Page 1

My Draping Journal

Name

: Gabriela Jessica Susilo

Admission number : F15FD0558 Class Module name Module title

: FD3A2 : Draping Baisc : DFS2122


DRESS FORM PREPARATION MATERIALS & EQUIPMENTS

Dress Form A good dress form is solid. The Surface is pin-able. It also can be rotate easily. It must have seams at the neck, side, waist and also princes seams.

Measuring Tape

Styling Tape

Pin

For Doing measurement

Styling tape is a tape that use for doing marking on the dress form

Choose the plain pin. It will cannot see when used for draping


STEPS of DRESS FORM PREPARATION

After finished to prepare all of things that are needed. First, mark the centre front line. Pin styling tape start from the neck—bust—waist— hip—hemline

Mark the centre back line. Pin the styling tape start from the neck—yoke line—waist—hip— hemline

Mark the princess line. Marking the princess line must be continuous from the front to the back. Pin the styling tape start from the front hemline—hip (f)—waist (f)—under bust (f)—bust point (f)—upper bust (f) —shoulder— yoke line (b)— waist (b)—hip (b)—hemline (b). When pin the hip on the back side, move the hip 1 cm for the original seam (because the original is too narrow). After that just continue the pin straight to the hemline. Do it on the both part of princess line (left and right)

Mark the waist line. Pin styling tape on the waist line part. Make sure it’s straight from the front to the back.

Mark the neckline. Pin the neckline part with styling tape. Make sure it curved perfectly. To make the neckline curved nice, add more pin to keep the curve balance.

Mark the hip line. Measure with measuring tape 15 cm under the waist, that is hip position. Pin the styling tape around 15 cm under waist line.


Mark the bust line. Pin the styling tape on the bust line part around from the front to the back. When pinning the styling tape, make sure that the styling is square with the side seam line when it come to the side seam part. It means that the styling tape is straight from the front to back.

Mark the armhole. Pin styling tape closely on edge of the armhole. From the top shoulder—underarm part (meet the side seam)—continue to the top shoulder again. When pinning at the underarm part, add 1 cm from the edge (armhole depth). Make sure the armhole line is curved nicely. Pin it more to make it curve perfectly.

Mark the shoulder line. Pin styling tape from the neckline part that meet with neckline, princess line and armhole

Mark the side seam line. Pin the styling tape from the side seam that meet with armhole, waistline and hipline


FINAL RESULT of DRESS FORM PREPARATION

FRONT VIEW

BACK VIEW

SIDE VIEW

SIDE VIEW


DEVELOPMENT & EXPLORATION of DRESS FORM PREPARATION


- FIT & SUPPRESSION -

DRAPING A BASIC BODICE (With Bust dart & Waist Dart) MATERIALS & EQUIPMENTS

Dress Form that has been marked with Styling Tape.

Pin Choose the plain pin. It will cannot see when used for draping

Fabric Scissors

Calico Fabric

Drafting rulers


STEPS of DRAPING A BASIC BODICE

Prepare a pieces of calico. Measure the size that enough to drape half part of front bodice. Make sure the straight grain is right.

Pin the CF line at the neckline, bust-line, waistline, and hipline. When you pin, pin it horizontally, so the fabric cannot be moved easily.

Draw the neckline, shoulder seam line, and armhole

Make a vertical line (CF line) that parallel with the straight grain and also mark the neckline, bust-line and waistline.

After marking, make horizontal line at the waist and hip to the side part. Make sure the line square (90o) with the CF line.

Pin the neckline. Smooth slowly the fabric toward the shoulder to form neckline. When you smooth Pin the shoulder and underarm area. Smooth slowly the calico toward the shoulder then pin it at the top it, you will realised that there is a tension on the neck area. To solve this cut the neck area a little shoulder. After that smooth again to the armhole and underarm, then pin at the underarm area. Draw the bit. armhole.

Take off and reline the neckline, shoulder line and the armhole the armhole. Using the drafting ruler, draw again the line.

Cut the fabric at the neckline and armhole area. Give 1 cm allowance at the neckline, shoulder seam line and armhole.


Cut the allowance at the curve area (neckline) to ease the tension. So it can make a smooth curve when it is pinned at the mannequin

Pin the waistline part at the side seam part. Smooth slowly from under the bust dart to side seam. Don’t push it to much until it have tension. You might find that the waist part will be not fit yet. The ease will be the waist dart.

Reline the side seam. Take the calico off but don’t take off the pin at the bust dart. Make the bust dart toward down. Just make a straight line at the side seam

Pin it again at the mannequin.

Draw the bust dart line and side seam.

Cut the side seam. Cut the side seam while the bust dart still close and give 1 cm allowance.

Pin the bust dart. First, smooth down slowly the fabric and an ease will be seen. To remove the ease, make the guide line that we have already made (horizontal line from CF at bust area) meet the bust line at the mannequin. Make it like a dart that is slightly away from bust point

Cut until waistline. You will realised that will be tension around hip because hip is bigger then hip. Because of that, cut it until near waist so, it can ease the tension.

Open the bust dart and relining the bust dart.


Close the bust dart again and put the calico on the mannequin again

Make the waist dart. Use the ease at the waist area for making a bust dart. Make the dart on the princes line.

Before take it off from the mannequin, do some adjustment of the line first.

Put it on the mannequin again and the Basic Bodice has finished

Draw the waist dart.

Take it off and reline the waist dart and the new adjustment.


- FIT & SUPPRESSION -

DRAP A BASIC BODICE SLOPER by University of Fashion Sources : http://www.universityoffashion.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/BodiceSloper-Web-DB-SLO-001-Bodice-Sloper.pdf

When I search about Draping basic block I found this document. Now, I know that some person drape the basic block with shoulder dart and waist dart. And they also have their own ways to drape. And this is one of way that I found and learned. This way is used by university of fashion group and below are the step that they used.

Prepare the Dress Form

1. Apply style tape to your dress form to establish the bust level. Tape from center front to side seam

2. And on the back, the shoulder blade level, which is 1/4th the distance from your neckline and waistline. Tape from the center back to the armhole ridge. Be sure that the both guidelines are parallel to the floor

Extract Measurement

1. To prepare your front muslin block measure across the bust level from center front to side seam and 4” and this will be the width of your front block

2. For the front block length, measure from the neckband tp the waistline (at the bottom of the tape) and add 3”

3. On the back, measure at the widest part of the back, under the armplate from side seam to center back and add 4”. This will be the width of your back block

4. Then measure from top of the back neckband to the waistline again. At the bottom of the tape, and add 2” for the back block length

Prepare Muslin Block

1A. Using the measurement that you extracted from your dress form, prepare your front and back muslin blocks. Measure, tear and block your muslin pieces so that your grain are at right angles to each other

1B. And on the back, the shoulder blade level, which is 1/4th the distance from your neckline and waistline. Tape from the center back to the armhole ridge. Be sure that the both guidelines are parallel to the floor

1C. Turn your muslin block over and reblock it necessary

2. Then press your pieces in the direction of the length grain


Measurements & Mark Guidelines

1. Front—draw lines on screen

2. On your front muslin block measure 1” from the right side edge and drag a guideline down, this represent center front

1A. You will need the following measurements when marking your muslin blocks beginning with the front: Neckband to bust level.

1B. Apex to center front

3. Then measure down from the top of the muslin your neckband to apex measurement and drag a guideline across your muslin block. This represent the bust level

4. On the bust level, place a mark representing center front to apex and drop a guideline down.

5B. Divide the side seam to apex at bust level and drag a guideline down. This is your balance guideline.

6. On the shoulder blade level, exact the measurement from your center back to the armhole ridge.

8B. From center back neckline measure down your shoulder blade level and drag a guideline across. Place a mark representing your center back to armhole ridge measurement

9. From your armhole ridge marking, place another mark at 1 1/4” away and then drag a guideline down. This represents a back guideline.

7. Measure in 1 “ from the left side of the muslin block, drag a guideline down. This is your center back.

10. Once you marked your muslin blocks give a final blocking and pressing in preparation for draping.

1C. And then the side seam to the apex

Step5A Taking your measurement from apex to side seam, place a mark on the bust level. This represents side seam.

8A. Measure down 3” from the top of the back muslin and place a mark to represent your center back neckline

11. Bend back your 1” extension and finger press both front and back block. Never iron the folded extension as it will stretch the grain.

Draping the Front

1. Begin the drape by lining up the apex marking on the muslim to the apex of the dress form. Secure it with 2 pins

2. Pin along the centerfront to the neckline, keeping the muslin bust level, level to the bust level of the dress form

3. As you pin the center front from bust level to waistline.

4. Continue to pin along the bust level from side seam to the apex. Secure your pins in alternating direction, this will help stabilize the muslin while you drape.


5A. Pin along your guideline down to the waistline. Make sure that your guideline is at the right angle to the bust level.

8. Continue to pin the waistline until you reach the side seam waistline intersection

11 Place a pin at the neckline shoulder intersection

5B. Once you reach the waistline, pick up a pinch of ease with a pin and secure it at the waist/guideline intersection.

9. The waist dart is formed by picking up the excess with a pin at the waistline, at the bottom of the waist tape. Your muslin guideline is the center of the dart.

12 Form the shoulder by smoothing the muslin up and over the chest area folding the dart flat with the dart excess on the inside. Make sure the dart is align with the princess seam. Secure the dart wit h pinat the princess-shouderline intersection

6. Place a pin at the armhole side seam intersection

7. Next, slash at the guideline from below the waistline to the bottom of the waist tape. This releases the high hip area

10A. Smooth the muslin around the neckline and with your fingermail, make a crease. Using your shears, cut away a rectangular pieces of muslin at the centerfront neckline 1� up and 1� over

10B The release the neckline by slashing into the necline excess to the creaseline. Be careful not to cut beyond the crease

13. Then place a pin at the shoulder armhole intersection

Marking the Front

1A. Start marking the front muslin in a counter clockwise direction. On center front/neckline and a few small dots along the necklines

4. Then mark the armhole, dotting along the armhole ridge. Stop at the crew level and place a crossmark

1B Cross mark the shoulder/neckline intersection

5. Place another crossmark at the side seam/underarm intersection. This is known as the tight body line.

2. Place a crossmark on the dart fold and on the body at the shoulder/ princess intersection

6. Crossmark at the waistline/side seam intersection and working at the bottom of t waist tape continue to place dot marks along the waistline unt

3. Mark the armhole/shoulder intersection

7. Mark bot sides of the waist dart and continue to dot the waistline until you get to the center front waistline intersection where you will then place a dash mark.


8. To form the shoulder dart, guide the shoulder dart in the direction of the apex

9. Then smooth the wast dart along the guideline towards the apex

10. Mark the vanishing point of the shoulder dart 1” away from the apex and also mark the vanishing point of the waist dart 1” from the apex

12. Before removing the front muslin from the dress form, be sure that you have captured all of your markings.

Trueing the Front

1A. With your front bodice flat on the table begin by truing the neckline.

1B. Then blend the neckline to the shoulder seam

4. True the waist dart by first making sure that the dart pick up on both sides of the dart are equal. If not you will need to adjust. Then connect the lines to the dart’s vanishing point

5A. True the side seam by first connecting the side seam/Armhole mark to the waistline/side seam mark.

6. Trueing the armhole.

6B. Add 1/2” seam allowance and trim away the excess muslin

7. Add 1/2: seam allowance to your lower neckline and trim away the excess muslin

8. Finger press the fold of the shoulder dart and then pin the dart closed with the dart material excess in the direction of center front

9. True the shoulder by connecting the neck mark to the shoulder mark. Add 1” seam allowance and trim.

10. Finger press the waist dart and pin closed with the dart material excess toward center front

11. Place your front drape back on the dress form. Make sure that you put it back on the way you draped it matching all key points such as neckline., centerfront, waistline and the shoulder neckline intersection

12. Align your shoulder seam and then sink your pins flat into the shoulder seam allowance

13. Match up the side seam of the muslin to that of the dress form and then place pins about 1”away

14. This will secure the muslin so that you can turn back the side seam in preparation for draping the back.

2. True your shoulder dart by connecting the mark closest to the center front at the shoulder to the apex

3. Come up 1/2” on that line and put a mark. Then connect the vanishing point of that dart to the corresponding mark at the shoulder


- FIT & SUPPRESSION -

MANIPULATING DART Last week, I have learned to drape a basic bodice block. This week, I was learning about dart manipulation which is pivoting the bust dart that I have learned last week on the basic bodice block. Bust dart can be pivot to every where but it have to be pointed to the apex. This week activity I have make 3 toiles which are contain of pivoting the bust dart to armhole part, shoulder part and neck part.

MATERIALS & EQUIPMENTS

Dress Form that has been marked with Styling Tape.

Pin Choose the plain pin. It will cannot see when used for draping

Fabric Scissors

Calico Fabric

Drafting rulers


STEPS of MANIPULATING DART I (Bust Dart to Armhole)

Prepare the calico with the basic marking. Prepare the calico that has already with the basic marking which is CF marking, neckline point, bustline and waistline (Make sure the waistline and bustlineis 90o with the CF

Pin the calico on the dress form at CF line at the neck, bust line and waistline

Smooth the fabric at the bust line part to the side seam. Make sure the waistline is parallel with waistline at the dress form and it doesn’t have ease at the bust part but let the ease at the waist

Pin at the underarm (armhole-side seam)

Smooth down to the waistline and pin at the meeting point of waistline and side seam

Form the waist-dart at the princess line partwaistline. After pinning the meeting point of waistline and side seam, there will be ease at the waistline. To make it fit and press, form dart at the waistline (Remember to stop the dart before touch apex)

Smooth the neck part and pin the neck part (meeting point of neckline and shoulder) to form neckline.

You will realised that there is a tension on the neckline area, to solve this, snip the allowance at the neckline to release the tension.

From neckline, smooth again the fabric to shoulder part and pin at the meeting point of shoulder—armhole.


Make a dart at armhole. After pinning at shoulder-armhole, there will be an ease at armhole area. Smooth slowly from bust (bottom) and shoulder and gather all the ease at armhole area and form a dart that pointed to the apex at armhole area.

Pin the dart and make sure it is toward apex but Outline the neckline, shoulder line, armhole, side seam and the darts. stop before touch apex.

Take off the calico from the dress form excepting Trim it at the allowance. Make sure the darts are the dart part After that, trueing the line with still pinned. For the dart at armhole part make it drafting rulers. toward hemline for the waist dart make sure it’s toward side seam.

After that put on the calico again at the dress form and do some adjustment

Finish

Snip allowance at neckline area and waistline area. After all finish, then trueing the dart.


STEPS of MANIPULATING DART II (Bust Dart to Shoulder)

Prepare the calico with the basic marking. Prepare the calico that has already with the basic marking which is CF marking, neckline point, bustline and waistline (Make sure the waistline and bustline is 90o with the CF

Pin the calico on the dress form at CF line at the neck, bust line and waistline

Smooth the fabric at the bust line part to the side seam. Make sure the waistline is parallel with waistline at the dress form and it doesn’t have ease at the bust part but let the ease at the waist

Pin at the underarm (armhole-side seam)

Smooth down to the waistline and pin at the meeting point of waistline and side seam

Form the waist-dart at the princess line partwaistline. After pinning the meeting point of waistline and side seam, there will be ease at the waistline. To make it fit and press, form dart at the waistline (Remember to stop the dart before touch apex)

Smooth the neck part and pin the neck part (meeting point of neckline and shoulder) to form neckline.

You will realised that there is a tension on the neckline area, to solve this, snip the allowance at the neckline to release the tension.

From bust-line, smooth the fabric to shoulder part and pin at the meeting point of shoulder— armhole.


Make a dart at shoulder. After pinning at shoulder-armhole, there will be an ease at shoulder area. Smooth slowly from shoulder and neck and gather all the ease at shoulder area and form a dart that pointed to the apex. Pin it and make sure it’s toward apex but stop before apex

Outline the neckline, shoulder line, armhole, side seam and the darts.

Trim it at the allowance. Make sure the darts are still pinned. For the dart at shoulder part and waist dart toward side seam

Snip allowance at neckline area and waistline area. After all finish, then trueing the dart.

Finish

Take off the calico from the dress form excepting the dart part After that, trueing the line with drafting rulers.

After that put on the calico again at the dress form and do some adjustment


STEPS of MANIPULATING DART III (Bust Dart to Neckline

Prepare the calico with the basic marking. Prepare the calico that has already with the basic marking which is CF marking, neckline point, bustline and waistline (Make sure the waistline and bustlineis 90o with the CF

Pin the calico on the dress form at CF line at the neck, bust line and waistline

Smooth the fabric at the bust line part to the side seam. Make sure the waistline is parallel with waistline at the dress form and it doesn’t have ease at the bust part but let the ease at the waist

Pin at the underarm (armhole-side seam)

Smooth down to the waistline and pin at the meeting point of waistline and side seam

Form the waist-dart at the princess line partwaistline. After pinning the meeting point of waistline and side seam, there will be ease at the waistline. To make it fit and press, form dart at the waistline (Remember to stop the dart before touch apex)

From bust-line, smooth the fabric to shoulder part and pin at the meeting point of shoulder— armhole.

From shoulder, smooth the fabric toward neckline and pin at the meeting point of shoulder and neckline.

Make a dart at neckline. After pinning at shoulder -neckline meet point, there will be an ease at neckline area. Smooth slowly from neck-shoulder and from CF gather all the ease at neckline area and form a dart that pointed to the apex. Pin it and make sure it’s toward apex but stop before apex


Outline the neckline, shoulder line, armhole, side seam and the darts.

Take off the calico from the dress form excepting the dart part After that, trueing the line with drafting rulers.

After that put on the calico again at the dress form and do some adjustment

Trim it at the allowance. Make sure the darts are still pinned. For the dart at neckline make sure it toward shoulder (side seam) and waist dart toward side seam. And also snip the waist area and neckline.

Finish

REFLECTION: Overall, I feel that this week’s lesson is easier than the last week one. The first reason is because last week is my first time experiences in draping. I have not used to it yet. This week, I can feel more about fabric and my hand also have been experienced and can handle, control all the elements (pins, dress form and also the fabric). The second thing is because last week I have a little bit difficulty when form the bust dart because have to follow the bust-line at dress form . This week, I don’t need to follow any guide but the important thing is can fit the ease.


ANALYSIS After I learn pivoting the dart I link it with the last week learning. I realised that the position of the dart is not only the position, but it can give a different effect for garment. It can make a effect of small waist, small hip, small bust, narrow shoulder and even the opposite. And below is my analysis after I observe it.

This is the basic dart that I have learned next week. This kind of dart can give the effect of small waist. But I think it make the wearer look big at the bust, chest and shoulder area. It’s suitable for person that have a small bust.

This kind of bust position is very suitable for the normal body. It make a effect that the portion of bust and waist is same.

This kind of dart make the shoulder look narrower. It make the bust look smaller.

This kind of bust make the bust look bigger. But it make the shoulder look narrower. This kind of dart position is very suitable for a very small body ( very slim one). Because it make the waist look bigger, the bust look bigger and also the shoulder.


I have research about dart and I found a unique dart that Dior create

THE DIOR DART It is not often that you hear reference to Dior darts these days, but since a couple of dresses I’ve made recently have this design feature, let’s discuss!

A Dior dart is a short bust dart that extends from a side front panel seam on the bodice, and it often occurs in fitted tops and dresses from the sixties. It certainly features heavily in the 1968 Burda Moden’s that I picked up a while ago:

As a sixties fashion fanatic I was a fan of this type of dart, but it wasn’t until I entered the garment industry that I heard my colleagues describing it as a ‘Dior dart’ – and I took their word for gospel as they had all trained during that era! I haven’t heard it referred to it as such again, well until I recently picked up a book that seconds the idea. InBasic Pattern Cutting by Maria Mori, the author claims the side panel bust dart was first used by Christian Dior – so maybe my colleagues were right after all:

I’ve always loved the look – the side panel seam slims, the short bust dart minimises – and these factors contribute to the desirable ‘youthful’ effect of that era. It is not just for the youthful though. In my Burda magazines there are plenty of examples in the mature/plus sizes, and they look very slimming indeed. Perhaps the best thing about the Dior dart is that it is easy to create for yourself! Here’s how: From your block or pattern, swing all dart suppression into a single side bust dart:

If you are using an existing pattern, you will need to extend all darts to the bust point first.


Fold the dart just as it will be pressed in the finished garment, then draw in a side panel seam:

Now trace around the side panel with the dart closed, but add double the width of the seam allowance:

Reduce the dart length by 2cm so the dart apex stops short of the bust point:

Source : https://patternscissorscloth.com/2012/07/12/the-dior-dart/

Add a seam allowance to the centre front panel, then cut along this line with the dart still folded:

Notch the dart legs on the centre front panel, and their match point on the side panel:


BUST SHAPING CONSIDERATIONS AT BALENCIAGA Balenciaga, PF15, Paris. Sometimes a design that is very simple on paper can throw some surprisingly tricky pattern considerations at you. There was one particularly simple dress from the Balenciaga pre-collection that illustrates a possible solution to an important question: When you move a seam line away from an apex of the body, what are your pattern options to keep the same fit value? In this case, since we’re using the Balenciaga dress as our example, we’re concentrating on the bust shaping so the “apex” we’re talking about is the “bust point”. You can imagine that this pattern could have been very simple if the bust shaping had been created with a fairly standard “Princess Line”, so that the panel ran from the armhole, over the bust point and down through the waist. However, the seam line actually runs off to the side of the bust, which means that some of the fit value may have been absorbed somewhere else. You can see examples of different princess line garments at Dior (Glossary: Princess Panel Lines) or create your own with our tutorial (Fundamentals of Pattern Making: Princess Panel Lines)

Sometimes you will see a style line moved to the side of the bust like this, but there will still be a small dart, sometimes referred to as a “Dior Dart” which is used to absorb that small bit of extra shaping that is still needed to smooth the fabric towards the bust point. This fit value could also be displayed in some other sort of visible detail, such as a few small tucks, or a small amount of gathering. With a dress this simple, the dart, gather and tuck options would be quite distracting, so another solution could have been that the excess fabric in the centre panel could be carefully shrunk and eased smoothly into the side panels. This would be a difficult feat and you’d have to have particularly forgiving fabric

Using the Bias Grain The other option is to reconsider one of the structural elements at the heart of the pattern: the grain line. Given how smoothly the dress hangs to the curves of the model it appears that the dress may have been cut entirely on the bias grain. This appears to be confirmed in the review onStyle.com» where this dress is described by Nicole Phelps as one of “a pair of sleeveless bias-cut dresses”. If you’re struggling with some small pattern detail like this, then sometimes it’s not about trying to rework an existing pattern, but to think more about what you need from the fabric. In this situation, creating the whole dress on a bias grain may have given the designer just enough extra fluidity in the fabric to flow easily over the curves of the body. This was probably not as simple as just redrawing the grain line on the pattern, and may have required the pattern to be re-draped from scratch. Many typical pattern blocks are designed so that darts and seam lines are created specifically to trace over the “hills” and “valleys” of the body. In this way basic pattern blocks, and the patterns of many tight fitting garments, are designed to cling to the widest and narrowest parts of the body. Many garments are created by simply sticking to the traditional seam positions or by shifting the fit value around in fairly simple ways, such as swinging dart value into a new position around the same apex of the body. But you don’t have to only trace over the curves of the body in this way, and sometimes by shifting the position of seam lines, and forcing yourself to deal with the fit issues this may cause, you will be forced to consider more interesting solutions.

Source : http://thecuttingclass.com/post/109397219773/bust-shaping-considerations-at-balenciaga


I have research about dart and I found a unique dart that Dior create When I see this article, I see that the shape and the way designer place the dart is very unique and interesting.

WAIST DARTS AT RODARTE Rodarte, SS13, New York. Darts are a shaping device that will often be hidden away in a garment to try to make them inconspicuous, but they can also be used as a feature of the design. The Rodarte team have quite a knack for making the most of darts and have in the past used the dart value at the waist line in a number of different formations. For their Spring-Summer 2013 collection the Mulleavy sisters used the dart value in a variety of ways including thick gathers and tucks which opened upwards towards the shoulders, accentuating a triangular silhouette. At times the darts were also extended out past the waist line. It is interesting to consider how designers use techniques such as this and picture them as actual patterns as this will help you to picture your own design ideas in more concrete forms.

Source : http://thecuttingclass.com/post/31859421062/waist-darts-at-rodarte


I don’t know why when make dart cannot stop at the apex, that’s why research and I find the answer at this article

PIVOTING A DART Hey, do you all know how to pivot a dart? It's super easy and fun. Remember my stripey dress, where I pivoted the dart to the center front seam to create a chevron effect?

Here's the bodice with arrows to indicate the dart placement. These are the only darts on the front bodice.

I got this effect by moving the original dart (which was at the waist) to the center front seam, radiating diagonally to the bust apex.

Here's a miniature of the original pattern piece. (It's actually just a hand drawn piece, so don't look at it for accuracy!) It's best to do this with the seam allowances removed. This way the seam allowance will not interfere with your drafting.

See how the waist dart closes to form a three dimensional shape?

Now, mark your new dart placement. The red arrow indicates where I want my new dart to be. It will radiate diagonally to the bust apex.

Pivot the pattern piece to the left so that the right leg of the original dart reaches the point where you started tracing. You've essentially closed up the original dart.

Now you can continue tracing where you left off on the original pattern piece. My new tracing line is in purple. End when you meet up where you started (in green marker here).

Start by putting your pattern piece on top of a new, clean piece of paper. Make sure you have your apex marked. Update: the bust apex isn't necessarily the end point of the dart, since darts usually stop short of the apex of the bust. In patternmaking, you usually work with a dart that ends at the apex and then, once the dart pivoting is complete, shorten the legs by about 1/2" to 1" so the dart doesn't end right on top of the bust, creating a pointy effect. Check your pattern (fold the darts and hold it up to your body) to make sure that you're working from the apex, which is the fullest point of the bust.

Start tracing at the left leg of your old dart. I'm using a green Sharpie here. Continue in a clockwise direction, until you get to your new dart placement point.

Remove the pattern piece. See that open space on the center front seam? That's your new dart!

Now, place a pin or awl (something pointy) into the dart apex so that it doesn't shift.

Use a ruler to draw new dart legs, connecting them to the apex point.

There you have it! Next you should add seam allowances back. Update: you will also need to shorten the dart by about 1/2" to 1" so the endpoint isn't right on top of the bust. Close up the dart and trace over it with a spiky wheel to get the shape of the seam allowance on the dart body. Straighten up any lines that might have gotten wonky, like the waistline (where the old dart used to be). Source : http://www.blogforbettersewing.com/2011/03/pivoting-dart.html


One of my classmate face a problem when she drape. Suddenly she confuse how’s the straight grain of the fabric. Then she also ask me and it ‘s confusing because the salvage has already gone. Because of that I need research more about straight grain.

A BASIC EXPLANATION OF GRAIN LINES Grain lines are a generally unnoticed aspect of the garment, that is until they are either used in the wrong way and cause fit problem, or used in interesting ways to mould the fabric in different ways to the body. Sometimes they can also be used to turn a print onto a different angle for interesting visual effect. When fashion designers and pattern makers talk about grain lines they are referring to the way that a pattern is cut out when it is laid out on a piece of fabric. Basically, fabric is woven from thread going in two different directions and it is sometimes easiest to remember that fabric is built on tiny squares of threads which criss-cross each other. The warp thread runs up and down while the weft thread runs right to left (You can rhyme weft with left to remember which one is which). The reason why these threads are important to grain lines is that they each react in different ways. The warp thread is generally the stronger of the two and is the least likely to stretch out of shape. So for example on the straight front placket of a shirt, you don’t want it to go out of shape so if you align it with the strongest threads then it will hold it’s shape better.

The straight grain is the grain used most often in garments. The straight grain generally runs up centre front and centre back of garments and up through the centre of sleeves and pant legs. In situations where a garment is cut slightly off grain this may cause sleeves or pant legs to twist around the body. You often see this as a problem in cheap tshirts because the fabric weave does not hold a solid grid pattern, making the fabric hard to cut correctly and causing the garment to be made up out of pieces which are off grain. On areas such as waistbands which hold tension, you want the strongest thread to run around the body so you would cut your waistband patterns following the straight grain, ie parallel to the selvedge. The selvedge is the band of more tightly woven fabric that runs up either side of the fabric meterage. If you imagine the fabric being woven on a loom then these are the edges where the thread turns back on itself to begin weaving the next row. In contrast to the straight grain you can also design garments which use the grain on a 45 degree angle, this is called bias cut. This effectively means that of that tiny weave of fabric you are going diagonally across the squares and making the fabric much more unstable. But while unstable sounds like a negative it can sometimes be what you need for a garment. It creates the ideal flexibility for creating bias cut dresses where you need the fabric to mould better to the body and will probably allow for less darts. You always need to be careful of how different grain lines affect each other when they meet at seams though, as sometimes seams can stretch when cut at a strange angle or on different grains to each other and this can cause puckering. On patterns the grain line is usually marked with a line with arrows on it, shown below in red.

When cutting out, the pattern will be laid with the grain line parallel to the selvedge.


EXPERIMENT—MAKE MORE THAN 2 DARTS

When I research about darts, I found these 2 pictures in internet. These pictures show us some technical drawing of garments that have more than 2 darts on it. It’s suddenly remind me something that when I did 2 darts before, I realised that the dart sometimes is too big especially for the bust dart part. Therefore, inspired by these picture I did a try to drape blouse that have more than 2 darts on it, and this is the result;

For this experiment, I did the dart on waist and neckline. It’s very simple. The steps is similar with the steps for manipulating bust dart to neckline. The different, I just need to divide the waist and neckline dart to 2 dart,. After I did the experiment, I realised that it’s very easy and useful and can be one way to change the aesthetic of the garment itself. Actually it also can do another way, which is I can make the bust dart manipulate to 2 place like for example at neckline and shoulder.


EXPERIMENT—DART VA LUE It’s begin when I I read an article from the cutting class “Waist Dart at Rodarte” and also “Fundamental of Pattern Making: Waist Tuck”. This is very interesting, because we can still have a variation in a fit garment. After that, I also research some similar garment that also use that technique in Pinterest.com;

I also tried to drape with that technique.

The first trial, I try to make variation on the shoulder and waistline. I try drape gather there.

For this experiment, firstly I pivot the bust dart value to the CF than I make pleat at the CF (above part)

The second, pivot all dart at waistline then, I make it like a pleat

The last one I try to make a tucks on the CF and waist. For the CF part it’s similar with the previous one pivot the bust dart value to the CF than I drape the tuck (Middle part)


- FIT & SUPPRESSION -

PRINCESS LINE After learning about dart and how it’s pivoted, this week, I learned the other way to make a fir and suppressed body block. This way is by creating seam to replace the dart, that usually called “Princess Line” Previous week, we just learned the front part of bodice, but for this week, I learned to drape the full toile of princess line front and back.

MATERIALS & EQUIPMENTS

Dress Form that has been marked with Styling Tape.

Pin Choose the plain pin. It will cannot see when used for draping

Fabric Scissors

Calico Fabric

Drafting rulers


STEPS of MAKING PRINCESS LINE (1st panel—CF)

Prepare the calico with the basic marking. Prepare the calico that has already with the basic marking which is CF marking that base on the straight grain

Snip at the neckline. When you pin the necklineshoulder seam, you will realised that there is a tension at the neckline, snip it to release the tension.

After that, smooth down from the apex a bit, and pin it through.

Pin the calico on the dress form at CF line at the neck, bust line and waistline

Smooth the fabric at neckline and pin it on the neckline-shoulder seam. Smooth it slowly make sure it’s smooth enough.

Then smooth again to the princess line—shoulder After that, smooth down to the apex, pin and make mark on it seam and pin it.

After that, snip it at the pin. When you pin, you will realise that there is a tension on the calico, that’s why snip it to release the tension.

Smooth down a bit again and pin through on it. After that snip it again like the previously one.


After that smooth it down again and pin it at the meeting point of waistline– princess line

Trim it at the allowance (1 cm) . And also snip at the neckline (curve area)

After that draw the line. Outline it at the princess line, shoulder seam, CF, neckline and waist line.

Don’t forget to add the straight grain.

Take of the calico from the dress form then outline (trueing) again with drafting ruler.

Finish

STEPS of MAKING PRINCESS LINE (2nd panel—Side Front)

Prepare the calico with the Straight grain guideline. Try to find the apex point and make mark on it.

Draw a line at the apex marking that 90o with the straight grain


Smooth it and pin at the apex

Smooth the calico and pin it at the shoulder seam – princess line meeting point. When you smooth it out, the straight grain no need to base on the princess line, just make sure the bust line is same position with the bust line at the dress form

Smooth again at the shoulder and then pin it at the shoulder seam-armhole meeting point.

After that, pin it at the armhole– side seam (underarm). Make sure the bust line at the calico is same position with the bust line at the dress form. And also pin at the

After that smooth down from the apex and pin it through (at the princess line)

And then snip it at the pin

After that smooth down again and pin it through and snip it

Smooth down and pin at the princess line – waistline meeting point. After that also pin at the waistline– side seam .

After that draw the line. Outline it at the princess line, shoulder seam, , nearmhole, side seam, and waist line.


Take off the calico from the dress form. After that, trueing the line with drafting rulers. Do not forget to draw the grain line

Trim it at the allowance.

Finish

STEPS of MAKING PRINCESS LINE (3rd panel—CB)

Prepare the calico with the basic marking. Prepare the calico that has already with the basic marking which is CB marking that base on the straight grain

Pin the calico on the dress form at CB line at the neck, bust line and waistline

Snip at the neckline. When you pin the necklineshoulder seam, you will realised that there is a tension at the neckline, snip it to release the tension.

Then smooth again to the princess line— shoulder seam and pin it.

Smooth the fabric at neckline and pin it on the neckline-shoulder seam. Smooth it slowly make sure it’s smooth enough.

After that, smooth down to the meeting point of bust line and princess line at the back.


After that, smooth down from the bustline– princessline a bit, and pin it through.

After that, snip it at the pin. When you pin, you will realise that there is a tension on the calico, that’s why snip it to release the tension.

Smooth down a bit again and pin through on it. After that snip it again like the previously one.

Snip it to the pin.

After that smooth it down again and pin it at the meeting point of waistline– princess line

After that draw the line. Outline it at the princess line, shoulder seam, CF, neckline and waist line.

Trim at the allowance.

Finish

Take of the calico from the dress form then outline (trueing) again with drafting ruler. Do not forget to draw the grain line.


STEPS of MAKING PRINCESS LINE (4th panel—Side Back)

Prepare the calico with the straight grain marking

Mark the meeting point of bustline—princess line (back side)

Draw line at the mark that 90o with the straight grain.

Smooth slowly the calico and pin it at the meeting Then smooth and also pin it at the armhole. Make point of princess line– shoulder seam and meeting sure the bust line that you make is same position with the bust dart on the dress form point of shoulder seam—armhole.

After that also pin at the meeting point of bust line—princessline (back) and then smooth down and pin through

After that, snip it at the pin

Smooth down again and pin it through

After that snip it again


Smooth and pin the meeting point of waistline- After that draw the line. Outline it at the princess line, shoulder seam, armhole, side seam, and princessline and meeting point of waistline—side waist line. seam

Trim it at the allowance.

Take off the calico and outline (trueing) it again with drafting ruler. Do not forget to draw the grain line.

Finish

REFLECTION: This week, I am still talking about fit and suppression. However, this week I learned the other way to make a fit and suppression which is used princess line. This week the lesson I think it’s easier because every piece of pattern is flat no need to fold it like what I did for the dart (Previous week)


I go to cutting class and I see one of the article that tell about bust shaping at Dior. Inside that, also tell about princess line that Dior use.

BUST SHAPING WITH PANEL LINES AT DIOR Christian Dior, SS15, Haute Couture, Paris. In discussing some of the details from the Balenciaga Pre-Fall 2015 collection», we began to discuss how moving the positions of panel lines can affect your ability as a pattern maker to fit the fabric to the body. As it happens the Christian Dior Haute Couture collection for Spring-Summer 2015 included garments that pushed panel lines away from the bust point apex to achieve slightly different fit variations on one basic sleeveless silhouette. If you are familiar with pattern making, then you will know that there are certain guideline measurements that help you to work out how far away from the bust point you can set dart points to achieve a good first fit. For example, depending on the size of the bust, you will normally set your basic pattern dart point at least 1.5cm, and up to 5cm, away from the bust point (BP). This seems like a wide margin of difference and it would be nice to think there was just one measurement that was guaranteed to work for every pattern, however if you think about the variety of body sizes in the world it makes sense that this measurement needs to be considered in proportion to the overall size of the pattern. The bust of a teen and the bust of a 60-something-year-old lady are probably going to require different types of bust shaping, and the distance of the dart point from the bust point will help to control this shaping. These “guide measurements” aside, if the dart point placement is instrumental in creating a specific design effect then there are no limits - if you want to create a cone-shaped bust effect then by all means put the dart point directly on the bust point. If you wanted a looser, less fitted effect, then the dart points could be moved back to make the darts shorter or turn the darts into smaller tucks instead.

The basic idea of having dart points fall within a certain radius away from the bust point for a “basic fit”, also follows through to how far you can move a panel line away from the bust point before you start to cause fit issues. Again, there are guideline amounts for how far you can move a panel line away from the bust point, but ultimately you are going to have to test the pattern and fit a toile in a similar fabric to your final design to see how much distance you can comfortably get away with. Basically, the further you move a dart or panel line away from the bust point, the less control you will have in fitting the curve right on top of the bust. In the example images from the Dior collection you can see that the busts of the models aren’t very pronounced, which gives the pattern maker more scope to shift panel lines around with less drastic consequences for the fit of the garment. However, you can still see that some panel line configurations keep the curve of the bust more easily, while other panel/dart/yoke combinations create different shapes or more flattened effects. To give you a sense of this idea of panel lines passing within range of the bust point, bust point dots and circles have been added to the following images. You can then follow the lines of these panel lines as they pass through the rough circle that radiates out from the bust point.

Source: http://thecuttingclass.com/post/117112011493/bust-shaping-panel-lines-dior


THE RUBY SLIP #7 – LACE BODICE VARIATIONS If you are sewing the Ruby Slip and would like to use a narrower lace on the bodice – here’s how! I’ll show you how to adapt the bodice pattern pieces, and also how to convert the princess seam into gathers under the bust – like this one that I whipped up in honey coloured silk satin: Before you jump into altering the pattern though, check out Chris’s brilliant solution for using a slightly narrower lace at Cuada Designs – it might be ideal for your lace too!

Adapting the pattern for a narrow lace: Start by tracing around your bodice pattern pieces:

…but the seam lengths will differ because of the different angles that they meet, so adjust the Side Front to fit:

Then add 2cm seam allowances to the upper edge (that is, 1cm seam allowance plus 1cm that was removed from them before):

Rule a line parallel to the centre front neckline, preferably intersecting the underbust seam at the CF:

Redraw the new line, and cut out the upper Side Front piece:

Here are the final pattern pieces:

Add 1cm seam allowance and cut it out:

Repeat for the back, once again checking the side seams match:

Do the same thing for the Side Front…

Here are the final lace pieces, it is a good idea to add some notches for easier assembly:

To make the lower bodice parts, cut around the remaining pieces, and trace them out again:

And the cut lace pieces – I ended up sewing a CF seam rather than an overlap because I thought it looked better:

Adapting the pattern for underbust gathers: To make the version with underbust gathers, line the Lower Centre Front and Lower Side Front up as below and trace around them. Draw a guideline 2cm from the cutting line to help you line them up accurately

Draw a smooth curve to join the lower edges:

Mark the original dart legs, 1cm in from the old cutting lines:

My total of 12cm will be gathered to 6cm:

Source: https://patternscissorscloth.com/2012/01/02/the-ruby-slip-7-lace-bodice-variations/

Smooth the curve at the upper edge too:

Divide the 6cm-or-whatever-your-number-is into two, and mark this either side of the original dart legs:


EXPERIMENT—VARIATION OF PRINCESS LINE After trying to make the basic princess line in class, I try to make another variation of princess line. Basically, princess line is a line that was used for shaping bust of a garment. It is a alternative way of dart. Firstly, what I did, I pin some additional styling tape on my dress form like photo beside. I form the styling tape base on shape that I want.

Reflection and analysis: I did some variation of princess line cutting. After doing, I realised that different cutting of princess line give different effect for the wearer. Basically it similar with the pivot dart. Different position might make the waist, bust shoulder look smaller, bigger or another effect. And this is my result and the analysis.

This kind or princess line cutting make the waist look small, that’s why it’s good for person that have a big waist. This also make person’s bust look smaller, and also make the distance of the bust smaller. (Suitable for person that have big bust or have a big bust distance)

Person who have a big waist and small bust is very good to used this kind of princess line cutting because this cutting make the waist smaller and make the bust bigger.

This kind of princess line give an effect of exposed the chest. It’s very suitable for person that have not too big bust and chest part.

For this kind of cutting, I think it’s very suitable for person that have a small waist, because it can make the waist look wider. It also suitable for person that have a small shoulder part because it can make the shoulder part make wider.


- BIAS CUTTING-

COWL NECK After learning the fit and suppression, slowly move, this week, we begin to give some volume to the drape. Besides, after five weeks observed and learned to drape at the grain line, this week, I learned about bias cut. Actually, I have already learned this in pattern making class before. However, I found that I know better after I do the draping in bias because I touch the fabric directly, not just do the bias cut symbol in pattern making. For trying the bias cut for drape, we were asked to drape cowl neck that is one of fashion details that required bias cut to achieve a good result.

STEPS of MAKING COWL NECK

First of all, draw a straight grain on the calico. The straight grain is parallel with the salvage of calico.

After that, try to find the bias using the drafting ruler. On the drafting ruler, you can see a cross, use that cross to find the bias

Put and pin the tip of the triangle on the shoulder, and give some allowance at the front (create the first cowl)

After that, repeat the step again to create the third cowl. Make sure it smooth nicely and don’t have tension.

After that, make a small triangle that fold to the bias direction.

After that, create the second cowl. To create the second you have to use your finger to take some amount of fabric , just pull slowly some.

Do right and left like the previous one.

Use the other finger to smooth slowly toward the shoulder and pin it to the shoulder (left and right)

Mark and outline the shoulder seam (left and right of the body)


Mark and outline the armhole. (the left and right of the body)

Take off the calico except the shoulder part (pleat - cowl part). After that, trueing the shoulder, armhole, side seam, waist.

Mark the point where you want to stop for the hemline (the left and right of the body)

Do markings at the cowl’s pleat (shoulder seam part)

Mark the side seam (left and right of the body). And also don’t forget to mark the waist

Cut at the allowance (1 cm). Don’t open the pin at the shoulder first, cut first.

Make sure you already mark the shoulder, armhole, side seam and also the position stop for the side seam

Open the pin. You will find these kind or marks. Add the folding direction for the cowl’s pleat part. It is show the direction of the folding. (Do it left and right)

Finish

Reflection: After draping the cowl neck on the bias, I realised that bias position is more draped than the straight grain position. It’s is can make a smooth drape better than t he straight grain. I realised also that at bias position, fabric can stretch easier than straight grain position. During doing this cowl neck, I feel that the most difficult part is when making the cowl curve (the draped neck part). It is because you have to keep balance and control between both of your hand when you take and pull the calico with one hand and continue to smooth it to the shoulder with the other hand. For the first time, I met a difficulty to do this. However, after the third cowl, I begin to be able to feel the drape feeling of the fabric and also keep the balance of my two hands.


This week, I learned about bias cut by draping the cowl neck that is one of the example of fashion details that required bias cut to achieve the best result of drape. However, actually, I still not so know about it. I want to know more about what bias cut is, how it can be invented, and what the other fashion details that required bias cut to achieve good result. And I also want to know, what is the different (comparison/ pro-cos)) between bias cut and straight grain.

What is Bias Cut? The term “bias-cut" or “cut-on-the-bias" describes the way a garment is cut. According to Merriam-Webster bias-cut is defined as diagonal, OR slanting, used chiefly of fabrics and their cut. Dictionary.com describes bias-cut as an oblique or diagonal line of direction especially across a woven fabric; in the diagonal direction of the cloth, out of line; slanting. Wikipedia's definition, which is more in-depth, defines the bias (U.S.) or cross-grain (UK) as the direction of a piece of woven fabric, usually referred to simply as “the bias" or “the cross-grain," is at 45 degrees to its warp and weft threads. Every piece of woven fabric has two biases, perpendicular to each other. Non-woven fabrics such as felt or interfacing do not have a bias. To know more about what bias cut is, I find an article that I think it’s very useful for me not only understand about what bias is but also straight grain, cross grain and also salvages. I think this article is short, not so technical but it’s clear enough because it’s answer my question about 5W1H. Actually, before I have already do research about it, but I think, that article not so useful because it don’t have enough picture to make me understand better.

Sewing Tips: What is Selvage, Bias and Grain? First off, what is selvage? According to Wikipedia, “The selvage (US English) or selvedge (British English) is the term for the self-finished edges of fabric. The selvages keep the fabric from unravelling or fraying.” Often times, the fabric designer and company are printed right along the selvage…..making it easier to remember what type of fabric you bought. So if someone falls in love with something you’ve made and wants to know where you got that darling fabric, just take a peek at your selvage. In most fabric stores, you will find fabric folded in half lengthwise and then wound around a bolt. And then you’ll see rows and rows of bolts of fabric. When the fabric store cuts fabric for you, they will cut you off a piece that is perpendicular to the selvage. So you will always have a selvage along both sides of your piece of fabric. Now, what is the fabric grain? Grain is the way the fabric is woven or knit together. If you look really closely at the polka dot fabric below, there are little threads that run parallel and perpendicular to the selvage. This is the grain of the fabric. If you cut right along the threads of fabric that are running perpendicular to the selvage, you will get a straight line……and will make a nice 90 degree angled corner. In fact, sometimes the print of the fabric (like stripes) are printed onto the fabric a little crooked and will not run exactly perpendicular or parallel to the selvage. But if you look closely, the grain still will……….and you can use that as a guide. And even though knits are woven, they still have a grain to them.

And finally, what is the bias? According to about.com, the “bias grain is the thread line that is at a forty five degree angle to the lengthwise and crosswise grain of the fabric as it is on the bolt”.

So if you have a piece of fabric laying down If you cut right along that diagonal fold, you are cutting on the bias……or a 45 deflat, and your selvage is along the gree angle to the selvage. bottom……..

Then if you cut a parallel cut next to the original cut, you can create a strip of fabric cut on the bias. (Just keep cutting it to make it as long as you need.)

So if you look closely, you can see that the grain of fabric is cut off at a 45 degree angle all along the diagonal edge.

And why do we care if the fabric is cut on the bias or not? Well, fabric cut on the bias actually has more give/stretch to it. If you hold a square piece of cotton fabric in your hands and pull along both selvage sides away from each other in your hands, your fabric won’t stretch at all. But if you pull along two opposite corners, or along the bias, the fabric will stretch just a bit. When do we use fabric that’s cut on the bias? Well, sometimes you’ll need little strips of bias cut fabric to finish off a quilt (like I did here), an apron (like I did here), or you can even use them to make strips of un-hemmed ruffles…..because bias cut fabric doesn’t fray much and then you don’t have to hem the edge of the fabric. (But that depends on if you like the look of a raw edge or not.) Have you heard of Bias Tape? Or seen it at the fabric store? It’s just strips of fabric cut on the bias like shown above, but then the edges are folded in once or twice towards the center. Bias tape gives and curves nicely as you use it along curved unfinished edges……whereas strips cut along the grain will pucker and bulge. You can use bias tape as apron or dress straps too…..or even as a fun decorative edges on something. And that’s about it for today. These are all questions that I receive here and there. Mostly from people who are wondering what in the world I’m talking about when I use the terms Selvage, Grain or Bias.

Source: http://www.apparelsearch.com/terms/b/bias_cut.htm http://www.makeit-loveit.com/2011/01/sewing-tips-what-is-selvage-bias-and.html


What are the pros and cons of a bias cut vs a straight cut? Bias cutting Requires more fabric and usually leaves more waste More time and skill required for cutting and construction Gives a greater fluidity to the garment Is comfortable to wear Requires fewer seam lines (unless wanted) Will 'stretch' before, during and after construction

Straight cut

Actually this list is not really the pros and cons of bias cut and straight cut,

Requires less fabric and therefore less waste

because it have their own advantages and disadvantages. This is list just

Easier construction and fabric cutting

want to show the different effects that will be shown when a fabric is cut on

Makes a more structured garment

this two different ways.

More restrictive movement Can re define the body shape

Source : https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-pros-and-cons-of-a-bias-cut-vs-a-straight-cut

Will ‘stiff’ Need finishing because can be frayed

Can be draped on the stand, rather than making a paper pattern Bias cut seams are not inclined to fray (no need finishing unless wanted) Is inclined to show every 'lump and bump' on the body

History of Bias Cut

Madeleine Vionnet and the Cross Cut Bias Method The French designer Madeleine Vionnet (The queen of Bias) opened her own fashion house in 1912. She devised methods of bias cross cutting during the 1920s using a miniature model. She made popular the halter neck and the cowl neck. The bias method has often been used to add a flirtatious and elegant quality to clothes. To make a piece of fabric hang and drape in sinuous folds and stretch over the round contours of the body, fabric pattern pieces can be cut not on the straight grain, but at an angle of 45 degrees. It is sometimes said that Vionnet invented bias cutting, but historical evidence suggests that close fitting gowns and veils of the medieval period were made with cross cut fabrics. The Edwardians also made skirts that swayed to the back by joining a bias edge to a straight grain edge and the result was a pull to the back that formed the trained skirt. She did really popularise it and the resulting clothes are styles we forever associate with movie goddesses and dancers like Ginger Rogers. Using her technique designers were able to produce magnificent gowns in satins, crepe-de-chines, silks, crepes and chiffons by cross cutting the fabric, creating a flare and fluidity of drapery that other methods could not achieve. Many of the gowns could be slipped over the head and came alive when put on the human form. Some evening garments made women look like Grecian goddesses whilst others made them look like half naked sexy vamps. Certain of her gowns still look quite contemporary. There was a passion for sunbathing. Women tried to get tans and then show them off under full length backless evening dresses cut on the true cross or bias and which moulded to the body. To show off the styles a slim figure was essential and that was getting easier for women who were educated and aware as many now used contraception and did not have to bear baby after baby unless desired.

Fashion Details that used bias cut in addition to cowl neck

Source : http://www.fashion-era.com/stylish_thirties.htm#Madeleine Vionnet And The Cross Cut Bias Method


EXPERIMENT—COWL VARIATION From the original cowl neck that I made at class, I do some collaging and try to change the position and the proportion of the cowl. I try to collage it on the dress form.

After make some collage I try to make 2 of them ;

Reflection: This exercise make me more understand about cowl and also the use of bias. Because when I do the exercise, once I wrongly drape cowl not using bias, and it’s difficult. Now I know that bias is very useful for cowl. Besides, I also can understand that cowl can be place anywhere and form a different garment variation.

Cowl at the hip (as skirt)

Cowl at the armhole


MINI TEST After learning draping for 6 weeks, today, we got a mini test. So every instruction we have to finished it in 15 minutes

INSTRUCTION I

The first test, I have to drape fit bodice front and back. For the front, we are asked to give waist dart and bust dart at the armhole. And for the back, I have to give waist dart.

INSTRUCTION II

The second one, I think is the most difficult one. So, I have to drape a fit bodice front that have waist dart and also bust dart at the centre front line.

INSTRUCTION III

The last one I had to drape fit bodice with princess line from the armhole. And for this, I have to drape it until hip. I think, this is the easiest because I have done this before for my princess line experiment

Reflection: I think it’s very useful for me because it can show, how far that I have understand about drape especially drape fit and suppression bodice. Because if I haven’t understand, I won’t finished quickly on time. Besides, this test also make me be punctual by time because I have to finish one toile in pre-set time. Why be fast in draping is important? Because sometimes draping is used for making a pattern from actual human. Sometimes, designer use drape to make pattern (especially for gown, wedding gown). I have ever done this before with a fashion designer in my country when I made a gown for my cousin’s wedding. So the designer will drape quickly and directly on my body, how the details of the gown want to look like, then she will do a quick marking on the draping . This method is used for making a pattern that absolutely fit on a body. If a designer cannot do it quickly, it means she/he doesn’t have a good service on it especially if the client is not a patient person.


FLARE SKIRT This week, I learned to drape more volume. This week, I learned how to drape flare skirt (front and back side). For me I think it’s not so difficult to drape a flare skirt and I think the last week drape (cowl neck) is more difficult than this. Basically, to drape flare you have to know, understand and divide where and how much flounce that you want at the garment.

STEPS of DRAPING FLARE SKIRT (FRONT)

Firstly, as usual, draw the straight grain (parallel with the selvage of calico)

Draw few cross grain guide line anywhere you want.

Pin down the CF (straight grain) at the waist.

After that pin through at the waist (place where you want to have volume)

Snip at the pin

After that spread and adjust the flounce that you want at that place.

After that put another pin at the place that you want to have volume

Snip on it again and spreadadjust the flounce. And repeat it until you think the volume is enough (pin trough-snip-spread)

After you think you have finished to give volume on the skirt, pin on the side seam.

Make a mark at the side seam and draw the waist line.

Take of and then trueing the waist line with French curve ruler

After that, from the side seam marking make a straight line that parallel with cross grain guide line that you have make before.


Draw the hemline base on length that you want (for me is 45 cm)

After that trim the hemline

Trim the waistline and side seam at the allowance (1 cm)

The flat view

STEPS of DRAPING FLARE SKIRT (BACK)

Firstly, as usual, draw the straight grain (parallel with the selvage of calico)

Snip at the pin

Draw few cross grain guide line anywhere you want.

Pin down the CB (straight grain) at the waist.

After that pin through at the waist (place where you want to have volume)

After that spread and adjust the flounce that you want. And repeat it until you think the volume is enough (pin trough-snip-spread)

After you think you have finished to give volume on the skirt, pin on the side seam. And make a marking at the side seam

Draw the waist line.


Take of and then trueing the waist line with French curve ruler

After that, from the side seam marking make a straight line that parallel with cross grain guide line that you have make before.

Trim the waistline and side seam at the allowance (1 cm)

The flat view

Draw the hemline base on length that you want (for me is 45 cm)

After that trim the hemline

Reflection: I feel that the flare skirt is easier to make than last week draping (cowl neck). After I finished the flare skirt (front and back) I feel that I start to be able to feel the volume, where should I put the flounce to make the skirt look nice.


I have learned to draped flare skirt, I immediately remember one site that I have ever read before about a circle skirt. I found that this article is interesting and this is show me a very unique way of making circular skirt with a very fast way.

Technique -- Draping Circle Skirt Fullness Who isn't familiar with the dramatic effect of a full circle skirt? This is the skirt shape with the least amount of fabric at the waist and the most at the hem. Swoosh, swoosh, swoosh, so feminine. I made each of my daughters a dress with a circle skirt when they were young, but after one trip to the bathroom, the youngest declared, never again, would she wear a circle skirt. :) Years ago, I wore to death a modified circle skirt (though I didn't realize it for a long time), that was very unusual in the way it was cut. I felt like a genius when I figured out how it was made and why it hung the way it did. I wasn't, of course, but I still want to pass on what I learned. :

For a traditional circle skirt, a waist hole is cut out of the fabric, like so:

On the body (or, in the case of this demo, on the toilet paper tube) the resulting fullness is evenly distributed around the tube.

However, in this skirt I owned so long ago, the waist hole was cut differently. Instead of being cut as a round, or oval, shape, it was cut as a slit, like so (square on the left): Now, this has a very different effect when worn on the body (or tube).

The front and back of the skirt fall straight, like a pencil skirt. The fullness falls to the sides of the skirt. This is a very flattering line for those who don't want fullness over the belly but don't mind it over the hips. Of course my TP tube demo uses a stiff fabric which is not very flattering, so I cut another in a knit fabric to show the drape better:


EXPERIMENT—FLARE EVERYWHERE The important thing of draping flare is understand where we want to put the flounce (volume) and how we control it. Because of that, I try to drape some flare at different places wit different amount of flounce and flounce’s position.

The first experiment, I make a front top with flare on the CF. Basically I was focusing the flare near the CF.

The second experiment, I try to make a little bit flare skirt. I want some of the waist area until hip line is tight to the body but under that is a bit flare. What I did is I tight the waist area first then I pin on the waist and also pin on under it (around hip). Then I snip until waist then I spread it a bit.

The last experiment is very simple. I just move the volume of the flounce to the side. So the flare will be able to see clearly if you see it from the side. When you see from front and back, the skirt not look like flare skirt.


I have learned to draped flare skirt, I immediately remember one site that I have ever read before about a circle skirt. I found that this article is interesting and this is show me a very unique way of making circular skirt with a very fast way.


SHAPE/GEOMETRIC CUTTING This week I started to learn making unusual shape of garment by draping shape/geometric cutting. This is a bit hard for me in the beginning because my mind always stuck every time I do something with geometric pattern. At the beginning when I still try with paper, I have try some geometric shape but all not so success. And below are my process, until I come out with the final So, there are four basic techniques that are used; 1. Cheese : Cheese means making hole on the fabric 2. Slashing : Cut the fabric, slash the fabric 3. Alphabets : Using alphabets and then connect it with another alphabets, straight lines, curve line or another geometric shape to create volumness geometric shape 4. Angle : Connecting an angle with another angle, straight line, geometric shape or another shapes to create shapes.

Cheese

Alphabets

Slashing

Angle

Actually, I have asked to try with paper first. However, when I tried in paper, I keep failed and failed. I try to make geometric shape, it keep not working. After that, I still trying to use paper, but use alphabet. It’s become easier for me.

After I try some, there is also difficulty when I do it with paper, it’s not comfortable and it is also hard for me because I cannot feel the real feeling of fabric. Because of that I start to directly use calico.

This is what I do.. Because I don’t really like an d can do geometric well, that’s why I finally work more on alphabets. I choose JES that I choose from my name.

First thing, I cut 4 “J” shapes. I connect two J shape together

After I connect two “J” together, it will become like this. I place it at the CF and CB

After that I make this pieces. So this is made from a rectangle and a square. Then I connect it with the J pieces.

Then it become bustier like this.


Because it just a bustier, I want to add cardigan to over the shoulder. I made the cardigan from “e” and “s”

Firstly, I cut 2 “e” shape and “s” shape on the calico. The “e” shape I form from circle shape that I slash and cheese.

At first, I try to drape the “e” shape become like this. However, I found that this is not so nice. It look like sailor-moon collar.

After that, I try to connect 1 “e” shape and 1 “s” shape together at the slashing of “e” shape. Then I adjust it at the dress form. And then the other pair is for the right side.

After finished. I found some ways to wear this garment. Which is preferable for the wearer.

Reflection: This week project is a bit challenging for me. It begin that the previous week because we have to form abstract, geometric shape that not like the normal pattern. However, I finally can do it though a bit hard at the beginning. This week I start to feel the true advantage of draping which is form a unique form of garment that can not be achieve with normal pattern making methods. Because with draping methods we can directly adjust the position, shape and the proportion of the shape itself.


SHAPE/GEOMETRIC CUTTING PRESENTATION, FEEDBACK, CORRECTION & EXPERIMENT

After presentation, there are some feedback that I got: 1. First I haven't indicated the opening of the garment. How it can be opened. After that I was thinking to use invisible zipper at the CB. 2. There is also problem. The garment cannot fit perfectly at the school dress form. The bustier cannot be lt properly by the bust. It is because the dress form that I use for making it (my own dress form at home) has bigger bust area than the school dress form. From this, my teacher suggest to not drape bustier anymore next time because the school dress form is not suitable for making buster 3. My stitching is not so neat 4. For the cardigan, It bit too much seam, and my lecture suggest to minimalized it again.

Reducing the Seam (Cardigan) Because I have problem for the cardigan, which is too much seam, I try to modified it and make it simpler. Still with the same concept, I still use my name for making the cardigan (still use “e” and “s”. However I try to cut it differently so can reduce the seam.

I cut the “e” and “s” differently. So the “e” shape I cut 1 piece “E” (which is the capital ) shape. For the “S” I use different way to cut. I make it from circle that I slash become like “S” shape.

I sew the “E” shape by connect the two inner part together so there’s no space at that area.

Last thing that I do is connect the “S” shapes. One at the right side and one at the left side then sew it together until the back part the continue until CF. Then Finish. The cardigan is become more simple, and it also can be use for making a top not only cardigan.


HONEYCOMB PATTERN STRUCTURES AT JUNYA WATANABE Junya Watanabe, AW15, Paris. The Autumn-Winter 2015 collection at Junya Watanabe was filled with repetitive structures created with a mathematical sense of precision. While the shapes hinted at a rigorous pattern making process, the garments themselves often had a softness and a sense of bouncy movement. Many of the fabric manipulations hinted at the sorts of patterns that would be needed to make paper lanterns and many of the structures appeared to be created with simple shapes that are ingeniously sewn together with alternating seams. Strips of fabric and circular panels appear to be used to create different slits and gaps. It is then the length and position of the slits or the spacing between the short seams, that is controlled to vary the overall shapes of the structures. Simple changes like varying the way panels are hung, altering the position of join lines or slowly increasing the width of panels, is used to further expand the reach of the concept to create more permutations. Often it is when gravity takes hold that the fabric opens up allowing the viewer to see the spaces created in the structures. At times, it appears as though stiffening may also be used along the join lines to defy gravity and to hold the fabric away from the body. In the accompanying diagrams some of the complex structures have been imagined in both flat and expanded forms as a guess at what some of the base pattern shapes and construction methods may be.

http://thecuttingclass.com/post/113982162208/honeycomb-pattern-structures-junya-watanabe


SUBTRACTION PATTERN CUTTING WITH JULIAN ROBERTS Many garments are created from flat pattern making methods, or from drape methods, but a method of “hollow construction” has been created by fashion designer Julian Roberts». This pattern cutting technique known as “Subtraction Cutting” makes the most of the negative spaces that can be opened up in fabric and falls somewhere between traditional pattern making and drape resulting in experimental garments that break the boundaries of the usual garment shapes. This is a pattern cutting technique that Julian has shared with many around the world through lectures and demonstrations of the subtraction cutting method. A pdf of his book “Free Cutting” is now available to download for free from the link below, and is a must read for all fashion students or adventurous home sewers. The techniques often build from the shape of an initial flat piece of material. This initial material is then sliced or opened up with holes, allowing the material to be twisted upon itself, fed through itself or enlarged with more pieces of fabrics. “This is a subtraction method of cutting, because the resulting shape is created by the removal of fabric, not the addition of fabric. This removal creates space for the body, but also controls how the fabric falls around the body.” “Subtraction cutting is DESIGNING WITH PATTERNS, rather than creating patterns with designs” The resulting garments make the most of the volume of the fabric and often look incredibly complex. Individual garments are often very reminiscent of the work of Japanese designers such as Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto and can also often be worn in more than one way, using the placement of your body and limbs to change the shape of the garment.

The potential for different garment designs that could emerge from this subtraction technique are endless. This is because the different sub methods that Julian lists in the book “Free Cutting” can be used either with careful consideration of the subtractions in terms of placement and size, or alternatively, you could use the methods in a process of completely random experimentation. If you have ever experimented with draping fabric onto a mannequin then you may have found yourself inadvertently using similar techniques to twist, displace and feed fabric back on itself. The great thing about the book that Julian is offering for download is that some of the core principles of subtraction cutting are broken down into different individual methods that you can use to approach your fabric with more awareness of the types of shapes you may be trying to achieve. An example image taken from the “Tunnel” technique:

An example taken from the “Displacement” Technique:

There is huge potential for these processes to be combined with traditional pattern cutting and drape techniques to achieve really beautiful results. Below is just a single page taken from the book where you can see the forms of traditional bodice blocks have been used to help to create the holes in the fabric. Feel free to distribute and share the book with other people that you think will be interested in this technique, as Julian is generously offering it for free, and with no copyright restrictions on reproductions.

Source: http://thecuttingclass.com/post/65052582315/subtraction-pattern-cutting-with-julian-roberts


CRYSTALLOGRAPHICA / IRINA SHAPOSHNIKOVA Posted in Design - Fashion by * FORMAKERS

Many thanks to Irina for providing these images of her awesome collection inspired by geological formation of crystals and mineral. The Crystallographica collection consists of garments with strong geometrical folds and sharp facets which accentuate the anatomy of a female body. Delicate fabrics of wool, silk organza and cotton are fused with plastic and high-tech fabrics to further create striking, powerful silhouettes.Irina Shaposhnikova was born in Moscow, Russia. At age 16 Shaposhnikova worked in her father’s sewing atelier where she learned about fabrics, materials, garments and how to stitch them. During her time ther Shaposhnikova quickly discovered her aspiration for fashion design. In 2008 Shaposhnikova obtained her BA in Fashion Design from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium and later that year her work was featured in Vogue (Russia). She continued on to obtain her MA in Fashion Design one year later.

http://www.formakers.eu/project-560-irinashaposhnikova-crystallographica

Reflection: Honestly, I am really bad in geometric. Every time talk about geometric, I also cannot. The collection by Irina Shaoposhnikova is ally amazing. I wonder, how she can make that kind of geometric shape on a garment.


THREE SEAMS DRESS This week I learned about a very interesting things. So, we are asked to make a dress with maximal three seams. This is very challenging for me because I never do it before. And I also think and realised that I am a type of person that is always design with many seams. Because of that, I became think complicatedly to find a way to do that, but I am not end up with anything. It’s really hard to me. Finally, I decided to think simple. I

CB

CB

Shoulder + arm length

Neck Hands CF

First, I cut a long rectangular of calico.

Then I just make 3 holes that are use for the neck, and hands

CF

I join the blue area together (CF as the break point). Okay, this is the first seam

After I join, It give a effect of pointed shape at the CF that is quite interesting

CB

CF

After that, I join the blue part and the green part together. I stitch the right side and the left side so these become my second and third seams

Okay after I stitched, this is the outcome. The shape is really big like a bat wing dress. It’s quite interesting. However, when I see the back part, I realised that there is too much ease (though it’s a voluminous garment). That’s why I add dart at the back part.

Reflection: This week is a bit stressing for me. I feel like I did it not so well though the outcome is quite acceptable and interesting actually. However, this is also fun because I can make a garment with only three seams. This method is really help me to create a simple but interesting and structured shape garment. There is some things that I think I have to improve from the garment that I have. From my observation, I see that this dress is really a very big and wide. And because of that, the fall is become not nice and very drape. Because of that I decided to research on how to make a big volumeness dress but structured.


Easy DIY Maxi Dress with One Seam May 19, 2014 By: autumn

I love how cool and comfy maxi dresses are – I could wear them every day in the summer (anything not to have to put on jeans when it’s 90+ degrees out!) A few weeks ago I posted an easy to sew maxi dress tutorial, but today I have an even easier maxi dress how-to for you – would you believe this dress only takes one seam to make? If you can sew one line, you can make this dress! It’s made using a pretty shirred Ikat print fabric from Joann (you can find it online here). I fell in love when I saw it in the store – it’s super soft, flows beautifully, and the print is gorgeous. The top of the fabric is already gathered up (shirred) with stretchy thread, making turning it into a dress ultra simple. I was put off at first by the price tag – 28 bucks a yard – youch! But then I thought about: I’d only need one yard and could use a half off coupon. When I realized I could sew a single seam and have a pretty new summer dress for $15 and 15 minutes of work, I was sold! The material is a rayon challis, which is soft and drapey. It’s gathered like a tube top all through the chest&ribs, then is loose through the waist and hips, which, for me, is a good thing. The photos above were taken when it was quite windy out, so here’s an indoor one to show you how it falls Here’s what you need to know to make your own one seam maxi dress: First, buy your fabric. If you usually wear a M or L tee, one yard will be just about right. Fold your fabric in half with right sides together as shown below. Sew a seam down the other side, matching raw edges together. Go back and either serge or zigzag the raw edges to make sure none of the elastic threads through the top come undone. .

Source: http://www.itsalwaysautumn.com/2014/05/19/easy-diy-maxi-dress-just-one-seam-sewing-tutorial.html

15-Minute Turtleneck Cape DIY Tutorial

1.) First, fold a 40 x 40" square in 1/2 twice so that the resulting square you see is 20 x 20"

5. Your turtleneck piece is a 14 x 17" rectangle. Make sure your 17" edge is the stretchy side of the fabric

2. From the folded corner, use your measuring tape to measure out 20" all along the edge of the fabric and mark (I use regular chalk, but there are also marking tools in the notions section of your fabric store) as you go to form an arc. This arc will result in the circle you'll use for your cape.

6. Fold in half with the right sides together and sew down (use a twin needle or serger for stretch) the open edges.

http://sewpetitegal.blogspot.sg/2014/11/15-minute-turtleneck-cape-diy-tutorial.html

3. Cut along your arc lines.

7. Turn your cape pieces inside out and place the turtleneck portion inside your cape. Line up the edges and sew (twin needle or serger for stretch again - a regular straight stitch would snap).

4. For a typical turtleneck, measure out your radius at the folded tip as 2.5" in the same manner as you did for the cape edges and then cut.


THREE SEAMS DRESS DEVELOPMENT After presentation and get some feedback and comments, I see that the shape of my three seams dress is really big (huge) especially when the wearer open her arm. The shape is really funny because it really look like bat. Because of that, I try to change some proportion of the garment by using Photoshop, and this is some of the result

Original


COMBINATION TECHNIQUE DRESS This week is the last draping basic lesson. So the lesson today is to make a dress that’s contain all of the technique that already learned previously weeks. The techniques that we have already learned are : Placing the styling tape on the dress form, drape the bodice (fit and suppression), pivoting darts, princess line (slash method), cowl , flare, and geometric. First of all, I draw some design that included all of the technique, and this is the drawing that I use

First thing that I made is placing the styling tape on the dress form. I place the styling tape on the seam part, dart part that is not same with the default (standard) place of styling tape

After that, the fist thing that I made is the cowl part at the shoulder and seam part. The cowl is connected from the front to the back side

So next step I make the triangle part at the above bust part (red circled). Picture at the left is the look when I half stitched the dress. So I join together the skirt and the triangle part. And then, I also add geometric shape effect by slash the skirt at the CF and insert fabric inside the slash. I also add geometric effect at the side seam. So I insert fabric also at the sides seam before I connect with the back side. The effect that is produced is really interesting that remind me of tweezers at the claw ding dong machine at the amusement park.

Drape the skirt part base on the styling tape that I have already made. I pivot the dart a bit


After that, I make flare at the back side with snip and spread method. After I finished the flare I also join it with rest of the garment’s part that I have already join

Then I join the cowl part that I have already made. (left and right)

And this is the outcome. The shape is interesting.

Reflection: After all, this week learning is very fun because it’s about throwback all of the technique that I already learned in previously weeks. And fortunately, I still remember all of the technique that I have learned before. Before I try to design and make, I thought that it is very too much when I have to include all of the details that I have learned before. However, after I tried, the outcome is quite acceptable and possible to be worn by someone.


COMBINATION TECHNIQUE DEVELOPMENT I did some sketches that include all of the element that required. However, I have just choose one to be made.

My Draping Journal Basic  

Draping journal about my first experience about draping.

My Draping Journal Basic  

Draping journal about my first experience about draping.

Advertisement