Issuu on Google+

issue # 1, December 2011

A journal of refineMENt

STYLE, SHOPPING, TRAVEL, WINE, WATCHES, INTERIORS, PROFILES.

Nick Wooster A men’s style expert on personal style, Tumblr and working as “a well-informed soundboard” 1


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CONTENTS

22

36

12- SHOPPING - Tortoiseshell eyewear, christmas presents, accessories

26- TRAVELLING - Paris for a weekend, by Gabriel Weil

16- PROFILE - Nick Wooster, by Gabriel Weil

30- WINE - California, by David Organisak

23- Q&A - George Paul Arab on mens fashion today

34- TRAVELLING - The Glamorous Explorers, by Gabriel Weil

24- INTERIORS - A flat that is a mirror of its owner, by Gabriel Weil

38- VINTAGE - Vintage Watches as the way forward, by Gabriel Weil

54

52

59- FASHION

44- PROFILE - David Frampton, by Gabriel Weil

82- GROOMING - Face Lifts, investigated by Gabriel Weil

54- DRINKING - Dry Martini, by Gabriel Weil

84- COACHING - The Ultimate Upgrade, by Angus Fletcher

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CONTRIBUTORS

GABRIEL MARQUEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S is a multimedia artist. Currently based in Sao Paulo, Brazil. His work ranges from illustration to graphic design, art direction and animation to tattoos. He's the illustrator of this issue's Nick Wooster cover.

ANGUS FLETCHER is a coach known for his natural style that combines humour with the ability to get to the nub of the issue however uncomfortable it may be to face. His clients include international non-profit organisations, UK prisons and Schools. He wrote "The Ultimate Upgrade" based on his own observations, especially for PROPER.

RAYMOND TAN'SZRUNVIHDWXUHV SKRWRJUDSK\DQGWLPHEDVHGPHGLD H[SORULQJLPDJHWKURXJKVXEOLPLQDO QDUUDWLYHV+LVZRUNLVQRPLQDWHGIRU WKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO<RXQJ3KRWRJUDSKHU $ZDUGDQGWKHRIĂ&#x20AC;FLDOVHOHFWLRQVIRU WKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO3KRWRJUDSK\ $ZDUG5D\PRQGSKRWRJUDSKHG'DYLG )UDPSWRQ+XJR:RGGLV0LNH'DOH DQG*HRUJH3DXO$UDEIRU3523(5 SURĂ&#x20AC;OHVDQGIDVKLRQVSUHDGV

DAVID ORGANISAK is a Los Angeles based wine importer, food and wine blogger, and self-avowed foodie and wine geek as well as travel addict. He shares his expertise on California Vino-Tourism. wineguyla@gmail.com

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CHRISTOPHER AGIUS BURKE, comes from the tiny island of Malta.  Stumbling across photography accidentally after a bad romantic breakup, his passion for photography grew as he experimented with various forms of image making.  Based in London he now works predominantly in fashion and portrait photography. He photographed Dominic O' Flynn in our fashion spread "Appointment".


prop¡er (prĂľp â&#x20AC;&#x2122; r) e

adj. 1. Characterized by appropriateness or suitability; fitting: the proper knife for cutting bread; not a proper moment for a joke. 2. Called for by rules or conventions; correct: the proper form for a business letter. 3. Strictly following rules or conventions, especially in social behavior; seemly: a proper lady; a proper gentleman. 4. a. Belonging to one; own: restored to his proper shape by the magician. b. Characteristically belonging to the being or thing in question; peculiar: an optical effect proper to fluids. 5. Being within the strictly limited sense, as of a term designating something: the town proper, excluding the suburbs. 6. Ecclesiastical for use in the liturgy of a particular feast or season of the year. 7. Mathematics of or relating to a subset of a given set when the set has at least one element not in the subset. 8. Worthy of the name; true: wanted a proper dinner, not just a snack. 9. Out-and-out; thorough: a proper whipping.

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PROPER SHOPPING

TORTOISESHELL 1.

Horn-rimmed spectacles were

2.

made popular by comedian Harold Lloyd in his movies around 1917. This made glasses a fashion item rather than just an utility device. After this, tortoiseshell or horn rims (which are really made from plastic), were the finishing touch of legendar y fashion moments.

3.

6.

4.

7.

5.

1. OLIVER PEOPLES; 2. OLIVER PEOPLES; 3. BARTON PERREIRA; 4. TOM FORD; 5. PERSOL; 6. OLIVER PEOPLES; 7. PERSOL. from OPTICIANS NATIONWIDE.

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PROPER SHOPPING

ACCESORIES

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

1. Wallet, BOTTEGA VENETA; 2. Wallet, LOUIS VUITTON; 3. Wallet, HERMÈS; 4. Bag in woven leather available in different versions and colours, from £1,440, BOTTEGA VENETA; 5. “Steve” bag in smooth taurillon leather, price upon request, HERMÈS; 6. Bag in “Utah” leather with aged finish hardware, £1680, LOUIS VUITTON; 7. Cufflinks in brushed white gold, ANTONIO BERNARDO; 8. Silver cufflinks, HERMÈS; 9. Cufflinks in textured silver, BOTTEGA VENETA; 10. Cufflinks in Swarowski crystal and metal, LANVIN; 11. Cufflinks in oxidised silver; BOTTEGA VENETA.

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PROPER SHOPPING

MY HOLIDAY WISH LIST:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

1.Briefcase, LOUIS VUITTON. 2. Tie, CHARVET. 3. Etrivière Belt, HERMÈS. 4.Charles Eames chair, KNOLL. 5.Watch, PATEK PHILIPPE. 6.Gregory Peck spectators, OLIVER PEOPLES. 7.Victoria weekend bag, HERMÈS. 8.William II Shoes, JOHN LOBB. 9.Coat, BAND OF OUTSIDERS. 10.Spark jumper, S.N.S-HERNING. 11.Range Rover, LAND ROVER.

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PROPER SHOPPING

HERS:

1.

2.

4.

5.

7.

3.

6.

8.

10.

9.

11.

1. Kelly clutch in crocodile by HERMÈS. 2.Bone cuff in gold, TIFFANY & CO. 3.Greer pumps, J.CREW. 4.Edith coat, STELLA MCCARTNEY. 5.Golden Stones rings in gold, crystal and diamonds, H. STERN. 6.Kosslyn sunglasses, OLIVER PEOPLES. 7.Nautilus watch in rose gold and diamonds, PATEK PHILIPPE. 8.Golden Retriever puppy. 9.BRNO chair, KNOLL. 10.Tribute Sandals, YVES SAINT LAURENT. 11. Belt, HERMÈS.

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PROPER PROFILE

N NickWooster Words by GABRIEL WEIL


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PROPER PROFILE

F

ashion insiders tend to be more con-

scious about what they wear than most people. To unfamiliar eyes, however, some of them may seem too extreme, too creative or too fussy. These carefully dressed individuals are often easy to classify, label and group, but they have things to teach when it comes to style. In a league of his own is veteran Nick Wooster. With a dauntless, yet elegant approach to style, this Manhattan-based menswear expert is the ultimate masculine style icon. He’s also object of cult of the ever-growing universe of street style blogs and its followers. Whether classically or rebelliously suited, Wooster, once described as a “sartorial badass”, never ceases to impress observers with his experiments in proportion, colour and pattern. Nevertheless, as bold as they may be, Wooster’s choices never sacrifice precise tailoring, masculinity or appropriateness. In full control of both the rebel and the classic gentleman within himself, he masters matching tie and shirt combos, blazer and shorts, cropped suits and leopard print trousers among others. His shoes are often stylised brogues that perform an extra function: “I always look for thick soled shoes to add an inch to my height. A 5’7” midget like me has to”, he exaggerates. In addition, his hairstyle is youthful, suitable and classic, his facial hair is impeccably groomed, his collection of classic shades shade without masking, and accessories are carefully picked. Rebelliousness, as his multicoloured, fully tattooed arms and partially inked legs might come across, didn’t happen in his teens or early twenties as it usually happens, but in his early thirties. “I got my first tattoo at thirty-three, in 1993. I finished my sleeves in 2008 and I started the legs in 2009. The legs are the only part I regret, because it was an extremely painful experience.” He also started smoking at age 31, when most regret having started

18


PROPER PROFILE

in the first place. “I know it’s stupid, but that’s just me”, he jokes. Without a doubt, there’s much to learn from a man that had already wised up before making the regrettable choices of life. His ability to use fashion to create a character who oozes elegance, has an air of mystery and breaks convention is a true talent. “I’m a midget who is known for dressing well, but I don’t think my ability to dress myself is very remarkable.” Nick’s superpower is an “eye” and a remarkable skill of synthesising what he sees, converting stimuli or imagery inspiration into fashion editing. “I don’t have an original idea. I was given a good filter at birth and I have my mum and dad to thank for it”. It’s from this exercise of style that both his personal and professional success come from. “An editorial eye for retailers” is how he describes his job. Beyond buying clothes from designers and discovering new talents, it’s his job to ensure the merchandise mix will make sense and stimulate his increasingly jaded consumer. “At the end of the day, it’s only a rack of clothes. What makes the difference is the story you tell with it. It’s all about information. I’m a well-informed sound board”, he explains. This includes defining visual merchandising, mix of products, colours, shapes and turning it all into a concept that will make the retailer sell by telling the right story. High responsibility, no doubt. Over the past three decades Nick’s talent has served prestigious designers such as John Bartlett, Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein, given him the job of men’s fashion director for Neiman Marcus/ Bergdorf Goodman, and his current similar position at the Gilt Group. Internet visibility, however, has happened on the last few years, and according to him, is resumed to a universe of fashion followers. “I’m not recognised at the grocery store, for example, but I’ll have people approach me when I’m shopping for clothes. It’s very funny, but super flattering”

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“I don’t think my ability to dress myself is very remarkable.”

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PROPER,PROFILE

Wooster’s scrapbook is available online on his Tumblr page (http://nickelsonwooster.tumblr. com). With a collection of imagery that ranges from cars to people, interiors, or just graphic design, he’s one of many who share his inspiration with blog followers. Lately, Tumblr has become one of his favourite activities. “I’m obsessed with Tumblr. It’s easy, it puts me in touch with what other people think, and it’s a great way to build an inspiration board.” As inspiring as his profile may seem, remember not to try it at home. Wooster is impossible to recreate. More than a lesson in style, he’s an example of individuality, and should inspire other gentlemen to become their own soundboards.

Where did you grow up?

“In Salina, Kansas, it was perfect.” Which is your drink?

“I don’t drink, so I’ll have iced coffee or club soda with cranberry juice.”

What do you like to eat? “Steak.”

What do you drive?

“I don’t have a car right now, but I had a BMW when I lived in LA. I’d drive a Range Rover now. You know, for the height.” Do you work out?

“ Yes. Six times a week if I’m in the zone.” What’s the worst possible look for a man?

“I’ll give you a PC (politically correct) answer:

It’s not about money. Some people spend a fortune



on designer things that don’t go together. Jeans and t-shirt can look great.” Do you shop online?

“ Yes, for groceries, for example. But for other

things, I love the thrill of finding them physically.”

All the pictures are reproductions of street style blogs.

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PROPER Q&A

What is your work uniform? I don’t have one. Lately I’ve been wearing made-tomeasure Gucci and forgot about the fashion pieces. What’s hot in menswear right now? I’ve been watching the success of these mid-market french brands in Paris over the past 5 years. Zadig et Voltaire, The Kooples, etc., which are now what Agnès B. was 20 years ago: a stylish mid-range brand. They’re selling incredibly well to BOBOs in Paris and beginning to go abroad. Then, of course, you have the client that will go for designers for status or quality. Where do men get their fashion information from these days? I’d say from fashion magazines, but they’re in a terrible moment. I guess it depends on the group of men. Billboards and advertising in general. In Europe you’ll see many men getting their fashion information from their partners, wives, girlfriends, with whom they often shop. Who is the best dressed man in the world?



I hate best dressed lists. I mean, they’re ridiculous! I definitely don’t believe in them. But, if I had to choose, I’d say Lapo Elkann is one of the best dressed men in the world. And the best dressed men are the Italians. In Milan, or in Florence, where they’re more of a BCBG kind.

George Paul Arab

The Paris-based Gucci’s worldwide training manager on style, retail and fashion magazines: George Paul Arab in London, September, 2011 blazer, GUCCI. Photo by RAYMOND

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PROPER INTERIORS

W HAT theWALLS SAY

All photos are courtesy of Roberto Negrete Interiores.

Childhood memories, unexplained crushes and a bar hidden behind books in a flat that is both functional and autobiographical. Words by GABRIEL WEIL

Clockwise from top right: Emeco Navy chairs and the corner fireplace in the living-room; glass tesserae in the bathroom; the kitchen where everything is at hand and ceramic vases against the mirrored entrance hall walls.

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PROPER INTERIORS

The living-room and the Guglielmo Ulrich chairs, among the designer’s favourite features.

T

entertainment centre, the fireplace, and the library that hides the bar.” On the practical side, he also loves the way the kitchen allows for

he Jardins area lies between downtown and the highest-

quick meals and has every appliance at hand.

end residential neighbourhood of Sao Paulo. Commercially and residentially desirable, it’s the address of sought-after shops and

The owner takes pride in how the space respects his “historical

restaurants and the strategic home of many who belong to the social,

repertoire”. “Light coloured wooden floors, mirrors, glass tesserae…

cultural and trendy core of the metropolis.

objects of my childhood home, revisited, of course.” He talks about

Located at the heart of Jardins, interior designer Roberto

the prevalence of an introspective search, not for trends, but for what

Negrete’s flat and home office is immaculate without being

makes him feel good. Rather than displaying fashions of the volatile

precious. Shared by himself and his cat, and constantly receiving

interior design industry, Negrete’s flat is about embracing what,

friends, colleagues and clients, it’s a work of distinctive design and

throughout the years, has built his aesthetic character.

functionality.

Uninformed visitors notice the unpretentious, yet curated

“...objects of my childhood home, revisited, of course.”

display of attractive furniture and objects, from which he points out his favourites: “At the entrance hall, the glass shell fixed to the mirrors, loaded with ceramic vases that I have an unexplainable crush on, the Guglielmo Ulrich chairs in the living room, made by Italian

Negrete has built the space from scratch, radically changing the flat plan of a 1950s apartment later remodelled on a 1980s loft of

manufacturers Matteo Grassi, and the white work on acrylic over

Japanese inspiration. “It was a very peculiar design that didn’t meet my

canvas at the entrance hall of the bedrooms.” Other harmoniously

needs. I needed two suites and a more spacious social area.”

placed charming picks such as the nonchalant Emeco navy chairs in

He needed more than that. Self-knowledge enthusiast and



the dining room subvert any sense of the untouchable. It’s a place to

passionate professional, Negrete sought to fully express himself;

live in.

which he lets out when commenting on the rooms of his flat: “I

“The idea was to let time do its work. To fill the walls with

think all of them are well-resolved. Each serves its purpose. The sink

more art, which curdles the tables and shelves with objects and

in the bathroom allows me to witness the sunrise coming through

memories, and stacks of books and magazines occupy more and more

the bedroom window; the living room wall that embraces the

space. The place exists, and for sure, time passes.”

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PROPER TRAVELLING

Week-end à PARIS

([FXVHRXU)UHQFKEXWWKH\ZRQ·WH[FXVH\RXU(QJOLVK/HDUQWRJHWDORQJWRHQMR\WKHPDJQLÃ&#x20AC;FHQW)UHQFKFDSLWDO Words by GABRIEL WEIL

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PROPER TRAVELLING

E

urostar’s Central London to Central Paris journey is

local. It could be a waiter, a taxi driver, a sales clerk or just a random

almost painless. It makes the French capital the perfect destination for

citizen. So what to do when a Parisian is less than kind to you? The

a weekend getaway. On paper. Cultural differences and peculiarities,

few helpful Parisians we could find came up with different antidotes to

however, might make this experience something close to a nightmare.

their own poison: “Give them a big smile and tell them they’re right”

Proper asked native Parisians for advice on how to deal with issues

was the civilised, sensible one; “Just ignore them and look down your

that make Paris a less than welcoming city. The questionnaire was

nose at them” is for those who feel the need to show some dissatisfac-

anonymous, allowing our Parisians to be entirely honest about their

tion. And for those who will lose sleep over an episode of this sort, “Be

hometown.

even more unpleasant. Parisians love to be abused!” It’s even said that

The first and almost ubiquitous comment was that Parisians

they can be snippy with one another, so be aware that what you may

don’t like it when you speak English: “We’re selfish and egocentric. We

perceive as rudeness might be no more than their own normal “man-

speak only French.” If you happen not to speak French, you’re likely to

ners”.

upset the locals, and they’re likely to roll their eyes at you. There’s no

Due to their own prejudices, tourists are also entirely to

way out of this one, so just keep it in mind.

blame for any disappointments when visiting a foreign city. Parisians

“Everything is irritating. We’re mean...”

despair at some touristic preconceptions, such as: “Paris is a romantic city.” It’s certainly beautiful, seductive and dazzling, but don’t count on Paris to inject romance into your life. You’ll be disappointed if you go to Paris to fall in love and just wind up getting irritated with the waiter. More direct and personal statements such as “Our women do not depilate”, “We don’t shower, we just use perfume to disguise the smell” or “Cheating on our partners is part of our culture” are nothing but urban legends, according to them.

Don’t forget that despite its beauty and high touristic appeal,

“Parisians love to be abused.”

Paris is a big, busy capital like many others. Just as in any other large city, tourist activity can really irritate the locals when they’re simply minding their own business. Here’s some things they pointed out: “Don’t talk in a loud voice,” especially when you’re at a table. Spaces are small, acoustics are bad, and a loud, drunken foreigner can be irritating in such a setting. The concept of “pub behaviour” doesn’t apply to their culture. Also, “Don’t bump into people” and “Don’t walk slowly on the sidewalks.” It’s OK for them to bump into you because theyw’re busy

They have also stated that it’s not true that “in Paris you eat

getting on with their lives. You, on the other hand, are merely spending

and drink well anywhere.” Again, like any other touristic city, Paris

money, helping to move their economy and admiring the beauty of

is full of traps. However, our lovely locals were kind enough to share

their city. “Everything is irritating. We’re mean!” If they say so…

some of their own favourite brasseries, where they do eat and drink

However careful you are, you may bump into an unfriendly

well, off the touristic circuit.

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PROPER TRAVELLING

When in Paris... BRASSERIES

CLICHÉS TO 9,6,7

La Fontaine de Mars, “it’s trop bon, with typical décor.”

wPère Lachaise cemetery, with famous graves such as Jim Morrison’s, Edith Piaf ’s and Marcel Proust’s. It can be a draining tour, since it’s such a large graveyard that you have to visit with the help of a map, a little like treasure hunting.

129 Rue Saint-Dominique 75007 Paris, France (33) 1 47 05 46 44

Balzar, “Good cuisine, and a mix of French intellectuals and chic foreigners.” 49 Rue des Ecoles 75005 Paris, France (33) 1 43 54 13 67

Sacré Coeur de Paris, because even if you’re not into church visiting, the view of the city makes it all worth the hike.

Chez Flottes, “For its proximity to Rue Cambon and Place de la Concorde.”

Bateau-Mouche tour, for many, the best way to see Paris, with a unique view from the Seine.

2 Rue Cambon 75001 Paris, France (33) 1 42 60 80 89

The Louvre, select an area of your interest and stick to it. You cannot do the entire museum in one visit.

Chez Paul, “You enter through an old confectioners. They dish up food specialties served in the south west by a really kind rugby player.”

Palais Royal, lovely place with shops and galleries in the heart of Paris. Notre Dame, because you can’t escape it.

13 Rue Charonne 75011 Paris, France (33) 1 47 00 34 57

The Marais, for shops, bakeries and people-watching. Great on Sundays.

Le Loir dans la Théière, “Lunch and tea only, this is a great café, with an interesting crowd.”

Tuileries Gardens, Paris’s Hyde Park.

3, Rue des Rosiers 75004 Paris, France (33) 1 42 72 90 61

Alexandre III bridge, one of the most beautiful sights in Paris. Don’t just see it from the taxi.

CAFÉS La Palette, where stylish locals gather for typically Parisian happy hours. 43 Rue de Seine 75006 Paris (33) 1 43 26 68 15

Ferdi, for the apéritif.

32 Rue du Mont Thabor 75001 Paris, France (33) 1 42 60 82 52



Sans Souci, “where there are no tourists, only BOBOs.” 65 Rue Jean-Baptiste Pigalle 75009 Paris, France (33) 1 48 74 37 28

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PROPER WINE

CALIFORNIA Vino-Tourism where it started words by DAVID ORGANISAK

I

ferentiate between wines with soul and those that are “soul-less”. The

have often found that the best learning experiences

I have ever had came when I immersed myself in a subject. It was

wines that follow are more naturally predisposed to welcoming wine

painful when those subjects were less pleasurable than the world of

lovers and wine-tourists.

food and wine. “Computational Linear Algebra” and “Probability and

Many countries and wine regions have recognised both the

Statistics” are far less “palatable” subjects than “The Wine and Food of

marketing and economic potential of vino-tourism. California has set

Burgundy or Piedmont.”

the standard, and, for better or worse, it is being copied the world over. When I visit a modern Chateau in Bordeaux (France) or a Bodega

My travels to various countries have been very important to me when trying to understand the wines made in those regions. It’s

in Spain or Argentina, all I can think of is, “How very California of

essential to take in the climate (whatever time of year one chooses),

them!” And though I have never been, I hear the same of wineries in

the sunlight, the slope (or lack thereof ) of the vineyards, the soils

Australia that have also been developing that standard for years now. Regions around the world that were among the first to em-

(white and limestoney, or red and clay-like, or perhaps pebbly. Let us also not forget the people, the cuisine, and the cheeses of the regions

brace this user-friendly style of vino-tourism are those that naturally

(especially in Europe).

have a lot of wine to sell and money behind them to do so to attract customers. That is, publicity in any form, including regional tourism,

This is aimed at those uninitiated wine lovers who would like to learn more about wine by choosing a country or region geared

helps bring brand awareness to their wines. Think Napa (California),

to tourists who like wine that also fun and easy to explore. In future

Mendoza (Argentina), Bordeaux and Champagne (France), Rioja

columns I will touch on regions that require a bit more effort in terms

(Spain), Piedmont (Italy), or Australia and Barolo(just wait until you

of research, planning and arranging visits to wineries to get the most

see some of the splashy facilities there).

out of one’s travels. In those regions, you need to let the soul of the area envelope you in order to be able to appreciate each wine and dif-

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PROPER WINE

Opus One’s modern installations

CALIFORNIA

There are good examples of wineries producing large quanti-

Let us start where it all probably started. The most fruitful

ties of wines while vying for the attention of visitors to the region. The

trip to California to explore wine would be one that includes visits to

first two are outstanding references of the heights of architecture in

three distinctive, though disparate, regions: Napa, Sonoma and the

wine regions:

Central Coast.

OPUS ONE NAPA

A joint venture between the aristocracy of French and Cali-

Since its epoch, Napa has been set up to handle visitors,

fornian wine-makers/families: the Rothschilds and the Mondavis,

and it does so with aplomb (at times a little too much aplomb). The

(http://www.opusonewinery.com/)

region is known for its busy tasting rooms and first-rate tours of rather impressive, if not dishearteningly large, wine-making facilities. There

QUINTESSA

are the exceptions to these rules, but many of those wineries make it

Founded by the aristocracy of Chilean wines, the Huneus

difficult to wangle a private tour. But for the most part, you can spend

family. One of the most beautiful properties in Napa as well as one of

a very pleasurable four to five days exploring (tasting, eating and sight-

the most impressive wineries. Designed by the San Francisco archi-

seeing) your way through the Napa Valley. In the town of Yountville is

tectural firm of Walker Warner and opened in 2002, it is a “quintes-

the French Laundry, considered by some to be the best restaurant in

sential” modern facility. (http://www.quintessa.com)

America. You might even be fortunate enough to land a reservation. Otherwise, there are plenty of other extracurricular activities to keep

ROBERT SINSKEY

one busy, such as mud baths in Calistoga or a hot-air balloon ride over

Off the beaten path in more ways than one. Here one finds

the vineyards.

delicious crafted wines made from other than the standard Bordeaux varietals grown in the Napa Valley. Besides Merlot and Cabernet

31


PROPER WINE

A map of the Californian wine country

Sauvignon, at Sinskey you will find a range of wines made from Caber-

SWAN

net Franc, Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris and Pinot Blanc. Here, as well, the

A small winery and one that begins to give you more of a

wines can be tasted along with the delicious seasonal fare served from

feel for what to expect from Sonoma; and, frankly, perhaps more like

their kitchen on the property. (http://www.robertsinskey.com/)

the less tourism-centric wine regions of Europe. Stop to taste delicious Pinots and Zinfandels.

SONOMA

http://w ww.swanwinery.com/wine.php

When heading north out of San Francisco, I have found this to be the region that I gravitate towards for two reasons. First, it

Here are two interesting stops that you may want to make while there:

feels more laid back and friendly; less bling and more soul. Second, the wines produced here are predominantly from Pinot Noir, Zinfan-

Copain Wine Cellars - http://www.copainwines.com/

del and Chardonnay (versus mostly Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and

Williams-Selyem Winery - http://williamsselyem.com/

Chardonnay in Napa). The wineries in this region have a tendency to be smaller, and hence, for me, at times provide a more genuine and

I am going to throw the following ones in as a bonus, for

intimate experience than some of the wineries in Napa.

these may be considered a bit more geeky or “boutiquey” than the wineries I’ve listed so far. But you should try to stop in if you are in the

KISTLER VINEYARDS

Northern Sonoma area (I’m not really a Zin guy, but these two make

A name perhaps synonymous with the success and reputa-

some wonderful Zinfandels):

tion of finely crafted Sonoma Valley wines. http://www.kistlervineyards.com/home/

A. Rafanelli Winery http://arafanelliwinery.com/



Ridge Lytton Springs Winery http://www.ridgewine.com/index.taf

32


33


PROPER TRAVELLING

THE GLAMOROUS EXPLORERS

Adventure in beautiful classic cars and high luxe, worldwide tourism is actually someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job.

Words by GABRIEL WEIL


PROPERTRAVELLING

The Jewel that is Jordan,courtesy of The Jewel Events

J

onathon Lyons is a long-time classic cars enthusiast and

derful collection of both joining the events. There is no other organisa-

a Bentley collector. In his collection are a rally-prepared 1953 R-Type

tion that presents lifestyle car events that is anywhere near our quality,” Trust comes from a reputation gained from impeccable

Continental and a 1938 Derby all-weather tourer with coachwork by Vandem Plas, formerly owned by the late King of Jordan. Also a

organisation. The routes are carefully researched for the best hotels,

passionate traveller, he has explored the world in his classic motorcars.

restaurants and tourist spots. “If we believe in our formula, we then

Lyons’s combination of interests resulted in his founding of “The Jewel

have road books designed to take us to these places on the most scenic

Events”, an organisation that promotes luxury lifestyle car events.

roads,” he explains. Although limitations in sophistication in some

These are better described as high-luxe rallies, in which participants

countries or regions are taken into account, he won’t book anything

drive their vehicles through carefully designed routes in different

that is less than the best. The pampered adventurers are catered for

countries or regions throughout the planet. These trips allow for both

with baggage service hotel to hotel, full mechanical team back-up

enjoyment of driving and uniquely luxurious exploring, with outstand-

following the last vehicle, the best hotels and venues organised in

ing sightseeing, gala events and gastronomic experiences.

advance, not to mention “special surprises” en route. “The Jewel That Is Europe I” left from the Chateau de

The select group of participants is composed of keen world travellers gathered by their passion for old cars, “with an organisation

Montfort, in France, to arrive at the Grand Finale Gala Dinner held

that they have grown to trust, which gives them as good as they can

at the Palazzo Ducale di Monforte, near the Amalfi Coast, in Italy.

get, and relieves them of the responsibility of organising it themselves”,

Participants got to experience the best features of the explored regions,

as Lyons describes it. “The cars, although a very important criteria, are

such as the tasting of black truffles and foie gras in the French Region

second to the people that apply. We have, I am thrilled to say, a won-

of Périgord, plus historic sightseeing throughout the trip.

35


PROPER TRAVELLING

The Classic Motor Cars, courtesy of The Jewel Events

In 2007, The Jewel Events produced “The Jewel That Is

became one of the seven wonders of the world,” Lyons says. Nearly all

China”, a pioneering event of the sort in the cournty. The tour from

participants have personally been presented to Their Majesties and to

Shanghai to Beijing was held by request of the Chinese government.

other members of the royal family. “It was never intended to become

Participants enjoyed a private gala dinner held in the Great Hall of the

an almost full-time occupation – a description I prefer to ‘business’. It

People and the first test showing of the 2008 Olympic firework display.

simply became a question of supply and demand.”

In 2008, “The Jewel That Is Europe II” started in Beaulieu-Sur-Mer

To Lyons, the participants are more than clients. “They

and finished once again at the Palazzo Ducale, with a black tie dinner

seem now to select us and a hard core of the participants have become

given by the Princess Pignatelli di Strongoli. Guests overlooked the

friends and family.” Often with encores due to demand, routes such as

Bay of Naples from the rooftop of the Palace.

London-Cape Town; Liège-Rome-Liège; Monte Carlo Classic; Copa

It all started in 2003, when Lyons organised “The Jewel That

Milano; and Lands End-John O’ Groats also took place, as well as

Is Jordan”, in which 44 rare classic cars set off from the Red Sea port of

visits to the Oktoberfest.

Aqaba to explore the country. “It was done as a one-off (so I thought)

Throughout the years, as is easy to imagine, Lyons has col-



event to honour my friend the late King Hussein of the Hashemite

lected several memorable moments, and he hesitates to point out the

Kingdom of Jordan and to show the world what a haven of peace Jor-

most special: “Perhaps Her Majesty Queen Rania dropping by in a

dan was in this troubled area,” he says. The great success of the event,

helicopter to greet the Jewel Participants without their knowledge at

and several requests for more, led in 2005 to “The Jewel That Is Jordan

the sight where Jesus was baptised, in Jordan.” When asked about his

II”, followed by III and IV in subsequent years. “We’ve had cars twice

dream route – one that he hasn’t yet, but would love to explore – Lyons

outside the treasury at Petra. Two weeks after the last occasion, Petra

is enthusiastically indecisive: “I have so many! Watch this space.”

36


37


PROPER VINTAGE

GOING BACK IN TIME

The best of Vintage Watches words by GABRIEL WEIL

1960s 18K Gold ROLEX OYSTER: qualityvintagetimepieces.com

38


PROPER VINTAGE

PATEK PHILLIPE from the 1940s in 18K gold: plaza57.com

/

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39


PROPER VINTAGE

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40


PROPER VINTAGE

V5ROH[2\VWHU

41

Early 1950s LeCoultre Futurematic, with extra complications.


1956 Universal Genève with full calendar, chronometer and moon phases

42


PROPERVINTAGE

52/(;



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A 1949 Rolex advert

43




PROPER PROFILE

“IT’S ALL GOOD...” David Frampton on acting, modelling and living life to the fullest. Words and Fashion by GABRIEL WEIL Photography by RAYMOND TAN

44


Coat by PRADA.

45


PROPERPROFILE

A

ctor David Frampton is John Kelly, in Sing J. Lee's

Acting is in the family. David's father was an actor at the

First the Bird Fell, a 2011 short film being shown in festivals through-

Royal Shakespeare Company, time during which a young David could

out Europe. He plays a retired runner in the process of remembering

watch stage performances, which, according to him, gave him a clear

his past. "We shot in Wales for four days. It rained non-stop, it was

idea of what he wanted to do for a living since very early in life.

freaking cold and I was wearing a vest and shorts most of the time",

He's been working in commercial movies, feature films and

he remembers with a laugh. 2011 has been a year of intense work for

film editorials, and is loving every new job. About the roles he plays, he

Frampton, who just got back from Turkey, where he starred in another

comments:

short movie. "The place was beautiful and I was treated like a prince."

“My talent really lies in evil. I play lots of psychos and bad guys."

The 34 year-old actor studied acting back at home, in Northamptonshire, at age 17. It was a three-year course he left six months early to move to London. The move led to a number of experiences that he remembers with a grim: "I worked as carpenter, delivery

He’s looking forward to experimenting with roles of differ-

man, and managed bars and clubs in Chelsea." Then came model-

ent sorts: “I’d like to play someone vulnerable, an outcast, disabled… I

ling, which took him around the world and, as he puts it, "was stupid

want to go for the whole spectrum.”

money for hardly doing anything." David modelled for several years to



David is enjoying himself like never before. “To me, every-

follow, until, three years ago, he decided to go back to his true passion

thing just seems to flow. I used to be a pessimist, looking for the bad in

of acting. All his life experience was key to shape the actor he is now.

everything. Now I’m happy all the time. I’ve realised there’s no bad. It’s

"I don't know how these kids that come straight from acting school do

all good.”

it without experience to draw from", he comments.

46


Coat from a selection. Trousers by PRADA, scarf by BURBERRY.

47


48


Military shirt from a vintage shop, about ÂŁ10. Watch, JAEGER LE COULTRE, circa 1954.

49


50


Jumper by JOHN SMEDLEY, trousers by GIORGIO ARMANI.

51


52


This page: blazer by GIORGIO ARMANI, jumper by UNIQLO, jeans by LEVI’S. Opposite page: trousers from a SELECTION, shirt by YVES SAINT LAURENT.

53


PROPER DRINKING

DRY MARTINI

A few things to know, whether you’re fixing or ordering. Words by: GABRIEL WEIL


PROPER DRINKING

A PROPER DRY MARTINI

GIN OR VODKA? HOW TO WORK THE MAIN INGREDIENT.

The origin of the dry Martini is unclear. It’s said by some to date from the 1860s, having first been served in San Francisco. Others

Vodka or gin can be used to make a dry Martini. It’s about

tell the story of a drink first served at the Knickerbocker Hotel in New

preference. As with the vermouth, when it comes to brands, styles

York, in the early 1900s.

and quality, choice is wide. There’s a growing gin trend in the drinks

But this is all absolute trivia. Let’s focus on discovering the

market, with launches from different countries, each with its own twist.

secrets of a good Martini. You should know how to make one, even if

G’Vine, a French brand, for example, is crafted from grape spirit, as

it’s just to order one properly. The basic recipe is simple, though the

opposed to grain. It has a distinctive “perfume”, a characteristic taken

numerous choices make it a bit of a science.

all the way to the presentation – its bottle looks as if it should contain

The international Bar Association has defined the propor-

cologne. For reasons of convention or availability, the traditional, better

tions for a dry Martini: 55ml of gin/vodka to 15ml of dry vermouth. It

known brands are still the most used.

should be mixed with ice in an adequate receptacle, then strained and

Whether you’re preparing it with gin or vodka, it’s important

served straight up in the glass. It’s finished off with a lemon twist or an

to have it properly added to the drink. First of all, it must be chilled.

olive. This should make an acceptable, basic dry Martini.

This is usually done in a mixing glass filled with ice. Marco explains:

There are, however, different versions of the classic. And, like

“You shouldn’t make circular movements. You should hear the noise

getting coffee in the high street, you might face various questions you

of the ice.” According to him, this technique avoids excessive dilution

should be ready to answer. “We ask: Gin or vodka? Twist or olive? and

from the melted ice.

How dry?”, says Marco Ercolano, bar manager at Galvin at Windows,

Dilution is a very important aspect: it shouldn’t add more

the Michelin-starred restaurant at the Hilton on Park Lane.

than 15ml of water to the drink. Marco points out some establishments who reduce dilution to zero by replacing the stirring in ice with

VERMOUTH

simply keeping the ingredients in the freezer, a common technique in the UK. “This changes the consistency of the drink as well. It becomes

OK, you’re not a bartender, but if you’re asked to prepare an extra-dry

more viscous.”

Martini, what do you do? The less vermouth in the drink, the drier it is. “In the US, for example, they like their Martini very dry. They’ll

THE GLASS

add the vermouth to the glass and then throw it away, leaving only traces in the drink. Europeans are more likely to enjoy the taste of the

Experiments with glasses are mostly disappointing. You can

vermouth,” explains Ercolano.

get dry Martinis in tumblers, wine glasses, and colourful versions of

Although small in amount, the choice of vermouth can

the familiar Martini glass. However, nothing compares to the clas-

define the quality and style of your drink. Despite having given its

sic, V-shaped version in which the drink became famous. Size varies

name to the famous cocktail, Martini is merely one brand of Italian

too. Americans tend to supersize their Martinis with generous 150ml

vermouth, which might or might not be used in t he preparation of

drinks, whilst the classic size ranges between 100 and 120 ml.

a dry Martini. “There are different kinds of vermouth. The often-used

At Galvin at Windows, Marco shows the 60ml version, which

French brand Noilly Prat is aged in oak, which gives it a complex,

he calls a single. “It allows for more drinks, keeping the customer sober

more sophisticated taste,” explains our expert. Passionate bartenders

for longer, and, because it chills faster in a smaller quantity, it allows for

will keep their own secret formula of vermouth and other ingredients

less dilution from ice.” The shape of their glass remains the same.

in a small dosing bottle. “It’s a secret they don’t share with anyone.”

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PROPER DRINKING

Sean Connery as James Bond in the 1956 film Diamonds are Forever, in which “Shaken, not Stirred”, was used for the first time.

OLIVE OR TWIST?

SHAKEN, NOT STIRRED

The finishing touch is key to presentation and adds another

James Bond’s “shaken, not stirred” jargon is world-re-

possibility of customisation. “We offer the choice of twist or olive,

nowned. It dates from the 1956 film Diamonds Are Forever and has

which are both classic. Some places now serve it with both. It’s a

been repeated in subsequent movies of the series. It sounds knowl-

trendy thing now,” says Marco. He points out that other finishes aren’t

edgeable enough, but wouldn’t shaking the gin in the ice increase

as classic, and some might even change the drink to something else.

dilution, fill the drink with broken ice pieces and result in a milky, less

“If you put in an onion, it becomes a Gibson.” There are no particular

appealing prospect than the clear, elegant original format? No inten-

names for those with cucumber slices, oysters or other inventive finish-

tion of discrediting Mr Bond’s refinement, but once we’re getting

ings one can find.

acquainted with the subject, it’s a question worth asking, right? SOMETHING FRUITY

Other requests are made by customers. “Women, for example, tend to sit down and ask for a Martini, then ask for a fruity version, with strawberries, for example. Some even ask for a Martini menu. It’s become a style lately, identifie

d by the shape

of the glass,” he explains. And there’s nothing wrong with something fruity, as long as you know it’s a far derivative from the real thing. 56




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FASHION 58 24/7 Photographed by RAYMOND TAN 66 CASUAL Photographed by RAYMOND TAN 74 AFTER 8 Photographed by CHRISTOPHER AGIUS BURKE Fashion Editor: GABRIEL WEIL 59


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24/7 Edited by GABRIEL WEIL Photography by RAYMOND TAN Modelled by MIKE DALE

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Blazer by GIORGIO ARMANI, shirt by PRADA.

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Blazer by GIORGIO ARMANI, shirt by CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION.

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Blazer by YVES SAINT LAURENT, T-shirt by UNIQLO, shoes by LOAKE.

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Shirt by PRADA, jumper by BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, tie by DOLCE & GABBANA.

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Blazer by BRIONI, shirt and tie by GIORGIO ARMANI, cardigan by PRADA, jeans, LEVI'S.

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C Casual

Edited by GABRIEL WEIL Photography by RAYMOND TAN Modelled by HUGO WODDIS


Classic "Breton" top by ST. JAMES. Navy trousers by JIL SANDER.

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Jumper by ZADIG et VOLTAIRE. Jeans by LEVI'S. Sunglasses by PERSOL.

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Coat by CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION, jeans by LEVI"S and jumper by GUCCI.

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Shirt by THOM BROWNE, Jeans by LEVI"S and shoes by ASOS.

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This Page: Blazer by GIORGIO ARMANI, Jumper by GUCCI, Trousers by PRADA. Oppoasite Page: Coat by CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION, Polo Neck by UNIQLO, Jeans by LEVI’S.

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Photographed by Christopher Agius Burke Edited by Gabriel Weil Modelled by Dominic O' Flynn 76


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Tweed Jacket, from a selection of vintage, spectacles by OLIVER PEOPLES, polo neck t-shirt by UNIQLO.

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Jacket by PRADA, polo neck by UNIQLO

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Blazer by LANVIN, shirt by JIL SANDER

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PROPER GROOMING

FACE LIFT? It might be time for you to give it a chance words by GABRIEL WEIL

A

mong other things, like buttocks workouts and jewel-

lery, plastic surgery is being demystified by men. They no longer fear hair implants and Botox®, and are slowly learning how satisfactory a facelift can be. Cosmetic surgery has always been a controversial subject, even among women, with some radically against it and others overenthusiastic – which leads to gossip and debate, to say the least. Whilst women have always been more open and less apologetic about it than men – who wouldn’t even discuss the subject – advances and new techniques producing natural, subtle results have been changing

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PROPER GROOMING

perceptions. Those who see it as a standard procedure are getting the

These are the most common cosmetic procedures sought after by male

best out of it.

patients:

Men have a different approach to cosmetic surgery. They FACELIFT

want to look younger, rested and healthy, and they seek solutions to match the face with a body maintained by exercise and good diet. Dr.

The traditional facelift (rhytidectomy) is achieved through

Paulo Muller, a Rio de Janeiro-based plastic surgeon with a 20 percent male clientele, tells how the male approach to surgery changed: “Ten

an incision in front of the ear extending up into the hairline. The skin

years ago, the men who had their faces operated on were artists or

is separated from the deeper tissues and the deeper tissues can be

politicians, but today the clientele is much more diverse and includes

tightened with sutures, with or without removing excess. Excess skin is

businessmen and other professionals who do not necessarily work with

removed (that’s the crucial part, when it’s up to the surgeon to remove

the public.” They, too, have been less afraid of the facelift due to the

just enough, not give the patient the artificial look). Incisions are then

more natural results achieved recently.

closed with sutures and staples.

According to Dr. Muller, men are different patients from THE EYELIDS

women, who “worry about millimetres”. Less attentive to details, they’re focused on the overall results and do not want to suffer postop-

Another classic procedure: the surgery around the eye

eratively. “Although the technique is the same, the results in men are milder, since they can’t make use of make-up to disguise traces of the

(blepharoplasty) is the removal and repositioning of fat and skin in

surgery.”

the area. Just as in the facelift, muscles and tendons may be reinforced. It can be both functional (to relieve pressure from the upper eyelids)

Among the new techniques and advances in the field are local anaesthetics with sedation, which reduce the risks and reduce

and cosmetic. It can be performed on both upper and lower lids or

bleeding. Another improvement is the work in deeper structures of the

separately.

face, like muscles, which, according to Muller “allows for an internal NECK LIPOSUCTION

rejuvenation, and not only of the skin, leading to more natural results”. Technological advances include the thinner liposuction cannulas,

This is the removal of fat from the neck area through the

which allow for more accurate finishes on the neck; the treatment of eyelid bags without incisions, through a transconjunctival method; and

insertion of a cannula (suction probe) into an incision. It’s often com-

canthopexy, which lifts and rejuvenates the lateral corner of the eye.

bined with excess skin removal in the area.

As procedures become safer, less invasive and more precise, FOREHEAD

allowing surgeons to perform more accurately, plastic surgery has been developing into art rather than medicine. Different techniques and

This surgery can be performed endoscopically, which means

procedures are combined to reach the desired results. Most people fear artificial, obvious results, which Dr. Muller explains are from

without incisions, to lift the end of the eyebrows. It’s also done by

badly designed procedures or combinations thereof. “A very important

direct incisions over the eyebrows.

factor for good postoperative results is the correct indication of each SURGICAL SKIN TREATMENTS

technique. The artificial results that we often see are due to several consecutive procedures without appropriate gaps.” He also mentions



The surgical peels (dermabrasion and CO2 laser) will also

how creative surgeons achieve better results: “It’s also important the

improve the quality of the skin in severe cases of acne scars.

direction of the traction that is the way to pull the tissue, which leads to good results. Of course there is also the creativity of the surgeon, working enough to give a satisfactory result, but not overdoing it, so that the outcome will be different from an “operated” appearance.

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PROPER COACHING

THE ULTIMATE UPGRADE A “10% new” rule to help you live better. Words by ANGUS FLETCHER

T

he traditional benefits of an upgrade may bring a little more

destroy everything in their path – I’m surprised we didn’t need to fasten

legroom, enhanced personal attention or a speedier access to informa-

our seatbelts during my experience on the plane. My concern is about how

tion. These upgrades undoubtedly provide comfort and ease by separating

these people will cope when more serious issues arise. What’s going to

us from the masses and removing the risk of anything unpleasant (God

happen during a situation out of their control such as the illness of a loved

forbid!).

one, or their own? Unfortunately, for some, a life in this silky cocoon can create

What’s happening is a reduction in ‘stretch’. Stretch sits between

a belief system in which nothing should ever go wrong. A sure sign of

two other personal states – ‘comfort’ and ‘panic’. The more comfortable

this belief system taking hold is witnessing someone freaking out over a

or familiar our lives become, the smaller our stretch zone becomes. The

lukewarm macchiato. I witnessed a woman beside me in business class go-

smaller our stretch zone – the closer panic looms. An ever-increasing

ing ballistic over a mixed-up special meal. She turned from a reasonable-

comfort zone is what’s behind the phrase ‘getting set in your ways’. The

seeming human being into some kind of monster in about two seconds.

traditional view of ageing is that this is inevitable – an ever-shrinking life

This is not to say we should accept shoddy service or sip a

that leaves us doing very little and being fearful of anything new.

lacklustre macchiato. There’s nothing wrong with demanding good service.

A friend told me about Fauja Singh, who recently finished a

The issue is how these unexpected changes are triggering sudden bouts

marathon at age 100. What seems most remarkable is that he took up

of rage and toxicity. Such behaviours usually come out of nowhere and

running at the age of 89 after the death of his wife. At 89, Fauja Singh

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PROPER COACHING

started doing something new. If he’d been a runner all his life, the feat,

The easy way to keep a healthy stretch zone is to follow the

though a great achievement, would have been within comfort.

‘10%-new’ rule. Introduce 10% of newness every week. This might be

So, how can we enjoy our lives and handle minor unexpected

as simple as a new route to work. I asked a very accomplished corporate

events with ease? The answer is simple enough: keep a personal upgrade

client of mine to experiment with choosing different sandwiches and

path running for your brain by keeping your stretch zone plump and

taking alternative routes to work. Although she initially had reservations

healthy. There is no need to give up the finer things – just recognise when

(and some scorn), once she realised how hard it had become to introduce

you’re hooked on them (that means a shrinking stretch zone). Neurosci-

change, the penny dropped and her work issues were easily addressed.

ence research shows that our brains have plasticity. Our beliefs are just

Keep an eye out over the weeks to come for people with a small

beliefs. We can discard out-of-date ones and create new, more appropriate,

stretch zone. They’ll be pretty easy to spot. Notice the stress they’re putting

beliefs as we have more experiences.

on themselves, not to mention the trail of destruction they leave behind

I went on an outward-bound training course a few years ago.



them. And, if you’re so inclined, introduce a 10%-new plan over the com-

This was a major stretch for me – the edge of panic. “I’m not a person who

ing three months and feel your stretch zone fill out. If brains are able to

walks on high wires,” I told myself. Also on the course was a highly profi-

change, it seems a shame not to allow them to do so.

cient climber. His stretch was to stay on the ground and support the rest of the group.

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PROPER SHOPPING

KEEPALL, LOUIS VUITTON Despite no-logo policies in today's elegance codes, it's undeniable that classic LOUIS VUITTON design canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ever be an unsure purchase. They stand the test of time and age beautifully. The key to get it right is to go for the true classics, the unaltered versions of their original creations. The Keepall is an example. First created in the 1930s as a revolutionary folding luggage item, it's frequently re-launched in new colours, materials and finishes, but nothing compares to the classic monogrammed version. Go for cabin sizes (no bigger than 55cm), and forget the shoulder strap version - it's much more elegantly carried by hand, although not as comfortable. Rub a piece of cotton soaked in tea through the leather parts and let it dry in the sun. It will remove the undesirable "brand new" tonality of the leather and add character to the piece.

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PROPER