obtained state funding to implement the I-75 corridor connection to the Traffic Management System between Paynes Prairie and Northwest 39th Avenue.

••

Completed stormwater pump installations at the Southwest 34th Street Industrial Park and Clear Lake using Federal Emergency Management Agency hazard mitigation funds.

Regional Transit System (RTS) •• Set a new fiscal year ridership record with 10,744,448 passengers in FY12 (including normal service, special service, Gator Aider and paratransit trips).

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Continued to be budget-conscious by increasing service more than 17,800 hours, while not increasing its budget.

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Completed the installation of video surveillance equipment on its entire fleet. RTS also continues to enhance its bus stops to comply with local, state and federal safety and ADA guidelines.

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Installed TranLoc’s Gator Locator on almost the entire fleet during the summer. Now UF campus routes are also shown on the real-time bus location service, which makes bus transfers much easier.

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Saw continued success with the Employee Bus Pass Program and its strong position as an incentive for many local businesses. While business budgets have shrunk, the program continues to serve more than 32,000 area employees and businesses. In FY12, RTS added Santa Fe College faculty and staff and expanded the participation of two existing partners.

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Brought in more than $250,000 in advertising dollars for FY12, setting a record for RTS sales staff. Monthly billing options have allowed full bus wrap advertising options to be more affordable to smaller organizations and resulted in an increase in sales profits.

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Received two large federal grants for the new RTS Maintenance Facility to begin the construction process. These grants, in excess of $30 million, will allow construction of the entire facility at a reduced cost. Construction is anticipated to begin in late 2012 or early 2013.

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Administrative Services

I ncreased E ffectiveness

The Administrative Services Department coordinates the strategic planning activities for the City of Gainesville, provides oversight to the departments of Budget & Finance and Risk Management and manages the contractual arrangement with GRU to provide Information Technology services to General Government. Strategic planning activities include coordinating the city’s tactical and strategic planning efforts, including all annexation activity, corporate goal setting and management planning. The office oversees the city’s performance measurement program, performs productivity analyses, program evaluations and leads work teams on special projects. The primary responsibilities of the Budget and Finance Department are to safeguard the city’s assets, ensure cost-effectiveness, provide financial support to operating departments and report accurate and timely financial information to the City Commission, management and residents of the community. The department offers budgeting, accounting, treasury, revenue recovery, grant fiscal coordination and procurement services to city departments. This includes providing financial analyses upon request, preparing the city’s biennial budget, quarterly monitoring reports and the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. It also administers position control, billing and collection of the city’s revenues, including occupational taxes and landlord permits, and the processing of payroll and accounts payable. The department also oversees the coordination of all city cash and investment management, pension management, debt management, mail services and the disposition of all surplus property through public auction. The Risk Management Department manages the general insurance and employee health, accident and life insurance benefits of the city, including a self-insurance plan for workers’ compensation, automobile and general liability coverage. The department also provides employee health, nutritional and psychological services through a city clinic. Wellness services are available to employees and retirees, as well as their spouses/domestic partners, if they are covered by the city’s group health plan. The wellness focus represents the city’s commitment to create and maintain healthy employees, ensuring the future financial stability of the city’s group health plan.

2012 Key Accomplishments (includes Budget & Finance, Risk Management and Strategic Planning) •• Negotiated significant changes to the General Employees Pension Plan, effective October 1, 2012, resulting in an

estimated savings of more than $10 million over the next five years and $230 million over the 30 year amortization period.

•• •• •• ••

Completed a Five-Year Financial Forecast for FY13-FY17 to kickoff the biennial budget process. Oversaw the adoption of the FY13 and FY14 biennial budget, with no significant service reductions. Annexed 146 acres of land on the east side of Gainesville through the voluntary petition process.

Continued offering ProClub wellness incentive to employees and retirees covered under the city’s health plan. Total awards reached 404 employees and retirees, a 34 percent increase over FY11.

••

Earned the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.

••

Continued to offer enhanced services to employees, focusing on disease prevention and early detection.

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I ncreased E ffectiveness ••

Managed the city’s strategic planning process, including quarterly progress reports to the 2012 Strategic Plan and a City Commission workshop to develop the FY2013/2014 Strategic Plan.

••

Continued to manage the city’s Safety Program, which has a positive impact on workers compensation premiums, in 2012. Fewer workers’ compensation claims, along with lower costs per claims over multiple years, resulted in an additional annual savings of more than $700,000.

•• ••

Developed a draft annexation strategy to kickoff two annexation referenda to be sent to the voters in FY13.

Updated the city’s Urban Reserve Area in the fall of 2011 to include the area encompassing the Sweetwater Branch/Paynes Prairie Sheetflow Restoration Project.

Communications Office

The Communications Office is responsible for coordinating General Government communications and promotional activities. Responsibilities include information and education programs; broadcast and maintenance of Community 12TV, the local government cable television channel; comprehensive communications activities; management of internal communications programs; content management of the city’s social media pages and main internal and external websites; development of electronic media outreach and public education initiatives.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Assisted with coordinating and planning more than 60 ribbon-cuttings, groundbreakings and other events. •• Continued to manage the content of the city’s website and intranet. The office also developed Web pages and

public information programs on the proposed relocation of the fairgrounds, the annexation referendum, the citizen election review committee and more.

••

Developed and designed presentations for the City Manager and other key executive staff, and designed, edited and published the 2011 Citizen’s Report.

••

Continued to provide city communications to the City Commission, staff, the media and the public through various publications, including press releases, the City Manager’s Biweekly Report to the City Commission and the Municipal Minutes e-newsletter.

••

Provided live meeting broadcast coverage; produced public service announcements and produced original television programs for Community 12TV. The office also provided telecasts of event replays on Community 12TV and online via video Web streaming technology.

••

Offered the 10th and 11th sessions of Gainesville 101: the City of Gainesville Citizens’ Academy, registering 69 residents for the course. The office also teamed up with the School Board of Alachua County and hosted City Government Week for the sixth consecutive year, giving approximately 21 fifth graders the opportunity to learn about Gainesville’s municipal government. The League of Women Voters and the State Attorney’s Office generously raised

30


I ncreased E ffectiveness money to provide a charter tour bus for the students and their chaperones.

••

Continued to chair the Communications Advisory Group and staff from the office provided 15 training opportunities throughout the year to staff throughout the city on best practices in communications.

••

Maintained the city’s official social media presence, utilizing websites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr. The office continues to increase its social media audience and now reaches more than 32,000 followers.

••

Coordinated the Fourth Annual Gainesville Photography Contest. Photographs that were submitted to the contest can be found on the cover of and throughout this publication. The office also held a photo exhibition in February 2012 featuring the finalists from the third annual photography contest at the Hippodrome State Theatre, and created a downloadable PDF calendar featuring the finalists.

••

Chaired the Website Design Update Team, identifying a vendor to redesign the city’s website, which should be complete in mid-FY13.

••

Oversaw the installation of a hearing loop in the City Hall auditorium, which provides excellent sound reproduction with no need for additional hearing devices by working with most hearing aids and cochlear implants manufactured during the past several years.

••

Earned the Award for Outstanding Achievement in Popular Annual Financial Reporting for the 2011 Citizen’s Report.

Human Resources

The mission of the Human Resources/Organizational Development (HR/OD) Department is to provide responsible stewardship of the human capital in the City of Gainesville in support of City Commission goals and objectives.

2012 Key Accomplishments •• Provided a high quality workforce to serve Gainesville’s citizens through selection strategies and through Gainesville Corporate University (GCU) employee training. In FY12, Staffing Services received and processed 16,582 applications and hired 383 individuals.

••

Continued to promote effective employee and labor relations through ongoing negotiations with the city’s labor unions, while managing classification and compensation to ensure employees are properly paid.

••

Worked with GRU to begin making Total Service Excellence (TSE) a way of life for GRU employees and began the rollout of a customer service initiative in General Government.

31


The financial information presented here is summarized and does not substitute for the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR). The CAFR details the city’s financial position and operating activities for each year in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles. This report, by its summary nature, is not intended to conform to generally accepted accounting principles and associated reporting standards set forth by applicable governing bodies. Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU), a major component of our organization, issues a separate report in compliance with its bond requirements. GRU financial information is not included in this report. The financial information presented in this report also excludes the city’s component units, Gainesville Community Redevelopment Agency and Gainesville Enterprise Zone Development Agency. Certain presentations of financial data also exclude other General Government funds, as described in each schedule or graph. Some statistical information is derived from the city’s Financial and Operating Plan (annual budget). The budget, the Citizen’s Report and the CAFR have received awards for outstanding financial reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association. The documents are available at the library and on the city’s website.

Economic Outlook

General Fund - Revenues & Expenditures as of Sept. 30, 2012 and 2011

F iscal S ustainability 2012 Revenues by Source: Taxes: $ 22,120,462 Real Property, Net 10,768,410 Utility Taxes 4,987,133 Local Telecom Services Tax 1,949,491 Other Taxes 866,237 Licenses & Permits Intergovernmental: 2,672,342 State Revenue Sharing 6,196,854 Half-cent Sales Tax 2,063,478 Other Intergovernmental Charges for Services: 4,639,983 Indirect Costs 3,006,260 Other Charges for Services 1,297,878 Fines & Forfeitures 1,401,786 Miscellaneous Revenues Transfers from Other Funds 36,004,958 From Utility 5,639,134 From General Government 103,614,406 Total Revenues Expenditures by Department: 1,201,744 Neighborhood Improvement 1,563,893 Planning & Development Services 387,149 Administrative Services 361,584 City Commission 576,068 Clerk of the Commission 757,699 City Manager 479,153 City Auditor 1,603,698 City Attorney 1,740,951 Information Technologies 2,526,019 Budget & Finance 553,150 Equal Opportunity 9,420,716 Public Works 30,917,789 Police 14,679,050 Fire 3,792,195 Combined Communications Center 1,881,199 General Services 6,903,341 Parks, Recreation & Cultural Affairs 1,199,758 Human Resources 5,293 Risk Management 355,175 Communications 3,278,831 Non Departmental 10,862,369 Transfers to Debt Service Funds 5,762,353 Transfers to Other Funds 100,809,177 Total Expenditures Excess of Revenues 2,805,229 Over/(Under) Expenditures Capital Projects funded from Reserves (6,125,000) Total Excess of Revenues (3,319,771) Over/(Under) Expenditures

The economic landscape in Gainesville continues to be dominated by the government sector. Many jobs in Gainesville are provided by federal, state or local government. This reliance on jobs from outside the private sector tends to modify Gainesville’s reaction to external economic stimuli, such that the local economy grows less rapidly than others during boom periods, but also suffers less during economic declines. The unemployment rate has decreased to 6.9 percent as 20,968,888 Fund Balance, Oct. 1 of September 2012. This rate is lower than the state’s $17,649,117 Fund Balance, Sept. 30 unemployment rate of 8.7 percent at the same point in Table 1: General Fund Revenues and Expenditures time. Enrollment at the University of Florida, the city’s largest employer, increased during the last ten years from 48,184 to 48,975.

Financial Highlights of the Year

2011 $ 23,066,872 11,155,355 5,216,204 1,890,084 832,815 2,612,454 6,275,308 2,059,926 4,446,428 2,720,167 1,264,962 1,202,555 35,232,540 5,460,894 103,436,564 1,096,183 1,367,404 335,136 345,274 537,076 765,399 467,821 1,477,034 1,831,591 2,448,095 504,173 9,143,382 30,270,883 14,354,901 3,419,786 2,012,493 6,649,280 1,188,789 4,351 324,465 3,655,957 10,075,474 5,509,391 97,784,338 5,652,226 5,652,226 15,316,662 $20,968,888

At the end of the current fiscal year, the unassigned fund balance in the General Fund was $12,775,493 (figure 1). General Fund expenditures exceeded revenues for the fiscal year by $3,319,771 (table 1). The city’s total bonded debt (excluding debt belonging to GRU) decreased by

32


F iscal S ustainability

G eneral F und - F und B alance

T rend in M illage R ates

6

Nonspendable Assigned Unassigned

16.43 12.78

M illage R ate

$ M illions

5

1.51

2012 Figure 1: General Fund - Fund Balance

3 2 1

3.47

3.36

4

1.06

2011

0 Figure 2: 10-Year Trend in Millage Rates

$6.4 million or 4.3 percent during the current fiscal year (table 4).

Financial Reporting

This financial summary and history is based upon a condensed view of the city’s assets and liabilities for only the General Fund of the city at a specific point in time, Sept. 30, 2012, which was the end of the city’s fiscal year (table 2).

General Fund - Balance Sheet

Current Assets are highly liquid and include cash, investments, inventories and receivables. Capital Assets (table 3 and figure 4) are the city’s long-term investments in land, buildings, equipment, improvements, infrastructure and construction in progress. The stated values represent the original cost less an amount of depreciation and any related debt. While current assets are available to finance regular city operations, capital assets are not.

Governmental Funds

Governmental Funds are accounting segregations of city activities that are budgetarily oriented and not business-type activities. The following are the city’s governmental fund types. The General Fund reflects the majority of the financial activity of departments within city government. Taxes, user fees and transfers from other city departments (including GRU) make up the majority of funding sources.

as of Sept. 30, 2012 and 2011 2011

2012 Assets Cash and Investments Other Assets Total Assets

$

Liabilities Accounts Payable and Accrued Payroll Other Liabilities Total Liabilities Fund Balance Nonspendable: Inventories Long-term Receivables: LifeQuest and PC Loans CRA Notes Assigned Unassigned Total Fund Balance

Table 2: General Fund Balance Sheet

13,267,709 9,150,682

$

13,264,636 11,329,917

22,418,391

24,594,553

3,843,291 925,985 4,769,276

3,039,190 586,475 3,625,665

18,991

11,915

133,095 3,211,605 1,509,933 12,775,493 $17,649,117

205,654 3,256,709 1,060,672 16,433,938 $20,968,888

33


F iscal S ustainability Special Revenue Funds are used to account for specific revenue sources that are restricted to expenditures for specified purposes. The sources of these funds include federal and state grants. These monies are normally spent over an extended period of time and are reflected on the financial statements until the programs are completed.

General Government Capital Assets* as of Sept. 30, 2012 Construction in Progress $40.0 million

Land - $34.7 million Buildings $40.0 million

Debt Service Funds are used to account for receipt and payment of general long-term debt proceeds, principal and interest. The city typically issues bonds in order to finance capital projects. Capital Projects Funds account for financial Infrastructure $71.0 million resources to be used for the acquisition or Improvements $9.9 million construction of major facilities or improvements (figure 5). Capital projects are projects which include the installation, construction or Machinery & Equipment Figure 4: General Government Capital Assets major repair and maintenance of the city’s $30.1 million *excluding Gainesville Regional Utilities infrastructure. These can include water mains, sewer mains, treatment plant expansion/construction, buildings (fire stations, operation centers, etc.), parks, drainage improvements, paving of dirt streets, resurfacing paved streets, sidewalk installation and more, typically costing $25,000 or more. The sources of these funds are usually General Fund New Construction & transfers, federal and state grants and debt issues. Renovations - $2.8 million The city maintains a five-year Capital Improvement Equipment & Computers Plan, which was adopted by the City Commission $0.9 million for 2011 through 2015.

C apital P rojects - F iscal Y ear 2012 General Government Expenditures in Capital Projects Funds

Proprietary Funds

Proprietary Funds are used to account for the government’s ongoing organizations and activities that are similar to those often found in the private sector. They are divided into two main categories: Enterprise and Internal Services. Enterprise Funds are self-supporting activities that provide service to the public on a user-charge Roads & Drainage basis. They are financed and operated in the same $5.3 million way private businesses operate. The mission of these entities is to provide goods and/or services to the Figure 5: Capital Projects for Fiscal Year 2012 public, while covering the cost of operations. Any profits are invested back into the entity for capital maintenance and acquisition.

Recreation Facilities & Equipment - $3.6 million

Internal Service Funds are used to give an accounting for activities provided by one governmental fund to other governmental funds. The charges for those services are designed for cost recovery only.

34


F iscal S ustainability

General Government Capital Assets* as of Sept. 30, 2012 and 2011 (Net Depreciation) Governmental Activities 2012 2011 Land

$ 28,821,333

$ 28,536,866

34,696,595

29,369,743

7,807,142

4,942,548

Machinery and Equipment

10,374,537

11,123,665

Infrastructure

61,833,256

Construction in Progress

Buildings Improvements

Total

Business-type Activities * 2012 2011 $ 5,899,514

Total 2012

2011

$ 5,163,459

$ 34,720,847

$

33,700,325

5,324,856

5,072,851

40,021,451

34,442,594

2,086,605

2,254,594

9,893,747

7,197,142

19,746,851

15,949,812

30,121,388

27,073,477

61,224,340

9,247,763

9,010,318

71,081,019

70,234,658

31,838,934

34,726,880

8,187,984

6,492,065

40,026,918

41,218,945

$ 175,371,797

$ 169,924,042

$ 50,493,573

$ 43,943,099

$225,865,370

$ 213,867,141

Table 3: General Government Capital Assets *excluding Gainesville Regional Utilities

Fiduciary Funds P roperty T ax R evenues

Fiduciary Funds are used to account for resources held for the benefit of parties outside the government. These funds are not available as sources for the city’s own programs. The city’s fiduciary fund type includes Pension, Disability and Other Post Employment Benefit (OPEB) Trust Funds. The trust fund net assets totaled just over $499.9 million on Sept. 30, 2012. They experienced inclines of $73.2 million in FY12 as the economy begins to recover from the recession of prior years.

$ M illions

25 20 15

Debt Administration

10 5 0

Figure 3: Property Tax Revenues

The city’s required principal and interest payments on outstanding debt were remitted timely and in full during fiscal year 2012. The city’s total bonded long-term liabilities at the end of the current fiscal year were $148.3 million, which excludes all debt belonging to the utility (table 4). The city has approximately $9.91 million of this debt due during FY13.

Bonded Long-Term Liabilities - General Government as of Sept. 30, 2012 and 2011

Component Units

The Gainesville Community Redevelopment Agency and the Gainesville Enterprise Zone Development 2012 2011 Agency were created by ordinance of the city to Governmental Activities: carry out community redevelopment within the city Revenue Bonds $ 53,872,219 $ 54,567,220 $ (695,001) of Gainesville. The City Commission appoints the Pension Obligation Bonds 82,240,641 83,567,113 (1,326,472) boards of these organizations and approves their OPEB Obligation Bonds 12,230,000 16,595,000 (4,365,000) budgets. The Gainesville Community Redevelopment Governmental Activity Agency’s purpose is to correct blighting influences $ 148,342,860 $ 154,729,333 $ (6,386,473) Bonded Long-Term Liabilities through construction of enhancements to public Table 4: Bonded Long-Term Liabilities for General Government places and land. Improving derelict buildings helps to create an environment conducive to private investment. The Gainesville Enterprise Zone Development Agency targets areas for economic revitalization. It offers financial incentives to businesses to encourage private investment and to increase employment opportunity for the areas’ residents. Three non-contiguous business districts within the City of Gainesville make up the zone. Increase (Decrease)

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2012 City of Gainesville Citizen's Report  

The Citizen's Report is prepared to inform residents about the City of Gainesville, its operations, services, programs and financial conditi...

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