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Alexa Kleinbard

TWILIGHT IN THE GARDEN


Alexa Kleinbard: Twilight in the Garden On view at the Gadsden Arts Center & Museum January 11 – March 14, 2020 SPONSORED BY

Sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, and the Florida Council on Arts & Culture. Gadsden Arts Center & Museum Departments Grace Robinson, Executive Director Angie Barry, Exhibitions & Collections Barbara Cushing, Development Anissa Ford, Education Melanie Joyner, Finance Catalog Design by Anissa Ford Images Courtesy of Alexa Kleinbard Published by the Gadsden Arts Center & Museum 13 N. Madison Street, Quincy, FL 32351 www.gadsdenarts.org All images copyright Alexa Kleinbard Essays licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0: Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Cover Image. Alexa Kleinbard, Nesting Grounds in the Land of Plenty, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2018-2019, oil paint on birch wood, 48 x 60 inches 2


Alexa Kleinbard

TWILIGHT IN THE GARDEN

Cynthia Hollis Guest Curator

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Alexa Kleinbard

TWILIGHT IN THE GARDEN

Twilight in the Garden Essay by Cynthia Hollis, Curator Notes & Recommended Reading

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Artist Biography By Alexa Kleinbard

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Résumé

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Select Collections

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Exhibition Checklist

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Alexa Kleinbard, Miccosukee Gooseberry, Endangered Plants of Florida Series, 2000, oil paint on birch wood, 48 x 96 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, In This Place Let There Be Plenty and Grace, All The Rivers Come Together Series, 1985, oil paint on birch wood, 48 x 60 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Slash and Burn, All The Rivers Come Together Series, 1984, oil paint on birch wood, 36 x 84 inches


twilight in the garden

Alexa Kleinbard works 1984-2019 By Cynthia Hollis, Curator

Alexa Kleinbard, Polar Bears Scavenging for Food, 1983, oil paint on paper, 20 x 32 inches

Alexa Kleinbard’s spectacular work is created from the premise that humans are in and of Nature, that Nature is not separate from or controllable by humans. In her view, we reside in the garden of nature but are not the owners of it. The beautiful and seductive works in this exhibition serve to shine a light on the now unavoidable fact that we are in the process of destroying this incredible garden that is our home. The earliest works on display are from the series All The Rivers Come Together, paintings inspired by research for trips Kleinbard made to Haiti and Alaska. These two places have been dramatically impacted by deforestation and human encroachment. An oil pipeline had recently been built in Alaska, causing major damage to flora and fauna and disruption to native cultures. Hunters began coming to Alaska to shoot wildlife from airplanes with automatic weapons, so it’s no wonder that the paintings from this series are filled with dark predictions for the future of the planet.

It was during this same decade that climatologist Dr. James Hansen first presented his alarming and eye-opening data on the effects of global warming in his testimony to Congress.1 Paintings from this series were included in the 1991 exhibition, “Made in Florida,” with one reviewer noting: “Alexandra Kleinbard’s large-scale paintings ‘Slash and Burn’ and ‘End of the Game,’ which confront ecological devastation, could have been produced anywhere, but there’s no denying that anyone concerned about environmental disaster has another sort of front-row seat in Florida.”2 Viewing these early works, one gets the eerie feeling they were borrowed from recent news images of people picking through ruined landscapes - places devastated by vast wildfires, immense floods, and massive storms.

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Far Left: Alexa Kleinbard, Salt Bush, Thunder Hole View, Mt Desert, ME, Talking Leaves Series, 19941997, oil paint on clay board, 24 x 18 inches Left: Alexa Kleinbard, Comfrey, Mt Desert, ME, Talking Leaves Series, 1994-1997, oil paint on clay board, 24 x 18 inches

Right: Alexa Kleinbard, Ginseng, Mountain to Lake View, Talking Leaves Series, 1994-1997, oil paint on clay board, 24 x 18 inches Far Right: Alexa Kleinbard, Hawthorn, Mt Desert, ME, Talking Leaves Series, 1994-1997, oil paint on clay board, 24 x 18 inches


Talking leaves 1994-1997

In the 1990’s, even as Kleinbard continued to explore the dichotomies of good and evil, despair and hope, an increasing lushness of imagery and a brighter and more lyrical quality appeared in her work. She began creating what she refers to as the cut-outs, a form she has used off and on over the years. The cut-outs are shaped paintings, painstakingly created by cutting birch wood or clay board and then sanding to an ultra-fine surface before the image is laid down in oils.

The leaf shape, reminiscent of an open hand, makes viewing them feel a bit like palm reading a place to be held dear. As Kleinbard metaphorically peels open the skin of each leaf, she reveals the pristine landscape home of each plant, with not a human feature in sight. It’s a jolt to realize how rare these views have become today.

Kleinbard’s first cut-outs were the Talking Leaves series, a title inspired by Native Americans, who referred to books as “talking leaves.”3 She began this group of sharply focused leafshaped paintings while at the Acadia Summer Arts Program, an artist residency in Maine run by Marian Bolton “Kippy” Stroud that Kleinbard attended for over 15 years.

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Alexa Kleinbard, Motherwort, Shell Point, FL, Talking Leaves Series, 1994-1997, oil paint on clay board, 24 x 18 inches

Left: Alexa Kleinbard, River Maple, Four Seals, ME, Talking Leaves Series, 1994-1997, oil paint on clay board, 24 x 18 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Melancholy Thistle, Botanical Drawings Series, 2000, graphite on paper, 11 x 14 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Black Cohosh, Botanical Drawings Series, 2000, graphite on paper, 11 x 14 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Rheumatism Remedy, Botanical Drawings Series, 2000, graphite on paper, 11 x 14 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Wavy Thistle, Botanical Drawings Series, 2000, graphite on paper, 11 x 14 inches


Botanical drawings 2000

Alexa Kleinbard has noted many times that drawing is her favorite activity. This group of black and white botanical drawings reveals both the delight she takes in the drawing process and the rapport she has for these plants. Influenced by Dan Tallamy’s book, Bringing Nature Home, she is a firm believer in restoring native plants to our dwindling landscapes and backyards, and she pays homage to them, their pollinators, and their fauna in her drawings and paintings.

Alexa Kleinbard, Holy Thistle, Botanical Drawings Series, 2000, graphite on paper, 11 x 14 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Night Blooming Cereus, Botanical Drawings Series, 2000, graphite on paper, 11 x 14 inches

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Endangered native species night thistles aphrodisiacs 2000-2003

The Botanical Drawings served as studies for these three series of cut-outs that are sized up to an imposing human scale and larger. Kleinbard, a self-taught painter with a very fine eye and a sophisticated sense of color and form, studied dance in her early years and sculpture during college. Her mastery of the three disciplines shows strongly in these immense shaped paintings.

The choice of plants depicted in these paintings was inspired by Kleinbard’s research into the Florida Natural Areas Inventory endangered native species lists.4 With their colossal leaves, over-scale blossoms, and dance-like posturing roots, these paintings convey a relationship between plants and humans that lies at the very heart of Kleinbard’s work: If humans disappear, plants still flourish, but if plants disappear, humans will disappear.

Alexa Kleinbard, Rosemary Etonia, Endangered Plants of Florida Series, 2000, oil paint on birch wood, 48 x 96 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Spiny Pod, Endangered Plants of Florida Series, 2000, oil paint on birch wood, 48 x 96 inches

Right: Alexa Kleinbard, Henbane, Aphrodisiacs Series, 2000, oil paint on 1/2 wood, 48 x 60 inches

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remedies 2003-2008

In her Remedies series Kleinbard’s focus turns toward healing. Plants that have been traditionally used for healing purposes have fascinated and inspired her for years. Through these stunning paintings she shares with us her deep interest in the medicinal quality of these plants, as well as stories and allegories based on the symbiotic and complex relationships humans have had with plants over the millennia.

Above: Alexa Kleinbard, Bloodroot, Remedies Series, 2003-2008, oil paint on 1/2 birch wood, 36 x 45 inches Left: Alexa Kleinbard, Mayapple and Senna, Remedies Series, 20032008, oil paint on 1/2 birch wood, 24 x 45 inches

Each work in Remedies is a portrait of a healing plant in full bloom. The flowers, some with their attendant pollinators - butterflies, bees, and other insects - have roots or leafy stems that lend them a strut and movement, a frolicsome posture that underlines the lusty and wildly interwoven diversity of species. Framed within each plant is a luminous image of the endangered wetland where it might be found. Kleinbard refers to these light-filled landscapes as the faraways, intending them as focal points for streams of energy, magical and centering, mandala-like. Some of the wetlands depict our own North Florida wild areas. Remedies is an old-fashioned word, fallen out of use like many ideas of care and balance that have also slipped from view. A dark stream of warning threads its way through these luscious paintings, made poignant as one considers their connections to us. In addition to medicines, plants supply our most basic needs – food, clothing, shelter, clean water, the very air we breathe – in an abundance seemingly so infinite and robust that we forget how at risk it all is today.

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Alexa Kleinbard, Comfrey, Remedies Series, 2003-2008, oil paint on 1/2 birch wood, 30 x 45 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Foxglove, Remedies Series, 2003-2008, oil paint on 1/2 birch wood, 36 x 45 inches

There is a feminine quality to Kleinbard’s paintings, a reference to Mother Nature. The Remedies are her tribute to this muse:

“I hope the paintings, with their close up view of a healing plant and their faraway view of a silent world, will offer the viewer a chance to ponder the future of our planet. By being provocative and strong enough visually, perhaps these works will stop a new viewer for a reflective instance, while at the same time celebrating a far away slice of landscape that is cradled in medicinal plant flora and root that have long served as keepers of the naturalist flame, a flame one hopes will never be extinguished.” ~ Alexa Kleinbard

Left: Alexa Kleinbard, Flax, Remedies Series, 2003-2008, oil paint on 1/2 birch wood, 37 x 46 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Fracked, Dandelion, Cumin, Chamomile, Fennel, Remedies Series, 2003-2008, oil paint on 1/2 birch wood, 36 x 25 inches

Left: Alexa Kleinbard, Mullein, Remedies Series, 2003-2008, oil paint on 1/2 birch wood, 30 x 45 inches

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Above: Alexa Kleinbard, Gulf Waters, Turtle, Corridors Series, 2011-2017, archival photos, archival paper, russian birch wood, 67 x 46 inches Below: Alexa Kleinbard, Cloudland Canyon, Corridors Series, 2011-2017, archival photos, archival paper, russian birch wood, 57 x 34 inches

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Corridors 2011-2017

The portraits of creatures in Alexa Kleinbard’s series, Corridors, are complex shaped collages, mounted on board and drawn on with pencil, ink, and paint. The pieced images of each collage are derived from photos Kleinbard has taken of the unique landscapes that comprise the creature’s home range. Each collage is not only a record of a fragmented place, but also a manifestation of the spirit of each creature, creatures that are lively and alive as they leap, hunt, prowl, stalk, swim, growl, sing, fly, and flee.

Larry D. Harris proposed in the 1980’s that fragmentation was the most serious threat to biological diversity in the United States. Fragmentation alters the abundance and persistence of many species. It means chopping a wild place into pieces. A house (or field, road, parking lot, power line, pipeline, mine, clear-cut, canal, levee, embankment) destroys anything of nature, and fragments the landscape.”5

All creatures we share this planet with are affected by human activity that fragments their habitats, their roaming and foraging grounds, and their mating and nesting places. In her extensive road trips around the United States, Kleinbard has observed increasing swaths of deforestation, especially in her home of Northwest Florida. The title of this series refers to wildlife corridors that are pathways designed to connect some of these fragmented habitats. Naturalist Janisse Ray writes about the great need for wildlife corridors, ”Biologist

Alexa Kleinbard, McNeil Sanctuary, Grizzly, Corridors Series, 2011-2017, archival photos, archival paper, russian birch wood, 53 x 24 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, St Marks, Eagle, Corridors Series, 2011-2017, archival photos, archival paper, russian birch wood, 29 x 40 inches

Installation of Corridors at the Gadsden Arts Center & Museum

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Alexa Kleinbard, Allegany Mountains, Fisher, Corridors Series, 2011-2017, archival photos, archival paper, russian birch wood, 48 x 27 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Aucilla River, Deer, Florida, Corridors Series, 2011-2017, archival photos, archival paper, russian birch wood, 35 x 25 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Tree Funeral, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2017-2018, oil pastel on Strathmore paper, 34 x 23 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Circling For a Place to Nest, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2017-2018, oil pastel on Strathmore paper, 25 x 18 inches

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Songbirds nesting at twilight 2017-2018

Alexa Kleinbard has had a lifelong interest in birds, their migrations, their songs, and their nesting sites. For years, from her treehouselike cabin in the woods on a North Georgia mountain, Kleinbard has enjoyed listening to the spectacular chorus of birds as they arrive in the spring and build their nests. Over time she has noticed the chorus getting quieter. Upon investigation, she found information that cited a combination of causes: pesticides, habitat loss, and climate change. This has been definitively confirmed by a recent study published in the well-regarded journal, Science, and reported in an article in the New York Times from September 2019 with the following headline: “Birds Are Vanishing From North America.” The article reports that scientists have found the number of birds in the United States and Canada has declined by 3 billion, or an incredible 29 percent since 1970. Kevin Gaston, a conservation biologist at the University of Exeter, said that the new findings signal something larger at work: “This is the loss of nature.”6

Kleinbard’s dark and darkly beautiful drawings and paintings from this series are tragic portraits of birds losing their habitat, of humans out of balance with the rest of nature, of the world in emergency. Her art serves as a powerful reminder that, as we despoil the food, water, and homes of the creatures we share this planet with, we do the same to ourselves.

Alexa Kleinbard, Wetlands Under Seige, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2018-2019, oil paint on birch wood, 18 x 12 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Buzzard Roost Twilight Song, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 20172018, oil pastel on Strathmore paper, 25 x 18 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Starry Night on Buzzard Roost Ridge, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2017-2018, oil pastel on Strathmore paper, 25 x 18 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Landings in a Deforested Wetland, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2017-2018, oil pastel on Strathmore paper, 25 x 18 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Danger in Beautiful Florida, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2017-2018, oil pastel on Strathmore paper, 25 x 18 inches


Top: Alexa Kleinbard, Last Stand, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2018-2019, oil paint on birch wood, 35 x 25 inches Bottom: Alexa Kleinbard, Explosion in the Gulf, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2018-2019, oil paint on birch wood, 35 x 25 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Messengers, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2018-2019, oil paint on birch wood, 48 x 60 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Fox and Big Blue, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2018-2019, oil paint on birch wood, 40 x 48 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Nesting on the Precipice, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2018-2019, oil paint on birch wood, 48 x 60 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Mountain Sanctuary on our Ridge, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2018-2019, oil paint on birch wood, 48 x 60 inches

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Breathing systems 2019

Kleinbard is an artist who researches and reads widely in her quest to understand the complex relationship humans have with wild nature. The writings of biologist, E. O. Wilson have influenced and informed Kleinbard’s work, especially the hopeful migration paintings, “When All the Rivers Come Together” and “The Mood of Mountains” from her most recent series, Breathing Systems. This series is inspired by Wilson’s idea of “Half Earth,” and shows the restoration of biodiversity through the reforestation of Long Leaf Pine forests in the South, and Boreal forests in the North, with a Native American woman’s head in the center of each painting, her flowing braids becoming rivers.

E.O. Wilson is a scientist who takes the long view, who thinks of the big picture. He recently calculated that the only way humanity could stave off a mass extinction crisis, as devastating as the one that killed the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, would be to set aside half the planet as permanently protected areas for the 10 million other species. “Half Earth,” as he began calling it, “half for us, half for them. It’s been in my mind for years that people haven’t been thinking big enough— even conservationists. Half Earth is the goal, but it’s how we get there, and whether we can come up with a system of wild landscapes we can hang onto. I see a chain of uninterrupted corridors forming, with twists and turns, some of them opening up to become wide enough to accommodate national biodiversity parks, a new kind of park that won’t let species vanish.”7

Left: Alexa Kleinbard, When All The Rivers Come Together, Breathing Systems Series, 2019, oil paint on shaped birch wood, 45 x 50 inches

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twilight in the garden

Environmental problems that were almost unimaginable in the 1970’s, are now becoming much more apparent as we see the increasingly destructive effects of atmospheric warming caused by our addiction to fossil fuels. The big question Kleinbard raises in these works is: When are we going to start making the large, hard decisions that will stop the worst effects of climate change from happening before it’s too late? We are a civilization that has survived world wars, natural disasters, and horrible plagues. We have sent men to the moon. There are people in many places who, like E. O. Wilson, are thinking big and taking the long view to solving the seemingly impossible before it’s too late for our children and grandchildren. We have the capabilities now to develop entirely sustainable energy sources, to clean pollution and waste from the planet, to create a new Garden. What we do not have at this moment is the political will and leadership to reach these goals.

What we need now lies in the vision President John F. Kennedy shared as he spoke over fifty years ago, about another seemingly impossible goal: “...we choose to do these things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win.”8 The works in this exhibition are a testament to Alexa Kleinbard’s unwavering focus on what we have now and what we are faced with losing unless we stop politicizing our environment, get organized, and act soon for the good of us all.

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Notes 1

Dr. James Hansen is perhaps best known for bringing global warming to the world’s attention in 1988, when he first testified before Congress about this issue. Dr. Hansen, a professor at Columbia University’s Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, is also the Director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. Dr. Hansen, on the subject of climate change, “It seems to me that special interests have been a roadblock wielding undue influence over policymakers. These special interests seek to maintain short-term profits with little regard to either the long-term impact on the planet that will be inherited by our children and grandchildren or the long-term economic well-being of our country. The Public, at some point, will realize that they were hoodwinked by the climate change deniers. The biggest danger is that deniers may succeed in delaying actions to deal with energy and climate change. Delay will enrich fossil fuel executives, but it is a great threat to young people and the planet. We can accurately calculate how Earth’s energy balance will change if we don’t reduce carbon dioxide levels to less than 350 parts per million.”*

From Storms of My Grandchildren; Hansen, James; Bloomsbury USA, 2009

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*September 2019 carbon dioxide levels are at 415 parts per million and increasing.

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Orlando Sentinel, 3/31/91, review of “Made in Florida,” an exhibition curated by Margaret Miller, David Courtney, and Joseph Jacobs. Originated at the USF Art Museum, the exhibition travelled to four museums in Florida and to museums in France, Belgium, and Spain.

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The title of Kleinbard’s series Talking Leaves, is from a book of the same name by Joseph Brucach, a work of historical fiction about Sequoyah and the creation of the Cherokee alphabet.

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The Florida Natural Areas Inventory is Florida’s Natural Heritage Program and a state member of the NatureServe network. It is housed within the Florida Resources and Environmental Analysis Center at Florida State University. They manage a database of current information on Florida’s rarest species, maintain an inventory of the state’s conservation land holdings, and conduct ecological surveys and analyses to support conservation planning and land management.

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Janisse Ray is a naturalist and environmental activist. Quote is from her book Pinhook, Finding Wholeness in a Fragmented Land. Her activist work is focused on providing alternatives to industrial capitalism, slowing the rate of global warming, working to decelerate fragmentation, and making logging sustainable.

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“Birds are Vanishing from North America,” by Carl Zimmer, from The New York Times, 9/9/2019.

The skies are emptying out. Scientists have found that the number of birds in the United States and Canada has declined by 3 billion, or an incredible 29 percent since 1970. The scientific analysis, published in the journal Science, is the most exhaustive and ambitious attempt yet to learn what is happening to avian populations. The results have shocked both the researchers and conservation organizations. David Yarnold, president and chief executive of the National Audubon Society, called the findings “a full-blown crisis.” This loss of bird abundance signals an urgent need to address threats to avert a future collapse of the entire bird population. Experts have long known that some bird species have become vulnerable to extinction. But the 2019 study, based on a broad survey of more than 500 species, reveals steep losses even among


such traditionally abundant birds as robins and sparrows. There are likely many causes, the most important of which include habitat loss and wider use of pesticides. A team of researchers from universities, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations collaborated on the new study, which combined old and new methods for counting birds. “We were stunned by the result – it’s just staggering,” said Kenneth V. Rosenberg, a conservation scientist at Cornell University and the lead author of the new study. 7

E. O. Wilson (b. June 10, 1929, Birmingham, Alabama), is an American biologist, theorist, naturalist, and author. Wilson has been called “the father of biodiversity” for his environmental advocacy. Among his greatest contributions to ecological theory is the theory of island biogeography, which served as the foundation of the field of conservation area design. He has earned more than a hundred scientific awards and other honors, including two Pulitzer Prizes. He is Professor Emeritus, Harvard University, and a special lecturer at Duke University. Modern humans left Africa and spread out across the globe 60,000 years ago. As people arrived, other species faltered and vanished, slowly at first and now with such acceleration that E.O. Wilson talks of a coming “biological holocaust,” the sixth mass extinction event, the only one caused not by some cataclysm but by a single species—us.

Perhaps Wilson’s most urgent project is one he promotes in his recent book, Half Earth. This project proposes increasing the land set aside for wild nature to 1/2 the total land on earth, upping it from just under 1/3, which is the current amount. Wilson also proposes setting the land aside in large tracts, rather than as a myriad of smaller areas.

“For the first time in history a conviction has developed among those who can actually think more than a decade ahead that we are playing a global endgame. Humanity’s grasp on the planet is not strong. It is growing weaker. Our population is too large for safety and comfort. Fresh water is growing short, the atmosphere and the seas are increasingly polluted as a result of what has transpired on the land. The climate is changing in ways unfavorable to life, except for microbes, jellyfish and fungi. For many species it is already fatal.”

From Wilson, Edward O. (2016); Half Earth: our planet’s fight for life. New York: WW Norton & Co.

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From an address at Rice University, delivered by United States President John F. Kennedy, about the effort to reach the moon. Rice University Stadium, Houston, Texas, September 12, 1962.

Recommended reading For further information, please read the New York Times article, “Major Climate Report Describes a Strong Risk of Crisis as Early as 2040,” by Carol Davenport, October 7, 2018. This article offers a summary of the United Nations IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) 2018 report, “Global Warming of 1.5ºC.” Full Report: https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/ New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/07/climate/ipcc-climate-report-2040.html

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Alexa kleinbard Artist Biography

I spent my childhood on four and a half acres of beautiful rolling land in Abington, Pennsylvania. My brother David kept care of beehives to pollinate all our flowers. We had a huge vegetable garden, plus apple and cherry trees, blueberry bushes, rhododendrons, mountain laurel, and many other native flowers, and hardwood trees. I first learned the names of plants following my father, Joseph, around our gardens. His hobby and great love was planting flowers. When not trailing after him I was climbing the neighbors’ enormous Beech tree or exploring the woods around us. Birdseye view drawing became a favorite past time early on, especially when I could be found viewing down from the Beech tree or sitting up high on my window ledge looking out through the dogwood trees across our fields to gorgeous flower gardens. Our fields would get covered by bird migrations in Spring, Summer, and Fall. Winter came as quiet sparkling white snow, and let my young eyes see deer, fox, chipmunk, and bird tracks that fascinated me, and inspired my early stitched and painted cloth books filled with flowers, tracks, and flying bird imagery. My

brother Jonathan was passionate about animals, and kept his raven in the room next to me. Later I used Ravens, Crows, and Owls to symbolize messengers in my paintings. He also had a pigeon coup and brought home a monkey and other animals over the years. Our place was jumping with life all around, my brother Peter’s rabbits and cats and my sister Polly’s puppies were in the mix as well. I always felt nature rescued me when I needed it, so I let nature just lure me into the woods to fill mind, vision, and soul with the wonderful mysteries of outdoor life. My mother was an amazing painter and puppet maker who had been a star pupil of Albert Barnes, having started to paint while still in her teens. She gave life to five children, then passed away when I was four. I learned about her through her paintings and paper maché puppets. Early on I started making things to help create other visual worlds, by depicting stories on paper and cloth until it became a natural way to express myself. Growing up with four brilliant siblings, all wordsmiths, I found 43


Alexa Kleinbard, The Fire Was Burning, Tidal Waves Series, 1980, Cellu clay over screen wire armature, oil paint, 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 x 6 inches, Collection of Theodore and Barbara Aronson

Alexa Kleinbard, Red Tide, Tidal Waves Series, 1980, Cellu clay over screen wire armature, oil paint, 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 x 6 inches

myself somewhat in contrast to them, being drawn toward a more visual way of expressing myself than the writing arts offered. I traveled across the country starting in my teens, by thumb, truck, car, or later, motorcycle, camping and hiking, sleeping in homemade teepees, tents, hammocks, caves, or just out in the open. In high school my friends and I would camp down on the Jersey shore, in the dunes area, wearing wet suits so as to swim any time of the year. As much as possible I preferred to be out in Mother Nature exploring, her inspiration my muse. In high school I was lucky to be in

a program that took me to France where I was placed with artistic families who took me mountain climbing in the Alps and to museums in Paris. Later in 1972, I was able to buy a $100 train pass to travel through Spain, seeing extraordinary fields of sunflowers for miles and museums filled with amazing art; Hieronymus Bosch at the Prado became my favorite. The last link in that trip was by boat over, and into, the amazing light of Greek Islands. I stayed for weeks watching the fishermen repair their nets before getting back out in their colorful boats, while I camped/lived in caves at night and drew everyday. I began my art career exhibiting in 1974 by entering juried shows right after college. My first break came when Marcia Tucker, then head curator at the Whitney Museum in New York and later founder of the New Museum, was the juror in a show I entered. She awarded me the big prize, $500, which was very encouraging and I started showing on a regular basis.

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Alexa Kleinbard, Intallation of Woman, Rock and Roll and Cherry Bop, and Rat Truck, 1978, Cellu clay mulch over screen wire backed with fiberglass, oil paint


Alexa Kleinbard, Installation of It Happened One Night, 1982, Cellu clay mulch over screen wire backed with fiberglass, oil paint

My husband Jim Roche and I met in 1974, when he came up to The University of the Arts in Philadelphia to give a talk. We immediately were drawn to each others’ love for nature, and took off by motorcycle, traveling across the country to see as much as possible, while being immersed in nature’s vastness. In 1976, Anne D’Harnoncourt, head curator at the Philadelphia Art Museum and later Director, came to my loft for a studio visit. The minute Anne walked into my loft all the electricity went off and I had to take the work outside for her to see it. She bought a painting for the museum and one for herself, which was a terrific boost for a very young artist. At that time I began making low reliefs of animal landscapes in clay forms, which I would then take paper molds from so as to start painting them. This included taking simple mountain forms made in clay and casting them in plaster. These were the beginnings of a whole body of work I continued after I moved to Florida in 1976 to begin life together with Jim Roche. There we created huge vegetable and flower

gardens on our little piece of land in Havana, Florida. In 1978, “Kippy,” Marion Bolton Stroud, Director of the Fabric Workshop Museum in Philadelphia, asked me to design a work of art collaborating with the workshop. I chose to draw out Alexa Kleinbard, Hug Time Dress, 1980. Image appeared in “Let’s a “Sorceress Cape” Play House,” in An Industrious Art, with rivers running Innovation in Pattern and Print at through it connecting The Fabric Workshop, edited by Marion Boulton Stround, 1991. to birds and animals. I worked with their designers, printers, and seamstresses. The cape was well received, and later pictured in an Art In America review of the works and the Fabric Workshop, Kippy’s dream project. In 1980 I designed “Hug Time Dress” collaborating again with the workshop. It is pictured in An Industrious Art Innovation in Fabric and Print at The Fabric Workshop, edited by Marion Bolton Stroud.

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Alexa Kleinbard, Carving Up The Earth, 1983, oil paint on birch wood, 36 x 60 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, On The Edge, 1985, oil paint on birch wood, 48 x 60 inches

Jim and I traveled as much as possible through the country by motorcycle and later by car and truck after our children were born: JimmyJoe in 1981 and Waylen Walker in 1989. Jim and I are incredibly fortunate to have two extremely bright and talented sons. JimmyJoe continues to perform and make films and Waylen, also a performer, composes captivating songs on the piano. Traveling encompassed exhibiting art and immersion into the land and rivers across America. Jim, a native Floridian, shared with me his love and knowledge of Florida, which infused in me a desire to learn as much as possible about our surroundings. Already a plant lover, North Florida’s rich habitat full of unbelievable biodiversity that I had never seen before, filled my heart and soul with exciting areas of nature to explore and plants to love and learn from. I continued working in clay and making paper molds from the forms, using paper mulch mixed with Roplex. After the cast forms dried I

painted landscapes and river-like imagery on them and began coating the back side with fiberglass for additional strength. These series evolved from mermaids at first, to dancing cactus with legs, on into “harpy bird,” an enormous three dimensional autobiographic woman pulled by city and country in different directions, into a large rat truck to symbolize the logging trucks driving by our house everyday, and then tidal waves that washed away things during hurricanes, and so on into even more autobiographical large reliefs. These were exhibited in the late 1970’s in Philadelphia at Eyes Gallery and Eric Makler Gallery, in New York City at the New Museum and PSI, and in Winston-Salem at SECCA, as well as many other museums and galleries over time. In 1979, I received a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship for this work. In 1982, I received a second NEA grant for a lifesized sculpted relief series that included many characters within large wall relief narratives. This body of work was included in “Southern Narratives” at the Contemporary Arts Museum 47


Alexa Kleinbard, When All The Rivers Come Together, 1985, oil paint on birch wood, 48 x 60 inches

in Houston, and the Contemporary Museum in New Orleans. Things were going almost too well, I guess. In 1982, I was in a near death car accident with JimmyJoe. My Toyota flipped 85 feet in the air and landed on top of me. JimmyJoe was held in place by his car seat to emerge unharmed. Jim had tied it in to secure it more firmly that morning before we left. This became a life changing experience for me. I was so thankful that our little angel was not harmed and I had only suffered minor injuries compared to what could have occurred. A retrospective I saw in NYC of Henri Rousseau paintings was also a pivotal factor in the desire to make the narratives of my life more direct. Around this time I found working with 3-dimensional paintings, that need to be shipped around the country, could be very difficult because of breakage. Already there was a lot of material out there on “our humans” impact on nature but I wanted to depict them. I decided to focus more on straight oil paint 48

applied on wood to fulfill the psychologically descriptive narratives I was feeling around me and visually seeing in real life. Also in 1982, I began making work for an exhibit that was shown at the Lockes Gallery in Philadelphia in 1986. The first pieces were of businessmen with white doctor-masks on, “Carving Up the Earth,” as trembling animals watch in horror. These evolved into paintings of scared wild animals running in fear and being pushed to the brink by human encroachment and fire. One painting, “Slash and Burn,” showed animals panicked and running from fire to find safety. I was reading intense articles about these issues and had just read Peter Beard’s book The End Of The Game. Another painting, “Beached Forest” showed how huge logs fall off logging ships and pile up on beaches in Northern Oregon to form a jungle of huge driftwood trees. Jim and I had camped on one of those beaches in 1977. Two paintings, “When All The Rivers Come Together,” which shows how water runs through us from Alaska to Florida, and “In this Place Let There Be Plenty and Grace,” which is about Alaska on the pivotal edge between


Alexa Kleinbard, In Sickness and In Health Till Death Do Us Part (left panel: Garden of Eden), The Chapel Project Series, 1987-1988, oil paint on canvas, 132 x 84 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, In Sickness and In Health Till Death Do Us Part (center panel: The Healing Ship), The Chapel Project, 1987-1988, oil paint on canvas, 312 x 84 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, In Sickness and In Health Till Death Do Us Part (right panel: Skeleton Trees), The Chapel Project, 1987-1988, oil paint on canvas, 132 x 84 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, In Sickness and In Health Till Death Do Us Part, The Chapel Project, 1987-1988, oil paint on canvas, 576 x 84 inches.

the old native ways of bountiful wildlife and the encroachment of non-native people into their lands, were both important to me. It was obvious to me that disrupting old Native traditions with quickly forming new-world times was very wrong for the Alaskan natural world. This huge body of work was shown in many museums and galleries in the USA and abroad, and was reviewed in publications in this country and Europe. In 1987, I was asked by Jerry Beck, who was director of the Revolving Museum in Boston, to participate in The Chapel Project, a huge sitespecific piece at Boston’s city hall that included several other artists. For this project I made a forty-eight foot mural on canvas. I named it “In Sickness and In Health, Till Death do Us Part.” It had three sections: the left panel depicts the garden beautiful and full of native bountiful life, unharmed; the center panel depicts the healing ship with homage to native cultures with Shamans helping to heal with medicinal plants; the right panel has skeleton trees and drowning ships of people glued to their screens - where 50

we are headed if we don’t change our ways. Creating this mural tied together the work from the 1980’s for me. In 1990, I started a new body of cut-out wooden shaped paintings that I collectively titled Birds Eye View. They showed birds and other wild creatures observing their habitats from the outside looking into their worlds. I had exhibited some earlier small ones in the Lockes Gallery show and now wanted to elaborate on them. At the time my father was very ill, which saddened me, and inspired me to paint in each piece a tunnel that a body was flowing into. I called this body of shaped paintings Just Passing Through. For me this symbolized one’s journey through this universe. Thinking more of how we come into this world and how we go out, I used a fallen tree uprooted across the center of each painting to symbolize ancient wisdom being torn apart and now revealing fully Nature’s fragility.


Alexa Kleinbard, Coast View, Birds Eye View Series, 1990-1991, oil paint over paper mulch, 24 x 14 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Sea of Valdez Oil Spill, Birds Eye View Series, 19901991, oil paint over paper mulch, 36 x 24 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Wolf, Coyote, Octopus, Turtle and Songbirds View, Just Passing Through/Birds Eye View Series, 1991, oil paint on wood, 48 x 54 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Forest Song View, Just Passing Through/Birds Eye View Series, 1991, oil paint on wood, 48 x 54 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard, Tulip Poplar, Sommes Sound, Mt Desert, ME, Talking Leaves Series, 1994-1997, oil paint on clay board, 24 x 18 inches, Collection of Bowdoin College, ME, donated by Marion Bolton Stroud Alexa Kleinbard, Echinacea, Blagden Nature Preserve, Mt Desert, ME, Talking Leaves Series, 1994-1997, oil paint on clay board, 24 x 18 inches, Collection of Bowdoin College, ME, donated by Marion Bolton Stroud

In 1994, “Kippy,” started inviting artists, curators, writers, scientists, and many other professionals to her new project, Acadia Summer Arts Program, a residency on Mt. Desert Island, Maine. I felt deeply thankful to be invited every other year through 2015. While there I started working on Talking Leaves that formed first as small cut-out shaped pieces on clay board delicately drawn and painted-on to reveal the leaf’s inner skin, the textural veins of each piece, and the fragile wetland that the plants were connected to, all of which are painted vividly on the leaves’ center window look out. My longtime interest in studying plant medicines, their physical and psychological properties, and the folklore about them from native cultures and early pioneers, has always fascinated me to the point that it became the catalyst for several bodies of work, including Remedies. I began doing graphite drawings to transfer their line onto wooden pieces, to then be cut out and shaped like a known healing plant. These were painted later to show the actual healing plant, with its flowers, and all the 52

Alexa Kleinbard, Quaking Aspen, Rossi, Mt Desert, ME, Talking Leaves Series, 1994-1997, oil paint on clay board, 24 x 18 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Ginkgo, Shell Point, FL, Talking Leaves Series, 1994-1997, oil paint on clay board, 24 x 18 inches, Collection of David Kleinbard


Alexa Kleinbard, Installation Photo (Passion Flower, Trumpet Vine and Animal Spirit Trees and Passion Flower with Pollinators), Remedies Series, 2003-2008, oil paint on 1/2 birch wood

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Alexa Kleinbard, Lotus, Aphrodisiacs Series, 2000, oil paint on 1/2 wood, 36 x 60 inches, Collection of Missouri Botanical Gardens, St Louis, MO

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Alexa Kleinbard, Melancholy Thistle, Thistles Series, 2001-2003, oil paint on 1/2 wood, 36 x 60 inches, Collection of Cecilia and David Maloney

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Alexa Kleinbard, Gribbell Island Owl, Corridors Series, 2011-2017, archival photos, archival paper, russian birch wood, 13 x 18 inches, Collection of Jane McPherson and Jon Jefferson

pollinators and wildlife that were dependent on that particular healer. I have worked on and off along this general theme showing the work in museums and galleries, including a solo exhibit at The Ogden Museum Of Art in New Orleans. Medicinal Plants and their attendant wildlife continue to be a major catalyst for my work. In 2005, Jim and I traded three lots in Florida we had purchased in 1980, for a modest studio on a mountain in Northern Georgia. Corridors is a series of photo collages laminated to shaped wood that are then drawn on and painted. These were inspired by observing how much territory animals need to find food, mate, and live in. Each piece is made up of piecedtogether photos of the natural corridors the animal needs to survive. The forest surrounding our tree house mountain studio is alive with wild native plants, birds, and multitudes of animals. Although we have been bird watchers for years, this new place became a front row seat to incredible bird song around us from spring till fall, giving me a chance from the screened treehouse porch to be surrounded 56

morning to night with birds mating, nesting, and foraging in the woods around us. This became the inspiration for the Songbirds Nesting At Twilight series. We were also witnessing the tremendous loss of trees and habitat in North Florida to over-development, pests multiplying due to a hotter planet, lack of water from wetlands being drained, drought, and Atlanta’s sprawl. Cutting down ancient live oaks to put up urban sprawl in the name of progress in and around Tallahassee became developers’ calling cards. As we travelled, I was also seeing deforestation to put up fast temporary development everywhere across the country. We were reading that wood pellet factories all along the east coast were being built to help Europe’s need for fuel, and these became a major cause of deforestation in the eastern USA. This was deeply disturbing, and ignited even more reasons to create work about this issue. After several years I noticed the bird songs I love coming earlier...but leaving North Georgia sooner...along with a drop in bird counts in our woods. I was also seeing the overgrowth of algae causing harm to fish, reptiles, amphibians,


Alexa Kleinbard, No More Sanctuary, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2017-2018, oil pastel on Strathmore paper, 34 x 23 inches

Alexa Kleinbard, Song of Loss, Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series, 2017-2018, oil pastel on Strathmore paper, 25 x 18 inches

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and bird life in the Florida waters and now in the great lakes. As the planet warms faster and we keep polluting our waters, the increase of toxic algae has become another very dangerous occurrence along with monster hurricanes. The Songbird drawings and paintings use green backgrounds as a symbol for overheating in the atmosphere and the rise of toxic algae. I have always been drawn, from my early years, starting with Kipling’s stories, to books involving nature. One favorite author, the great entomologist, E.O. Wilson, came out with a new very moving book, called Half Earth. The book’s essential message is that we must preserve biodiversity for half the planet in order to survive. He suggests saving these wild places and only allowing scientists to go there while the rest of us observe them virtually. Breathing Systems is a new body of shaped wood paintings inspired by his book. In the two finished paintings called “When All The Rivers Come Together” and “The Mood Of Mountains,” there are bird and monarch migrations flying across North America over rivers. At the top of each painting is a Native American woman’s head with her braids flowing into rivers. I plan to continue the work with paintings about Mozambique’s Gorongosa Park. In Half Earth, E.O. Wilson talks about two incredible philanthropists. M.C. Davis bought huge pieces of connecting land in North Florida, to assure it’s protected from development. Davis completely replanted the Long Leaf Pine forests that were the original virgin trees filled with life before being harvested in the late 1800s. Gregory Carr from Idaho put 10 million dollars into restoring Gorongosa park in Mozambique after years of war, devastation, and massive poaching. Both of these great 58

men installed programs around these parks for the indigenous people to be educated and involved with keeping these beautiful places intact. With these two examples, Wilson makes a strong case for preserving the most important places on earth of biodiversity before it is too late to save humans and all other life on our planet. The wonderful addition of our grandson, Marlowe, has made preservation of nature for the survival of life on earth even more crucial to me. Over many years I have been inspired by nature writers, exploring of nature, and psychological narrative. I have always found it important to use everything in my background as I weave all this together into a tapestry that tells the story of a place, its inhabitants, and its emotion, while hopefully inspiring others to help preserve and protect nature for future generations of life. Heart and Brush, Alexa Kleinbard

Alexa Kleinbard, Many Trees, Botanical Drawings Series, 2000, graphite on paper, 11 x 14 inches


Alexa Kleinbard, The Mood of Mountains, Breathing Systems Series, 2019, oil paint on shaped birch wood, 45 x 50 inches

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Alexa Kleinbard Abbreviated Resume alexakleinbard@gmail.com www.alexakleinbard.com Personal

22 March 1952

Education 1974

1979, 1982 NEA Fellowship Endowment 1982 Florida State Individual Artist Grant 1977 SECCA NEA Endowment Grant

BFA University of The Arts Philadelphia PA

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2019 2018 2016 2014 2013 2012 2005 2004 2003 2001 2001 2001 2000 2000 1999 1995 1986 1981 1980,1979 1980 1980 60

Grants

Gadsden Arts Center & Museum, “Twilight in The Garden,” Quincy, FL, catalogue Clark and Associates Gallery, “Songbirds Nesting at Twilight,” Houston, TX 621 Gallery, “Observations of The Natural World,” Tallahassee, FL, brochure Koelsch Gallery, Houston, TX Young Harris College, “Natures Corridors,” Young Harris, GA Ogden Museum of Art, “Remedies,” New Orleans, LA Brogan Museum of Art, “Selected Works 1985-2005,” Tallahassee, FL, catalogue Raleigh Museum of Art and Science, Raleigh, NC, brochure Macon Museum of Art and Science, Macon, GA, brochure Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO, catalogue Museum of Art and Science, Melbourne, FL Moore College of Art, Philadelphia, PA Okaloosa Fort Walton Community College, Niceville, FL Gulf Coast Museum of Art, Belaire, FL, catalogue Len Gardens Gallery, Orlando, FL Division of Cultural Affairs, Tallahassee, FL Locks Gallery, Philadelphia, PA Nexus Gallery, Atlanta, GA Eric Makler Gallery, Philadelphia, PA Miami Dade Junior College, Miami, FL, brochure University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, brochure


Selected Group Exhibits 2018 2012 2012 2011 2006 2002-2003 2002 2002 1999 1995-1996 1995 1991-1992 1989-1990 1988 1988 1987 1987 1987 1987 1987 1986 1984-1985 1983 1982-1984 1981 1980 1978

Revolving Museum, Project Soar, Fitchburg, MA Florida Focus, First Street Gallery, St. Petersburg, FL Fitchburg Museum of Art, “Tales of The Test Tube,” Fitchburg, MA Tempus Projects, Tampa, FL A Sense of Habitat, Brogan Museum, Tallahassee, FL Florida Visual Art Fellowships, 25th Anniversary Exhibit, Lowe Art Museum, Miami, FL, travels to six museums Luminaries, Moore College of Art, Philadelphia, PA Flora Art and Ecology, Brogan Museum, Tallahassee, FL Atlantic Center for The Arts, Harris Gallery, New Smyrna, FL Faculty Exhibit, FSU Museum of Fine Arts, Tallahassee, FL New Museum, “Temporarily Possessed,” New York City, NY Yellowstone Art Center, “Black and White,” Billings, MT University of South Florida, “Made in Florida,” Tampa, FL, catalogue, travels to four museums in Florida and four museums in Europe Boston Plaza, ”The Chapel Project,“ Boston, MA, brochure Morris Gallery of Art, “Searching Out the Best,” Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Philadelphia, PA, catalogue Ten Years of The SECCA Seven, SECCA, Winston-Salem, NC “West Art and The Law,” Plaza Gallery; San Francisco, CA; Albrecht Art Museum, Saint Joseph, MI; Muscarrelle Art Museum, Williamsburg, VA; catalogue Alternative Museum, “From the Files,” New York City, NY, Curators Choice Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, “The Telling Impulse,” Philadelphia, PA, catalogue Philadelphia Museum of Art, “Philadelphia Collects,” Philadelphia, PA, catalogue Minneapolis College of Art, “Contemporary Southern Art,” Minneapolis, MN, catalogue New Orleans Museum of Contemporary Art, “Dark Humor in The South,” New Orleans, and Alexandria Museum, LA, traveled to five museums, catalogue Museum of Contemporary Art, “Southern Fictions,” Houston, TX, New Orleans Contemporary, New Orleans, LA, catalogue New Gallery, Art Materialized Selections from the Fabric Workshop, Cleveland. OH, travels to seven museums, catalogue The Image of Art in Contemporary Art, University of Houston, Houston, TX Institute of Contemporary Art, Material Pleasures, Philadelphia, PA and Chicago, IL, catalogue New Museum, Outside New York, New York City, NY

Workshops

1978, 1982 Fabric Workshop, produced four projects, including “Hug Time Dress,” reproduced in An Industrious Art Innovation in Pattern and Print at the Fabric Workshop, a book by Mary Bolton Stroud, and “Sorceress Cape,” reproduced in Art in America.

Residencies

1993-2013 Every other year. Acadia Summer Arts Program, Mt Desert Island, Maine 61


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Alexa Kleinbard Select Collections

Selected Public Collections

Southeastern Center For Contemporary Art, Winston-Salem, NC Miami Dade Junior College, Miami, FL Missouri Botanical Gardens, St Louis, MO Belger Collection, Kansas City, MO Florida State University, Panama City, FL Prudential Life Insurance, Philadelphia, PA Orlando Museum Of Art, Orlando, FL Health and Human Resource Building, Tallahassee, FL Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA New Museum Of Contemporary Art, NYC, NY Fabric Workshop Museum, Philadelphia, PA Clinica Estetica, Nyack, NY Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME The Best Collection, NYC, NY

Selected Private Collections

Marilyn Oshman, Houston, TX Sandy Boone, Austin, TX Jane McPherson and Jon Jefferson, Athens, GA Cecilia and David Maloney, NYC, NY Su and Steve Ecenia, Tallahassee, FL Barbara Hamby and David Kirby, Tallahassee, FL Frank and Peper Willis, Tallahassee, FL Jill Harper, Tallahassee, FL Cynthia Hollis, Tallahassee, FL Joe and Cindy Johnson, Tallahassee, FL Kati Schardl, Tallahassee, FL Helene Weiss, Philadelphia, PA Anne D’Arnencourt and Joe Richell, Philadelphia, PA Marcy Hermansader, Dummerston, VT Jay Massey, Philadelphia , PA Mr. and Mrs. Herman Schwartzman, New York City, NY Mr. and Mrs. William Wolgin, Philadelphia, PA Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Aronson, Philadelphia, PA Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Kaiserman, Philadelphia, PA Mr. and Mrs. Roth, Orlando, FL Joanne Howard and Jonathan Demme, Nyack, NY Lalo Robles and Ghita Heit, Tallahassee, FL Marjorie and Kevin Simon, Philadelphia, PA Kimberly Pelkey, Philadelphia, PA Polly and Sam Goldstein, Newtown, PA Elizabeth Simon and Joe Schoonover, Boulder, CO Gail Rubini and Conrad Gleber, Philadelphia, PA Amy Vigilante, Gainesville, FL Dean Minardi, Tallahassee, FL 63


EXHIBITION CHECKLIST Listed alphabetically by series.

All the Rivers Come Together Series oil paint on birch wood In This Place Let There Be Plenty and Grace, 1985 Slash and Burn, 1984 Aphrodisiacs Series oil paint on wood Henbane, 2002 Botanical Drawings Series graphite on paper Black Cohosh, 2000 Comfrey , 2000 Erect Clematis, 2000 Holy Thistle, 2000 Melancholy Thistle, 2000 Milk Thistle, 2000 Night Blooming Cereus, 2000 Passion Flower, 2000 Rheumatism Remedy, 2000 Breathing Systems Series oil paint on shaped birch wood The Mood of Mountains, 2019 When All The Rivers Come Together, 2019 Corridors Series, 2011-2017 archival photos, archival paper, russian birch wood Allegany Mountains, Fisher Aucilla River, Deer, Florida Baltimore Oriole Bitter Root Valley, Elk Brasstown Bald Squirrel Buzzard Roost Owl Caloosahatchee River Panther Chaco Canyon Deer Chattahoochee Rabbit 64

Cloudland Canyon Bobcat Fox Gribbel Island Bear Gulf Coast Deer Gulf Tern Gulf Waters, Turtle Marianna Caverns Bat Marianna Caverns Bat Marianna Caverns Bat McNeil Sanctuary, Grizzly Mt. Desert Ilse Maine Loon Mt. Desert Ilse Maine Osprey St Marks Bear St Marks Duck St Marks, Eagle Tallahassee Bird Tallahassee Bird Tallahassee Bird Tallahassee Bird Tallahassee Bird Wolf Endangered Plants of Florida oil paint on birch wood Rosemary Etonia, 2000 Spiny Pod, 2000 Fabric Workshop Series Hug Time Dress, 1980, silkscreen on satin Sorceress Cape, 1978, silkscreen on hammered satin Remedies Series oil paint on 1/2" birch wood Bloodroot, 2008 Comfrey, 2008 Flax, 2005 Foxglove, 2005 Fracked, Dandelion, Cumin, Chamomile, Fennel, 2008 Mayapple and Senna, 2005 Passion Flower, 2005


Songbirds Nesting at Twilight Series Baltimore Orioles Nesting, 2016 colored pencil on paper Buzzard Roost Twilight Song, 2018 oil pastel on Strathmore paper Circling For a Place to Nest, 2018 oil pastel on Strathmore paper Closing In, 2018 oil pastel on Strathmore paper

Danger in Beautiful Florida, 2018 oil pastel on Strathmore paper

Slash and Burn Forest Land, 2018 oil paint on birch wood Songs of Peril, 2018 oil paint on birch wood

Starry Night on Buzzard Roost Ridge, 2018 oil pastel on Strathmore paper Tree Funeral, 2017 oil pastel on Strathmore paper Wetlands Under Seige, 2018 oil paint on birch wood

Explosion in the Gulf, 2018 oil paint on birch wood

Talking Leaves Series oil paint on clay board

Intoxicated Woodpecker on Sycamore Tree, 2018, oil pastel on Strathmore paper

Comfrey, Mt Desert, ME, 1995 Ginger, 1997 Ginseng, Mountain to Lake View, 1997 River Maple, Four Seals, ME, 1994

Fox and Big Blue, 2019 oil paint on birch wood

Landings in a Deforested Wetland, 2018 oil pastel on Strathmore paper Last Stand, 2018 oil paint on birch wood Messengers, 2019 oil paint on birch wood

Mountain Sanctuary on our Ridge, 2019 oil paint on birch wood Mt. Desert Ilse Seal Cove, 2013 oil on wood

Nesting Grounds in the Land of Plenty, 2019 oil paint on birch wood Nesting on the Precipice, 2019 oil paint on birch wood

No More Sanctuary, 2018 oil pastel on Strathmore paper

Pristine Florida Under Seige, 2018 oil paint on birch wood Shrikes Dinner for Chicks, 2016 colored pencil on paper

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Alexa Kleinbard

TWILIGHT IN THE GARDEN Alexa Kleinbard’s spectacularly beautiful work has focused on the natural world for over thirty years, addressing the issues surrounding the degradation and destruction of our natural environment. Kleinbard takes the position that we are in and of nature, that as we despoil and destroy the plants and creatures we share this planet with, we do the same to ourselves. Kleinbard has researched and deeply pondered the relationships we have with animals and plants, and I hope that her astounding works displayed at Gadsden Arts Center & Museum will prompt rapt viewers to do the same. Cynthia Hollis, Curator

Catalog published by the Gadsden Arts Center & Museum Quincy, Florida • 2020 Exhibition on view January 11 – March 14, 2020

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Alexa Kleinbard: Twilight in the Garden Exhibition Catalogue  

Alexa Kleinbard’s spectacularly beautiful work has focused on the natural world for over thirty years, addressing the issues surrounding the...

Alexa Kleinbard: Twilight in the Garden Exhibition Catalogue  

Alexa Kleinbard’s spectacularly beautiful work has focused on the natural world for over thirty years, addressing the issues surrounding the...

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