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S • 6 • F OOD WI TH LOVE • INDEPE NDE NT MAGA ZINE

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SUMMER

T A BL E OF C ONTE NTS

7 / EDITOR'S LETTER | 8 / FLORILEGIUM | 20 / MODERNIST PAINTING | 24 / IRISH SODA BREAD | 26 / BLUEBERRY BAGEL TOAST | 28 / STRAWBERRY JAM | 30 / VIETNAMESE COFFEE MOUSSE | 32 / MISS BABACILU | 36 / CLASSIC GREEK SALAD | 37 / OLD -FASHION BABA GANOUSH | 38 / FETTUCCINE WITH MUSHROOMS AND BACON | 40 / PIZZA WITH BROCCOLI AND CHICKEN | 42 / MACARONS | 44 / PAVLOVA WITH LIME CREAM | 46 / THE SIXTIES | 54 / A POSSIBLE HISTORY | 64 / WILDERNESS | 80 / THE DEATH OF THE AUTHOR | 84/ GRILLED CHICKEN TACOS | 86 / POPSICLES | 94 / PERFORMANCE POETRY VS POETRY SLAM

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What Liberty Ate S • 6 • F OOD WI TH LOVE • INDEPE NDE NT MAGA ZINE

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FAC EBOOK www.facebook.com/whatlibertyate

C ONTAC T contact@gabrielaiancu.com

W H AT L I B E R T Y AT E . C O M / M A G A Z I N E

Š Copyright 2014 What Liberty Ate Magazine All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording and/or otherwise without the prior written permission of the editor. This publication can be shared online via its active link and can be embedded on websites and/or blogs which have non- commercial means, as stated and protected by the copyright law. All photographs presented in this issue have been used with the consent of their authors and can not be used without prior author's permission. To use any photograph presented in this issue, please enquire at contact@whatlibertyate.com. Magazine's contributors are responsible for the content of their articles. First publishing of 6th issue - August 2014. Printed in the United States of America Publication designed by Gabriela Iancu Cover photograph and styling by Gabriela Iancu Pattern design by Gabriela Iancu 4 – WHAT LIBERTY ATE


GABRIELA IANCU Editor in Chief and Creative Director www.gabrielaiancu.com

ANA MARIA C IOLACU Photographer www.justlovecookin.com

MEDEEA IANCU Contributing Writer www.medeeaiancu.com

APRIL BELL Photographer www.aprilbellphoto.com

IOANA MALANCU Jewelry Maker www.missbabacilu.com

OANA PISCUREANU Illustrator

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Expressions 6 – WHAT LIBERTY ATE


***

I enjoy exploring new things. I am restless at acquiring new manifestations of the world. I do not fear risk and failure. I have a deep desire of discovering the unknown. I accept failure because is part of ourselves and it is always revealing the truth. This issue explores the vulnerabilities that come with change and new forms of expression. For the past year, I lived my life between two worlds, and I've had highs and lows. The mistakes on which I stumbled upon pushed me toward learning from them. In this new volume I seek to lay out a few of the things that resulted from my exploration between these two worlds and my day-to-day life. Florilegium is my first photographic series on which I worked in my first quarter at SCAD. It reveals the vulnerabilities and hopes I had for what this new experience was for me. Furthermore, the meals I share with you are the sign of a creative environment and an approach to merge two cultures, European and American, into a single world. phic essays From a possible history, to a romantic outlook over homeland, the photogra art aim at here unfold a desire to look and remember. Moreover, the critical essays about the modern art. investing ourselves with knowledge, and are reflecting on the symbolism of More then ever before, today I consider this journal as a curatorial space of creative and inspirational works that trigger my participation in the most fruitful function. We should all dare and care to look fearless at the many more wonders that life is waiting to offer to us. •

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F L O R I L FLORILEGIUM IS DOCUMENTING THE A DJUSTMENTS OF SOC IAL C ONSTRAINTS IN MY LIFE, A DJUSTMENTS RESULTING FROM EXPLORATION, KNOWLEDGE AND CULTURE. WI TH

FLORILEGIUM , I AM C OLLECTING EXC ERPTS FROM PER SONAL EXPERIENC ES THAT ILLUSTRATE THE NARRATIVE MEC HANISM OF VULNERABILI T Y. I ENTERED INTO A RELATIONSHIP WI TH MYSELF BY PRODUC ING AND REC EIVING THE AR T, FEELING AND EVOKING AT THE SAME TIME THE EMOTION I WAS EXPERIMENTING. • PHOTOGRAPHIC ESSAY by GABRIELA IANCU

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L E G I U M

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Modernist Painting CLEMENT GREENBERG

TEXT and PHOTOGRAPHY by GABRIELA IA NC U

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THE ART READINGS

GREENBERG IS EXAMINING, FROM A CRITICAL STANCE, THE UNIQUE CHARACTERISTICS OF ALL MODERN ART FORMS. BASED ON KANT'S THEORY OF SELF-CRITICAL THINKING, GREENBERG IS FORMULATING THE LIMITATIONS AND IDENTIFYING THE UNIQUE ELEMENTS OF MODERN PAINTING.

The essence of Modernism—the self-criticism—is the method of criticizing

from within the object being examined, and does not judge from the outside, establishing it more firmly. Starting from this definition, Greenberg speaks further about the self-justification of each form of art, specificity of the medium, and flatness as a defining feature of painting.

Greenberg claims that the process of self-justification should be done medium

by medium, in order to identity the rational justification of each form of art, since each social activity has to have reason to justify itself. The modernism of each form of art rests, in the first instance, on the self-justification of its capacity to establish its uniqueness, in art in general, and each art in particular.

Throughout history each form of art had to demonstrate its unique and valuable

essence, characteristics that have not been obtained from any other form of art. Thus, the specificity of the medium rests on these characteristics. To achieve this pure specificity, each art form has to give up on the elements that have been borrowed from any other art. Therefore, this self-defined Modern art would become independent of other art forms.

Greenberg is focusing further on the limitations of painting as a medium, and

the Modern appreciation of the two-dimensionality of the picture surface. While Realist painting was encouraging the viewer to see the depth of perspective, Modernist painting is embracing the limitation of the flat surface, the shape of support and the properties of pigment.

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THE ART READINGS

The Impressionists and Post-Impressionists have done nothing more than appreciating painting with painting. By using flatness as an element that is unique to painting only, these artists have declared the unique qualities of painting through highlighting the process. Modernist painting has thus proclaimed the flatness before anything, forcing the viewer to see the painted surface.

In order to sustain its independence, Modernist painting had to abandon any

kind of representation of space. Abstract painting, as well as Old Master's painting, has referenced a three-dimensional space—a characteristic element of sculpture, being not able to attain the uniqueness of pictorial art. Modernist painting had to be about looking at the picture, and not about looking into the picture. The resistance of painting to sculpture, shows at the same time how much painting has tried over time to get rid of the sculptural, but also its attachment to tradition. But, Modernism became more conscious of itself, and put the visual experience forward achieving eventually the desired flatness. By setting up this set of norms, Modernism has settled the limits of a picture seen as a Modernist painting. However, the more we get used to a certain artistic novelty, the more we see it as conservative, for Modernism being almost impossible to achieve the perfect flatness. While not permitting a sculptural illusion, Modernism permitted the optical illusion instead of the tactile associations that connoted to sculptural.

Greenberg seems to argue limited points of view related to how to make painting

a modern art. However, he succeeds to justify why Modernism finds the fullest expression in the limitation of arts. Greenberg successfully proves why Modernism brings forward the true nature of visual art, only through questioning the practice, and making a norm out of referencing the visual experience as an activity that is not making reference to any other kind of experience. •

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Irish

SODA BREA D WITH PEANUT FLOUR AND SEEDS

REC IPE and PHOTOGRAPHY by GABRIELA IA NC U

1 T EA SPO O N B A KING SO D A + 1 1 / 2 C U P ( 2 0 0 G) W H O L EMEA L FLO U R + 1 / 2 C U P ( 10 0 G) PEA NU T FLO U R + 1 / 2 C U P ( 1 3 0 ML ) B U T T ERMIL K + 1 T EA SPO O N SA LT + 1 T EA SPO O N SU GA R + 1 T A B L E SPO O N B U T T ER + 2 TA B L E S P O O N S S U NF LOW ER SEED S + B ROW N FL A X SEED S

1. Preheat oven to 420°F (220°C). Sift

surface and shape into a round loaf.

together the flours, sugar, salt, and

3. Transfer dough to a large, lightly

baking soda into a large mixing bowl.

greased cast-iron skillet. Score top of

Add the butter and work the mixture

dough in an “X” shape. Transfer to oven

until it resembles coarse meal.

and bake until bread is golden and

2. Make a well in the center of the flour

bottom sounds hollow when tapped with

mixture. Add buttermilk and mix with

a knife, about 20-30 minutes. Transfer

a wooden spoon until dough is holding

bread to a rack to let cool briefly. Serve

together. Add the seeds. Gently knead

bread warm, at room temperature, or

dough until you will have a rough ball.

sliced and toasted. •

Transfer dough to a lightly floured

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MUSHROOMS ON BLUEBERRY BAGEL toast

POACHED EGGS AND HOLLANDAISE with

REC IP E A D A P T E D from G O U RM E T T R AVEL L ER | P H OT O GR AP H Y by G AB R I EL A I A N C U

SERVES 2 PEOPLE 2 tablespoons olive oil

1. In a small saucepan, simmer shallot, vinegar, pepper and

1/2 cup (100 g) brown mushrooms

tarragon over medium heat until reduced by half (2-3 minutes).

1 small garlic clove, finely chopped

Set aside to cool, and allow to infuse for 10 minutes.

1 teaspoon thyme salt and pepper

2. Whisk yolks, vinegar and 1 tablespoon water at bain-marie

2 poached eggs

until thick and emulsified (3-4 minutes). Slowly add the

2 blueberry bagels

clarified butter whisking until all is incorporated. If necessary,

Tabasco sauce

thin the sauce consistency with a little warm water. Cover and

basil leaves

keep warm.

3. Preheat oil in a skillet and cook the mushrooms and garlic until just golden (2-3 minutes). Season to taste with thyme, salt and pepper. HOLLANDAISE SAUCE 1 1/2 golden shallot, finely diced

4. Toast the bagels for 1-2 minutes on each side. Poach eggs in

1/4 cup (50 ml) white wine vinegar

a large saucepan of simmering water with a splash of vinegar

1 teaspoon black peppercorns, crushed

over medium heat until soft-poached (2 1/2 minutes), then drain

1 tarragon sprig

on absorbent paper.

1/2 cup (125 g) butter, coarsely chopped 2 egg yolks

5. To serve, spread toast with mushroom, then poached eggs, spoon hollandaise sauce over and scatter with basil leaves. •

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S t r a wbe r r y jam

—T he f ine st sp r ea d o f summer —

RECIPE and PHOTOGRAPHY by GABRIELA IANCU

» 3 POUNDS (1,3 KG) FRESH STRAWBERRIES / 3 CUPS (380 G) WHITE, GRANULATED SUGAR / 4 TEASPOONS VANILLA EXTRACT / 2 TEASPOONS FINELY GRATED LEMON ZEST / 3 TABLESPOONS ORANGE JUICE

1. Combine the strawberries, lemon zest, orange juice, vanilla and sugar in a large saucepan over medium-low heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 10-15 minutes or until sugar dissolves. 2. Increase heat to medium-high and bring to the boil. Boil, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until jam is reduced by one-quarter. Cook for 5-10 minutes, stirring more frequently as jam thickens, until it has the consistency of very loose jelly. Remove from heat.

3. Spoon the hot jam evenly among four sterilized preserving jars and seal immediately. Turn upsidedown for 2 minutes. Turn upright and process the jars in the boiling water bath for 5-10 minutes. Set aside to cool completely. Label and date. •

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VIETNAMESE COFFEE MOUSSE

R E C I P E f r o m I N D E P E N D E N T.C O . U K | P H OT O G R A P H Y b y G A B R I E L A I A N C U

2 EGG YOLKS 2 1/2 TBSP CASTER SUGAR 1 TBSP INSTANT-COFFEE GRANULES 4 TBSP CONDENSED MILK 8 OZ/220ML DOUBLE CREAM HANDFUL COFFEE BEANS, CRUSHED

1/ Place the egg yolks, caster sugar, coffee and 1 tablespoon of water in a bowl and whisk to combine.

2/ Place the bowl over a pan of gently simmering water and stir until the mixture has thickened into a custard. Stir in the condensed milk and set aside to cool.

3/ Lightly whisk the cream in a large bowl until it holds its shape. Using a large metal spoon, fold the cream into the cooled coffee custard. Cover and chill in the fridge for at least 1 hour.

4/ Spoon into serving bowls, sprinkle with crushed coffee beans and serve. • 30 – WHAT LIBERTY ATE


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Q & A INSPIRATION

MISS BABACILU — T HE EX Q U I S I T E " S W E E T TH OOTH " F O R H A ND MA D E JE WELRY— ww w. m issbabac il u. c o m | p h o to g r a p h y b y G a b r i e la Ia n c u

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WHAT

INSPIRED

YOU

TO

START

MISS

BABACILU?

M I S S B A B AC ILU as a characher evolved from a drawing of mine called BA B AC ILU, a cute little smiling girl that I used to call a tea creature. I imagined a story around her, she used to live in a tea pot, hanging on tea cups, having friends like cats, clouds and angels. As I started to draw more, I turned this character into pieces of jewelry, mostly brooches. I tried to improve these pieces and eventually started using cameos, pearls and gemstones. I guess that’s the moment when MI SS B A B AC ILU became a reality because making my first elegant, feminine and less childish designs was the moment I realized this is what I wanted most to create.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE OVERALL AESTHETIC OF MISS BABACILU? If I were to choose just one word to describe MI SS B A B AC ILU’s pieces that word would be delicate. My creativity and joy of wearing jewelry made me create different styles of costume jewelry but no matter how large or how tiny, how visible or how mysterious they all have this intrinsec delicacy, a detailed appearance, a graceful feeling, like a delicate touch of a petal. Studying petals closely you will come to acknowledge that although they have a velvet touch, they seem made to caress, they are powerful, strong elements. That’s exactly how Miss Babacilu’s pieces are: a fragile, sweet, romantic presence with a solid base of gemstones, crystals and plated brass. I adore the idea of tea parties and garden parties and each piece I create has to be perfect for this kind of events. Interestingly, this makes them suitable for office wear, casual wear of special occasions, they are very versatile. Deep down they are envisioned to give their wearers a sense of her beauty nything else.

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WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE PROCESS IN JEWELRY MAKING? I like, no, absolutely love everything about designing and making Miss Babacilu’s pieces. I love everything from the first glimpse of inspiration, from the excitement of drawing the first scratches in my notebooks, from selecting the materials to the moment when I sit at my table and start matching elements and swirling the wire. Each of this parts of the process gets me eager to start a new day. I like wire wrapping the elements until I forget about everything and let my hands work, and I also like the thrill of creating something upon special request, combining ideas with the future wearer in order to create the perfect piece for her. And even if this is not part of the process of jewelry making I will add here my great love for packaging the pieces and, on rare occasions, handing them personally. I have a deep gratitude for each lady wearing Miss Babacilu’s jewels and meeting them, seeing their enthusiasm about their new piece of jewelry makes everything worth, fuels days of works and plans. They also are my greatest inspiration. WHAT

ARE

MISS

BABACILU

BEST

MARKETING

TIPS?

We sure have tried many techniques and will be trying others. From all we’ve experienced at Miss Babacilu I can only say that this simple thing as staying true to brand’s values can make a great difference in the big scheme. And developing around this solid base gets things moving more than anything else. HOW Oh,

DO it

sure

YOU is

SEE

bright!

And

THE

FUTURE

wonderful

as

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OF an

MISS

endless

BABACILU? tea

party!


C

L

A

S

S

I

C

GREEK SALAD REC IPE and PHOTOGRAPHY by GABRIELA IA NC U

SERVES 2 PEOPLE 200 g firm feta, sliced / 8 cherry tomatoes, sliced / 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced / 1 cucumber, peeled and sliced / 1 tablespoon olive oil / a handful green olives / a handful basil leaves / cracked black pepper

0 1 / Heat a large non-stick frying pan over high

and top with the tomato, onion, cucumber, olives,

heat. Fry the feta for 1–2 minutes each side or

basil. 0 3 / Sprinkle with pepper and drizzle with

until golden. 02 / Divide between serving plates

the oil to serve. •

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Old-fashion

BABA GANOUSH REC IPE and PHOTOGRAPHY by GABRIELA IA NC U

A DELIC I OUS SMOKE Y AUBERGINE D IP PERFEC T F OR A PICNIC OR AS A N APPE TI ZER

SERVES 6 PEOPLE 01 / Prick the eggplants with a fork and grill until the skin is charred and

3 eggplants / 1 white onion, finelly chopped / 1/2 lemon, juice only / 4 tablespoons olive oil / salt and black pepper, to taste / chopped tomatoes, to serve

blacked, about 15-20 minutes, turning halfway through cooking. Set aside to cool

02 / Unpeel the skin and reserve the flesh. In a medium bowl mix the flesh with the onion, oil, lemon juice and season to taste with salt and pepper.

0 3 / Serve on toast with a drizzle of olive oil and chopped tomatoes. •

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WITH MUSHROOMS AND BACON REC IPE and PHOTOGRAPHY by GABRIELA IA NC U

SERVES 2 PEOPLE 10 1/2 oz. (300 g) fettuccine / 2 tablespoons olive oil / 5 oz. (150 g) bacon, cut in lardons / 4 oz. (100 g) brown mushroom, finely chopped / 1/2 red onion, finelly chopped / 1/2 red bell pepper, finelly chopped / 1 tablespoon jalapeno chille, finelly chopped / 1 garlic clove, minced / 1/3 cup (80 ml) white wine / 1 sprig thyme / 2 tablespoons cheddar, grated / fresh basil leaves, to serve / Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste /

1. Fill a large pot with salted water, bring to a rolling

the mushrooms. Add the bacon and garlic, season with

boil over high heat. Add the fettuccine to the boiling

salt and pepper, stir to combine and fry over low-medi-

water and cook for 8-12 minutes or until al dente.

um heat until the bacon is turnin golden and crispy.

Drain and keep 1/3 cup pasta water in the pot, you will

Add wine and thyme leaves, stir and simmer for 10

use it later on for the pasta sauce.

minutes. Set aside.

2. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large, non-stick

3. Add the cooked fettuccine to the pan, along with

frying pan set over medium heat, and lightly sauté the

pasta water, tossing well. Season with salt and freshly

onion for 1-2 minutes. Next, add the mushrooms, bell

ground black pepper. Cook in the pan for a 1-2 minutes

pepper and jalapeño, and cook for 5-6 minutes, stirring

more. Serve with basil and sprinkle cheddar on top. •

often, until most of the moisture has been removed from

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with RECIPE and PHOTOGRAPHY by GABRIELA IANCU

SERVES 2 PEOPLE g) all-purpose H — 2 cups (240 PIZZA DOUG 10 / tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil flour / 2 tablespoons pinch of salt spoons dried yeast / 1 lukewarm water / 2 tea T O P P I N G — 2 tablespoons olive oil / 4 oz. (100 g) chicken breast / 4 tablespoons and sugar minced broccoli / 4 tablespoons brown mushrooms / 4 oz. (100 g) goat cheese / 1/2 cup (100 ml) good quality tomato sauce / 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce / 2 tablespoons jalapeño chille / salt and pepper / a handful of basil leaves / grated parmeggino, to serve

DIRECTIONS

in a large 1. In a big bowl, sift flour, salt and sugar. Dissolve the 2. Meantime, cook broccoli ter yeast in lukewarm water and let it stand for 5 minutes.saucepan of boiling salted wa Reserve Make a well in the center of the flour and add yeast. until al dente (6-8 minutes). m until Mix together until it starts to form a dough, add olive broccoli and finelly chop the oil and continue to knead until the dough it’s perfectly resemble coarse meal. 3. Preheat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in combined and elastic. Let it stand in a warm place for a pan. Cut the chicken breast in small 30 minutes, covered with a clean towel. In this first cubes and cook for 5-6 minutes. Add 30 minutes, lightly knead the dough from 10 to 10 the Worcestershire sauce, jalapeños minutes, then let it stand covered until doubled in size finelly chopped and season to taste (around 30 minutes more). Dive the dough into two. with salt and pepper. Cook for another Lightly knead the dough on a floured surface and roll 1-2 minutes and set aside. 5. Preheat the oven to 475°F (250°C). Place pizza it in big circles. dough on baking sheets lined with parchment s

paper. Spread tomato sauce over dough, then crumble the goat cheese, and top with chicken, broccoli and mushrooms finelly chopped. Bake on the highest level grid of the oven for 10-15 minutes or until pizza base is lightly browned and crisp.

6. Serve it with grated parmeggiano and the basil leaves finely chopped. •

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Macarons RE C I P E by M A R T H A ST E WA R T | P H OT O GR AP H Y by G AB R I EL A I A N C U

{ INGREDIENTS } 2/3 CUP (71 G) SLICED BLANCHED ALMONDS | 1 CUP (117 G) CONFECTIONERS' SUGAR | 2 LARGE E G G W H I T E S , R O O M T E M P E R AT U R E | 1 / 4 C U P ( 5 3 G)

G R A N U L AT E D

SUGAR

|

FOOD

COLORING,

IF

D E S I R E D | J A M , C H O C O L AT E O R Y O U R P R E F E R E D FILLING

1. Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C)with rack in lower third. Place almonds in a food processor; process until as fine as possible, about 1 minute. Add confectioners' sugar; process until combined, about 1 minute. 2. Pass almond mixture through a fine-mesh sieve. Transfer solids in sieve to food processor; grind and sift again, pressing down on clumps. Repeat until less than 2 tablespoons of solids remains in sieve. 3. Whisk egg whites and granulated sugar by hand to combine. Beat on medium speed 2 minutes. Increase speed to medium-high and beat 2 minutes. Then beat on high 2 minutes more. 4. The beaten egg whites will hold stiff, glossy peaks when you lift the whisk out of the bowl. Add flavoring and food coloring, if desired, and beat on highest speed 30 seconds.

5. Add dry ingredients all at once. Fold with a spatula from bottom of bowl upward, then press flat side of spatula firmly through middle of mixture. Repeat just until batter flows like lava, 35 to 40 complete strokes. 6. Rest a pastry bag fitted with a round tip inside a glass. Transfer batter to bag; secure top. Dab some batter remaining in bowl onto corners of 2 heavy baking sheets; line with parchment. 7. With piping tip 1/2 inch above sheet, pipe batter into a 3/4-inch round, then swirl tip off to one side. Repeat, spacing rounds 1 inch apart. Tap sheets firmly against counter 2 or 3 times to release air bubbles. Sprinkle finelly chopped nuts, grated chocolate, finelly chopped dried fruits or any variation that is most appealing to you. 8. Bake 1 sheet at a time, rotating halfway through, until risen and just set, 13 minutes. Let cool. Pipe or spread filling on flat sides of half of cookies; top with remaining half. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate. •

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PAVLOVA ULTIMATE SUMMER W I TH M I X F R U I TS and LIME C R E A M

RE C I P E by G O U RM E T T RAVEL L ER | P H OT O GR AP H Y by G AB R I EL A I A N C U

MER I NG U E 4 E G G W H ITE S, AT RO OM TE M P E R ATU R E | 1 1/ 4 C UP ( 24 0 G ) CA STE R SU GAR | 1 TB SP CO R N F LO U R | 1 T SP W H ITE V IN E GA R | 1 VANI LLA B E AN, SCR A P E D SE E D S O NLY

INGRE DIENTS L IM E CR E A M

1 3 /4 CU P ( 4 0 0 M L ) SOUR C R E AM | 1 LI M E , F I NE LY G R AT E D R IN D O N LY | 2 TB SP P UR E I C I NG SUGAR , SI F T E D

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 100°C. Line a large baking tray with baking paper, brush with butter and dust with flour. 2. For meringue, whisk eggwhites and a pinch of salt in the bowl of an electric mixer until soft peaks form. With motor running, add sugar, a tablespoon at a time, whisking until sugar dissolves (5-10 minutes). Fold in cornflour, vinegar and vanilla seeds, then pile mixture into a 20cm-diameter circle on oven tray, gently smoothing top and making a slight indentation. 3. Bake in center of oven until crisp but not colored (1-1¼ hours). Turn off oven and leave to cool completely with door ajar. Meringue will keep in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 4. For lime cream, whisk sour cream, lime rind and icing sugar in a bowl until thick. Spoon over meringue, top with peaches, strawberries and blueberries and serve immediately.•

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THE

SIXT

The sixties, a culinary decade of the American culture. FUN, SIMPLE AND ICONIC FOODS to tease the excitement of home parties. Suburban or soul foods, all are entertaining ideas revealed to the homemaker in you. J O U RN E Y by G AB R I EL A I A N C U

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TIES WHAT LIBERTY ATE – 47


Powdered S T U N H G U O D REC I P E A D A P T E D from M A R T H A S T E W A R T | P H OT O GR AP H Y by G AB R I EL A I A N C U

1 ENV ELOP E I NSTAN T Y E A ST | 1 /4 CUP ( 32 G) GR ANU L ATE D SU GA R | 3/ 4 T S P S ALT | 3 3 /4 CU P S ( 4 8 0 G) ALL- PU R PO S E F LO U R | 1 C U P (250 ML ) B U T T E R M IL K , RO OM T EM PER AT U R E | 2 L A R G E E G G S, PLUS 1 L AR G E EGG YO L K | 4 TB SP UN SALT ED BU T T ER , SO F TE N E D | 4 T BSP MELT ED BU T TE R | CO N F E CT IONER S ' S U GAR , F O R RO L L IN G

1. Whisk yeast, granulated sugar, salt, and 3 cups (384 g) flour in a medium bowl; set aside. Mix buttermilk, eggs, and yolk on high speed in the bowl of a mixer fitted with the dough hook until combined. Mix in flour mixture on low speed until combined. Mix in softened butter, 1 tablespoon at a time (dough should form a ball). 2. Gradually add remaining 3/4 cup (96 g) flour, mixing until dough is tacky but not sticky. Transfer to a lightly oiled bowl; cover with plastic wrap. Let dough rise in a warm, draft-free spot until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour 20 minutes. 3. Preheat oven to 375˚F (190˚C). Roll out dough 3/4 inch (2 cm) thick on a lightly floured work surface. Use a 3 inch (7.50 cm) round cutter to cut out doughnuts. Use a smaller cutter to cut holes from center. Transfer to a baking sheet. Let rise 25 minutes. Generously brush with melted butter. Bake until pale golden, about 10 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack; let cool slightly. Roll in confectioners' sugar. 48 – WHAT LIBERTY ATE


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BLOODYody Mary RE CIPE and P H O T O G R A P H Y by G A B R I EL A I A N C U

A classic example of combining in one potion both the poison AND ANTIDOTE.

BLOODY MARY

THE FRESH TASTE OF

RECIPE

The Cocktail Hour

/ 2 oz (60 ml) vodka / 2 oz (60 ml) tomato juice / 2 oz (60 ml) beef bouillon / 1/2 oz (14 ml) freshly squeezed lemon juice / 3 dashes Worcestershire sauce / 2 dashes Tabasco sauce / pinch of kosher salt / pinch of coarsely ground black pepper / 1. Place all ingredients into a mixing glass. 2. Add ice and roll contents between mixing glass and shaker tin until well mixed. 3. Strain into an ice-filled glass. 4. Garnish with a wedge of lemon. • 50 – WHAT LIBERTY ATE


Perfect cornbread RE CIPE ADA P T ED F R O M S AV EU R | P H O T O G R A P H Y by G A B R I EL A I A N C U

While all soul food is southern food, not all southern food is

soul.

RECIPE

THE SOUL FOOD

CORNBREAD

1/3 cup (70 g) unsalted butter, melted / 1 cup (170 g) yellow cornmeal / 1 cup (128 g) all-purpose flour / 1 tbsp. sugar / 2 tsp. baking powder / 1 tsp. baking soda / 1 tsp. chili powder / 1 tsp. kosher salt / 3/4 tsp. ground cumin / 1 egg, beaten / 1 cup (110 g) parmigiano / 3/4 cup (180 ml) buttermilk / 1/2 cup (120 ml) milk / 2 tbsp. minced fresh dill / 4 tbsp. bacon, minced / 3 tbsp. bell pepper, minced 1. Heat oven to 400˚F (200˚C). Grease an 8”x8” (20x20 cm) baking pan; set aside. Whisk cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder and soda, chili powder , salt, and cumin in a bowl. In another bowl, whisk together butter and egg; stir in cheese, buttermilk, milk, dill, zucchini, bacon, and peppers. Whisk mixture into flour; pour into pan; smooth with a rubber spatula. Bake for 30 minutes. • WHAT LIBERTY ATE – 51


BASIL

Julep d

Ap p gle anp e f r u i t ra RE CIPE and PH OTOG RAPH Y by G A B R I EL A I A N C U

A southern classic julep for you to take a sip.

HAL F O F LI ME | 1 /4 CU P ( 6 0 M L ) G R A P E F RUI T JUI C E | 1 / 2 C U P ( 1 3 0 M L ) A PP L E J U IC E | 1 O Z. ( 2 TAB LE SP O O NS ) BOU R B O N | 2 O Z . ( 4 TA B L E SPO O NS) SPAR K LI NG W I N E | GA R N ISH : A PP L E SL ICE S, LI M E SL I C ES, AND FR E SH BA SIL

Stir together apple juice, grapefruit juice, and lime juice. Stir in bourbon. Garnish with apple slices, lime and basil leaves. Top with chilled sparking wine.

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Steakwith Burger

grilled corn chipotle salsa

RE CIPE and P H O T O G R A P H Y by G A B R I EL A I A N C U

SERVES 2 PEOPLE 2 pork loin sea salt and pepper olive oil to brush 1 cob of sweet corn CHIPOTLE SALSA 2 small tomatoes basil leaves 2 tsp. chipotle chile

COLESLAW 2 tsp. sour cream 1 tsp. Dijon mustard 2 tsp. olive oil 1 medium carrot, shredded 4 tbsp. cabbage, shrredded 1 tbsp. celery, shredded 1 small apple, shredded

1. In a small bowl, mix all ingredients for cole slaw. Refrigerate until required. In a small bowl, mix all ingredients for salsa. Refrigerate until required. 2. Peel back and detach the corn husk, then remove silks and discard. Place corn in a large bowl, cover with water and soak for 20 minutes to prevent burning, then drain. Heat a grill over medium-high heat and cook corn, turning occasionally, for 12 minutes or until tender and slightly charred. 3. Using same grill, brush pork with olive oil, season to taste and cook 15-20 minutes, turning once. Set aside to rest. 4. Spread coleslaw on bun bases, add the meat, top with salsa and corn and serve.•

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APRIL BELL

WWW.APRILBELLPHOTO.COM

APRIL’s fascination with photography began when she took a BLACK & WHITE film class her senior year of high school. After graduating high school she took a few years off to further explore her love of photography. After that break she went back to school and received a B.F.A. in Photography from the SAVANNAH COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN in Atlanta. She is now a fine art photographer living and working in Atlanta, Georgia.

Her work has been shown two consecutive years at OPEN STUDIO NIGHT (SCAD—Atlanta's annual juried show featuring photography, printmaking and painting by students, professors and alumni). Her work has also been shown in POLARITY and LOGICAL CLIMAX, group shows featuring her and her SCAD classmates. In addition to SCAD group shows, she is also one of four leading members of a photography collective called ARTNOMAD. ArtNomad’s most recent show, Symbiosis, took place in Chattanooga, Tennessee in March of 2014. 

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A

P O S S I B L E

H I S T O R Y A found family photograph. An abandoned car. A house reclaimed by nature. When I come across these objects and places, my imagination begins to run wild. Who were these people? What was their life like? What was their fate? Why were the places they loved so carelessly left behind? My mind begins to form a story. The questions are given answers. And before I know it, I've created A POSSIBLE HISTORY.

P H O T O G R A P H I C E S S AY B Y A P R I L B E L L

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IN SEARCH OF TIME

WILDE AN ALLEGORICAL

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RNESS DIMENSION OF WONDERLAND P H OT O GRA P H Y by G A B RI EL A I A N C U

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THE DEATH OF THE AUTHOR

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ROLAND BARTHES' 1967 CRITICAL ESSAY THE DEATH OF THE AUTHOR IS EXAMINING THE NOTION OF AUTHORSHIP, WHERE THE AUTHOR IS SEEN AS A MODERN CONSTRUCT THAT EMERGES FROM THE MIDDLE AGES. T E X T BY G AB R I E LA I A N C U

Barthes' theory is centered around the post-structural and post-modernist

approaches, where the author's identity is secondary to the meaning that the reader perceives, deconstructing the authority of the writing. Barthes argues that giving “a text an Author is to impose a limit on that text, to furnish it with a final significance, to close the writing”. Thus, he is analyzing the existence of any distinction between the identity of the author and the act of writing, for him the act of writing and creating being unrelated. Barthes sees the author as a subject whose identity is lost in the process of writing, and the reader is the place-holder of all writings, the destination of this performance act. Barthes mainly argues against the practice of reading, a practice that has been constructed on the intentions and biographical context of the author in the interpretation of a text.

Barthes claims that the author is a modern invention because of the importance that

has been given to the author's person through the capitalist system of ownership, property and privilege. The author becomes an unique object and holds a part of the authority on the writer, on the interpretation or individuality. However, traditional tales never knew an author, but a mediator, shaman that was performing the act of narrating.

Barthes develops further his argument by showing how later on, literature has put

the author in the center of our intellectual culture, and thus the critical analysis of the literal text was done through author's life, taste and passions. According to Barthes, the explanation of a work shouldn't be sought in the person that produced it, as the voice of the author is the same with the voice of the text. This is necessary in order to open up the text to the reader's own meaning. The writer makes the readers as he makes his characters. The author is a subject that is communicating from the inside and the outside with the other characters in the text, and altogether with the reader, but whose intentions in creating a text are irrelevant in interpreting that text. In fact, this limitation of the intellectual capacity, where

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literature has deliberately refused to provide

Barthes argues that the creative

the ultimate meaning of a work of art, in

work should stand on its own, and the

other form than through discovering of the

author if he does exists, he does not explain

author, shows according to Barthes why

the work, since the language is the tool that

only language should act and not the signifi-

should create, writing being an action, not

cance of subjectivity of the author. The shift

an act of expression. The meaning belongs

from a model of authorship to a refusal of

to the language, and ultimately, the reader

that authorship matters at all, transformed

is the one that has the capacity of under-

the author in nothing more than an instance

standing the valances of a text. The reader

of writing, where he writes to confirm a

is the destination of all writings, he gets

text’s meanings, its unity, and to announce

born at the same time with the text and he

his death and sacrifice.

should understand the literary text as more

Through his essay, Barthes is

than just a reflection of its author. However,

trying to demonstrate that suppressing the

the response of the reader to the text cannot

power of the author in favor of the writing,

any longer be personal, cannot be beyond

will restore reader's place into the work itself.

known language, since the reader is without

Linguistically, the author is the subject that

history or biography, he is only the one that

makes the language hold together, destruct-

holds together the written text. According

ing the author being a trait of the modern

to Barthes, the unity of a text lies in its

text. The author was thought to be the person

destination not its origin. Its multiplicity

that existed before and at the same time with

is focused on the reader, as an absent point

the writing, as in a father to child relation-

within the text, to whom it speaks. The

ship. In the modern approach however, the

writer and reader are linguistic persons,

author is not preceding or exceeding the

not psychological persons. Their role in

writing, exists only simultaneously with the

the story is defined by their coded place in

text. In contrast with what historical events

discourse, not their specific traits. To give

have constructed around the notion of the

to the reader the right place in literature,

author, the modern understanding resumes

we must acknowledge our inability to fully

the author only to a scriptor stance, that is

isolate the author's voice, and embrace the

not depicting but using the verbal form to

meaning author adds to a work of art, and

write the text. The modern scriptor is not

restores the reader's importance in the inter-

making use of expression, passion or voice to

pretation of the art.•

write, but uses language as an inscription to create the text.

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ROLA ND BA R THE S

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Tacos

EN K C I H C GRILLED

WITH PICO DE GALLO AND RE C I P E and P H OT O GR AP H Y by A N A M A R I A C I O L AC U

SEA SON ING

PI CO DE GA LL O

1/2 teaspoon salt

PLU S salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1 cup (2 pc.) diced tomatoes

1/2 teaspoon chili powder

1 diced jalapeno

3 - 5 flour tortillas

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1 garlic clove, minced

10 oz (300 g) chicken breast, sliced

1/2 teaspoon paprika

2 tablespoons chopped fresh

1/2 avocado

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

cilantro

1/2 bell pepper, thinly sliced

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1/4 cup(70 g) chopped onion

3-5 tablespoons shredded cheese

juice of 1 lime 1 tablespoon olive oil 84 – WHAT LIBERTY ATE


D AVOCADO

DIRECTIONS1. In a bowl, combine all the ingredients for Pico de Gallo, then cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

2. Mix all the seasoning ingredients together. Brush the chicken breast with some olive oil, then rub the seasoning mix over.

3. Cook the chicken on preheated grill, then transfer to a cutting board and slice into thin strips.

4. Divide chicken strips over heated tortillas. Top with pico de gallo, avocado, cilantro, bell pepper slices and shredded cheese. Serve with lime wedges. • WHAT LIBERTY ATE – 85


POPSICLE R EC I P E and P H OT O GR AP H Y by A N A M A R I A C I O L AC U

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B L U E B E R RY & C H E R RY B A N A N A

ES

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REC IPE

1 CUP (150 G) BLUEBERRIES/CHERRIES 1/2 CUP (115 G) PLAIN YOGURT 2 TABLESPOONS LEMON JUICE 4 TABLESPOONS HONEY 1 BANANA

1. Pla c e a ll th e i n g r e d i e n t s i n a b l e n d e r and com bin e . / 2 . Po u r m i x t u r e i n t o t h e mol d s and in se rt stic k s . / 3 . Fr e e z e t h e p o p s icl es f or 2 - 3 h o u rs, u n t i l s o l i d .

N OTE S

For the Cherry–Banana Popsicles, simply

replace blueberries with cherries. If you don't have a popsicle mold, you can pour the mixture into paper cups. Cover the cups with foil, then insert a stick in the center. Once frozen, run them under hot water for a second, then pull the popsicle out. •

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Performance

poetry vs.

poetry SLAM

T E X T by M E D E E A I A NC U | P H OT O GR AP H Y by G AB R I EL A I A N C U

***

T

he shift of avant-garde poetry started from the shadier and still space of the book to the performance space. Thus, the avant-garde movement was focused on the language and was looking for a new poetic expression. The show forth of the period was looking for a return to the pure language; to purge the stereotypes, fixe elements, by betting on contraries, on non-sense, musicality and sound' spaciality, as well as on shape and use of the letter and word. This assumed the break of tradition, in which the poetic text was assigned only to the book, to print, and individual reading. This was done in order to have an opening to a wider audience, to allow exploration of the sonant, rhythmic, musical, but also performative qualities of the poem. In this context, Marinetty was proposing to search the inspiration in the urban space, to break off the old norms of structural construction of the poem and to give up its description. For instance, the Russian futurists changed the classic packaging of the book, bringing innovation through the lithographic technique. The book cover was loosing the standard appearance, and the pages were embroidered with ornamental fillets. Thus, it was visible the intent of empting the language and the poetic text from current sense, going after new formulas through which the poem can reveal the primordial purity, but also the rhythmic, musical and sonal quality. Russolo as well, through “The Art of Noises” tried another direction through which to conduct the music closer to the real quotidian, proposing the noisesound and the performance of the music only through sounds specific to the city. Thus, he was claiming that the era of serenity has ended, the human ear being more familiarized with the noise. The noise is part of nature, and its variety is more capable of creating another type of music. Isidore Isou was on the same page as Russolo, and with his lettrism proposed a poem created only by unspoken sounds, such as tongue flap, applause, grunts or mutters. The poem does not have to be anymore restricted to the verse only, but to use the voice and to explore its vocal quality. The poem will become a vocal mass, freeing up of lyricism and of its usual information. The vocal poetry advocates the importance of the vocal, focusing as well on space and action. This type of poetry assumes distortions of voice or sound, a performance act of the poetic text, and the usage of its rhythmic and musical information. The vocal poetry creates thus a space for the poem, succeeding to combine sounds, letters and words in order to construct situations. 94 – WHAT LIBERTY ATE


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The spacial poetry aims at revealing the forgotten potential of the words, by arranging the visual and vocal mass. Thus, the poem looses its sentences, words, syntax, articulations, functioning only through breath. The breath is the engine of a new language, where the sounds and words will be created according to the Indo-European mode - subject-verb-complement. This abandonment implies a reconstruction of the thought as well, not only that of language. This type of poetry changes the reader' stance. The vocal poetry asks the reader to abandon his passive role, and to corroborate and intervene into performing the poem. Another form of breaking off the poem with the tradition is the poetry slam. This type of poetry assumes a poetic recitative demonstration through a contest. Poetry slam was first started in 1986 by March Smith. This performance counts on the oratorical qualities of the participant. The slam movement started as a reaction against the formal salon lectures, bringing poetry in the middle of the judging public, and in a less formal space, the bars. The poetry slam has embedded within a social character. The poem becomes thus a weapon, a combination of poetry, spectacle and theater, and it's never just a theoretic discourse. The slam movement refuses the print publication, aiming only at the vocality of spectacle. The recited texts have no rime, traditional expression means, and do not focus on first-person singular. The slam movement is not interested anymore in a renewal or deconstruction of the language, of the word or sound, but brings the poetry closer to public; thus becomes an avenue of knowing other poets, an agent of socializing or an entertainment type. Slam is a poem in which the oratorical quality of the participant is essential; it is a popular poem which focus it's on rhythm and words' musicality, it is a form of free expression, a poem of the street. The audience's role is not passive, the public becomes a jury and chooses a winner. A such performance assumes not only a competition, but also a confruction between poets. However, poems keep their value as well through a simple lecture. Thus the reader interprets the text, enrichening it, transforming it into a real univers. The reader moves the poem from the safe zone of the page to the immediacy of the interpretation. The reader is enacting the poem, becoming its own author. And there is left only the orator's talent and his ability of pricking through the poetic sense of the words, making them acqure a life, a body; a life which does not sump up only the page, but all senses of the poetry. •

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What Liberty Ate magazine is a biannual independent publication which resonates to the curious, educated reader, interested in honest and creative food made at home, personal stories, essays, photographic projects and interviews. An all-through artistic project that focuses on pastoral, simple, yet elegant living.

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W W W. W H AT L I B E RT YAT E . CO M / M AGA Z I N E 100 – WHAT LIBERTY ATE

Summer Issue - What Liberty Ate Magazine (#6)  

This issue explores the vulnerabilities that come with change and new forms of expression.

Summer Issue - What Liberty Ate Magazine (#6)  

This issue explores the vulnerabilities that come with change and new forms of expression.

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