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Destination: Summer!

A guide to great adventures here, there and everywhere! June/July 2017 Hot Hacks for Outdoor Fun Paint with Tissue Paper Cell Phones and Teen

Plus:

Family-friendly events, recipes and more!

Published by


Kalamazoo Public Schools

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r o t i d E e h t from

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M a r i e L eitoer Ed

fyiswmichigan.com •

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TIFFANY ANDRUS

Who are these lovely people? See below. Destination: Summer!

A little tissue paper and water can make a mess or, as Tiffany and her always-willing-tobe-creative son Landen show us this month, some really cool art. Because this craft uses a spray bottle filled with water, it’s the perfect project to tackle outside on a warm day. Tiffany lives in Alamo and is the mother of two boys.

A guide to great adventures here, there and everywhere! June / July 2017 Hot Hacks for Outdoor Fun Paint with Tissue Paper Cell Phones and Teen

Plus:

Family-friendly events, recipes and more!

brian lam

ren briggs

Published by

Ren is a modern-day Tom Sawyer. She has a way of creating a dinner recipe so that it’s easy and fun enough that the kids will want to help out. Pretty soon we’ll just be standing there with a spoon watching our children do all the work. Okay, probably not, but you will have a delicious dinner. An Allegan mom, Ren is a graduate of Grand Rapids Community College’s Secchia School of Culinary Arts, a former baker for Alpen Rose, Via Maria and deBoer Bakery, and she makes the best birthday cakes. Ever.

As a child and now as a dad, Brian has observed enough Father’s Days to predict exactly how these holidays paying homage to dads will go. Check out his spot-on observations in the Family Man column on page 30. Brian, owner of Lam Creative Solutions in Kalamazoo, is the father of a seven-year-old.

Publisher

encore publications, inc.

Editor

marie lee

Graphic Designer alexis stubelt

Contributors

tiffany andrus, ren briggs, brian lam, anne lape, david miles, brian powers

Advertising Sales

tiffany andrus, celeste statler, krieg lee

Office Manager hope smith

Distribution

anne lape

mark thompson

When you read her great hacks for outdoor entertaining and fun on page 14, you will be like us: wishing Anne would just invite you to “drop over” some night this summer. When she’s not gazing at stars at her impromptu backyard parties, she lives and teaches in Kalamazoo and is the mother of a high schooler.

FYI is published 6 times a year by Encore Publications, Inc. Copyright 2017. All rights reserved. Editorial, circulation and advertising correspondence should be sent to Encore Publications, 117 W. Cedar St. Suite A, Kalamazoo MI, 49007. Phone: 269 383-4433. General email correspondence to publisher@encorekalamazoo.com FYI is distributed free of charge at locations throughout Southwest Michigan; home delivery subscription rate is $18 per year. Advertising rates and specifications at fyiswmichigan.com or by request. FYI does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors; articles and advertisements do not necessarily reflect FYI’s opinions or those of the FYI staff.

DAVID MILES

To learn more about us visit fyiswmichigan.com

4 • June / July 2017

David Miles always creates the perfect illustrations for our Family Man column, no matter the topic. Is it because he’s a dad? Or that he had a dad? Or maybe he just has super powers in intuitive illustration? Whatever the reason, we’ll keep him. David is a Kalamazoo illustrator who has created pictures for Zonderkidz, Highlights, Sleeping Bear Press, as well as FYI, whose creative genius can be seen on page 30.

About the cover: Ashley Takace, right, and daughter Inara, 3, engage in a favorite summer pastime of bubble blowing. The Takace family lives in Kalamazoo. Photo by Brian Powers.


June/July 2017

In Every Issue 3

From the Editor

4

Our Contributors

6

Fun for Free

Family-friendly fun at no charge!

8

Is this Normal?

Should my teen have a cell phone? You ask, experts answer!

11 Creation Station

Tissue paper and water make fun art to create on summer days

14

Everyday Hacks

FEATURE

18

16 Make This!

Destination: Summer! Our family fun experts have ideas for you to have fun, fun, fun all summer long!

Ac tivities 24 Family Events

Great tips for impromptu backyard get-togethers

Breakfast for dinner is easy and fun with mini-omelets

PARENT TO PARENT 30 Family Man

It’s all about dads on Father’s Day … or is it?

Greater Kalamazoo’s most comprehensive calendar of family events

28 Activity Page

Games, coloring and other fun to keep little hands busy

fyiswmichigan.com •

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Fun For Free FYI

Love the LEGO City

Dig into Some Dinosaurs It’s like Land of the Lost, but better (no Sleestaks). The Dinosaurs: Land of Fire and Ice and Dinosaur Discovery exhibits at the Kalamazoo Valley Museum will transport you back in time where you will encounter unfamiliar landscapes, touchable dinosaurs of all shapes and sizes and opportunities to investigate clues about what the dinosaurs left behind. You’ll tremble as a roaring Albertosaurus, a Triceratops and a Pteranodon come alive through animatronics. Check out the museum’s website for a whole host of great hands-on activities related to the exhibit. When: June 17–Sept 17 9am–5pm Mon–Sat, 1–5pm Sun Place: K  alamazoo Valley Museum 230 N Rose St Ages: All ages Info: kvm.kvcc.edu/dinosaurs, 269.373.7990

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June / July 2017

Maybe it’s seeing the world in miniature or maybe it’s just cool that little plastic blocks can uncannily create a small scale reproduction of your town, but you can’t deny there’s something mesmerizing about a city built with LEGOS. Be mesmerized at the Portage District Library when All Day LEGO City Returns is on display during the first week of July. You’ll see buildings you recognize and some that aren’t in existence anymore. Make sure to search out the superheroes and fun LEGO characters interspersed throughout the exhibit. When: July 3–8 (closed July 4) 9 am–9 pm Mon–Thurs, 9 am–6 pm Fri, 9 am–5 pm Sat, 1 pm–5 pm Sun Place: Portage District Library 300 Library Lane Ages: All ages Info: portagelibrary.info, 269.329.4544


Get Your Do-Dah On

It’s goofy, silly and fun. The annual Do-Dah Parade through downtown Kalamazoo is a pageant of parody, with fun floats, whimsical costumes and a lot of surprises. Grab a couple of chairs or blankets and plant yourself on the route which starts at the corner of Jasper and Lovell Street and runs down Lovell Street to Park Street to Michigan Avenue to Portage Street and then back to Lovell. When: 11 am, June 3 Place: Downtown Kalamazoo Ages: All ages Info: experientiallearningcenter.org, 269.388.2830

Horse Around a Little Kids and horses. They love each other. You and your family will be able to see just how much at the Kalamazoo 4-H Open Horse Show. This show displays horses of all shapes and sizes and the horsemanship of their riders in every riding discipline. Cheer on these young ostlers and their steeds as they show the fruits of their hard work. When: 9 am, July 8 & 9 Place: K  alamazoo County Expo Center Horse Arenas, 2900 Lake St Ages: All ages Info: bit.ly/2pj1hXb

Enjoy Kid-Friendly Blues The Kalamazoo Public Library presents two opportunities in July for families to feel the rhythm of Sweet Baby Blues. Bluesy Suzy & her Blues Sisters — singer/songwriter Susan Harrison and puppets Millie Holiday and Bella Fitzgerald — offer upbeat and interactive performances that will charm audiences young and old. When: 6:30 pm, July 12 Place: Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch, 315 S Rose St When: 3:30 pm, July 13 Place: Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch, 1000 W Paterson St Ages: All ages Info: kpl.gov, 269.342.9837

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Is this normal? FYI

You Ask, Experts Answer

Q:

Our 13-year-old daughter does not have a cell phone, not because of expense, but because we don’t think she needs one. But all the girls in her social group have phones. She has been really upset lately, saying her friends are leaving her out of things because they can call and text one another but not her. I look around and see a lot of other kids in middle school with phones and I wonder if we’re just weird parents who are ruining our daughter’s social life. Are we? — Portage Dad

A:

Parenting teens in a world where technology is increasingly accessible presents a lot of choices that we must make as parents about limits and monitoring technology use and content. This is no easy task for a parent! As parents, we must consider both the risks and the benefits of teenagers having access to cell phones, which also puts social media outlets literally at their fingertips. It sounds as if you’ve weighed these pros and cons and made the decision to not allow her to have a cell phone, but you’re wondering if that is the correct decision. While it is true that cell phones and access to other technology is a privilege, not a right of teens, there are some important factors to consider before providing your teen with a phone: • Some studies show that more than a quarter of teens report being bullied over cell phones or cyber-bullied on social media. We need to make sure to talk to our teens about bullying, standing up for others and how to stand up for themselves. • Technology creates many “spaces” that are unmonitored and unsupervised by adults, and it’s important for parents to have access to their teen’s technology so they can appropriately monitor and supervise his or her activity. • Human brains continue to develop until they are 25 years old. Teens don’t have a fully developed pre-frontal cortex, the part of the brain that helps with decision making and impulse control. Teens need to be given rules and limits on technology and be aware of the risks and consequences of poor decisions. Regardless of if and when you choose to provide a cell phone or other technology for your child, ultimately the

8 • June / July 2017

decision is yours, as the parent. As with any decision you make, having an open conversation with your child about how you came to the decision and allowing them to ask questions and understand where you are coming from can help build trust and open communication and help them learn how to make decisions in the future. Even if they don’t agree with your decision, you can continue to build open communication and a positive relationship with them through this conversation. Many families find it helpful to discuss these and similar issues in family therapy because there is a neutral space and a neutral person assisting to guide the family through problem solving particular issues. If you try to discuss this with your daughter and there is not resolution, you may find it helpful to find a family therapist to help restore the relationship and peace in your home.

Q:

My 8-year-old seems obsessed by our family’s finances. Like many families, we live paycheck to paycheck, but we try not to talk about money around our kids. But every month my son asks if we have enough money to pay the bills. He was really sick this winter and didn’t want to go to the doctor because “it costs money.” And he wouldn’t tell me he was wearing shoes that were too small because he didn’t want us to spend money on new ones. How can I help him not worry so much? — Kalamazoo Mom

A:

It sounds as if your son has picked up on the fact that there is some financial strain in your household,


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pinerest.org/telehealth fyiswmichigan.com •

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ROARING SUMMER FUN 06.17.17 - 09.17.17

DINOSAURS ARE COMING! SUMMER HANDS-ON

EVERY WEDNESDAY 1 - 4 PM | FREE Discover everything about dinosaurs!

The Kalamazoo Valley Museum is operated by Kalamazoo Valley Community College and is governed by its Board of Trustees

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Your Child Deserves the Best!

Best of 2016-17 Readers Poll

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10 • June / July 2017

even though you haven’t discussed it with him. Kids can be so perceptive! A child may overhear adult phone conversations, see a bill lying out or take an off-hand comment out of context. It is really important that your son hear from you that you are paying the bills and taking care of all of the financial things and that he does not ever need to worry about how and when things are getting paid because you are taking care of it. That assurance can help to start putting him at ease that he doesn’t need to worry about “adult stuff.” Something you may want to consider is how you talk about money and affording certain things. Instead of saying “we can’t afford that right now,” you could simply say “not today,” or “we don’t need that right now.” Another thing you want to be careful about is who you are discussing your finances with and whether little ears are listening. Even if you aren’t having a conversation with your child about finances, he may hear from another room if you’re talking about it. It may be helpful to have a conversation with your son from time to time about things he might need or want. If he would really enjoy a new toy, for example, you can talk to him about saving up money he might get from a birthday or holiday and begin to teach him about money management in a fun way so he doesn’t view money as being only a stressful thing. You can also talk with him about his worries and what he can do to calm down when he feels anxious. Ideas such as talking to a trusted adult, drawing pictures or writing about his worries, teaching him some breathing techniques or teaching him ways to soothe himself could be helpful. If he seems to have a lot of worries or anxieties, you may want to find a counselor or therapist who will work with you and him together on working through those worries so he can learn how to cope and you can learn additional ways you can support him. Questions answered by Erin Praedel, LPC, LMFT, a couple and family therapist at Family & Children Services in Portage and Kalamazoo.


Creation station FYI

Painting with Tissue Paper by

TIFFANY ANDRUS

Creativity knows no bounds

11 • June / July 2017

Tiffany Andrus

with this easy and fun art project. Once your kids get the hang of painting with tissue paper, they will want to try different patterns and ideas — they are limited only by their imaginations! Because this project requires water and can get a little messy, painting with tissue paper art is a great craft to do outside on a summer day. If the kids, or you, get hot, you already have a spray bottle handy.

Landen Andrus with his finished tissue paper painting.

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MATERIALS NEEDED •B  leeding Art brand tissue paper — see note under Hints • 11 × 14 inch flat canvas panel • Spray bottle with water • Picture frame • Rubber or latex gloves (optional) • Paintbrush (optional)

1. Create a workplace by laying down thick layers of newspaper so that the tissue paper doesn’t bleed onto anything else but the canvas panel. 2. Cut the assorted colored tissue paper to desired shapes and sizes (we used squares). 3. Put on gloves if you don’t want colored fingertips for a day or so, although the color will wash off your hands with soap and water. 4. Place the blank canvas on the newspaper-covered workspace.

12 • June / July 2017

Tiffany Andrus

HOW TO

5. Lightly spray the canvas with water. 6. Place different colors of the tissue paper shapes on the moistened canvas, laying them in a single layer, or overlap them for more color mix.

7. Lightly spray the tissue paper on the canvas. 8. Let dry for 20 minutes. 9. Remove the tissue paper to reveal your masterpiece of watercolors.


HINTS • The tissue paper you use does make a difference. I’ve tried standard colored tissue paper available at local craft stores, but it doesn’t work as well. Bleeding Art tissue paper is available on Amazon for $8–$11. • Flat canvas panels are available at Walmart for $5. We chose to use flat canvas panels because they are the perfect depth to put into a frame.

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• While our design was random, you can get more intricate in your designs: • Use different shapes and sizes of tissue paper. • Lift and move the moistened tissue paper shapes to different areas of the canvas.

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• Crumple a piece of the tissue paper and blot color on your canvas in a “sponging” technique. Add water as needed, lifting and checking the color and repeating wherever necessary. • Use a moistened paintbrush to press down on the tissue paper on the canvas to help bleed more color from it. You can also use the paintbrush to pull the tissue paper across the canvas to create a “washed” effect.

Singer

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are between the ages of 13 - 19 and live in Kalamazoo County,

We Want YOU!

We are now holding auditions for 2017 United Teen Talent show! Auditions are based on a first come, first served basis.

May 31 - YMCA Maple Street - 3 to 5 pm June 1 - Mayors Riverfront Park - 3 to 5 pm June 9 - Portage District Library - 3 to 5 pm June 10 - Epic Center, 2nd Flr. - 10 am to Noon and 1 to 3 pm Download an Audition Form at:

Funding provided by

kalamazooarts.org

fyiswmichigan.com •

13 •


Everyday Hacks FYI

Tips for Easy Outdoor Fun by

ANNE LAPE

S ummer is my favorite season be-

cause being able to be outside is like gaining an extra room in my home. When friends drop by, it’s an excellent reason for an impromptu backyard party. I don’t worry about what the inside of the house looks like; I just make sure there’s a cool drink for everyone, a few snacks and outside we go. We sit and visit as the sky darkens and the kids play and no one mentions the word bedtime. Summer entertaining doesn’t have to be fancy, but here are a few hacks to streamline your outdoor entertaining, so you can spend time enjoying the weather and your guests. Grills Just Want to Have Fun Maybe every girl thinks that her dad is the king of grilling; mine actually is. So, for the best grilled chicken, fish, steak, and, yes, turkey, I head to his house, and he’s a great host, so you’re probably invited, too. However, if you are grilling on your own, here are some tips: • Maximize table space and minimize clean-up time by using a muffin tin to hold your barbecue condiments. A jumbo muffin tin will hold ketchup, mustard, mayo, relish, tomato slices, and pickles. Just add spoons to each cup. • Have a box of wet wipes on your outdoor table for post summer-feast hands and face clean-up, because, when it comes to barbecued food, paper napkins often just can’t do the job.

14 • June / July 2017

Perfectly Buttered Corn on the Cob This is from my childhood neighbor, Mrs. Peterson, who had the best method for buttering corn on the cob. It’s also a neat “magic trick” the kids will love doing. Fill a tall canning jar or glass with hot water, leaving 1½ inches of space at the top. Melt a stick of butter in the microwave, and then pour the melted butter into the jar or glass of hot water. See the butter floating on top? Dip your cooked ear of corn all the way into water and butter, pull out and voilà! You’ve got a perfectly buttered ear of corn, evenly coated on all sides with just the right amount of butter per kernel. Cool and Protect Beverages Try these fun and refreshing ways to keep beverages cool and covered: • Fill some water balloons with water and freeze. On a hot day, place the frozen water balloons in a cooler with your drinks to keep them cool. The frozen water in the balloons will gradually melt, leaving you ready for a late afternoon water balloon fight.


(But wait to use them until they are fully melted to avoid injury.) • Freeze berries or grapes and place them in glasses in lieu of ice cubes to chill your drink without watering it down. • Keep bees and other bugs away from your drinks by covering the top of each glass with an upside-down cupcake liner. Poke a drinking straw through the center of the liner and sip away. Outdoor Reading Nook Create a cozy kids’ outdoor hang-out spot by filling a larger-sized kids’ wading pool with blankets and pillows. Place in a shaded area of your yard, throw in some books and you have an instant outdoor library!

to conserve water since you won’t need to dump it out as often and may even help the water retain its warmth. Shop Now, Relax Later As summer begins, I head to my favorite spot — the dollar store — and stock up on paper products such as plates and napkins, bubble solution and glow sticks, so I can easily say to friends, “The weather is beautiful! Drop by tonight.”

Bubble Station Fill a gallon drink dispenser from a dollar store with bubble solution. Give each child a kid-sized paper cup and a bubble wand and let them fill their cups with solution from the dispenser. They can blow to their hearts’ content and get more bubble solution on their own when they run out. Glow Ring Toss Put a twist on backyard games with glow sticks. Stake two thicker glow sticks about five feet apart in the grass. Have kids bend several thinner glow sticks into circles for tossing. Quick Kiddie Pool Cover A twin-size fitted sheet makes a good cover for a wading pool to keep out dirt, bugs, leaves and small animals when your kids aren’t splashing around in it. It’ll also help

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15 •


Make this! FYI

Family Dinner Breakfast for Dinner? Yes! by

REN BRIGGS

B

reakfast for dinner is a fun way to change up the ordinary, and these little baked omelets are a simple, healthy dinner option. Your kiddos can add whatever items they like in their omelet for a creative way to engage the whole family in helping dinner make it to the table.

Individual Baked Mediterranean Egg Omelets

INGREDIENTS • 6 eggs • 3 Tbsp. milk  • 1 Tbsp. fresh basil, chopped finely • 2 Tbsp. diced Roma tomato •2  Tbsp. canned mushrooms with stem and pieces, drained and chopped • 2 Tbsp. black olives, drained and chopped • 16 oz. shredded Parmesan cheese • Salt and pepper to taste • Garlic (fresh minced or powder) to taste • Muffin tin • Nonstick cooking spray • Medium mixing bowl • Whisk

HOW TO 1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. 2. Spray 9 of the cups in the muffin tin with cooking spray and set pan aside. 3. Crack eggs into mixing bowl, add milk and whisk thoroughly.

6. Sprinkle a small amount of Parmesan cheese into each cup. 7. Bake for 15–18 minutes or until the egg on top is “dry.” Eggs will rise slightly in the cups as they bake. 8. Remove cupcake pan from oven. 9. Sprinkle the tops of each mini-omelet with a small amount of Parmesan cheese while hot. 10. To serve, carefully loosen edges of omelets all the way around and lift from the tin.

HINTS

4. Divide egg mixture equally into sprayed muffin cups, filling each about 2/3 full.

• Let the kids get involved in making dinner by having them choose the ingredients for their own omelets.

5. Sprinkle basil, tomato, mushroom and black olives into the cups.

• Chop all ingredients and whisk egg and milk mixture and refrigerate the night before for a super quick

16 • June / July 2017


Ren Briggs

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The Simple Advantage dinner! You may need to add just a minute or two to the cooking time. • Serve the omelets with your favorite salsa or pico de gallo for an extra flavor boost. • Place 2 omelets on top of grilled or seared sourdough or Italian (as pictured) toast with salsa and a sprinkle of shredded cheddar for a delightful treat. • Other flavor combinations include:

• Chopped precooked bacon, chopped spinach and shredded cheddar cheese • Diced ham, diced green peppers, diced onion and shredded cheddar cheese • Chopped precooked Italian sausage, chopped green onion, chopped red pepper and shredded mozzarella cheese.

We often overlook the simple things in life. One reason for that might be because when we keep things simple, they work. The desire to improve things often comes with the cost of making things more complicated. The simple sheet of paper is a good example. Durable, flexible, manageable, and ideal for communicating information, the single sheet of paper carries with it an independence you don’t always see these days. You don’t need the right software to open a piece of paper, and you don’t need some kind of access to servers to find it. You don’t even need electricity to read it. Technology might change and improvements might make things more flashy and fashionable, but when you want to tip things in your favor, remember the gifts of simplicity. Paper has advantages, and that creates benefits for you.

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fyiswmichigan.com •

17 •


: N O I T A N I T DES MMER! SU There’s a reason we all love summer: because it’s long days of fun, fun, fun (the Beach Boys knew what they were talking about). Michiganders know how to pack more into our short summer months than you can stuff in a carry-on suitcase. And Southwest Michigan is a summer paradise — we are just a few hops, skips and a car ride from beaches, museums, festivals, music and more. To help your family enjoy the season, our family fun experts at FYI have compiled these great suggestions for close, near and far adventures to have this summer.

LEGEND Close: 30 minutes or less away Near: up to 1 hour away Day Trip: 1 hour or more away * Distance from Bronson Park, downtown Kalamazoo

18 • June / July 2017


DESTINATION: GARDENS Close

Pollinator Garden Kellogg Bird Sanctuary, 12685 East C Ave, Augusta, 15.2 miles* The Kellogg Bird Sanctuary in Augusta has a Pollinator Garden with over 30 species of native Michigan plants to attract pollinators such as butterflies and hummingbirds. The Sanctuary, which is a refuge for migratory birds, also offers two miles of walking trails, including a 3/4mile paved trail good for strollers, and four geocaches hidden on the property. Hours: 9 am–7 pm daily Cost: $5 adults, $4 for seniors and college students, $3 ages 2–17, children under 2 free Info: birdsanctuary.kbs.msu.edu, 269.671.2510

Near

Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park 1000 E Beltline NE, Grand Rapids, 56.6 miles* More than just gardens and sculpture, Frederik Meijer Gardens has a variety of kid-friendly features as well. From the Butterfly Maze and The Lena Meijer Children’s Garden with imaginative, child-friendly activities, to its newest feature, the Japanese Garden, which has eight acres of unique plants, waterfalls, elevation changes and structures, your family’s senses will be filled. Hours: 9 am–5 pm Mon–Sat; 11 am–5 pm Sun Cost: $14.50, $11 seniors and students, $7 children ages 5–13, $4 children ages 3–4, children 2 and under free Info: meijergardens.org, 616.957.1580

Day Trip

Windmill Island Gardens 1 Lincoln Ave, Holland, 66.4 miles* With 36 acres of gardens, including some that mimic famous paintings by Van Gogh and Matisse, and a 250-yearold working Dutch windmill, these gardens offer a lot to see. Tour the inner workings of the windmill, ride the antique Dutch carousel, enjoy the playground and children’s gardens, and walk the grounds with its dikes, canals and picnic areas. Hours: 9:30 am–6 pm daily Cost: $9 adults, $5 for children 3–15 Info: cityofholland.com/windmillislandgardens, 616.355.1030

DESTINATION: PARKS Near Close

Woods Lake Park 2900 Oakland Drive, Kalamazoo, 2.8 miles* Woods Lake Park is conveniently tucked away in the heart of the city and offers a sandy beach, picnic pavilion and a playground. You can fish along the shore, and the lower parking lot has handicapped-accessible parking. With Oakland Plaza across the street, beverages and ice cream are a quick walk away. Hours: 8 am–dusk daily Cost: Free Info: kzooparks.org/parks

Eagle Lake Beach Fort Custer Recreation Area, 5163 Fort Custer Drive, Augusta, 15 miles* A quick afternoon at the beach can be had on the shores of Eagle Lake at Fort Custer’s recreation area. You can stake your spot on the sand or on lush grassy areas nearby. Bring sand toys, floaties, chairs and towels and enjoy the lake views. Hours: 8 am–10 pm daily Cost: $11 State of Michigan Recreation Passport Info: michigandnr.com/parksandtrails, 269.731.4200

Day Trip

Silver Beach County Park 101 Broad St, St Joseph, 52.7 miles* A fun family day trip, Silver Beach offers Lake Michigan beach access, volleyball, picnic areas and playgrounds. There’s also a large splash area with seating and in-ground water spouts, concession stands and a restored carousel. Hours: 5 am–sunset daily Cost: $8 per vehicle Info: berriencounty.org/parks, 269.982.0533

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DESTINATION: MUSEUMS Near

Close

Air Zoo 6151 Portage Road, Portage, 5.3 miles* Explore space and air flight exhibits in this multi-sensory aviation museum. Recently expanded, the Air Zoo offers more than 50 rare and historic aircraft, amusement park-style rides, flight simulators, 3D/4D theater programs, as well as historical exhibits and educational activities. Hours: 9 am–5 pm Mon–Sat; noon–5 pm Sun Cost: $15.50 adults, $12.50 ages 60 and older, $14.50 ages 5–18, children 4 and under free Info: AirZoo.org, 269.382.6555 Kalamazoo Valley Museum 230 N Rose St, Kalamazoo, .2 mile* One of the area’s not-so-hidden gems is the Kalamazoo Valley Museum. The 60,000-square-foot museum offers cultural, historical and scientific literacy development for children of all ages via special exhibits, such as this summer’s Dinosaurs: Land of Fire and Ice and Dinosaur Discovery. Admission and exhibits are free; some programs and planetarium shows cost $3 a person. Check FYI’s calendar on page 24 for ongoing, weekly and daily museum events. Hours: 9 am–5 pm Mon–Sat; 1–5 pm Sun Cost: Free admission; $3 for planetarium shows Info: KalamazooMuseum.org, 269.373.7990

20 • June / July 2017

Michigan Maritime Museum 260 Dyckman Ave, South Haven, 39 miles* With five buildings, including a center for teaching boatbuilding skills, this museum highlights the maritime history and culture of the Great Lakes. There are also on-water excursions, including a river launch, a tall ship and a Coast Guard motor lifeboat. Make sure to check out its new exhibit, Lake Michigan’s Call to Duty, which highlights the Lake Michigan region’s vast mobilization for World War II. Hours: 10 am–5 pm daily Cost: $8 adults, $7 seniors and $6 children; tickets for onwater excursions vary in cost, see website for details and reservations Info: michiganmaritimemuseum.org, 269.637.8078 Kids ‘N’ Stuff Children’s Museum 301 S Superior St, Albion, 46.8 miles* Kids ‘N’ Stuff Children’s Museum is an interactive experience exploring interesting facets of everyday life. You’ll find hands-on exhibits on agriculture and wind energy, build mountains or castles from blocks, visit critters and learn about conservation, explore how grocery stores, credit unions and auto shops work, and more. Best yet? There’s free admission on June 22 & July 27. Hours: 10 am–4 pm Tues–Sat; noon–4 pm Sun Cost: $6.50, children under 1 free Info: kidsnstuff.org, 517.629.8023

Day Trip

Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum 220 E Ann St, Ann Arbor, 98 miles* The focus of this museum is handson experiences in science, technology, engineering, art and math (STEAM). This museum offers more than 250 exhibits on topics ranging from honeybees and Michigan nature to light, optics and the internet. Hours: 10 am–5 pm Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat; 9 am–5 pm Tues; 10 am–8 pm Thurs; noon–5 pm Sun Cost: $12, children 0–23 months free Info: aahom.org, 734.995.5439


DESTINATION: ANIMAL ADVENTURES Close

Wolf Lake State Fish Hatchery 34270 County Road 652, Mattawan, 10.6 miles* Wolf Lake State Fish Hatchery, which produces a variety of fish species for the Great Lakes and connected inland waters, has exhibits, tours, hiking trails, a bird-viewing platform and hands-on activities for kids. A visit to the hatchery is appropriate for all ages and allows kids the opportunity to engage in local nature and ecology. Hours: 10 am–6 pm, Mon–Sat; noon–6 pm, Sun Cost: Free Info: michigan.gov/dnr, 269.668.2876

Near

Critchlow Alligator Sanctuary and Zoological Gardens 1698 M-66, Athens, 34.4 miles* Ever wanted to hold an alligator? Well, you can here. Created as a safe haven for reptiles and amphibians needing homes, the Sanctuary promises opportunities for hands-on and up-close experiences to observe and learn about a variety of species. Explore the animal exhibits, sandbox, gazebo, rainbow forest, lagoon, swamp walk and greenhouse as well. Hours: 10 am–6 pm daily Cost: $7.95, $6.95 seniors and educators, children 2 and under free Info: alligatorsanctuary.com, 269.729.4802

Day Trip

Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo 3411 Sherman Blvd, Fort Wayne, Indiana, 119.5 miles* Ranked as one of the Top Ten Zoos for Kids by parents.com, this zoo offers a walk on the wild side in its 38acre, park-like setting. Go on safari in search of lions, leopards and zebras, and stop to hand-feed giraffes. Discover kangaroos, orangutans, sharks, tigers, stingrays and more and enjoy kid-friendly features and five rides. Hours: 9 am–5 pm thru Oct. 8 Cost: $14 adults, $12 for ages 62+, $10 for ages 2–18, children 1 and under free Info: kidszoo.org, 260.427.6800

play fort in the

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4/13/17 8:41 AM fyiswmichigan.com • •


DESTINATION: FRUITY FESTIVALS Close

Strawberry JAMboree Stokes Homestead, 13988 County Road 215, Grand Junction, 32.2 miles* You can pick them, eat them, sample wine made with them and compete in a contest eating pie made out of them — it’s all strawberries, all the time at this weekend family fun fest. Enjoy the farm’s wagon rides, nature trail, cow-train rides, playground, corn crib, pedal karts and duck races, or peruse arts and crafts and see a magic show. Hours: 10 am–5 pm, June 24–25 Cost: Free, however there is a cost for picking berries Info: stokeshomestead.com/strawberry-jamboree.html, 269.427.7777

Near

National Blueberry Festival Downtown South Haven, 38.7 miles* With a parade and pageant, arts and crafts, concerts and more ways to eat blueberries — from pancakes to pie — than you can imagine, this festival is four days of blueberry-lovin’ fun. Take in the classic car show, sand sculpture contest, fish boil and kids’ activities, too. Hours: Aug 10–13, hours vary by day and activity; check website for schedule Cost: Most events are free, there is a cost for some vendors and food Info: blueberryfestival.com, 269.637.5171

Day Trip

National Cherry Festival Traverse City, 192.2 miles* This festival is more than an homage to cherries; it’s a week-long event with concerts, kids’ activities, arts and crafts fair, parade, an air show and food events galore. With performers including Shinedown, REO Speedwagon, Cole Swindell, TruTV’s Impractical Jokers, and the USAF Thunderbirds, there’s pretty much entertainment for every age and interest. Hours: July 1–8; see website for full schedule of events Cost: Some activities free, tickets required for others; see website for details. Info: cherryfestival.org, 231.947.4230

DESTINATION: GET WET Near Close

Nicholas Kik Pool 1018 Walter St, Kalamazoo, 1.1 miles* With a 50-meter outdoor swimming pool, Kik Pool offers an affordable cool-off alternative, but also offers swimming lessons, lap swimming and water fitness classes. The pool is part of Upjohn Park, and after you take a dip, wander over to the park’s playground. Hours: Open swim hours: 1:30pm– 7 pm Mon, Wed, Fri–Sun; 1:30 pm– 3 pm Tue & Thurs Cost: $7 adult, $4 child Info: kzooparks.org/kik-pool, 269.337.8191 •

22 • June / July 2017

Long Lake Beach Ramona Park, 8600 S Sprinkle Road, Portage, 9.8 miles* One of the draws of Ramona Park is its beach staffed with lifeguards who watch over the whole family as they splash in the lake. Aside from swimming and fishing, Ramona Park has multiple play structures, pavilions, picnic tables, soccer, football and baseball fields, grills and restrooms, making it a great all-day destination. Hours: 10:30 am–7:30 pm, June 9– Sept 4 Cost: $5 per vehicle for Portage residents; $10 per vehicle for nonresidents Info: portagemi.gov, 269.329.4522

Day Trip

Red Oaks Waterpark 1455 E 13 Mile Road, Madison Heights, 145.5 miles* A huge park with water slides, wave pool, a children’s water playground with 68 features and toddler play area, and 990-foot moving river, your family can make a day-long adventure visiting the Red Oaks Water Park in Oakland County. The wave pool, river ride and children’s water playground are heated. There are abundant grassy areas for sitting as well as picnic pavilions and grills. Hours: 11 am–7 pm weekdays; 10 am–7 pm weekends Cost: $17 weekdays, $20 weekends; children up to a year old are free with a paid adult admission Info: oakgov.com/parks/recreation, 248.858.0918


DESTINATION: PLAYGROUNDS Near

Close

Upjohn Park Lake and Walter Streets, Kalamazoo, 1.1 miles* Nestled right in the heart of Kalamazoo, Upjohn Park boasts 18 acres that include a large, multi-section playground for children of different age groups and physical abilities. There’s a “Sway Fun” glider (a wheelchair-accessible glider that fits two wheelchairs and about six other children), a zoo of wooden animals that double as percussion instruments, a sand playground and three-point harness swings. Older kids might like the basketball court, skate park and soccer fields to run around on. Hours: Dawn to dusk Cost: Free Info: kzooparks.org/parks, 269.337.8191

Northside Park Watson Road, north of River Street, Otsego, 18.9 miles* Northside Park is tucked amongst rolling hills with a mammoth Swiss Family Robinson-style wooden playground structure that has turrets, rope spider webs, miniature zip lines, a spaceship, kid-sized honeycomb, four slides and wall-puzzles. There are also baby and regular-size swings and a skateboard area with a ramp, baseball diamond and basketball court. Hours: Dawn–10:30 pm Cost: Free Info: www.cityofotsego.org/parks, 269.692.3391

Day Trip

Tunnel Park 66 N Lakeshore Drive, Holland, 71.7 miles* You can’t beat the views at this playground. Located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, this 22-acre park features a unique tunnel through a dune and a children’s playground complete with a dune climb and a stairway with scenic views of Lake Michigan. It’s also a great place for swimming, sunbathing and picnicking. Hours: 7 am–10 pm daily Cost: $7 daily motor vehicle fee for non-residents Info: miottawa.org/parks, 616.738.4810

Performance Training Sports Camps These camps will help athletes improve movement patterns for any sport by focusing on speed, agility, explosiveness and power.

Camps June 26-29 July 10-13

Grades 4-7 9-11:30 a.m. 9-11:30 a.m.

Grades 8-12 1-3:30 p.m. 1-3:30 p.m.

July 24-27

9-11:30 a.m.

1-3:30 p.m.

Cost: $65/camp Location: 3433 Midlink Drive (Sprinkle Rd & I-94), Kalamazoo Register: bronsonhealth.com/classes Questions: (855) 618-618-2676, ext. 4579

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23 •


WEEKLY WHERE IS? Addresses, phone numbers & websites of venues frequently appearing in the calendar: Comstock Township Library — 6130 King Highway, 345-0136, comstocklibrary.org Kalamazoo County Expo Center — 2900 Lake St, 383-8778, kalcounty.com/parks/expo Kalamazoo Institute of Arts — 314 S Park St, 349-7775, kiarts.com Kalamazoo Valley Museum — 230 N Rose St, 373-7990, kalamazoomuseum.org KPL-Alma Powell — Kalamazoo Public Library-Alma Powell, 1000 W Paterson Ave, 553-7960, kpl.gov KPL-Central — Kalamazoo Public Library-Central, 315 S Rose St, 342-9837, kpl.gov KPL-Eastwood — Kalamazoo Public Library-Eastwood, 1112 Gayle Ave, 553-7810, kpl.gov KPL-Oshtemo — Kalamazoo Public Library-Oshtemo, 7265 W Main St, 553-7980, kpl.gov KPL-Washington Square — Kalamazoo Public Library-Washington Square, 1244 Portage St, 553-7970, kpl.gov Parchment Library — Parchment Community Library, 401 S Riverview Dr, 343-7747, parchmentlibrary.org Portage Library — Portage District Library, 300 Library Lane, 3294544, portagelibrary.info

Mondays Family Storytime (begins June 19), language skills, stories, rhymes, movement & letter of the week, 9:30 am, Portage Library, ages 2–5, FREE Baby & Toddler Storytime (begins June 19), books, fingerplays & movement, 10:30 am, Portage Library, ages 0–23 mo, FREE Craft Days (begins June 19), create crafts (registration required), 10:30 am & 1:30 pm, Comstock Library, ages 3 & up, under 5 with adult, FREE Play & Learn, play for early learning, 5:30–7 pm, KPL-Eastwood, ages 1–5, FREE Tuesdays Stories with Jethro (excluding June 27), read to a friendly dog (registration required), 4–5:30 pm, KPL-Oshtemo, all ages, FREE

JUNE

Friday, June 2

Animotion Festival, dinosaurs & animation workshops, times vary, Kalamazoo Valley Museum, all ages, FREE

Art on the Mall, artisans display & sell work, noon–8 pm, Kalamazoo Mall, 342-5059, kalamazooarts.org, all ages, outdoors, FREE

KIA Arts Fair, artwork for sale & children’s activities, 3–8 pm, Bronson Park, Kalamazoo, 3497775, kiarts.org, all ages, outdoors, FREE Art Hop, art at locations around Kalamazoo, 5–8 pm, 342-5059, kalamazooarts.org, all ages, FREE Saturday, June 3

Animotion Festival, dinosaurs & animation workshops, times vary, Kalamazoo Valley Museum, all ages, FREE

Art on the Mall, artisans display & sell work, 9 am–5 pm, Kalamazoo Mall, 342-5059, kalamazooarts.org, all ages, outdoors, FREE KIA Arts Fair, artwork for sale & children’s activities, 9 am–5 pm, Bronson Park, Kalamazoo, 3497775, kiarts.org, all ages, outdoors, FREE

LEGO at the Library, build, race & imagine, 10:30 am, KPLOshtemo, all ages, FREE

24 • June / July 2017

Craft Days (begins June 20), create crafts (registration required), 7 pm, Comstock Library, ages 3 and up, under 5 with adult, FREE Wednesdays Summer Family Fun (begins June 21), interactive program for caregivers & children, 10 am, Portage Library, ages 0–5, FREE Drop-in Storytime, stories, songs, games & parachute play, 10:30 am, Comstock Library, ages 1–5, FREE STEM Wednesdays (begins June 21), explore science & engineering activities (registration required), 1:30 pm, Comstock Library, all ages, under 5 with adult, FREE Thursdays Family Storytime, stories, songs & fingerplays, 10:30 am, KPL-Oshtemo, ages 0–5, FREE

Play & Learn, play for early learning, 10:30 am–noon, KPLEastwood & KPL-Washington Square, ages 1–5, FREE Teen Time (begins June 22), crafts & activities (registration required), 1:30 pm, Comstock Library, grades 6–12, FREE Reading with Tucker (July only), read to a friendly Golden Retriever (registration required), 4–5:30 pm, KPL-Central, all ages, FREE Fridays Family Storytime, stories, songs & fingerplays, 10:30 am, KPL-Central, ages 0–5, FREE Play & Learn, play for early learning, 10:30 am, KPL-Alma Powell, ages 1–5, FREE Create! (begins June 23), create with various materials (registration required), 1–2:30 pm, Portage Library, grades K–5, FREE

Do-Dah Parade, fun floats & whimsical costumes, 11 am, downtown Kalamazoo, 3882830, experientiallearningcenter.org, all ages, outdoors, FREE

Vicksburg Old Car Festival, old car show, arts, crafts & “Tin Can Tourists,” downtown Vicksburg, facebook. com/Vicksburg-Old-Car-Festival-118214114873005/, all ages, outdoors, FREE

Wednesday, June 7

Teen Game & LEGO Club, play video games, read comics & build with LEGOs, 4–5:30 pm, Portage Library, grades 6–12, FREE Friday, June 9

National Cereal Fest, world’s longest breakfast table, parade, children’s activities & entertainment, downtown Battle Creek, bcfestivals.com/cerealfest, all ages, outdoors, see website for details Friday Teen Night, art-making, museum-strolling & pizza, 6–8 pm, Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, teens, FREE Saturday, June 10

National Cereal Fest, world’s longest breakfast table, parade, children’s activities & entertainment downtown Battle Creek, bcfestivals.com/cerealfest, all ages, outdoors, see website for details

Sensory Showtime: Captain Underpants, a movie welcoming to guests with special needs, Celebration Cinema, 6600 Ring Rd, Portage, 324-7469, celebrationcinema.com/sensoryshowtimes, all ages, see website for times and ticket prices

Kalamazoo Mud Run, get muddy or stay clean on a 5K trail run, 8 am–noon, Kalamazoo Community Church, 2435 N 26th St, Kalamazoo, kalamazoomudrun.com, all ages, outdoors, see website for details

Tumble Toddlers, movement with music (registration required), 10:30 am, KPL-Central, ages 1–3, FREE Discovering Dinosaurs, look at large & small dinosaur fossils, 11 am–2 pm, Leila Arboretum, 928 W Michigan Ave, Battle Creek, 269-969-0270, lasgarden.org, all ages, $2 per person Monday, June 12

Little Scientists, stories, songs & experiments (registration required), 10:30 am, KPL-Central, ages 3–6, FREE Wee Sing, Play & Dance Now, sing, dance, move, listen & play instruments, 6:30 pm, KPLOshtemo, ages 15 mo–3 years, FREE Tuesday, June 13

Pasture Dairy Open House 90th Celebration, farming technology from each decade, wagon rides & ice cream, 4–8 pm, Pasture Dairy Center, 10461 N 40th St, entrance on North


ONGOING Thru June 4, And Still We Rise: Race, Culture & Visual Conversations, works that draw on the tradition of storytelling thru quilts, Kalamazoo Valley Museum, all ages, FREE Thru June 4, High School Area Show, art work by area high school students, Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, all ages, regular admission Thru June 11, The Little Star That Could, animated story about a star searching for a home, 1 pm Sat, 2 pm Sun, Kalamazoo Valley Museum, all ages, $3 Thru June 15, MI Spring Skies, tour the night sky over Michigan, 2 pm Sat & Sun, 3 pm Tues & Thurs, Kalamazoo Valley Museum Planetarium, all ages, $3

Thru June 16, Journey to Space, explore what lies beyond the next horizon, 3 pm Sun, Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat, Kalamazoo Valley Museum Planetarium, all ages, $3 June 17–Sept 17, Dinosaurs: Land of Fire & Ice, explore the age of the dinosaurs, Kalamazoo Valley Museum, all ages, FREE June 29–July 4, Field of Flight Air Show & Balloon Festival, hot air balloons, air show, carnival & fireworks, W.K. Kellogg Airport, 15551 S Airport Rd, Battle Creek, 269-962-0592, bcballoons.com, all ages, outdoors, see website for details July 12–16, Kindleberger Summer Festival of the Performing Arts, theater, car show, arts

& crafts, 5K & kids fun run, & parade; The Brothers Grimm Spectaculathon, youth production, 5:30 pm July 12–14, 3:30 pm July 15–16; Once Upon a Mattress, family musical, 7 pm July 12–14, 5 pm July 15–16, Kindleberger Park, 650 S Riverview Dr, Parchment, kindleberger.org, all ages, outdoors, FREE July 13–16, Black Arts Festival: Unity Through Culture, 3491035, blackartskalamazoo.org, all ages, see website for details July 21–Aug 6, Peter and the Starcatcher, Farmers Alley Theatre presents a swashbuckling prequel to Peter Pan, 7:30 pm Thurs, 8 pm Fri & Sat, 2 pm Sun, Little Theatre, WMU, corner of Oakland Drive & Oliver Lane,

Kalamazoo, 343-2727, farmersalleytheatre.com, see website for ticket prices July 24–Sept 2, Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine, exhibit focusing on men & women who served as surgeons & nurses during the Civil War, Kalamazoo Valley Museum, all ages, FREE

39th Street, Hickory Corners, 671-2508, pasturedairy.kbs. msu.edu, all ages, FREE

Harborfest, celebrate Southwest Michigan’s maritime history, music, crafts & food, 11 am– 11 pm, downtown South Haven, southhavenharborfest.com, all ages, outdoors, FREE

Sunday, June 18

2 pm, Portage Library, all ages, FREE

Wednesday, June 14

Discovering Dinosaurs, look at large & small dinosaur fossils, 10 am–noon, Leila Arboretum, 928 W Michigan Ave, Battle Creek, 269-969-0270, lasgarden.org, all ages, $2 per person

Ice Cream Social, enjoy ice cream & toppings for showing your library card, 11 am–7 pm, Comstock Library, all ages, FREE Wild Wednesdays: Bees! What’s the Buzz?, discover bees & their importance to us, 6:30 pm, Kellogg Bird Sanctuary, 12685 East C Ave, Augusta, 671-2510, birdsanctuary.kbs. msu.edu, all ages, $5 adults, $3 ages 2–17 Friday, June 16

Buttermilk Jamboree, music & arts festival with swimming, dancing & local food, Circle Pines Center, 8650 Mullen Rd, Delton, 269-623-5555, buttermilkjamboree.org, all ages, outdoors, see website for details United Kennel Club Premier Dog Show, agility, obedience & dock diving events, 8 am–4 pm, Kalamazoo County Expo Center, 343-9020, all ages, $5 per vehicle; $10 weekend Little Scientists, stories, songs & experiments (registration required), 10:30 am, KPL-Oshtemo, ages 3–6, FREE

LEGO Club, imagine & build (registration required), 4–5:30 pm, Comstock Library, all ages, under 5 with adult, FREE

Kids’ Klassic, 1K & 2K Fun Run, 6 pm, YMCA of Greater Kalamazoo, 1001 Maple St, 270-5641, kalamazooklassic.org, ages 15 & under, see website for details Saturday, June 17

Buttermilk Jamboree, music & arts festival with swimming, dancing & local food, Circle Pines Center, 8650 Mullen Rd, Delton, 269-623-5555, buttermilkjamboree.org, all ages, outdoors, see website for details

Harborfest, celebrate Southwest Michigan’s maritime history, music, crafts & food, 8 am–11 pm, downtown South Haven, southhavenharborfest.com, all ages, outdoors, FREE United Kennel Club Premier Dog Show, agility, obedience & dock diving events, 8 am–4 pm, Kalamazoo County Expo Center, 343-9020, all ages, $5 per vehicle, $10 weekend LEGO at the Library, build, race & imagine, 10:30 am, KPL-Central, all ages, FREE

Father’s Day Car Show, sponsored by the Southern Michigan Street Rod Association, 8 am–4 pm, Historic Charlton Park, 2545 S Charlton Park Rd, Hastings, 269-945-3775, charltonpark. org, all ages, $6 adults, $4 ages 5–12, 4 & under free

Buttermilk Jamboree, music & arts festival with swimming, dancing & local food, Circle Pines Center, 8650 Mullen Rd, Delton, 269-623-5555, buttermilkjamboree.org, all ages, outdoors, see website for details Harborfest, celebrate Southwest Michigan’s maritime history, music, crafts & food, 8 am–5 pm, downtown South Haven, southhavenharborfest.com, all ages, outdoors, FREE

United Kennel Club Premier Dog Show, agility, obedience & dock diving events, 8 am–4 pm, Kalamazoo County Expo Center, 343-9020, all ages, $5 per vehicle, $10 weekend Monday, June 19

Binder Park Zoomobile, live animals & artifacts, 2 pm, KPLEastwood, all ages, FREE, but ticket required

J-Pop Club, latest media & food from Japan, 4 pm, KPL-Central, grades 6–12, FREE Tuesday, June 20

There’s an Alligator Under My Bed, read the book & see live alligators (registration required),

Wednesday, June 21

Teen Game & LEGO Club, play video games, read comics & build with LEGOs, 4–5:30 pm, Portage Library, grades 6–12, FREE Thursday, June 22

Free Day at Kids ‘N’ Stuff Children’s Museum, hands-on exhibits that encourage imagination, 10 am–7 pm, Kids ‘N’ Stuff Children’s Museum, 301 S Superior St, Albion, 517-629-8023, kidsnstuff.org, all ages, FREE

Teddy Bear Clinic, meet Mr. Sniffles & learn about healthy habits (registration required), 10:30 am, KPL-Central, ages 4–6, FREE Jim Gill Concert, sing, clap & dance with the musician & author, 6:30 pm, KPL-Oshtemo, all ages, FREE

Famous Structures: Build Them with Cups, hands-on family program building the world’s greatest structure (registration required), 6:30 pm, Portage Library, all ages, FREE Saturday, June 24

Sensory Showtime: Cars 3, a movie welcoming to guests with special needs, Celebration Cinema, 6600 Ring Rd, Portage, 324-7469, celebrationcinema. com/sensoryshowtimes, all ages, see website for times & ticket prices

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25 •


Cheetah Chase, 5K run thru the zoo (registration required), 8 am–noon, Binder Park Zoo, 7400 Division Dr, Battle Creek, 269979-1351, binderparkzoo.org, all ages, outdoors, $30–45

Kalamazoo Reptile & Exotic Pet Expo, buy, sell or trade, 10 am–3 pm, Kalamazoo County Expo Center Room A, 779-9851, all ages, $5 adults, $2 children, under 6 free Strawberry JAMboree, arts & crafts, magic show, farmyard fun & strawberry eating contest, 10 am–5 pm, Stokes Homestead Farm Market, 13988 County Rd 215, Grand Junction, stokeshomestead.com, all ages, FREE

Urban Craft Fair, artists, handmade items, vintage décor, food trucks & music, 10 am–4 pm, Bronson Park, Kalamazoo, 269-903-5820, facebook.com/ events/1628767760481941/, all ages, outdoors, FREE Sunday, June 25

Strawberry JAMboree, arts & crafts, magic show, farmyard fun & strawberry eating contest, 10 am–4 pm, Stokes Homestead Farm Market, 13988 County Rd 215, Grand Junction, stokeshomestead.com, all ages, FREE

Kalamazoo Backyard BBQ, fundraiser for Great Lakes Burn Camp: motorcycle ride, classic car show, games & food, 9 am–4 pm, Kalamazoo County Expo Center, 217-3943, all ages, outdoors, FREE Monday, June 26

Wee Sing, Play & Dance Now, sing, dance, move, listen & play instruments, 6:30 pm, KPL-Central, ages 15 mo–3 years, FREE Tuesday, June 27

Teen Cake Decorating Competition, prizes given for best designs, 6:30 pm, Portage Library, grades 6–12, FREE Wednesday, June 28

Summer Page Turners, a book club with discussion, dinner & games, 5:30 pm, Portage Library, grades 3–5, FREE

Wild Wednesdays: Trumpeter Swans, learn of the history, habitats & traits of swans, 6:30 pm, Kellogg Bird Sanctuary, 12685 East C Ave, Augusta, 671-2510, birdsanctuary.kbs.msu.edu, all ages, $5 adults, $3 ages 2–17 Thursday, June 29

Here, Kitty Kitty Kitty, learn about cat care & listen to stories,

26 • June / July 2017

10:30 am, KPL-Eastwood, all ages, FREE

Rockin’ Rollercoaters, Air Zoo program exploring speed, mass, g-force & energy (registration required), 2 pm, KPLEastwood, ages 8–11, FREE Rocket Readers, book club that builds vocabulary & encourages language development, 4:30 pm, KPL-Central, grades K–2, FREE Music for Families by BenJammin, a fun, educational concert, 6:30 pm, Portage Library, all ages, FREE

JULY

Saturday, July 1

LEGO at the Library, build, race & imagine, 10:30 am, KPLOshtemo, all ages, FREE

Mud Fest, get dirty & rinse off in sprinklers, 11 am–2 pm, Leila Arboretum, 928 W Michigan Ave, Battle Creek, 269-969-0270, lasgarden.org, all ages, $2 per person Monday, July 3

All Day LEGO City Returns, see a city made from LEGOs, Portage Library, all ages, FREE

Light Up the Lake Fireworks, 10:30 pm, North & South Beach, South Haven, 269-637-5171, southhaven.org, all ages, outdoors, FREE Wednesday, July 5

All Day LEGO City Returns, see a city made from LEGOs, Portage Library, all ages, FREE

Teen Game & LEGO Club, play video games, read comics & build with LEGOs, 4–5:30 pm, Portage Library, grades 6–12, FREE Thursday, July 6

All Day LEGO City Returns, see a city made from LEGOs, Portage Library, all ages, FREE

Maranda’s Park Party, rides, games, inflatables & food, noon2 pm, Bronson Park, downtown Kalamazoo, 337-8191, wotv4women.com, all ages, outdoors, FREE

Friday Night Highlights: The Steve Pesch Band, classic rock, blues & classic country, 6–7:30 pm, Kalamazoo Valley Museum, all ages, FREE Saturday, July 8

All Day LEGO City Returns, see a city made from LEGOs, Portage Library, all ages, FREE

Zoorific Kids’ Day, Binder Park Zoo, 7400 Division Dr, Battle Creek, 269-979-1351, binderparkzoo.org, all ages, outdoors, regular admission Kalamazoo 4-H Open Horse Show, classes for every riding discipline, 8:30 am, Kalamazoo County Expo Center Horse Arenas, msue.msu.edu/kalamazoo, all ages, outdoors, FREE for spectators

Sensory Showtime: Despicable Me 3, a movie welcoming to guests with special needs, Celebration Cinema, 6600 Ring Rd, Portage, 324-7469, celebrationcinema.com/sensoryshowtimes, all ages, see website for times & ticket prices Sunday, July 9

Kalamazoo 4-H Open Horse Show, classes for every riding discipline, 9 am, Kalamazoo County Expo Center Horse Arenas, msue.msu.edu/kalamazoo, all ages, outdoors, FREE for spectators Music Festival, bluegrass & Americana music, noon–4:30 pm, Overlander Bandshell, 7999 S Westnedge Ave, Portage, 329-4452, portagemi.gov, all ages, outdoors, donation Monday, July 10

Little Scientists, stories, songs & experiments (registration required), 10:30 am, KPL-Central, ages 3–6, FREE

Rockin’ Rollercoaters, Air Zoo program exploring speed, mass, g-force & energy (registration required), 2 pm, KPLWashington Square, ages 8–11, FREE

Friday, July 7

Wee Sing, Play & Dance Now, sing, dance, move, listen & play instruments, 6:30 pm, KPLOshtemo, ages 15 mo–3 years, FREE

Art Hop, art at locations around Kalamazoo, 5–8 pm, 342-5059, kalamazooarts.org, all ages, FREE

Camp 9-1-1, an interactive camp to educate children on emergency preparedness (registration required), 9 am–4 pm, Kalamazoo Valley Museum, 373-3116, ages 9–11, FREE

All Day LEGO City Returns, see a city made from LEGOs, Portage Library, all ages, FREE

Tuesday, July 11

Wednesday, July 12

Wild Wednesdays: Froggy Fun, discover frogs & what they can tell us, 6:30 pm, Kellogg Bird Sanctuary, 12685 East C Ave, Augusta, 671-2510, all ages, $5 adults, $3 ages 2–17 Sweet Baby Blues, feel the rhythm & dance to the beat of Bluesy Suzy & her Blues Sisters, 6:30 pm, KPL-Central, all ages, FREE

Build a Fairy House with Your Family, (registration required), 6:30–8 pm, Portage Library, all ages, FREE Thursday, July 13

Teddy Bear Clinic, meet Mr. Sniffles & learn about healthy habits (registration required), 10:30 am, KPL-Central, ages 4–6, FREE Sweet Baby Blues, feel the rhythm & dance to the beat of Bluesy Suzy & her Blues Sisters, 3:30 pm, KPL-Alma Powell, all ages, FREE Friday, July 14

Family Fishing Day: What Eats What?, fish for the eagle’s breakfast & examine what fish eat (registration required), 9 am– 2:30 pm, Kellogg Bird Sanctuary, 12685 East C Ave, Augusta, 6712510, all ages, $60 guardian & 1 child, $15 additional child Nova VR, explore virtual reality gaming, 1–3 pm, Portage Library, all ages, FREE

Kalamazoo Blues Festival, local, regional & national touring acts, 4:30–11 pm, Wings Event Center, 3600 Vanrick Dr, 3451125, wingseventcenter.com, see website for ticket prices

Wee Sing, Play & Dance Now, sing, dance, move, listen & play instruments, 6:30 pm, KPL-Central, ages 15 mo–3 years, FREE Vintage Electronics Extravaganza ‘17, vintage radios, TVs, record players, computers & video games, 7 am–6:30 pm, Kalamazoo County Expo Center, 734-316-2803, all ages, $5 adults, 12 & under free Saturday, July 15

Vintage Electronics Extravaganza ‘17, vintage radios, TVs, record players, computers & video games, 8 am–4 pm, Kalamazoo County Expo Center, 734316-2803, all ages, $5 adults, 12 & under free


LEGO at the Library, build, race & imagine, 10:30 am, KPLCentral, all ages, FREE Kalamazoo Blues Festival, local, regional & national touring acts, noon–11 pm, Wings Event Center, 3600 Vanrick Dr, 3451125, wingseventcenter.com, see website for ticket prices Sunday, July 16

Vintage in the Zoo, outdoor vintage market, 11 am–3 pm, Kalamazoo Farmers Market, 1204 Bank St, 989-859-1875, vintageinthezoo.com, all ages, outdoors, FREE

Kalamazoo Blues Festival, local, regional & national touring acts, noon–6 pm, Wings Event Center, 3600 Vanrick Dr, 3451125, wingseventcenter.com, see website for ticket prices Monday, July 17

J-Pop Club, latest media & food from Japan, 4 pm, KPLCentral, grades 6–12, FREE

Here, Kitty Kitty Kitty, learn about cat care & listen to stories, 4 pm, KPL-Eastwood, all ages, FREE Tuesday, July 18

Camp 9-1-1, an interactive camp to educate children on

emergency preparedness (registration required), 9 am–4 pm, Kalamazoo Valley Museum, 373-3116, ages 9–11, FREE Wednesday, July 19

Rockin’ Rovers, dancing dogs perform, 4 pm, KPL-Alma Powell, all ages, FREE

Teen Game & LEGO Club, play video games, read comics & build with LEGOs, 4–5:30 pm, Portage Library, grades 6–12, FREE Thursday, July 20

Return of the Big Trucks, explore dump trucks, excavators, loaders & more, 10 am-1 pm, Portage Library, all ages, FREE Friday, July 21

Little Scientists, stories, songs & experiments (registration required), 10:30 am, KPL-Oshtemo, ages 3-6, FREE

A Visit with the Kalamazoo Nature Center, learn how animals inspire builders, 11 am, Comstock Library, all ages, FREE LEGO Club, imagine & build (registration required), 4-5:30 pm, Comstock Library, all ages, under 5 with adult, FREE

Saturday, July 22

Kalamazoo Reptile & Exotic Pet Expo, buy, sell or trade, 10 am–3 pm, Kalamazoo County Expo Center Room A, 7799851, all ages, $5 adults, $2 children, under 6 free

Tumble Toddlers, movement with music (registration required), 10:30 am, KPL-Central, ages 1–3, FREE Tuesday, July 25

Once Upon a Raptor, meet raptors & touch artifacts, 2 pm, KPL-Alma Powell, all ages, FREE, but ticket required Wednesday, July 26

Summer Page Turners, a book club with discussion, dinner & games, 5:30 pm, Portage Library, grades 3–5, FREE

Wild Wednesdays: Wonder Walk About, discover, observe & collect things found in nature, 6:30 pm, Kellogg Bird Sanctuary, 12685 East C Ave, Augusta, 671-2510, all ages, $5 adults, $3 ages 2–17 Thursday, July 27

Free Day at Kids ‘N’ Stuff Children’s Museum, hands-on exhibits that encourage imagination, 10 am–7 pm, Kids ‘N’ Stuff

Children’s Museum, 301 S Superior St, Albion, 517-629-8023, kidsnstuff.org, all ages, FREE Rocket Readers, book club that builds vocabulary & encourages language development, 4:30 pm, KPL-Central, grades K–2, FREE Friday, July 28

Family Late Night: Build a Fort at the Library, build forts, read & play hide-&-glow seek, 6–7:30 pm, Portage Library, all ages, FREE Saturday, July 29

How We Came to the Fifth World, a blacklight production inspired by an Aztec creation myth, 2 pm, KPL-Central, all ages, FREE

Events may change without notice. FYI Family Magazine makes all reasonable effort to ensure the accuracy of the events listed here, but makes no warranty for the accuracy, reliability or completeness of the events information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for results obtained from the use of the information.

fyiswmichigan.com •

27 •


Kids’ Corner FYI

Activity Page

Color All the C s and discover the animal

28 • June / July 2017

Trace to see the sea Creature


Family Man (continued from page 30) one can leave, but there have been no directives from Mom yet on what this special day entails. The kids and dad sporadically roam into the kitchen and root around the fridge. The weather outside is beautiful — the perfect weather for an epic round of golf — so Mom finally suggests a Father’s Day barbecue. Dad heads out and cleans the grill. While prepping the grill, Dad briefly tries to remember what they did last Father’s Day. Unable to recall, he wonders if maybe they just skipped it. He is suddenly struck with the thought that he can’t remember a single Father’s Day. That can’t be right, can it? He’s been a dad for — wait, how old is their oldest child again? — at least 9 or 10 years. He vaguely

recalls a drawing with Tom Petty-looking stick figures last year. Maybe they did celebrate it. The grill is ready. It’s 1 p.m. and Dad cracks a beer as he grills. The one true perk of Father’s Day is that drinking beer midday gets a far less disapproving look from Mom than on a typical weekend. (Which is why Dad always strategically hands Mom the mimosa on Mother’s Day. When you’re hitting the champagne before you get out of bed in the morning, it makes it tougher to judge the midday beer over the grill.) The family eats outside and, truth be told, it’s pretty great. Mom put together a nice spread and what family man doesn’t enjoy grilling for his family on a beautiful afternoon? The kids even hold it together for a while.

Maybe it’s because Mom reiterated to them that it was Father’s Day prior to eating but, forced or not, no iPads or kids nagging each other is always a good thing. This brief, peaceful moment with family is what the day is all about. Dad convinces himself he will remember today next year. Wait, didn’t he make the same promise last year? Satisfied that the Father’s Day box has been checked, Mom lets the oldest child head to a friend’s house. The youngest heads to the TV. Dad goes in to help with dishes and grab another beer. It’s been a decent afternoon, but the day is far from over for Dad. With Mother’s Day only 11 months away, he knows he has got to start planning.

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29 •


Family Man FYI

A Father’s Day to Remember, or Not by

BRIAN LAM

David Miles

N

o day holds more meaning for a family man than Father’s Day. On that special day in May — or June, or whenever it is — dads around the country finally get a day that is all about them. On a normal Sunday, a family man might selflessly sacrifice his time by rounding out that foursome for his buddies on the golf course. He might dutifully support his professional sports team, while at the same time heroically clearing the fridge of that unwanted beer and removing those about-to-gobad potato chips taking up space in the pantry. Or, he might surrender his precious waking hours to generously sleep in and preserve the serenity of the morning for the family.

30 • June / July 2017

But not on Father’s Day. For just one day a year, a family man is released of those rigorous Sunday obligations. On Father’s Day, a family man can put the needs of others on the backburner and think only of himself, while he engages in whatever his family has planned for him. While Father’s Day is in the top 200 holidays recognized by wives and kids (nestled snugly between “Penguin Awareness Day” and “Talk Like a Pirate Day”), it still ranks significantly beneath Mother’s Day, so Father’s Day does not begin with a childmade breakfast-in-bed of burnt toast, cereal surprise and a random piece of fruit, mercifully saved by the Dadmade mimosa.

No, Father’s Day begins with a family mom’s iPhone alerting her that it is actually Father’s Day, and she jumps into action. Mother’s Day is a mere 11 months away and she is not going to let dad forget that these are special days not to be forgotten! She rallies the kids and Dad is awakened to the youngest child pushing a crayon drawing into his face that reads, “hapy father day” and depicts two identical stick figures with an arrow pointing to one that reads “me,” and an arrow pointing to the other that reads “dad.” The arm of one is freakishly long and bent so that it can reach the arm of the other. Both figures have hair that is eerily reminiscent of Tom Petty’s. The dog runs in and jumps up on the bed. Dad is up. Dad heads to the kitchen to see that his oldest child is eating breakfast. Mom clears her throat and the oldest child robotically says, “Happy Father’s Day.” Mom says she made coffee and there should be some left. The oldest child asks about the possibility of playing with a friend. Mom replies that it’s a day to spend with Dad, so of course not. Dad and the oldest give each other a knowing look. Today, they are going to enjoy Father’s Day, whether they like it or not. The family sits in a holding pattern for a while, engaged in far less activity than if it had just been a “family day” or even a typical Sunday. No (continued on page 29)


Photo courtesy of Michael Terri Studios

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32 • June / July 2017

FYI Family Magazine June/July 2017  

Southwest Michigan's Family Magazine: Great summer destinations near and far, hot hacks for outdoor fun, painting with tissue paper, cell ph...

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