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F V M A ADVOCATE ISSUE 1 | 2020

Keeping Them Pearly White and Smooth Pg. 6 Jan Bellows, DVM, DAVDC, DABVP (Canine and Feline)

Exceeds Expectations, so Why the Reservations?

Pg.16

Ian Dembling, FVMA Communications Specialist

THE

91

st

FVMA ANNUAL CONFERENCE

MARCH 12-15, 2020

HILTON ORLANDO BONNET CREEK & WALDORF ASTORIA ORLANDO | ORLANDO, FLORIDA Located at official Walt Disney World® Resort hotels!

More details inside!


President's Message “The best way to predict your future is to create it.” - Author Unknown

7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, Florida 32809 Phone – 407.851.3862 Toll Free – 800.992.3862 Fax – 407.240.3710 info@fvma.org | www.fvma.org

This is a quote the FVMA often references. As your President, I want to assure you that we have been hard at work creating the future of this profession. We have many plans and programs in place to aid the profession’s success in the state of Florida for years to come. Our practices are increasingly under pressure from outside sources trying to garner the attention of our clients. As practitioners, we must continue to find a way to maintain value in the profession.

OFFICERS

Dr. Michael Epperson President Dr. Mary Smart President-elect Dr. Donald H. Morgan Treasurer Dr. Marc A. Presnell Past President Mr. Philip J. Hinkle Executive Director

DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVES Dr. Scott Richardson District 1–Big Bend Dr. Thomas E. Hester District 2–Northeast Dr. Todd Fulton District 3–Central Dr. Rachel Klemawesch District 4–Tampa Bay Dr. Susan M. Carastro District 5–Treasure Coast Dr. Marta P. Lista District 6–South Florida Dr. Barbara Lewis District 7–Southwest Dr. James M. Brechin District 8–Northwest Dr. Kelly J. Sloan-Wade District 9–Space Coast

We are embarking on a new endeavor that will place your FVMA as a pioneer and one of the most influential associations in the United States. We are in the midst of planning a permanent training center in Central Florida. This training center will be like no other. It will give us the ability to influence the leaders of tomorrow, while offering world-class continuing education to the practitioners of today. We will do this by implementing wet labs that will enable us to harness our skills so we can better support the needs of our patients and our clients. We will also continue to bring in speakers to provide real world skills that can be applied in your practices the very next day. The options are endless, but our intent is to put ourselves in the captain’s chair, with the aim of creating our future. This year has been one of the best years of my life as a veterinarian. However, that does not mean it wasn’t challenging. Like many of you, I’m a practicing veterinarian. My wife and I are also business owners and share the duties of managing two clinics in Northwest Florida. We know the challenges faced in the work force. We see the struggles of being a veterinarian these days. For example, most business owners may feel as though there are not enough veterinarians out there to meet the needs of our clienteles, and associates may feel tasked with trying to keep up with the day-to-day demands of their families — all while trying to meet the needs of their practices. However, I want to remind you that we’re all in this together. Reach out to veterinarians in your community and brainstorm ways to make things more doable. We are all looking for that work-life balance, and with the support of your team and your colleagues moving in the same direction it is sure to happen. The FVMA has many resources available to help us, as professionals, manage our careers and be successful. We are quickly approaching the end of my term as FVMA President. I’m grateful for the opportunity to serve our profession in this capacity, which has given me a deeper insight and appreciation for the importance of organized veterinary medicine. We are the architects and protectors of our great profession. I encourage you to become involved in your local and state VMAs, today. Thank you for allowing me to represent you as your President of the FVMA.

Dr. Ernest C. Godfrey AVMA Delegate Dr. Richard B. Williams AVMA Alternate Delegate Dr. Jacqueline S. Shellow FAEP Representative to the FVMA Executive Board

Michael Epperson, DVM

FVMA MISSION:

TO ADVANCE THE VETERINARY MEDICAL PROFESSION, PROMOTE ANIMAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND PROTECT PUBLIC HEALTH.

Opinions and statements expressed in The Advocate reflect the views of the contributors and do not represent the official policy of the Florida Veterinary Medical Association, unless so stated. Placement of an advertisement does not represent the FVMA’s endorsement of the product or service.

2  |  FVMA ADVOCATE


MEMBER SPOTLIGHT Veterinarian Turned Congressman Retires FVMA member Dr. Ted Yoho is currently wrapping up his fourth term as a member of the U.S. Congress. He recently, however, announced he will not seek a fifth term in this position. Congressman Yoho spent 30 years as a large animal veterinarian before getting into politics. During his time in Washington D.C., he sponsored and co-sponsored legislation that has made a positive impact on the veterinary profession. These include: The Horseracing Integrity Act (HR 1754), the Transporting Livestock Across America Safely Act (HR 487), and the Shark Fin Sales Elimination Act of 2019 (HR 737). While in office, Dr. Yoho co-founded and served as co-chair of the Veterinary Medicine Caucus. He worked with a fellow congressman, who also spent time as a veterinarian, to put together bipartisan, animal-related legislation. He has also been a strong advocate for the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program Enhancement Act and the PAST (Prevent All Soring Tactics) Act. Congressman Yoho (R) represents Florida’s 3rd Congressional District, which encompasses Gainesville, Palatka, and other parts of Northern Florida. Dr. Yoho said he hopes he left this country a little better for the next generation, especially the veterinarians who will succeed him. The Congressman sent the FVMA a statement regarding his decision not to run for re-election. “It is one of my highest honors to be elected to Congress. As one of only two veterinarians serving in the House of Representatives, it has been a privilege to serve the great people of the 3rd Congressional District. This position has allowed me the opportunity to fight for those issues pertinent to the veterinarian profession. A profession that enables us to serve our animal patients that can’t speak for themselves.

“I am proud to have fought for animal welfare issues like the PAST Act to end the cruel practice of horse soring and the Veterinary Mobility Act (VMA) that corrected the restriction in the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). The CSA was blatant government overreach that prevented veterinarians from transporting or using controlled substances outside of their registered places of business. “The VMA made it legal for veterinarians to transport and dispense medications for pain management, anesthesia and euthanasia that they need to properly care for animal patients in various settings. These are accomplishments that I am proud to have been a part of with my colleague and fellow veterinarian Kurt Schrader (D) from Oregon that has made animals and our profession better off. “After leaving congress at the end of the 116th Congress, I plan to take some time with my wife and family to travel, enjoy life, and reflect on the past eight years. I feel confident that I’ll serve in some capacity to give back and stay engaged on these issues.”

In This Issue 3 | 6 | 10 | 12 |

Member Spotlight Keeping Them Pearly White and Smooth FVMA Legislative Chair's Mid-Session Report The 13th Annual Dr. Harvey Rubin Memorial Food Animal Veterinary Medical Conference 14 | The 91st FVMA Annual Conference 16 | Exceeds Expectations, so Why the Reservations?

PES 2020 Save the Date Membership Corner License Renewal Deadline Approaching FVMA’s Veterinary Clinic Inspection Checklist 22 | Practice Pulse 24 | Classified Advertisements 18 19 20 21

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KEEPING THEM PEARLY WHITE AND SMOOTH

PERIODONTOLOGY FOR THE DENTAL TECHNICIAN Jan Bellows, DVM, DAVDC, DABVP (Canine and Feline) Periodontal disease is the most common small animal ailment. Eight out of 10 dogs and cats older than five will suffer from periodontal disease. If periodontal problems are left untreated, bacteria and toxins can be absorbed into the blood stream and, in some instances, can cause permanent damage to internal organs, decreasing the pet’s life span. Periodontal disease starts with plaque, which attaches to teeth and gingival surfaces. Plaque is primarily composed of bacteria, white blood cells, and saliva. When removed daily, plaque doesn’t cause problems. If left to accumulate, mineral salts in saliva mix with plaque, forming hard calculus. Without daily plaque removal, more plaque accumulates on top of the calculus, extending under the gingiva. At first, there is little difference between the bacteria above (supragingival) and below (subgingival) the gingival margin in healthy sites. Most supragingival plaque bacteria are gram positive, non-motile, aerobic cocci. As periodontal infection progresses, destructive gram-negative, motile, anaerobic rods predominate.

Disease predisposition

The cause of periodontal disease is multifactorial. Many elements factor into the equation of why some small animals develop disease, while others do not. Some of the most common criteria that predispose some animals to periodontal disease include: • Breed- small breeds are more prone to periodontal disease due to the proximity of the teeth and the relative thinness of the bone around the incisors. • General health- animals that have compromised health or that are immunologically suppressed cannot fight periodontal pathogens effectively. • Dermatological disease- animals with dermatological disease many times chew at their coat, embedding hair under the gum line and, thereby, promoting periodontal disease. • Nutritional health- animals on a poor diet often have less immunity to disease. • Age- older pets are more prone to periodontal disease. Ultimately, the destruction of tooth support (periodontium) is responsible for the loss of teeth. The height of the alveolar bone is normally maintained by an equilibrium between bone formation and bone resorption. When resorption exceeds formation, bone height is reduced. In periodontal disease, the equilibrium is altered, so that bone resorption exceeds bone formation.

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Plaque-laden calculus plays a key role in maintaining and accelerating periodontal disease. When calculus extends deep into the subgingival tissues, the potential for repair and reattachment is lost without medical or surgical intervention. The therapeutic importance of plaque and calculus removal by the veterinarian and follow-up home preventative care by the client cannot be overemphasized.

The periodontal exam

Periodontal pockets result when the periodontal ligament loses part, or all, of its attachment to the tooth. The periodontal pocket is defined as a pathologically deepened gingival sulcus. The clinical pocket depth is defined as the distance from the free gingival margin to the base of the pocket. Diagnosing periodontal disease and assessing the response to treatment are, in part, based on pocket depth measurement. The measurement of clinical pocket depths by a probe is the backbone of a thorough periodontal examination. The periodontal probe is marked in millimeter gradations and gently inserted in the space between the gingival margin and the tooth. A probe will stop where the gingiva attaches to the tooth, or at the apex of the alveolus, if the attachment is gone. Mediumsized dogs without periodontal disease should have less than 2 mm probing depths, and cats should have less than 1 mm. Each tooth is probed on a minimum of four sides. Abnormal probing depths of all teeth should be noted on the dental record, and a treatment plan should be mapped out before therapy begins.

Gingival recession involving the left maxillary fourth premolar, extraction is indicated. Photo courtesy of Dr. Jan Bellows


Stage 2 (PD 2): Early periodontitis - less than 25% of attachment loss or, at most, there is a Stage 1 furcation involvement in multirooted teeth. There are early radiologic signs of periodontitis. The loss of periodontal attachment is less than 25%, as measured either by probing the clinical attachment level, or by radiographic determination of the distance of the alveolar margin from the cemento-enamel junction relative to the length of the root.

Gingival recession occurs secondary to bone loss. Recession is the exposure of the root surface caused by a shift in the position of the gingiva toward the root. Recession may be visible where the root is clinically observable, or hidden where the root is covered by minimally adhered gingiva. Hidden recession can be measured by inserting a probe down to the level of epithelial attachment and/or by evaluating radiographs. Oronasal fistulas result from periodontal disease of the maxillary teeth, resulting in communication between the oral and nasal cavities. In cases of oronasal fistulas, a periodontal probe will usually extend from the oral cavity through the nasal cavity. Most commonly, the maxillary canine teeth are affected. Clinical signs include sneezing and nasal discharge, which is sometimes blood tinged.

Stage 3 (PD 3): Moderate periodontitis - 25-50% of attachment loss, as measured either by probing of the clinical attachment level, or by radiographic determination of the distance of the alveolar margin from the cemento-enamel junction relative to the length of the root, or there is a Stage 2 furcation involvement in multirooted teeth. Stage 4 (PD 4): Advanced periodontitis - more than 50% of attachment loss, as measured either by probing of the clinical attachment level, or radiographic determination of the distance of the alveolar margin from the cemento-enamel junction relative to the length of the root, or there is a Stage 3 furcation involvement in multirooted teeth.

Gingivitis.

Photo courtesy of Dr. Jan Bellows

Gingivitis vs. Periodontitis

Understanding the difference between gingivitis and periodontitis is critical when formulating a treatment plan. Gingivitis is an inflammatory syndrome affecting the soft tissue. Gingivitis does not clinically extend into the alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, or cementum. Periodontitis, on the other hand, is an inflammation involving the periodontal ligament, the alveolar bone, and the cementum. Periodontitis is present once bone loss occurs; all cases of periodontitis start with gingivitis. The distinction between gingivitis and periodontitis is important because gingivitis is considered curable with teeth cleaning and home care, whereas periodontitis is merely considered controllable and progressive.

Furcation invasions occur secondary to periodontal disease. The furcation is the area between the roots of a multirooted tooth, formed where the roots begin to separate at the floor of the trunk. Normally, this area is sealed off from the oral environment by the gingival attachment. The area of bifurcation or trifurcation is exposed when periodontal disease causes bone loss. When left untreated and allowed to progress, the furcation invasion may result in tooth loss. There are three clinical furcation classifications distinguished by the use of an explorer probe. Furcation involvement/exposure definitions • Stage 1 (F1, furcation involvement) exists when a periodontal probe extends less than halfway under the crown, in any direction of a multirooted tooth, with attachment loss. • Stage 2 (F2, furcation involvement) exists when a periodontal probe extends greater than halfway under the crown of a multirooted tooth with attachment loss, but not through and through.

There are four stages of periodontal disease that are clinically recognizable. The degree of severity of periodontal disease relates to a single tooth; a patient may have teeth that have different stages of periodontal disease. Normal (PD 0): Clinically normal - no gingival inflammation or periodontitis clinically evident. Stage 1 (PD 1): Gingivitis only without attachment loss. The height and architecture of the alveolar margin are normal.

8 mm probing depth around a dog’s canine tooth affected with advanced periodontal disease, extraction is indicated. Photo courtesy of Dr. Jan Bellows

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other than axial, over a distance of more than 0.5 mm and up to 1.0 mm. • Stage 3 (M3) The mobility is increased in any direction, other than axial, over a distance exceeding 1.0 mm or any axial movement. Radiographs are helpful when identifying furcation involvement. The slightest radiographic change in the furcation area should be investigated clinically. Diminished radiodensity in the furcation area suggests furcation involvement.

The importance of intraoral radiology

Intraoral radiography supplies valuable information to the veterinarian, when evaluating the tooth’s support structure. Radiographic examination is crucial in all cases of periodontal disease. Gingivitis- Clinically, the gingiva appears swollen and inflamed. In Stage 1 disease, no bone loss has occurred yet, and dental radiographs appear normal. F3 furcation in a cat’s left maxillary fourth premolar. Photo courtesy of Dr. Jan Bellows

Early periodontitis- Stage 2 disease indicates early periodontitis and signifies the first appearance of radiographic abnormalities. The earliest radiographic sign of periodontitis shows a loss of definition of the crestal bone. The alveolar crest loses its distinct, sharp appearance and becomes blunted. The bony margin becomes diffuse and irregular, and may demonstrate areas of localized erosion. In the incisor regions, there will be a blunting of the alveolar crests. Moderate periodontitis- Stage 3 periodontal disease is typified by pocket formation. Radiographically, the bony destruction extends to the alveolar bony plate. There may also be horizontal or vertical defects. Horizontal bone loss is used to describe the radiographic appearance of the loss of bone height in the region of several adjacent teeth. Vertical bone defects are also called “intrabony defects.” This defect extends from the alveolar crest, and is surrounded by either one, two, or three walls of bone.

F3 furcation exposure affecting a dog’s right first molar. Photo courtesy of Dr. Jan Bellows

Advanced periodontitis- Deep pockets represent advanced periodontal lesions typified by Stage 4 periodontal disease, tooth mobility, gingival bleeding, and pustular discharge. Bone loss is extensive.

Steps of professional teeth cleaning • Stage 3 (F3, furcation exposure) exists when a periodontal probe extends under the crown of a multirooted tooth, through and through from one side of the furcation out the other. Tooth mobility • Stage 0 (M0) Physiologic mobility up to 0.2 mm. • Stage 1 (M1) The mobility is increased in any direction other than axial over a distance of more than 0.2 mm and up to 0.5 mm. • Stage 2 (M2) The mobility is increased in any direction

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In the long run, no other procedure performed on small animals does more to help patients than periodic teeth cleaning and aftercare. The dental visit for cleaning, however, must be performed in a methodical manner. All 12 of the following steps are important and interlinked. When one step is not performed, long-term benefit to the patient suffers. 1. Conscious oral evaluation 2. Anesthetized intraoral radiography 3. Teeth scaling 4. Crown polishing 5. Periodontal probing 6. Subgingival irrigation


Periodontal Therapy at a Glance

7. Periodontal therapy or extractions 8. +/- antibiotic therapy 9. Antiplaque sealant application 10. Oral mass biopsies 11. Anesthesia recovery 12. Home care education

LESION

APPEARANCE

Stage 1 Gingivitis

Plaque/calculus at gumline inflammation

Under anesthesia removal of supra and subgingival calculus, irrigation, full mouth radiographs charting, home care instructions, set follow-up

Stage 2 Early Periodontitis

< 25% support loss

Same as above, +/instillation of local antimicrobials into cleaned pockets

Stage 3 Moderate Periodontitis

25-50% support loss

Same as above, plus root planing in pockets

Stage 4 Advanced Periodontitis

>50% support loss

Same as above, plus curettage and surgery to either save the tooth through flaps, guided tissue regeneration, or extraction

Oronasal Fistula

Communication between the mouth and nasal cavity (some animals will have a nasal discharge)

Extraction of the affected tooth, plus closure of defect with single or double flap technique, without tension on the suture line

Furcation Invasions

Gingival recession to exposure of a void at the area where the roots bifurcate or trifurcate

If the furcation is exposed on both ends (buccal and lingual/palatal), extraction is indicated

Marked Gingival Recession

Greater than 50% of the root exposed

Perform either intraoral radiographs to confirm extraction or advanced periodontal surgery

Medical vs. surgical therapy

• Grade 1 gingival and Grade 2 periodontal disease can be treated non-surgically. Once the teeth are cleaned, polished, fluoridated, and home care rigidly followed, gingivitis will recede, returning the gingiva to normal appearance and function. • Grade 3 periodontal disease may require some surgical care, based on the amount of attachment loss. If the periodontal probe depth is not greater than 5 mm, often the tooth root can be cleaned thoroughly with hand instruments and/or special ultrasonic scaler tips for subgingival use.  Root planing- When calculus is removed from the root surface, the cementum is often left rough. Root surfaces exposed to periodontal disease is covered with bacterial plaque and endotoxins. Root planing will smooth these roughened surfaces by shaving the root surface down with a curette. Obviously, smooth surfaces are easier to keep clean than rough ones. The smooth surface will also adapt easier to the cleaned pocket, thus reducing the pocket depth.  Subgingival curettage involves removing the lining of the periodontal pocket as well as damaged tissue. Subgingival curettage is performed with curettes, following plaque and calculus removal.  Scaling, root planing, and curettage can be quite effective as definitive treatments in cases of periodontal disease that have a slight amount of tissue destruction, particularly where there is pocketing of 4-6 mm. The combination of tissue shrinkage, connective tissue remodeling, and gain of soft tissue attachment makes these procedures viable options.  Instillation of Clindoral® or Doxirobe®, in areas of Stage 2-3 support loss has been shown to decrease pocket depths.

TREATMENT

• Grade 4 periodontal disease requires surgical careextraction.

Jan Bellows, DVM, DAVDC, DABVP (Canine and Feline) Dr. Jan Bellows received his undergraduate training at the University of Florida and his Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Auburn University. After completing a small animal internship at The Animal Medical Center in New York City, he returned to South Florida where he still practices companion animal medicine surgery and dentistry at All Pets Dental in Weston, Florida. He is certified by the Board of Veterinary Practitioners (canine and feline) since 1986 and American Veterinary Dental College (AVDC) since 1990. He was president of the AVDC from 2012-2014 and is currently president of the Foundation for Veterinary Dentistry. Dr. Bellows’ veterinary dentistry accomplishments include authoring four dental texts: The Practice of Veterinary Dentistry …. A team effort (1999); Small Animal Dental Equipment, Materials, and Techniques (2005, second edition 2019); and Feline Dentistry (2010). He is a frequent contributor to DVM Newsmagazine and a charter consultant of Veterinary Information Network’s (VIN) dental board since 1993. He was also chosen as one of the dental experts to formulate AAHA’s Small Animal Dental Guidelines, published in 2005 and updated in 2013 and 2019.

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FVMA LEGISLATIVE CHAIR'S MID-SESSION REPORT By Dr. Richard B. Williams

Our 2020 FVMA delegates inside the state Capitol building

At the midway point of the 2020 Florida legislative session, the FVMA continues to monitor nearly 40 different bills relating to the veterinary medical profession, animal welfare, student loans, and appropriations. Two of these bills have been the major focus of the FVMA Legislative Committee and Executive Board for the past several weeks. The first of these bills is Senate Bill 366/House Bill 1015. The FVMA introduced this bill in both the Senate and the House of Representatives these past several years. The bill is meant to address deficiencies in the “Practice Act” as to what constitutes a valid client/patient relationship, and establish a definition of a physical examination. Unfortunately, the House has refused to allow our bill to move forward, as they believe it could be restrictive to unregulated telemedicine, which they seek. Thus,

10  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

we are once again at a stalemate with leadership this year, and we have been told our bill will “go nowhere.” The next bill is one which the FVMA strongly opposed as originally written. SB1044/HB621 (commonly referred to as “Allie’s Law”) is an anti-animal cruelty bill involving only dogs and cats. It was presented to us as a simple bill that every veterinarian in the state should support, and it had many co-sponsors in both the House and Senate. Unfortunately, Allie’s Law was not that simple. It was found to be a bill which required mandatory reporting of animal cruelty, without reporter protection for the veterinarian. It also required that the veterinarian either report without direct knowledge of actual abuse, or that the veterinarian contact individuals suspected of abuse and require them to have their pet examined within 24 hours. This places our veterinarians in a


this year. The FVMA’s position on declawing is identical to the AVMA’s policy, which was just revised in January, 2020. While the declawing of cats should be discouraged as an elective procedure, the AVMA and FVMA “acknowledge the veterinarian’s right to use professional judgement when deciding how to best protect their individual patients’ health and welfare.” Richard B. Williams, DVM FVMA Legislative Chair

potentially dangerous situation. That was not something we could support for Florida veterinarians. Thus, at our Legislative Action Days this past January, the FVMA mounted a vigorous campaign of opposition to the bill. We met with both the House and Senate sponsors to directly relay our concerns about these bills. More than 40 of our FVMA delegates met with the senators and representatives of their respective districts to explain our opposition. We were asked to develop alternative language, which we presented to both sponsors within a week, and are presently working to keep veterinary professionals anonymous in public records when reporting animal cruelty. Thanks to our efforts, the Senate bill has been amended to strike all objectionable language. The House bill, which has not been amended, is not scheduled to be heard in any committees. Rest assured, we will continue to monitor these two bills very closely.

FVMA Delegates preparing to meet with senators and representatives from their respective districts, fighting on behalf of the Florida veterinary medical profession

One final bill we are watching, although it doesn’t appear it will move to a vote, this year, is the “Ban on Declawing Cats,” which has been introduced in the Senate (SB48). No companion bill was filed in the House, so it should not be able to go anywhere,

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13

th ANNUAL

Dr. Harvey Rubin

Memorial Food Animal Veterinary Medical Conference

March 21-22, 2020 Register by March 6 and save!

 15 CE credits  $225 pre-registration (includes two lunches and a steak dinner)  $250 on-site registration (no meal tickets guaranteed)  FREE for CVM Students (pre-registration is required) The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Animal Industry; pharmaceutical and animal food industry partners; and the Florida Veterinary Medical Association invite you to attend the 13th Annual Dr. Harvey Rubin Memorial Food Animal Veterinary Medical Conference. Our program provides 15 hours of continuing education obtained through quality food animal informational lectures presented by specialists in the field of food animal veterinary medicine.

12  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

We invite you to enjoy the steak dinner Saturday evening that also features native Southern foods, compliments of our industry partners. Without their support, we could not bring you this high-quality continuing education program. To register, call the FVMA toll-free at 800.992.3862 or visit the FVMA website at www.fvma.org. On-site registration begins at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 21 at the Osceola County Extension Building in Kissimmee, Florida.


SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

Registration Desk Hours

Saturday, March 21, 2020 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday, March 22, 2020 7:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m

AGENDA*

Saturday, March 21, 2020 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Introductions & Welcome – Dr. Lisa Conti, FDACS FDACS/Bronson Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab Update – Dr. Michael Short, FDACS, DAI 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m. USDA Update – USDA-APHIS-VS 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch (subs and wraps, plus snacks) FVMA Welcome – Dr. Mary Smart, FVMA President UFCVM Update – UFCVM 1:10 p.m. – 2:50 p.m. FL Laws & Rules Governing the Practice of Veterinary Medicine – Edwin Bayó, Esq. 3:10 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Dispensing Legend Drugs – Edwin Bayó, Esq. 4:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m. Biocontainment – Disease Control in the High-risk Stocker – Dr. Che Trejo, Zoetis 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Social Hour and Hotel Check-in 6:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Steak Dinner Served at FCA Headquarters 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. FCA Welcome – Matt Pearce, Florida Cattlemen’s Association

EVENT LOCATIONS Osceola County Extension Building (next to the Silver Spurs Arena) 1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane Kissimmee, FL 34744 Florida Cattlemen’s Association 800 Shakerag Road Kissimmee, FL 34744 (Saturday’s Social Hour, Dinner, Cases & Roundtable Events)

Verification and Marketing Programs - Opportunities and the Future - WhereFoodComesFrom.com team

Sunday, March 22, 2020 8:00 a.m. – 8:10 a.m. 8:10 a.m. –9:00 a.m.

Welcome/ Housekeeping

9:00 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine

Trace Minerals Effect on Bovine Immune System

– Dr. Roberto Palomares,

Rumen Function – The Healthy Rumen – Dr. T.G. Nagaraja, Kansas State University

Break 10:10 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Rumen Dysfunction – Dr. T.G. Nagaraja, Kansas State University 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m. Reproductive Synchronization: Putting it all Together – Dr. Stephen Foulke – Boehringer Ingelheim 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Lunch (pizza and snacks) Electronic Options, Compliance – Dr. Diane Kitchen, FDACS, DAI New Bio-tech Spotlight - Cattle Immune Health Testing – Nano Discovery Inc. 1:30 p.m. – 2:20 p.m. Accreditation Module 2 – Role of Agencies and Animal Movement Forms – USDA, APHIS, VS Break 2:40 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Accreditation Module 31 – High-impact Equine Diseases in the U.S. – USDA, APHIS, VS

Sponsors LARCH HILL

Laboratory

Additional support provided by

*Preliminary program subject to change.

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IT'S NOT TOO LATE TO REGISTER! www.eventscribe.com/2020/FVMA-Annual

FEATURED SPEAKERS

300 HOURS OF STIMULATING, QUALITY CONTINUING EDUCATION

MARK ACIERNO

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DVM, DACVIM (SAIM, ONCOLOGY)

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LENORE BACEK

DVM, PH.D., DABVP, DACVP

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DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS • DR. RANDY BASINGER • EDWIN BAYÓ, ESQ. • DR. SØREN BOYSEN • DR. KELLY BRADY • MEGAN BRASHEAR, BS, RVT, VTS (ECC) • DR. ANDREW BUGBEE • DR. JEB CADE • DR. SERGE CHALHOUB

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AMARA ESTRADA

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GARY NORSWORTHY

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MICHAEL D. WILLARD

DVM, MS, DACVIM-SA

ERIC GARCIA

LORE HAUG

DVM, MS, DACVB

R. MICHAEL PEAK

DVM, DAVDC

MICHAEL WONG

DVM, DACVIM (NEUROLOGY)

• DR. BREE MONTANA • REBECCA “BECKIE” MOSSOR, RVT • CORT NORTON, CVT • JEANNE PERRONE, CVT, VTS (DENTISTRY) • DR. ALEXANDRIA POLLES • DR. PHILIP RICHMOND • DENISE S. ROLLINGS, CVT, VTS (DENTISTRY) • DR. ALFREDO ROMERO

SHEILAH ROBERTSON

BVMS (HONS), PH.D., DACVAA, DECVAA, DACAW, DECAWBM (WSEL), CVA, MRCVS

TONY M. WOODWARD

DVM, DAVDC

• DR. SCOTT SECREST • DR. JAMIE STAHL • DR. JOHN THOMASON • DR. KENNETH R. WALLER III • DR. STUART WALTON • DR. LINK WELBORN

C ON T I N U I NG E D U C A T I O N C R E DI T This program has been approved by:  American Association of Veterinary State Boards RACE, Provider #532  Sponsor of Continuing Education in New York State  Florida Board of Veterinary Medicine, DBPR FVMA Provider #0001682

This program 532-39371 has been approved for 267 hours of continuing education credit for veterinarians in jurisdictions that recognize RACE approval with 31 maximum hours available to an individual veterinarian attendee. This program has been approved for 124 hours of continuing education credit for veterinary technicians in jurisdictions that recognize RACE approval with 19 maximum hours available to an individual veterinary technician attendee.

VISIT WWW.FVMA.ORG FOR MORE DETAILS | EMAIL: INFO@FVMA.ORG | PHO


WET LABS

BUILDING THE DYNAMIC VETERINARY TEAM • Feline Extraction Techniques • Canine Extraction Techniques • Difficult Extractions and Retrieval of Fractured Root Tips • Dental Radiology Positioning & Techniques • Dental Nerve Blocks, Cleaning, Probing & Charting • Ophthalmic Surgery • Basic Small Animal Abdominal Ultrasound SOLD OUT

• Advanced Small Animal Abdominal Ultrasound • Medial Patella Luxation SOLD OUT • Cranial Cruciate With OrthoZip • Veterinary Point-of-care Ultrasound for Everyday Practice SOLD OUT • The Great Endoscopy Adventure (A.M. and P.M. sessions) • Five-minute, Five-dollar Tests: “Specialist” Diagnostic Techniques That Are Actually Easy and Inexpensive

RESORT & VENUE INFORMATION HILTON ORLANDO BONNET CREEK 14100 BONNET CREEK RESORT LANE, ORLANDO, FL 32821 P: 888.353.2013 • FVMA Special Rates: Starting at $235, plus taxes • Group rate extended stay three days pre- and post-conference, based on availability.

WALDORF ASTORIA ORLANDO

14200 BONNET CREEK RESORT LANE, ORLANDO, FL 32821 P: 888.353.2009 • FVMA Special Rates: Starting at $285, plus taxes • Group rate extended stay three days pre- and post-conference, based on availability. All room rates quoted above are exclusive of applicable resort fees. There is an optional daily resort fee at the individual guest’s discretion. The resort fee is $45.00 per night, per room. Applicable state and local taxes will be posted to all guest rooms. The optional resort fee covers the following items, services and amenities: • Kids meals deals and discounts. • Free golf club rental after 2 p.m. • Lazy river tubes and cabana • Daily water (two bottles). • Unlimited in-room local and 1-800 discount. • Access to golf club practice facilities. calls.

DISCOUNTED RATES HONORED UNTIL SOLD OUT.

RESERVE YOUR ROOM TODAY!

ONE: 800.992.3862 OR 407.851.3862 | FAX: 407.240.3710 | REGISTER NOW!


EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS, SO WHY THE RESERVATIONS? RECOGNIZING THE SIGNS OF HIGH-FUNCTIONING ANXIETY IN YOUR WORKPLACE, AND HOW TO HELP THOSE WHO NEED IT. Ian Dembling, FVMA Communications Specialist Introduction You may have someone working at your practice whom you admire for their work ethic, their punctuality, even their overenthusiasm about mundane job responsibilities. Secretly, however, this employee is struggling to accept his/herself, or the job s/he is doing as “good enough.” This person is overwhelmed by the continuous workload management puts on him/her every day, while, at the same time, is fearful of how “well-liked” s/he is by those same managers. This employee could be struggling with high-functioning anxiety, and, whether you realize it or not, it’s severely affecting his/her life, both at work, and once s/he clocks out for the day.

Our mission

As a nonprofit organization aimed at assisting those in the veterinary profession, we here at the FVMA make an effort to spotlight issues regarding mental health, wellness and well-being. Our goal is to educate and protect those in this business from burning out, and provide resources to help them be successful in their veterinary careers. It’s important to remember mental health issues are unseen battles. Your employees and coworkers may be making a vigorous effort to hide their emotions in order to not appear weak or incapable – an added burden in an already intense profession.

High-functioning anxiety

High-functioning anxiety is not a “real” medical diagnosis, but a self-appointed term. According to psychiatric professors and members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, this undiagnosed condition may exist because those with high-functioning anxiety are too anxious to receive an official diagnosis. A recent report from the ADAA estimates that 15 million Americans (about 6.8 percent of the U.S. population) have a social anxiety disorder (SAD). Another survey from the ADAA found that 36% of those with social anxiety refused to

16  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

seek help, despite struggling with these symptoms for 10 or more years. Often, those with high-functioning anxiety "grin and bear it," while their mental health goes untreated. This propensity to hide the issue can lead to it going unrecognized even by family, friends, and, most especially, bosses. If someone in your office struggles with high-functioning anxiety, understand that whenever you show dissatisfaction on an assigned task, this employee is likely living with an unrelenting dread that you believe s/he is "incompetent" or "weak".

It’s affecting the veterinary profession each day

Veterinarians and staff members alike feel the effects of highfunctioning anxiety the most when plans go off course. This used to be a common problem for the FVMA's Professional Wellness and Well-being Committee Chair, Dr. Phillip Richmond. “I had explanations in my mind about how it might all end up – with me losing my job by the end of my brain’s mental gymnastics routine,” he says. “Sometimes, I just couldn’t get a case, or something someone said, out of my head. This would often lead to me not being able to be fully present, which in turn led to more opportunities for my irrational thinking to take hold.” As more and more professionals in the veterinary field began openly expressing these concerns, the FVMA and AVMA began offering resources for those struggling in the veterinary profession. The FVMA now has an entire section on our website (www. fvma.org) dedicated to providing resources for those struggling with a mental health condition. We also work to add a mental health article, such as this one, in each issue of The Advocate. If you would like to contribute, or share a personal experience you


think could help others in the veterinary community, feel free to reach out to us over email (info@fvma.org) or through one of our social media platforms (Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter).

These team challenges can include, but aren’t limited to, the following activities:

“There are tools to help challenge those thoughts and see them for what they are,” Dr. Richmond says, “My mind is a much calmer place to hang out, now.”

Incentives for team-building challenges may include movie passes, gift cards, trophies, extra vacation days, a donation to the winner’s charity of choice, or a picture of the winning team/individual on the practice’s bulletin board or social media channels (granted all winners are comfortable with you doing so).

How managers can combat this growing issue

Here are some strategies managers can use in the workplace to help anyone secretly struggling with high-functioning anxiety. • Be Understanding: Don’t assume mental health disorders are not in your workplace, or that whomever you’re speaking to isn’t struggling. • Be Proactive: Educate those in your workplace about different types of mental health disorders, so that each person in the office treats everyone with kindness and respect. • Be Resourceful: Promote the resources your company already has available to those who may need additional assistance outside of work hours. • Be Aware: Individually reach out to those who are not already utilizing these resources and make sure they know how much they are appreciated for the job they do at your company. Remind them you're always willing to listen, if there's anything they need to share with you. • Be Mindful: Some people may need altered work conditions in order to achieve the success you are looking for. These accommodations include, but aren’t limited to: modified workspaces, flexible schedules, or permission for additional breaks throughout the work day. • Be Empathetic: Realize that mistakes will happen on the job, and if someone seems genuinely upset about a mistake they made, reach out to them individually to remind them of their worth and past accomplishments.

• Capturing the best or funniest pictures of a patient. • Contests to see who can prepare the cleanest exam room. • Coming up with the funniest animal-related jokes. • Recognizing team members who go above and beyond, or who always make you smile.

Conclusion

While no one may ever be cured of anxiety, a more open environment to discuss struggles and a greater recognition of those doing an above-average job can lead to a better dialogue between all employees, as they work toward the same goals. People with high-functioning anxiety aren’t looking for special treatment, but instead want understanding, respect for their work ethic, and resources to be the best veterinary professional they can be. If you or someone you know is suicidal or in emotional distress, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1.800.273.8255. Trained crisis workers are available to talk 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Your confidential and toll-free call goes to the nearest crisis center in the Lifeline national network. These centers provide crisis counseling and mental health referrals.

Additional Reading:

Managers looking to help their employees see their own strengths should consider turning stale meetings into team-building opportunities and creating more incentives for jobs well done (as opposed to fear of punishment for imperfections). In teambuilding challenges, the objective is to help everyone realize that the entire office is working towards the same ultimate goals, and that each person, regardless of one's job title, brings his/her own strengths to the team.

WWW.FVMA.ORG |

https://adaa.org/about-adaa/ press-room/facts-statistics https://www.avma.org/javmanews/2016-05-01/studies-confirm-poor-well-being-veterinary-professionals-students https://www.avma.org/ resources-tools/wellbeing https://www.avma.org/ resources/wellbeing/settingworkplace-wellbeingprogramhttps://www. avma.org/sites/default/ files/resources/AVMATeam-BuildingActivities.pdf

THE FVMA |

@FLORIDAVMA |

@FLORIDA_VMA |  17


SAVE THE DATE

16 ANNUAL th

PROMOTING EXCELLENCE

SYMPOSIUM

OCTOBER 8-11, 2020

SAWGRASS MARRIOTT GOLF RESORT & SPA, PONTE VEDRA BEACH, FLORIDA

PES 2020 OFFERSâ&#x20AC;¦

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7207 MONETARY DRIVE, ORLANDO, FL 32809 | PH: 800.992.3862 | FAX: 407.240.3710 | EMAIL: INFO@FVMA.ORG

FLORIDAAEP |

@FLORIDAVMA |

@FLORIDA_VMA |

WWW.FAEP.NET


To all our veterinarian and affiliate members, I am excited to serve as your new director of membership and certification at the Florida Veterinary Medical Association (FVMA). Having previous association experience, I understand how crucial our role is to all of you, and how we can strive to make your jobs easier. The work of our association is to provide its members with professional tools and support, to offer world-class continuing education, and to fight for the well-being of all veterinary professionals and animals. I am passionate about this role and will work every day to advance this profession. Your FVMA team is always looking to enhance your benefits and provide more communication to you throughout the year. We will be rolling out several new benefits. Our first will be a monthly legislative/regulatory update. This update will keep you posted on what is happening at the state Capitol, provide an overview of bills we are monitoring, and discuss new regulations and issues that affect the veterinary profession at the local level. We will keep you informed about how we are supporting you and this amazing profession through our year-round advocacy program.

The FVMA thrives because of our members' support. We are recognized as a national leader, expert, and advocate for the veterinary profession. We appreciate your continued membership and engagement. The support that we have received has made us a successful association since 1928, and we will continue to work for the advancement of this profession for many more years to come. Renew your membership by March 31st, so we can continue to provide you with discounted rates for continuing education offerings, and fight for legislation that protects veterinary medicine and makes a positive impact on what you do. Please encourage your colleagues who have not yet joined to become members or affiliate members of the FVMA. We need everyone involved in fulfilling our mission: to advance the veterinary medical profession, promote animal health and well-being, and protect public health.

— Brandon Wilson FVMA Director of Membership & Certification

Another of our goals is to expand the membership and benefits of our affiliate groups. The FVMA’s new Team Member Engagement Specialist, Tammy Borden, is leading this endeavor to make the affiliate membership program more robust. We aim to streamline the program, grow the overall membership, and build a stronger relationship with all team members in this profession.

WWW.FVMA.ORG |

THE FVMA |

@FLORIDAVMA |

@FLORIDA_VMA |  19


REMINDER - MAY 31, 2020

LICENSE RENEWAL DEADLINE

IS FAST APPROACHING

Veterinarians in Florida must complete a minimum of 30 hours of CE every two years to renew their licenses. The deadline for acquiring required CE hours this year is May 31, 2020. The guide for required continuing education needed by Florida veterinarians for licensure purposes is Rule Chapter 61G18-16, Florida Administrative Code of Chapter 474, Florida Statutes. This rule directs that licensed veterinarians must renew their licenses every two years in the even-numbered year. The last renewal date was June 1, 2018. The next renewal date is June 1, 2020.

Other Important Guidance From 61G18-16.002 F.A.S. •

One hour of CE equals a minimum of fifty (50) minutes and a maximum of sixty (60) minutes. Total hours of lecture time cannot be added up and divided by 50 minutes to obtain one (1) hour credit for each 50-minute interval.

Computer online programs that involve online, real time, live or delayed participatory questioning or responses are not correspondence courses.

Five hours of CE in laws and rules may be obtained once during the biennium by attending a full day or eight hours of a Board of Veterinary Medicine meeting where disciplinary hearings are conducted by the board. The attendee must sign in with the executive director of the board or designee before the meeting begins; must remain in continuous attendance; must sign out with the executive director of the board or designee at the end of the meeting day or at a time earlier as affirmatively authorized by the board. A licensee may receive continuing education credit for attending the Board meeting only if he or she is attending solely for the purpose of obtaining CE.

Licensees must retain certifications of attendance or provider verification documenting completion of continuing education for a period of not less than three years from the date the course was taken.

Failure to comply with the continuing professional education requirements shall prohibit license renewal and result in delinquent status at the end of the biennium.

61G18-16 of the Florida Administrative Code specifies how many hours of particular CE-earning modalities are acceptable, as well as the types and categories of CE veterinarians may pursue in the biennium in order to be licensed for the succeeding period. It goes on to define the standards that must be upheld and adhered to by continuing education providers.

Requirements for Active Status License Renewal in Florida

61G18-16.002 Continuing Education Requirements for Active Status License Renewal (1) reads: “All licensed veterinarians shall be required to obtain continuing professional education which contributes to the advancement, extension or enhancement of professional skills and knowledge in the field of veterinary medicine.” The CE requirements contained therein include: • Completion of 30 hours of continuing professional education in veterinary medicine every two years. • No less than one hour of CE must be in the area of dispensing legend drugs. • No less than two hours of CE must be in the area of the laws and rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine as contained in Chapters 455 and 474, Florida Statutes, and Rule Title 61G18, F.A.C. • Not more than fifteen hours can be non-interactive, correspondence courses. • Not more than five hours in complementary and alternative medicine modalities.

Visit fvma.org for more information on the FVMA Combined Three-hour Online Course!

20  |  FVMA ADVOCATE


FVMA’s VETERINARY CLINIC INSPECTION

CHECKLIST

IMPORTANT NOTICE – If you are unable to check any box on this Inspection Checklist, you need to IMMEDIATELY address that area so your establishment can pass an unannounced state inspection. Call the FVMA toll-free at 800.992.3862 with questions. This inspection checklist is provided as a service to FVMA members. This document is a useful tool to help our members prepare their establishments for an unannounced inspection. For additional information on the state inspection rules and regulations, contact the state Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Division of Regulation at 850.487.1395, or contact the FVMA toll-free at 800.992.3862 or visit our website at www.fvma.org.

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS

FACILITIES/EQUIPMENT FOR IMMEDIATE RESUSCITATIVE CARE

PREMISES REQUIREMENTS (MANDATORY) Exterior

FACILITY REQUIREMENTS

Veterinarian(s) at this establishment possesses a current, active Florida license This establishment has a current, valid premises permit License(s) of each veterinarian(s) is conspicuously displayed This establishment’s valid premise permit is conspicuously displayed This establishment does not employ unlicensed person(s) in the practice of veterinary medicine Exterior signs legible and easily identifies location Facility is clean and in good repair Emergency care telephone number is visible and easily seen from exterior Grounds are clean and orderly

Interior

Restroom(s) is clean and orderly Office is clean and orderly Emergency telephone answering service is available 24 hours a day

Examination Room

Examination area is clean and orderly Lined waste receptacles are in all exam rooms Disposable towels and sink are available (sink in the restroom is not acceptable) Examination table is constructed of smooth impervious material

Pharmacy

Area and equipment are clean and orderly Sterile instruments, drapes, caps and masks Operating table appropriate for proposed use and constructed of smooth and impervious material Oxygen and equipment are available for immediate use Anesthesia equipment Holding areas capable of sanitation/proper ventilation/sufficient lighting/size consistent with welfare of animal Sanitary cans lined with disposable bags Effective insect and rodent control Carcass disposal meeting local sanitary codes Emergency lighting which includes at minimum, a functioning rechargeable battery-operated light Fire extinguisher with current annual inspection tag Refrigeration to store drugs, biologicals, lab samples, reagents and other perishable items Handling and disposal of biohazardous waste in accordance with Rule 64E-16, Florida Administrative Code [61G18-15.002(2)(a)15.] Veterinarians must furnish clients with permanent address for obtaining medical records

FACILITIES FOR RADIOLOGY OR OUTSIDE SERVICE

Clean and orderly pharmacy area X-ray machine; 100 MA minimum Blood storage or donor is available Developing tanks Accurate controlled substances log Monitoring of exposure of personnel to radiation required Accurate patient medical records FACITILITES FOR SURGERY OR OUTSIDE SERVICE If controlled substances are on the premises, a locking, secure cabinet for storage Must be clean and orderly DEA certificate kept on premises Sterilization of surgical equipment by autoclave or gas method Segregated area for storage of expired drugs Operating table appropriate for use and constructed of smooth, impervious Disposable needles and syringes surface All drugs stored on the premises are properly labeled with drug name, strength, Well lighted and expiration date Oxygen and equipment for its administration All drugs are properly labeled and dispensed in child-proof containers unless HOSPITAL WARDS OR OUTSIDE SERVICE otherwise requested in writing Area must be clean and orderly MEDICAL RECORDS Holding area(s) size must be consistent with the welfare of the animal Medical records as required by 61G18-18.002 Florida Administrative Code Well lighted [61G18-15.002(2)(a)6.] Proper ventilation

LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Microscope Centrifuge

ON PREMISES OR CONTRACT MANDATORY

Urinalysis equipment or outside lab available Hematology facilities or outside lab available Blood chemistry or outside lab available Microbiological capability or outside lab available

OPTIONAL ITEMS REQUIRING INSPECTION Reception area is free from hazards Grooming area is clean and orderly Kitchen/food area is sanitary

EXERCISE RUNS (OPTIONAL)

Clean and secure No hazards


PRACTICE GOT A QUESTION? THE FVMA CAN HELP.

One of the benefits of an FVMA membership is our Helpline (800.992.3862), which is available to members Monday through Friday from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Our Helpline also provides insight to the FVMA staff of the challenges and concerns of our members. In this feature, we will highlight topics from the questions we received in preceding weeks as a part of an effort to keep our members up to date on current concerns, as well as regulatory and legislative changes.

QUESTION: A stray puppy was brought in without a microchip.

The puppy was hit by a car and suffered severe injuries, including a shattered pelvis and broken rear legs. We are looking through local websites and nobody seems to have placed an ad saying "Lost Dog." At what point can we claim, and start working on, this dog legally? A: The statue (Good Samaritan Act) allows the treatment of this puppy under these circumstances:

Section 768.13(3), F.S. (Good Samaritan Act) (3)  Any person, including those licensed to practice veterinary medicine, who gratuitously and in good faith renders emergency care or treatment to an injured animal at the scene of an emergency on or adjacent to a roadway shall not be held liable for any civil damages as a result of such care or treatment or as a result of any act or failure to act in providing or arranging further medical treatment where the person acts as an ordinary reasonably prudent person would have acted under the same or similar circumstances. If the veterinarian is acting in good faith and with due care to TREAT the animal, then the veterinarian is on firm, legal ground. The veterinarian would not have the right to insist on payment from the owner, but would not be liable to the owner for treating the animal without prior authorization. Furthermore, the law below would allow the veterinarian to humanely euthanize an animal in a similar scenario. 828.05  Killing an injured or diseased domestic animal. (1) The purpose of this section is to provide a swift and merciful means whereby domestic animals which are suffering from an incurable or untreatable condition or are imminently near death from injury or disease may be destroyed without unconscionable delay and in a humane and proficient manner. (2) As used in this section, the term “officer” means: (a) Any law enforcement officer; (b) Any veterinarian; and (c) Any officer or agent of any municipal or county animal control unit or of any society or association for the prevention of cruelty to animals, or the designee of such an officer or agent. (3) Whenever any domestic animal is so injured or diseased as to appear useless and is suffering, and it reasonably appears to an officer that such animal is imminently near death or cannot be cured or rendered fit for service and the officer has made a reasonable and concerted, but unsuccessful, effort to locate the owner, the owner’s agent, or a veterinarian, then such officer, acting in good faith and upon reasonable belief, may immediately destroy such animal by shooting the animal or injecting it with a barbiturate drug. If the officer locates the owner or the owner’s agent, the officer shall notify him or her of the animal’s location and condition. If the officer locates

22  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

only a veterinarian, the officer shall destroy the animal only upon the advice of the veterinarian. However, this section does not prohibit an owner from destroying his or her own domestic animal in a humane and proficient manner when the conditions described in this section exist. (4) No officer or veterinarian acting in good faith and with due care pursuant to this section will be liable either criminally or civilly for such act, nor will any civil or criminal liability attach to the employer of the officer or veterinarian. (5) A court order is not necessary to carry out the provisions of this section.

QUESTION: Where would I go to report someone practicing veterinary medicine without a license? A: To file a complaint regarding unlicensed practice, you must contact the Board of Veterinary Medicine (BVM) at the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. Complaints should be made online via the department's website. You may also call to speak to a customer service agent, or write: Board of Veterinary Medicine Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation 2601 Blair Stone Road Tallahassee, FL 32399 Telephone: 850-487-1395 You can file your complaint online at: https://www.myfloridalicense. com/entercomplaint.asp?SID=; or get more information by emailing them from their website at: http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/contact-us/.

QUESTION: After reading the email from the FVMA about HCCE permits, I am still unsure if I need to continue to have one. The email referred to DVMs practicing as professional associations or LLCs. I have an S-corp. Do I still need an HCCE permit? A: If you are the only veterinarian in your practice, you do not need

an HCCE permit. Also, in this scenario, you are allowed to purchase drugs, and pay for them with your company check. For your reference, here are our guidelines on the HCCE we were able to procure from the DBPR and the Florida Department of Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics • •

All licensed veterinarians have the legal authority to purchase and own prescription drugs. Veterinarians who operate in a group practice that have a


• •

• •

• •

physical permanent location where they provide veterinary services must obtain an HCCE permit for that location. An HCCE permit covers all the veterinarians in a clinic, but requires a “qualifying practitioner” to be named on the permit. That “qualifying practitioner” is responsible for all record keeping, storage, and handling of all prescription drugs ordered and dispensed under the HCCE. The law does not prohibit the use of Rx drugs by practitioners in a group practice that were purchased by another member of the group at that establishment. A veterinarian who was previously issued an HCCE permit, but who decides to purchase prescription drugs under his/her individual license instead, should return the HCCE renewal notice to the Department of Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics Division of the DBPR, along with a letter or simple note stating he/she is not renewing the permit. No veterinarian has been inspected or disciplined because they did not send back the Health Care Clinic Self Inspection Survey. The last Health Care Clinic Self Inspection Survey mail out has just been completed, and veterinarians applying for new HCCE permits may receive one of the surveys as part of the process. The answers to questions 7, 8, 23, 24, 26, and 57-62 should either be “N/A” or left in blank. In the case of individual practitioners, they can purchase drugs and pay with a corporate check. The FVMA and our legal counsel have been able to persuade the DDC that INDIVIDUAL PRACTITIONERS who have their own corporation to run the practice DO NOT have to obtain the HCCE permit. If the mobile veterinary clinic is a business entity, it may pay for the prescription drug with business entity funds as long as the wholesale distributor confirms with the purchaser that the prescription drugs are being ordered by a Florida licensed veterinarian and that the veterinarian is operating a mobile veterinary clinic or has a solely mobile practice. Those veterinarians with mobile practices need to send a letter to their wholesalers stating that they only operate as a mobile clinic/practice. The FVMA was able to have the DBPR clarify/agree that they WILL NOT enforce the 61N-1 requirements dealing with security, temperature monitoring, record keeping, policies and procedures, etc., so long as the clinics have satisfactory Board of Veterinary Medicine inspections and are storing drugs according to the manufacturer’s requirements (i.e. refrigerated or “store in a cool dry place”). Veterinarians CAN have veterinary drugs drop-shipped to the stable/farm/racetrack so long as they are veterinary drugs (not human-labeled drugs or controlled substances).

QUESTION: I am hoping to clear up a bit of confusion I have regarding on-line live webinars. I have received conflicting information about whether these satisfy the in-person, active CE requirements for Florida vets. I have been under the impression that if you attend the webinar during the live broadcast then it is included as active CE but that if you watch it later, it is not. Could you clarify this for me? A: Nowhere does the rule about continuing education specify an

“in-person, active” CE requirement. The highlighted section of the rule below calls correspondence courses ‘non-interactive,’ limits the amount of ‘non-interactive’ courses to be taken in the biennium, and goes on to say that online courses, in their varieties, are not correspondence courses. 61G18-16.002 Continuing Education Requirements for Active Status License Renewal. (1) All licensed veterinarians shall be required to obtain continuing professional education which contributes to the advancement, extension or enhancement of professional skills and knowledge in the field of veterinary medicine. (2) Licensed veterinarians shall complete a minimum of thirty (30) hours of continuing professional education in veterinary medicine every biennium. Beginning on June 1, 2012, no less than one (1) hour of continuing education shall be in the area of dispensing legend drugs and no less than two (2) hours of continuing education shall be in the area of the laws and rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine. For the purposes of this rule, the laws and rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine are Chapters 455 and 474, F.S. and Rule Title 61G18, F.A.C. (a) One (1) hour equals a minimum of fifty (50) minutes and a maximum of sixty (60) minutes. Total hours of lecture time cannot be added up and divided into 50 minute intervals to obtain 1 hour credit for each 50 minute interval. (b) Not more than fifteen (15) hours shall be non-interactive, correspondence courses. Computer on-line programs that involve on-line, real time, live or delayed participatory questioning or responses are not correspondence courses.

WWW.FVMA.ORG |

END NOTE: The ultimate responsibility in the practice of veterinary medicine lies with the licensed veterinarian. Professional discretion must always be exercised.

THE FVMA |

@FLORIDAVMA |

@FLORIDA_VMA |  23


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS VETERINARIANS WANTED

ASSOCIATE VETERINARIAN WANTED - BRANDON, FL: Santa Cruz Animal Clinic is a 3 Full Time doctor practice. We care for small animal, pocket pets, avian and some exotics. Santa Cruz Animal Clinic has been open since 1971 and is the second oldest practice in Brandon, Fl. We have competitive salary and benefits. Experienced and new graduates will both be considered. We are well equipped with brand new Idexx Lab Equipment, Digital Radiography, Digital Dental Radiography, Ultrasound and MLS Multiwave Laser. General Surgery experience and or Orthopedic experience is a plus. Pay will be discussed with each individual applicant Check us out at: www.santacruzanimalclinic.com or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/SantaCruzAnimalClinicBrandon/ Please email all resumes to: santacruzanimal@verizon.net (1/20; ID#5295) VETERINARIAN WANTED – OVIEDO, FL: Veterinarian needed to join our AAHA Accredited, Cat Friendly Hospital located in Oviedo, Florida near UCF. Practice focus is Ultrasound, Feline Medicine, Dentistry, and Health Screening (early detection). AAHA mentorship certified. Base Salary and ProSal. Benefits structured to your personal needs. Partnership after 2 years. www.oviedoveterinarian.com . Send resumes to woodyvet22@gmail.com. We pay for wetlabs in Ultrasound and Dentistry. (1/20; ID#10450) VETERINARIAN WANTED - MELBOURNE FL: Seeking integrative veterinarian to co-locate. Well established (8yrs.), Natural Pet Specialty Shop, located on Florida’s Space Coast is seeking a dedicated Integrative Veterinarian who is certified in Holistic modalities to co-locate their OWN clinic (1832sq. ft) within our upscale Specialty Store (3000 sq. ft.) which is transitioning into a complete Pet Wellness Center in March/ April 2020 at a brand new location. This opportunity comes with our existing clientele base of over 2900 customers seeking Holistic Veterinary support. Just do your build outs and open your door! Contact Lee De Barriault at 321-961-5218 or Natural Pet Specialty Shop at 321-259-3005. www.naturalpetspecialtyshop.com email: admin@naturalpetspecialtyshop.com. (1/20; ID#47868) VETERINARIAN WANTED – HOLLYWOOD, FL: City College is seeking a full or part time veterinarian for its Veterinary Technology Associate program in Hollywood, FL. Qualified candidates will hold a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree (or equivalent) and be currently licensed to practice in Florida. Responsibilities include overseeing animal care on site, leading the teaching clinic, and classroom instruction. Teaching experience is preferred. For details or to submit resume please contact Kim Augustin at 954-744-1777 ext.2022 kaugustin@citycollege.edu. (1/20; ID#8556) VETERINARIAN WANTED – JACKSONVILLE, FL: Seeking energetic, outgoing small animal practitioner to take over a small animal practice located in a desirable area of Jacksonville, Florida. Great staff and an opportunity to grow a practice with great clientele. Earn ownership while making a good salary plus production bonus. Call 904 564 9400 (1/20; ID#40490) VETERINARIAN WANTED – FORT MYERS, FL: Small animal veterinarian. Full-or part-time. We provide excellent veterinary medicine in a progressive veterinary hospital, with a great support team. We utilize DR digital X rays, digital dental x-ray, ultrasound, therapy laser, radio-surgical unit. Our doctors and support team truly work as a team. We enjoy caring for animals as much as we enjoy working with each other. We are located on Florida's west coast, 15 minutes from Fort Myers area. Our county offers many recreational activities, good schools and great quality of life; biking, canoeing, kayaking, golf and more. 100% small animals, with some avian & exotics, and we open to new interest. We are very comfortable mentoring as needed. Compensation; Base $ 75,000.00 - $ 85,000.00 Pro-Sal Health Insurance, $ 1,500.00 continuing education, license fee, DEA fee, 2 professional memberships DVM degree with Florida & federal accreditation. Skill required are strong medical knowledge, proficiency in surgery, good communication skills and ability to work within a team based management environment. For more information please contact Dr. Carlos Gonzalez at drcgomzalezt@aol.com.(1/20; ID#4342)

24  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

VETERINARIAN WANTED – TALLAHASSEE, FL: Full-time small animal associate veterinarian is needed at Novey Animal Hospital. We are looking for a veterinarian to join our team that enjoys practicing high-quality medicine and surgery in a client-centered, compassionate and collaborative manner. We are located in Tallahassee, Florida, home of the state capitol, FSU, FAMU, and are only a short drive to the beach. Tallahassee is ranked in the top 100 best places to live in America and one of the best places to raise a family. We are a well-established hospital, with great clientele and a welltrained staff. We are equipped with digital dental radiography, digital radiography, ultrasound, laser, and more, with a specialty hospital and multiple emergency hospitals within minutes. Our associates enjoy great benefits, including a 4.5-day work week, no emergency on-call, health insurance, 401(k) match, and more! Recent and new graduates are welcome; mentorship will be provided and collaboration amongst our doctors is highly valued and expected. Please contact: Larry Novey, larrynovey@hotmail.com or (850) 5082171.(1/20; ID#12890) VETERINARIAN WANTED – NAPLES, FL: Full-Time Associate Wanted Gulfshore Animal Hospital, an AAHA 3 doctor practice in beautiful Naples, FL, is seeking a full-time associate to fill our third doctor vacancy. Established in 1971, Dr. David Ball and Dr. Kim Schemmer have owned Gulfshore Animal Hospital since 1987. We have a 4350 sq. ft. hospital and boarding facility located on the main highway in central Naples. Our practice is computerized with the most current ImproMed software, capable of paperless medical record keeping. Our practice is equipped with the latest technology including digital dental radiology, laser surgery, K-Laser therapy, Sound digital radiology, Idexx in-house laboratory equipment, and a GE laptop ultrasound. We have an exceptional clientele who demand, and can afford, quality comprehensive veterinary care. Our practice is committed to attention to detail and exceptional client communication and service. We have an excellent management team composed of the current owners and a practice manager of 15 years who are committed to a team approach to the practice of veterinary medicine. This management team is prepared to and capable of training the new associate in the management procedures and practices that have contributed to this very successful practice over the years. The candidate must have leadership skills, share the approach to veterinary medicine described above. This is a tremendous opportunity for the right individual. Our practice address is 3560 Tamiami Trail North, Naples, FL 34103 and our website is www.gulfshoreanimalhospital.com. Interested candidates should email a letter of introduction and current resume to drdave@gulfshoreanimalhospital.com. (1/20; ID#26066)

RELIEF VETERINARIAN WANTED

RELIEF VETERINARIAN: "Got to get away? "VetRxRelief , 39 years experience small animal Veterinarian.Please call 321-508-3879 or Vetgator@gmail.com. (1/20; ID #2187)

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE OR LEASE

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE – JACKSONVILLE, FL: Shoreline stainless steel cages available also one stainless exam table. Various size cages at great prices. Located in Jacksonville, Florida. Contact me for prices on sizes needed. It will be necessary for you to transport them. Contact Deloris Stamm (904) 294 8384 or deloris@paradiseoga.com. (1/20; ID #40490) EQUIPMENT FOR SALE – BRANDON, FL: 1) Burton Single Lamp Surgery Light (ceiling mounted) $150 2) Shore Line Stainless Steel Hydraulic Surgery Table $1200 3) Shore Line Mechanical Lift Exam Table with Scale $1000 4) Two Stainless Steel Kennel Run Doors, 3' X 5' $150 ea. 5) Phillips Oralix 50 Wall Mounted Dental X Ray Unit $250 6) Landmark Vetland Isoflurane Anesthetic Machine $1200 Reason for selling: Closure of Business/Semi-Retirement All Prices Negotiable Contact: 813 503-2857, Leave Message, If Necessary (1/20; ID #25975) EQUIPMENT FOR SALE – MIAMI BEACH, FL: Heska Hematrue CBC machine for sale, practically new- still under warranty; priced $1,200 but will accept offers. Will ship USPS Parcel Select Ground. Call 305-542-9515. (1/20; ID #16738)


Practices for Sale

Practices for Sale

FL: Central FL: Solo dr, SA prx. $632K+ 2019 gross. RE available. (FL11S)

FL: Central FL: Solo dr, SA prx. $632K+ 2019 gross. RE available. (FL11S)

NC: Northeast near VA: $1M+ gross, 2 dr., attractive facility & land. (NC66G)

NC: Northeast near VA: $1M+ gross, 2 dr., attractive facility & land. (NC66G)

GA: South Central GA: $959K+ gross, up 5% in 2019, 1.5 doctor practice. Nice facility & equipment. (GA14F)

GA: South Central GA: $959K+ gross, up 5% in 2019, 1.5 doctor practice. Nice facility & equipment. (GA14F)

GA: Hinesville: Solo dr, SA prx. $930K+ Gross. $196K personal income to new owner. (GA34H)

GA: Hinesville: Solo dr, SA prx. $930K+ Gross. $196K personal income to new owner. (GA34H)

FL: SOLD! Jacksonville: Congratulations to Dr. Don Cook on the sale of his practice, Arlington Animal Hospital to Dr. An Nguyen.

FL: SOLD! Jacksonville: Congratulations to Dr. Don Cook on the sale of his practice, Arlington Animal Hospital to Dr. An Nguyen.

1610 Frederica Road, Saint Simons Island, GA 31522 Toll Free: (800) 333-1984 | www.simmonsinc.com Email: southeast@simmonsinc.com Licensed in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina Real Estate Broker

Florida Practice Listings! Practices for Sale -Central Florida– North of Tampa– Well established, Solo Dr., $888K gross in 2019. In-house lab, digital x-ray, dental xFL:sq. Central FL: Solo dr, SA $632K+ ray, 4400 ft. free standing hospital w/prx. 3 exam rooms,2019 Prx and RE available a turnkey operation. Price just reduced. gross.inRE available. (FL11S) -SE Coastal Fl.– Owner Financing Solo Dr. Practice 2019 gross $688, 6100 sq ft office and boarding space. Well equipped NC: Northeast near in VA: 2 dr., with experienced staff. Located an $1M+ upscale gross, beach community. -Greater Orlando area– & Solo Dr. has worked only part time. attractive facility land. (NC66G) Nice 2700 sq.ft. freestanding office on a new major 6 lane. Great opportunity for Start-up/Jump-Start. Priced to sell. GA: GA:from $959K+ gross, upDr.5% -New– S.E.South Coast–Central Just minutes the beach….Solo grossing ~$630K.1.5 Lease spacepractice. with 4 exam rooms, very&well in 2019, doctor Nice facility equipped, served the(GA14F) community for 40 years. Approximately equipment. $160K in after debt income...priced to sell. -New-East Coast– Solo Dr. Prx with RE 2019 gross $1.07mm Very high well equipped, tenured staff. GA:net, Hinesville: Solo dr, SA prx. $930K+ Gross. -New-Equine Practice– income Brevard to Co.-Rare opportunity to buy $196K personal new owner. (GA34H) a turnkey Equine practice on the central east coast. 1 to 1.5 Dr. 2019 gross $670K. Barn, stalls, treatment area, paddocks, office.

FL: SOLD! Jacksonville: Congratulations to Dr. Don Cook on the sale of his practice, Are Corporate Groups contacting you about buying your Practice? Arlington Hospital If so, let Animal us help make sure you to getDr. yourAn bestNguyen. deal!!!

Contact Dr.Frederica Richard Alker forSaint further practice information. 1610 Road, Simons Island, GA 31522 Toll Free: (800) 333-1984 | www.simmonsinc.com 850.814.9962 or Richard@tpsgsales.com Email: southeast@simmonsinc.com Showcase Properties of Central Florida, Broker Licensed in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina Real Estate Broker

WWW.FVMA.ORG |

1610 Frederica Road, Saint Simons Island, GA 31522 Toll Free: (800) 333-1984 | www.simmonsinc.com Email: southeast@simmonsinc.com Licensed in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina Real Estate Broker

Veterinary Practice Real Estate Brokers, Licensed Nationwide Sales - Valuations - Buyers Representation - Certified Valuation Analyst

Practices for Sale

FL: Central FL: Solo dr, SA prx. $632K+ 2019 gross. RE available. (FL11S)

PALM BEACH COUNTY: Solo, small animal practice on the southeast coast! +$535k gross NC: Northeast near VA: $1M+ gross, dr., and +$111k ADI in most recent year. Appx.21,150 attractive facility & land. sq. ft. leased facility. Great(NC66G) opportunity in a vibrant, affluent community! [FL95]

GA: South Central GA: $959K+ gross, up 5% VOLUSIA COUNTY: Family owned, animal in 2019, 1.5 practice. Nicesmall facility & practice withdoctor legacy to build upon! +$697k gross equipment. (GA14F) and +$204k ADI in most recent year. Appx. 3,368

sq. ft. leased facility. Room to grow! [FL96]

GA: Hinesville: Solo dr, SA prx. $930K+ Gross. LEON COUNTY: welcoming $196K personalLong-established, income to new owner. (GA34H)

practice with growth potential! +$744k gross and

+$129k ADI in most recent year. Appx. 1,978 sq. FL: SOLD! Jacksonville: Congratulations to ft. facility with RE. yourofown [FL97] Dr. Don Cook on Build the sale his legacy! practice, Arlington Animal Hospital to Dr. An Nguyen.

1610 Frederica Road, Saint Simons Island, GA 31522 Toll Free: (800) 333-1984 | www.simmonsinc.com Email: southeast@simmonsinc.com Licensed in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, | 800.636.4740 psbroker.com info@psbroker.com and South Carolina Real| Estate Broker

THE FVMA |

@FLORIDAVMA |

@FLORIDA_VMA |  25


THE

8

th

2020

SAVE THE DATE

TG A V C Experience the Difference

ANNUAL GULF-ATLANTIC

VETERINARY CONFERENCE DECEMBER 3-6, 2020 BOCA RATON, FLORIDA

■ EXCEPTIONAL SPEAKERS, LECTURES &WET LABS ■ RELAXATION ■ NETWORKING

WWW.TGAVC.ORG |

@TGAVCONFERENCE |

TGAVCONFERENCE |

DR. GREG HEATON

@FLORIDA_VMA |

800.992.3862

DR. HAL OTT


Our Listings Are PRACTICE SALES VALUATIONS BUYER REPRESENTATION ASSOCIATE BUY-INS WE WELCOMED SEVEN NEW PSA CLIENTS

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KNOXVILLE, TN

EASTERN TN

READY TO BE NEXT? 844.4.PSA.HELP

Hello@practicesalesadvisors.com Rebecca Robinson Davis, CBI PRINCIPAL BROKER

MENTION THIS AD FOR A FREE PRACTICE APPRAISAL IN JUST 2 WEEKS! Brennan McGoldrick, DVM, MBA

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VICE PRESIDENT


Florida Veterinary Medical Association 7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, FL 32809

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage PAID Orlando, FL Permit #793

WHEN IT COMES TO SELLING YOUR PRACTICE, GETTING THE BEST PRICE IS JUST THE FIRST STEP. PROTECTING YOUR LEGACY SHOULD GUIDE THE JOURNEY. Your practice is worth more than just a building with equipment. Its value includes your dedicated team, carefully crafted culture, and personal commitment to pets and their families. That is why we approach selling your practice with the goal of ensuring you receive a maximum return and that your legacy continues. Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re considering a private or corporate sale, partner with the experts to navigate the process.

42 Years | 3,200 Sales Transactions | 12,000 Practices Appraised

Call us today at 800.333.1984 for a complimentary and confidential conversation.

Learn more at simmonsinc.com

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FVMA Advocate Issue 1, 2020  

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