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Hybrid Course Development

A complex orchestration


Our Cafe Activities

• Group snapshot of our experiences with hybrid courses (good, bad, and ugly) • Examine two tools that help with (1) hybrid course selection l ti and d (2) course development and review


4 Deliveryy Learning g Modes at Algonquin g q Hybrid

Online

Learning Modes

BlendedTraditional

5/25/2009

Experiential

Gail Allan, Centre for Organizational Learning

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Online Hours Target g - Hybrid - Fully Online -General General Education - Some Labs - Traditional-Blended -Field Work/Practicum/ Clinical Practice - Some Labs

Gail Allan- Algonquin College

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Hybrid course defined f from a delivery d li perspective ti

a course delivered partly p y face-to-face and p partly y online

5/25/2009

Gail Allan, Centre for Organizational Learning

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From a learning perspective A hybrid course is experienced by the learner in three interdependent environments: in class out in-class, out-of-class, of class and online online.

5/25/2009

Gail Allan, Centre for Organizational Learning

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Essential Components of a Hybrid Course 7 Gail Allan- Algonquin College


Hybrids are complex in their •Overall design •Integrated components •Learning/assessment activities •Facilitator role •Time and data management

Gail Allan/10/21/2008

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Generic Models at Algonquin Week-by-week in and out-of out of class /online activities

1 2 3

Project built week-by-week out-of-class/online d dependent d t upon iin-class l work k

Block model of concentrated in-class work followed by a block of out-of class/online activities Gail Allan- Algonquin College

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Common Ingredients for a Successful Hybrid 1. Overall Re-Design

4. Active learning throughout the course

Gail Allan/10/21/2008

2. Transparent Relationship between In and Out-of Class Activities

5. Variety of assessments aligned li d with ith the curriculum

3. Realistic expectations for selfdirectedness

6. Realistic timelines for learner & teacher

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Learners and Facilitators i aH in Hybrid b id C Course

Gail Allan/10/21/2008

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Two Tools to Help with Hybrid Course S l ti Selection, D Development l t and dR Review i Course Profile Template

Hybrid H b id Course C Design/Review Tool

What Colour is Your Hybrid?

Gail Allan- Algonquin College

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What Colour is Your Hybrid? y Four elements guide development/review of a hybrid course. Design I l Implementation t ti Engagement Assessment Gail Allan- Algonquin College

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Purpose of the Hybrid Tool Colour Chart

Design

I l Implementation i

Engagement

Assessment

D

C

B

A

Does not meet essential  criteria.

Meets essential criteria.

Meets more than but not  all of the criteria. 

Meets all criteria.

Does not meet essential  criteria.

Meets essential criteria.

Meets more than but not  all of the criteria. 

Meets all criteria.

Does not meet essential  criteria.

Meets essential criteria.

Meets more than but not  all of the criteria. 

Meets all criteria.

Does not meet essential  criteria.

Meets essential criteria.

Meets more than but not  all of the criteria. 

Meets all criteria.

The chart uses colour as a visual for identifying whether the four elements are very weak, weak, strong, or very strong relative to how many criteria were met. 5/25/2009

Gail Allan, Centre for Organizational Learning

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Garrison Garrison, Anderson & A h (2000) Archer Community of Inquiry ((COI)) Model Adapted from: Garrison, D. R., T. Anderson, and W. Archer. 2000. Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education 2 (2–3): 1–19.


A Framework to Guide Decision-Making i Hybrid in H b id Course C Design D i

Garrison, Anderson & Archer (2000) 5/25/2009

Gail Allan, Centre for Organizational Learning

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How do we blueprint activities and assessment across a semester/program? t / ? A variety of ways for learners to interact with ith the content, peers, and teacher.

5/2/2010

Gail Allan/Centre for Organizational Learning

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Benefits to the Learner Balanced and Predictable Workload

Integrated use of R Resources

Realistic R li ti O Out-oft f Class Expectations

Connected Learning within and across cade c Levels e es Consistent Expectations Academic for the use of Technology

5/2/2010

Gail Allan/Centre for Organizational Learning

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Benefits to the Teacher •Scaffolding development of learning and technology skills •Clear expectations of what skills learners are coming with •Focus on learning first then teaching second •Supports selection of valid activities and assessments across the program

5/2/2010

Gail Allan/Centre for Organizational Learning

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Benefits to the Program g

Collaborative decisionmaking strengthens the curriculum

Sharing ideas within and across courses stimulates creativity Opportunities to integrate best p practice activities and Careful consideration of assessments how changes within a

course impacts the academic level and program as a whole 5/2/2010

Gail Allan/Centre for Organizational Learning

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Estimating g the Learner’s Weekly y Workload General rule of thumb: For everyy hour of in-class time,, the learner should be spending approximately 1 hour out-of-class.

5/2/2010

Gail Allan/Centre for Organizational Learning

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Calculate the weeklyy hours of homework.

5/2/2010

Gail Allan/Centre for Organizational Learning

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Thank you! Looking forward to working with you during your hybrid course development and implementation. 5/25/2009

Gail Allan, Centre for Organizational Learning

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Presentation on Hybrid Courses at Algonquin COllege  

Presented to the CDAG (Curriculum Developers Affinity Group) of Ontario

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