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2012

G A B R I E L A

DESIGN

B A R A J A S


[PRO]

PROFILE

ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 01

[A_L]

ALT_LANDTIS

THE PROBELM OF THE GULF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 02 SITE

..............................................................................

03

DEVELOPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 04 RENDERING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 05

[HT]

HAITI

AFTER THE STORM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 06

[SA]

SUBURBIA

THE PROBLEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

[UF]

URBAN FARM

FARMING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

[CB]

CUTI TUBECULAR

LIGHTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

[NA]

NUEBIA

THE SHELTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

[CM]

CILUM

FUTURE HOUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

[HM ] HIBERNACULUM WE ARE BECOMING EXTINCT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32


Gabriela BARAJAS

In 2006, I received an A.A. Degree in liberal arts with specified studies in architecture history and now a recent graduate of Cal Poly Pomona’s Architecture Program. I was the lead in the accomplishment of outstanding project selections such as Alt_Landtis 2x8 Source AIA Los Angeles Exhibition in 2011 as well as in 2012 I was choosen once again to participate in 2x8. I was also involved in the Re-Building Haiti Initiative and had worked closely on the Takit-EZ House design and working drawings which was selected to be built in Haiti. I take charge and I am always one of the lead designers in collaborative work efforts. I take responsibility in graphics--photshoping, rendering scenes, diagraming. Insightful in computer programs such as AutoCAD 2011, 3DS MAX, Rihno, Grasshopper, Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, as well as the Microsoft Office programs. As of now I will do freelance work for various firms such as Foxlin and Hostcell.


ALT_LANDTIS

Alt_LANDTIS The problem

SITE ANALYSIS

COLLABORATIVE TEAM (CT) GABRIELA BARAJAS G. (ARC) ASHI MARTIN (ARC) MARCUS RICHESON (ARC) ALEX PHUNG (ARC)

of the Gulf

The Gulf of Mexico’s resources are a tremendous source of ecological, economic and social value. The mass petroleum extraction, destructive agricultural runoff and climate change all contribute to the damage of the Gulf’s increasingly depleting resources, water quality, and wildlife ecosystems.

With the onset of peak oil, the ALTLANDTIS project seeks to appropriate the aging symbols of an unsustainable economic model. Transforming the existing brownfield of offshore oil platforms into matrices of vibrant, ecologically aware and self-sustaining communities will emphasis sustainability.

Through the adaptive reuse of existing materials and infrastructure, ALT-LANDTIS aims to help restore and sustain the region’s diminished ecological, economic and social systems. ALT-LANDTIS way of functioning will create a renewable economy, biodiversity of surrounding ecosystems and a sustainable lifestyle.

The balance of these components would in turn restore the region’s valued resources, and remove our independence natural resources. The once iconic source of dirty energy will be morphed into a new alternative model of sustainable living.

02


03

ALT_LANDTIS

SITE ANALYSIS


CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

AGRICULTURE

POWER SCHOOL

COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL

Presently, the urban environment are essentially remnants of an obsolete and stubborn approach to urban planning. The old approach to urban planning aims to segregate its programs and functions into large isolated zones. As a result, access is limited and can only be overcome through exhaustive means. ALT_LANDTIS incorporates a better approach to land use distribution. Evenly distributing integral aspects of urban living such as transportation, food production, power generation and civic spaces will successfully provide easy access to all of ALT_LANDTIS’ inhabitants. Doing so will effectively limit growth by providing an efficient template for it, incorporate urban agriculture, afford to habitat exchanges, car free living, etc. ALT_LANDTIS’ land use organization reflects the our underlying strategy of evenly distributing its programs throughout an urban space. Doing so creates a strata of conceptual grids of functions that comes together to create an integrated system.

04

SITE

ALT_LANDTIS

PARK & AGRICULTURE

WATER TREATMENT

RESIDENTIAL

CONVENTIONAL ZONING A “rational” ordering of land use by single function promotes a “flush and forget” mentality, fosters disconnection between citizens and critical life support systems, increases dependence upon energy and pollution intensive forms of transportation, and negatively impacts public health

CIVIC & INSTITUTIONAL

COMMERCIAL

TRANSIT

PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION

DISTRIBUTED ZONING Made possible by “clean” manufacturing and industrial processes; promotes social awareness an compact, connected communities, encourages “people powered” modes of transportation and encourages a healthy lifestyle

PLATFORMS

OSCILLATING WAVE TOWERS

L3

MIXED USE

50

FISHING

PROGRAM

SCIENCE

50

DENSITY (PPA)

50

MANUFACTURING

50

EDUCATIONAL

40

L4

0.5

F.A.R

22,000 10 50

TOTAL FLOOR AREA LAND USE %

0.5

MIXED USE

25

0.5

22,000 25 50

FISHING

100

20

SCIENCE

100

50

100

25

27,000 40 35

+

100

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.5

44,000

55,000

44,000

25

25

200

20

RESIDENTIAL

20

30

50

30

30

3.0 30

RETAIL

20

50

OPEN SPACE

+

92,000 20 40

0.5 40

22,000 10 50

CONSTRUCTIVE WETLANDS

PARK

100

+

1.5 50

50,000 25 25

The project’s isolation from conventional transportation routes necessitates its ability to be self sufficient. Food production is a prominent feature of ALT_LANDTIS with the half of its rooftop real estate devoted to agriculture.

77,000 15

SCIENCE

200

50

+

3.0 55

88,000 30 15

1.5 20

55,000 30 50

0.5 0

5,000 10

90

40

200

3.0 30

50

+

3.0

ENTERTAINMENT

88,000 55

30

MIXED USE

100

MANUFACTURING

50,000

MIXED USE

MIXED USE

50

0.5

11,000 20 60

30

L5

MIXED USE

200

ZONING

ENERGY PRODUCTION

Fresh, locally produced fruits and vegetables are readily available to all the city’s inhabitants. The remaining half of the project’s roof area is set aside as a habitat preserve for migratory birds and other species

ALT_LANDTIS’ clean, environmentally sensitive manufacturing and industrial processes make a diversified, distributed land-use policy possible. In turn, the highly mixed-use nature of the project promotes social awareness and compact, connected communities.


05

ALT_LANDTIS

SITE


ALT_LANDTIS

DEVELOPMENT

06


07

DEVELOPMENT

ALT_LANDTIS

SUMMER SOLSTICE

WINTER SOLSTICE

SOIL FRESH PRODUCE

WARM AIR OUT

NON ORGANIC WASTE CYCLE

‘mottainai’ (it is a shame for something to go to waste) RECYCLING CENTER

IMPORTED PRODUCE FARMERS MARKET

REUSE STORE

HYDROPONICS

WATER STORAGE

EXPORTED WASTE

COOL AIR INTAKE

Grey and black wastewater is treated by point-source waste treatment systems, such as the Biolytix system, and then used to irrigate rooftop gardens. Rooftop collection systems are designed to simultaneously collect excess irrigation water and rainwater; both of which are then treated and used to resupply domestic and commercial demand.

Passive solar strategies such as horizontal overhangs, operable louvers, natural ventilation and cool roofs are used to minimize heating and cooling loads while light colored materials, light shelves and transparent vertical shafts permit natural daylight to penetrate deeper in to buildings reducing the demand for electric day time lighting.

The closed loop system prevents any discharge of wastewater from entering the environment thereby preserving the surrounding ecosystem and leaving natural water flows undisturbed.


HAITI HOUSE

Haiti HOUSE calm after a storm

The Takit_EZ team is a group of students from Cal Poly Pomona University Department of Architecture, fourth Year, and together we collaborated to help restore the destruction that was brought from the aftermath of the Haiti Earthquake in January 2010. Our studio is focused in designing temporary and permanent housing for Haitians, community buildings, as well a 1-5-10 year master plan.

. All construction of all the homes as well as other buildings will use PGI’s honeycomb product, which is completely made from recycled products. The Takit_ EZ house was presented the BBBC Haiti Expo; it was selected out of three home designs to be built in Haiti. We are still in the process of constructing a full scale prototype of our Takit_EZ.

COLLABORATIVE TEAM (CT) MICHEAL FOX (ARC) JUINTOW LIN (ARC) GABRIELA BARAJAS G. (ARC) ASHI MARTIN (ARC) NICOLE GRACIANO (ARC) FARIBA MONSTAJER (ARC) JENNIFER GUERRA (ARC) LILIANA ALVAREZ (ARC) RYAN RASKOP (ARC)

The first of house for the Haiti Reconstruction Project designed by students at Cal Poly Pomona has been completed. The house was designed and prototyped by students under the direction of Professors Juintow Lin and Michael Fox in an effort to respond to the desperate need for affordable housing in the aftermath of the magnitude-7 earthquake in Haiti in 2010.

Development efforts are carried out with Pacific Green Innovations of Portland, OR. which has established a complete manufacturing and fabrication facility in Haiti. The house is constructed with a unique resin-coated corrugated paper core sandwiched between magnesium board panels which is manufactured in Haiti and built entirely by local workers using very few imported materials.

ANALYSIS

08


09

ANALYSIS

HAITI HOUSE

MasterPLAN

ONE HOME

WATER WELL

ONE SOLAR PANEL

4 TOILETS

PRODUCE

FARM

2 COMPOSTE BIN MARKET

ONE RECYLE BIN PUBLIC SPACE


HAITI HOUSE

ANALYSIS

HOT AIR OUTLET

COOL AIR IN-TAKE

A number of winair studies were conducted testing variations of the number of clerestory openings and placements. The variation with the best results, in terms of increased air flow, is having a clerestory with 4 openings as opposed to just a few or none. For maximization of wind flow, the house should face north with the clerestory facing east. This allows for more wind to enter into the central living space.

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11

ANALYSIS

The photographs show one of the prototype house (painted green) built at Cal Poly Pomona, with Architecture students and Profs. Fox and Lin http://foxlin.com/showcase/takit-ez-house/

HAITI HOUSE

one of the prototypes (painted orange) at the Haiti Housing Expo; and Haitian workers building a prototype. The orange prototype was built as part of an exposition in Haiti and will become a permanent home for a Haitian family after the exposition closes.


WE

We Suburbia And its a problem

We all love suburbia. We all want that big back yard where you can BBQ with your family and friends. We all want to have our private indoor and outdoor spaces so that our neighbors can’t spy on us. We all want our own parking spaces and we all want to have a sense of ownership; to be able to do what we want with our own homes.

SUBURBIA

THE PROBLEM

COLLABORATIVE TEAM (CT) GABRIELA BARAJAS G. (ARC) ASHI MARTIN (ARC) GERARDO VILLA (LANDSCP) HUGO SALAZAR (LANDSCP)

These are the elements that we love about suburbia; however suburbia poses many problems for us. Suburbia it is too expensive, it is too uniform, it is wasteful and our social interaction with our neighbors are very low. In order to solve these problems that we have with living in suburbia, we will need to re-think suburbia its roots

. We focused on the micro scale instead of designing at a huge scale of the site all at once—in order to establish a modified suburbia by really understanding the single family suburban lot. The site is essentially irrelevant because this re-imagined suburbia will be able to be applied to any site.

We all want our own parking spaces so that we don’t have to worry about finding a parking spot in case u decided to have a long and wild night out. And we all want to have a sense of ownership and to be able to do what we want with our own homes.

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13

THE PROBLEM

Four 1400 sqft units along with two 900 sqft which can be rented out by Two of the house owners. Below the Rentable units is a shared parking garage space. Have a smaller front yard, but you still have a big back yard either private or shared. Roads in front and back of lot allow easy access to parking garage and units. We all want that big back yard where you can BBQ with your family and friends We all want to hove our private indoor and outdoor spaces do that our neighbors can’t spy on us

WE

SUBURBIA

This modified suburban lot allows for diverse unit sizes as granny flats, for couples or students to live in. It makes suburbia more affordable and gives some extra income to people living in the bigger units. Front yards are smaller becoming more human scale where it becomes a much more social space, while the back yard is still very spacious. Shared parking allows for more interaction with your neighbors.

Mirrored allows for a 24’ wide parking garage and Four rentable units being either 38’ x 24’ or 12’x75’ . It also acts as an infrastructure to the site as it collects grey water in cisterns for reuse. Additional parking would also be provided at the end of each block for rental unit residents or visitors


WE

LIVE WORK

SUBURBIA

14

PROGRAMING

UNITS - BLOCK KITCHEN

EVERYONE R

R-1

R-2

R-3

CONTENT RATED BY

AGHG

LIVING ROOM

LIVING ROOM

KITCHEN

1.0 F.A.R

2.0 F.A.R.

0.05 LIVE-WORK HOUSING

3.0 F.A.R

0.15 LIVE-WORK HOUSING LIVE

LEASING FINANCE 15% AFFORDABLE LIVE-WORK HOUSING

0.30 LIVE-WORK HOUSING LIVE

LIVE

WORK

WORK

LEASING FINANCE 25% AFFORDABLE LIVE-WORK HOUSING

1.0 F.A.R

2.0 F.A.R.

3.0 F.A.R

0.25 SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING 0.75 SENIOR HOUSING

0.60 MEDIUM DENSITY HOUSING 0.15 LIVE-WORK HOUSING 0.15 SENIOR HOUSING

0.70 HIGH DENSITY HOUSING 0.30 LIVE-WORK HOUSING

WORK

30 LEASING FINANCE 40% AFFORDABLE LIVE-WORK HOUSING

[UNITS/BLOCK]

60

RESIDENTIAL SQUARE FOOTAGE 1,000 SQFT - 2,250 SQFT

RETAIL

[UNITS/BLOCK]

100

RESIDENTIAL SQUARE FOOTAGE 825 SQFT - 2,000 SQFT

[UNITS/BLOCK]

UNIT VARIATION

RESIDENTIAL SQUARE FOOTAGE 525 SQFT - 1,250 SQFT

F.A.R EVERYONE

3ST OR Y

2S

TO RY

5-

ST OR Y

50

%

25

25

%

%

2.0 F.A.R.

1.0 F.A.R.

1.0 F.A.R

2.0 F.A.R.

3.0 F.A.R

50

[PEOPLE/ACRE]

BUILDING BLOCK COVERAGE 45,000 SQFT = 1 ACRE

0.10

[LOTS/BLOCK]

RETAIL TYPES SMALL INDEPENDENT

0.33

[LOTS/BLOCK]

RETAIL TYPES SMALL INDEPENDENT + MEDIUM FRANCHISE

0.50

[LOTS/BLOCK]

RETAIL TYPES SMALL INDEPENDENT + MEDIUM FRANCHISE

OPEN SPACE

+

ROOF SPACE

=

90%

100

[PEOPLE/ACRE]

BUILDING BLOCK COVERAGE 85,000 SQFT = 2 ACRES

3.0 F.A.R. 200

[PEOPLE/ACRE]

BUILDING BLOCK COVERAGE 150,00 SQFT = 3.5 ACRES


15

PROGRAMING

WE

SUBURBIA


URBAN FARM

Urban FARM future of city farming

As the interest and demand rises in New York City for locally grown food and the appreciation for a wealth of vegetables and plants deepens, there exists an opportunity to develop an urban agriculture for the city. Urban farming has the potential to raise city dwellers’ awareness of their food sources and increase their appreciation for agriculture and sustainable practices.

SITE PROXIMITY

COLLABORATIVE TEAM (CT) GABRIELA BARAJAS G. (ARC) ASHI MARTIN (ARC)

In addition to providing fresh nutrient rich food, the farms will provide a wealth of new employment opportunities in the city as well as potential revenue from urban farm markets. Waste incurred by shipping food into the city will also be reduced and will allow for even fresher farm to table opportunities at the markets and restaurants.

This open international ideas competition is for a Center for Urban Farming. This center will experiment with a small farm within New York City while also developing programs and serving as an educational hub for the promotion of urban agriculture. The facilities will house testing centers for developing means of safely and efficiently.

While farming is a fundamental part of our history, to make urban agriculture succeed, technology and science will play an important role. The celebration of progress and technology should be explored in the architecture for this project.

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17

DEVELOPMENT

URBAN FARM


CUTITUBECULAR

CutiTUBecular lighting the way

Cutis Tubercular is part of an ongoing investigation (SSV - Systemic Surface Variations) in lamellar, filigree, and planar quadrilateral (PQ) surfaces. Using in part biomimetic references, the research is anchored around hybridizing soft andrigid systems to create dermis-like effects and resolve several agendas whichencompass acoustic, tectonic, illumination, and enclosure conditions.

DEVELOPMENT

COLLABORATIVE TEAM (CT) GABRIELA BARAJAS G. (ARC) ASHI MARTIN (ARC) AXEL SCHMITZBERGE (ARC)

The current, projected version of the ongoing SSV research—Cutis Tubercularis—is a lighting installation derived and modified from a prior investment i creating a skin-like surface that ameliorates acoustic reverberation and improves illumination in the atrium of a building on a university campus in southernCalifornia.

The design follows prior rule-based strategies established early on; and, while maintaining a cohesive formal and visual strategy, it abandons traditional principles of architectural lighting and respectively acoustical responses. Limitingthe original research on parameters such as planar quadrilateral (PQ) conditions, lamella systems.

The tubercular structure’s form is based on self-relaxing suspension systems; thematerial stiffness is either achieved by the component materiality itself or throughthe chain-mail aggregation.

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19

DEVELOPMENT

The proposed size for the structure is 10 Feet in diameter on the top and features 1500 individual units.

CUTITUBECULAR


NueBIA The shelter

NEUBIA is a proposed evacuation shelter that addresses the growing need and urgency to implement temporary safe havens for people during a tsunami crisis. This particular shelter also serves as a vertical urban farm as well as science labs open to the community to promote sustainability awareness.

NUEBIA

SITE

COLLABORATIVE TEAM (CT) GABRIELA BARAJAS G. (ARC) MILAGRO J CARPIO (ARC) JIMMY CHANG (ENG) JENNIGER CHENG (ARC) HENRY CHI (ENG) MAN HUYNH (ENG) ASHI MARTIN (ARC)

Conceptually the tsunami shelter is designed with a hierarchal mindset with a building that expands as it grows in order to have a minimal footprint. The greater the tsunami, the higher the occupancy levels become which can accommodate over 1,000 people as the building produces local farmed aeroponic plants within the programmed wall space.

For this particular project, the team proposed the tsunami evacuation shelter to be situated in Seaside, Oregon. Seaside, Oregon is an ideal site because it sits along the edge of the Pacific Ocean relatively close to the Cascadia fault. The city is bisected by the Necanicum River which flows northward and empties into the ocean.

Demographically the city is home to approximately 6,500 people with a median age of 41. An art walk is held on the first Saturday of every month. In the summer, Seaside becomes a popular tourist area and carnival host with appealing hiking trails and historical background that entices many visitors into the area

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21

BASIC PROGRAMMING PROBABILISTIC

TSUNAMI

HAZARD

ASSESSMENT

Neacoxie Cr

incoming tsunami waves

SITE

LEGEND

SEASIDE OREGON Tsunami Observations Meters HMW-Horning, 1997

The structural System highlights that are supporting our structure are a V-shaped column wall that acts as an inner cone to resist lateral forces along with concrete rings holding the structure together. An outer cone to resist gravity loads. The five walls are designed as shear walls. The critical members of our structure include the interior and exterior walls, floor beams, and ring beams.

the graphics that were used in the project such as renderings and manipulations were completed by me. All photoshop work was handled and futher developed by me in addition to have had been of the lead designers

NUEBIA


BASIC PROGRAMMING

NUEBIA LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3

LEVEL 4

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23

BASIC PROGRAMMING

NUEBIA


CILUM

Ci_LUM home of the future

As time passes there is great need of more space due to population growth that is rapidly accelarating. The need for homes that require small space but that will be equiped with enough room to suffice the everyday day need of the average individual is something we so desperately need. This house is for the future demands that are so near us.

BASIC PROGRAMMING

ONE PERSON EFFORT (OPE) GABRIELA BARAJAS G. (ARC)

The future of housing changes in the future and that so does the architecture and the interior design. This house aims to satisfy the space that is required for a one single family to live off by in the future.

The programming of this research facility will be spacious and grand due to the large expectancy of inhibitors – the inhibitors being the humans, animals and plants. Considering the research and public units, it must be subdivided in a logical and systematic manner; orientation is very important in an institution that contains so many units that vary in accessibility.

Although the programming will be mechanical, the overall design objective is to be fluid, natural and interlaced with nature. By presenting an organized intersection of pathways and buildings with a soft and natural design will balance the composition of the facility center.

24


25

BASIC PROGRAMMING

The kitchen becomes the heart of the home providing the basic necessities we have to day but at a scale in which not too much room is necesary.

CILUM

The kitchen like today is the most important space in a home. It is what gives life and purpose to a home.

Areas of light, uncertainty, reflections and depths will be developed in the kitchen to serve as a family epicenter for everyone.


26

HOUSE

CILUM

current house layouts freezing

future house layouts

preperation

enrance enrance

hall

utilities

hall

side entrance

side entrance gate

kitchen utilities

play areas storing

gate

dinning room

garden/yard

kitchen living room

washing

cooking

play areas

dinning room

living room

garden/yard

combine house program and get rid of unnecessary spaces

dinning area

views from kitchen transit in larger homes

The home has a series of steps. People would move from the center being public to the more private spaces along the back.

The home has the capability of changing depending on where it is suitated. In order for the space to be maximized the door would be operable

An air duct would be provided for air circulation and glass openings on the roof for light penetration


27

HOUSE

CILUM


27

HOUSE

CILUM


DEVELOPMENT

CILUM

Ci_LUM v II home of the future

Another version of the future home. As time passes there is great need of more space due to population growth that is rapidly accelarating. The need for homes that require small space but that will be equiped with enough room to suffice the everyday day need of the average individual is something we so desperately need. This house is for the future demands that are so near us.

ONE PERSON EFFORT (OPE) GABRIELA BARAJAS G. (ARC)

Although the programming will be mechanical, the overall design objective is to be fluid, natural and interlaced with nature. By presenting an organized intersection of pathways and buildings with a soft and natural design will balance the composition of the facility center.

CTEKS

The programming of this research facility will be spacious and grand due to the large expectancy of inhibitors – the inhibitors being the humans, animals and plants. Considering the research and public units, it must be subdivided in a logical and systematic manner; orientation is very important in an institution that contains so many units that vary in accessibility.

The future of housing changes in the future and that so does the architecture and the interior design. This house aims to satisfy the space that is required for a one single family to live off by in the future.

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29

DEVELOPMENT

CILUM

SHELL WALL OPTED FOR SITTING SPACE-FURNITURE SPACE

a

b

KITCHEN SPACE/OUTDOOR LIVING BATHROOM PRIVATE SPACE TRANSITION

FLOOR PLAN BEDROOMS

WATER WIND SUN

The home has a series of steps. People would move from the center being public to the more private spaces along the back.

The home has the capability of changing depending on where it is suitated. In order for the space to be maximized the door would be operable

SECTIONS


CILUM

The walls become the living center. The walls act as place holders for furniture, accessories etc

fluidity layers of skin peeled back to receive an implant, there will be an above and a below that dialogue and interpenetrate one another.

Areas of light, uncertainty, reflections and depths will be developed

DEVELOPMENT

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31

DEVELOPMENT

CILUM


HIBERNACULUM

HiBERNaculum Were Becoming Extinct!

SENIOR PROJECT

EXTINCT (EX) EXTINCT IN THE WILD (EW) CRITICALLY ENDANGERED (CR) ENDANGERED (EN) VULNERABLE (VU) NEAR THREATENED (NT) LEAST CONCERN (LC) DATA DEFICIENT (DD) NOT EVALUATED (NE) ic

nt

cd

VU

CR

EW

EX

EX

EW

The main objective of this research conservation facility is to be a safe haven for the endangered species of California. Wild animals that are native to California – such as bobcats, wolves and foxes – will find homes that will be accurately replicated from their natural habitats. Scientific research in regards to gene preservation and reproduction will be conducted in hopes to ultimately preserve endangered species.

CR

VU

cd

nt

ic

Endangered plants and foliage will also be taken account of in this facility. Essential assets like nutrition, reproduction, environment, and trace elements consumption will be studied and replicated at maximum accuracy. The conservation facility will be reminiscent of familiar zoo programming although with a greater focus on educational and preservation elements.

The programming of this research facility will be spacious and grand due to the large expectancy of inhibitors – the inhibitors being the humans, animals and plants. Considering the research and public units, it must be subdivided in a logical and systematic manner; orientation is very important in an institution that contains so many units that vary in accessibility.

Although the programming will be mechanical, the overall design objective is to be fluid, natural and interlaced with nature. By presenting an organized intersection of pathways and buildings with a soft and natural design will balance the composition of the facility center.

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33

SENIOR PROJECT

HIBERNACULUM


HIBERNACULUM

The main objective of this research conservation facility is to be a safe haven for the endangered species of California. endangered species.

Wild animals that are native to California – such as bobcats, wolves and foxes – will find homes that will be accurately replicated from their natural habitats..

Scientific research in regards to gene preservation and reproduction will be conducted in hopes to ultimately preserve endangered species.

RENDERING

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35

California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica)

FINAL SITE PLAN

[CP]

Scarlet Columbine (Aquilegia formosa & ssp.)

HIBERNACULUM

[AQ]

[Plant Attraction]

[Plant Attraction]

Bird (Other) Attraction

Bird (Other) Attraction

Hummingbird Attraction

Hummingbird Attraction

Butterfly Attraction

Butterfly Attraction

Description - Eschscholzia californica, or the California poppy, is actually California's state flower. A hardy flower, it can live in limited conditions and does not need special care in order to blossom and survive. This flower displays extremely bright and orange petals.

The Red or Scarlet Columbine, scientifically named Aquilegia formosa, attracts hoards of humming birds because of its extremely sweet and nutritious nectar. Being a heavy bloomer, it flourishes in seasons of heavy sun. However, also need dampened soil in order to promote growth.

Coyote Mint (Monardella macrantha & ssp.)

[CM]

Monkey Flower (Mimulus cardinalis & ssp.)

[Plant Attraction]

[Plant Attraction]

Bird (Other) Attraction

Bird (Other) Attraction

Hummingbird Attraction Butterfly Attraction

Although very short-lived, the Manardella Macrantha 'Marian Sampson," also known as Coyote Mint, is prominent during summer and fall. This plant blooms with bergandy orange flowers and requires good drainage to survive.

[MF]

Hummingbird Attraction Butterfly Attraction

Mimulus Cardinalis, dubbed the Scarlet Monkey Flower, is an attractive ornamental plant. Because it is so easily pollinated, this species has produced over thousands of subspecies. This fiery flower is part of the Phrymacaea family.

Buckwheat (Eriogonum - fasciculatum, giganteum & umbellatum)

[BW]

Douglas Iris (Iris douglasiana)

[Plant Attraction]

[Plant Attraction]

Bird (Other) Attraction

Bird (Other) Attraction

Hummingbird Attraction Butterfly Attraction

Eriogonum fasciculatum 'Theodore Payne,' Theodore Payne buckwheat for short, is a very popular with bees and butterflies due to its pollen. Although the plant's growth habit is slow, its drought-tolerance make it a hardy plant that makes a beautiful groundcover.

[DI]

Hummingbird Attraction Butterfly Attraction

The Iris Douglasiana, shortened to Douglas Iris, usually blossom three individual flowers which contain a yellow iris. These plants are part of the Iridacaea family and grow usually in clumped masses.

PLANT PROGRAM LIST <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<


Because the facility would focus on species preservation, it was important to make enclosures that mimicked the original habitats of those endangered species. Creating spaces that were almost identical to their home habitats while making it accessible to the faculty was something that had to be done without confliction.

Creating spaces that were almost identical to their home habitats while making it accessible to the faculty was something that had to be done without confliction. Creating spaces that were able to be seen and monitored by faculty and the public was one of the main objectives of the project.

HIBERNACULUM

DEVELOPMENT

Sustainability was also a concept that had to be developed considering the focus behind Hibernaculum. Creating a structure that takes advantage of the abundant resource of sunlight and wind circulation without wasting electricity was the simplest yet most effective measure that coule be taken.

Although this programming may seem simplistic, the practicality of it will make it easy to navigate through for the faculty and the public that will be circulating through the facility.

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DEVELOPMENT

HIBERNACULUM


HIBERNACULUM

DEVELOPMENT

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DEVELOPMENT

HIBERNACULUM

The program of the facility was created accordingly to the four major focal points -- administration, machinary, lab + research, and educational spaces. Considering that the first floor is linked to the main entrance for the public, creating an educatioinal station here was essential. The second floor would be accessible to only faculty and other staff, so creating spaces for administration and mechanical on the second floor was the most practical solution.

INDOOR PROGRAM

LAB + RESEARCH SPACES

PUBLIC EDUCATION SPACES

ADMIN

MECHANICAL


HIBERNACULUM

RENDERING

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CODES RESEARCH

HIBERNACULUM


Academic Porftolio