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F V M A ADVOCATE ISSUE 1 | 2016

Zika Virus & Animals

2016 FVMA

General Elections

the 87 FVMA Annual Conference th

APRIL 14-17, 2016

Tampa marriott waterside hotel & Marina and Tampa Convention Center, tampa, Florida


President's MESSAGE 7 207 Monetary Drive Orlando, Florida 32809 Phone – (407) 851‑3862 Toll Free – (800) 992‑3862 Fax – (407) 240‑3710 info@fvma.org | www.fvma.org

Officers

Dr. Richard M. Carpenter President Dr. Richard C. Sutliff President-Elect Dr. Richard B. Williams Treasurer Dr. Donald H. Morgan Past President Mr. Philip J. Hinkle Executive Director

District Representatives Dr. Alex M. Steverson District 1–Big Bend Dr. Julia Conway District 2–Northeast Dr. Marc A. Presnell District 3–Central Dr. Rachel Klemawesch District 4–Tampa Bay Dr. Marc D. Pinkwasser District 5–Treasure Coast Dr. Marta P. Lista District 6–South Florida Dr. Mary Smart District 7–Southwest

Greetings, Since the last issue of the Advocate, much has happened in our calendar of events for the FVMA. After we got through the holiday season and into 2016, the travel and meetings got much busier with lots of travel. Starting out early in January was the AVMA Leadership conference in Chicago. Now that should sound cold to those of you used to Florida winters, and it was, but by comparison to last year it was like heaven. One could actually walk around outside with just a coat on! But, the best part was the quality of the meeting – what a great experience this year. A lot of focus was on the “millennial” generation, in which a large portion of our younger veterinarians are, and how to communicate with them. One would be surprised of the difference in thinking and expectations of the younger generation in our profession. The bottom line is, if we don’t pay attention to this issue we are never going to grow as an association. I have seen several articles in DVM360 and some other publications since the meeting. If you have seen them and not read them, I suggest you go back and do so. Practice owners will benefit as well because more and more of our clients are in that generation; and how we talk and communicate with then will make a big difference in their use of our services. After that, the NAVC in Orlando was the next destination. This was my first experience at that meet‑ ing and it was certainly a unique time. Following that, I attended the Ocala Equine Conference and enjoyed visiting with the equine practitioners in our profession. Also at that meeting we held the Col‑ lege Advisory Committee meeting and there was much discussion regarding the CAC’s role with the College – both Faculty and Students. Stay tuned for changes to come and a more streamlined relation‑ ship with our College of Veterinary Medicine. And lastly, were Legislative Action Days in Tallahassee where we had a very successful round of meetings with our legislators. The FVMA continues to build relationships in Tallahassee which are important to the practice and governance of veterinary practice in Florida. If you haven’t been involved, give it some serious consideration. You would be amazed at what shows up in the Legislature that impacts veterinary medicine. And to end January, was the sad event of losing an old friend to most of the veterinarians in Florida. Dr. Paul Nicoletti fell on Friday, January 29th and passed away from complications on Sunday. He will be missed by all of us greatly and especially those of you who were privileged to have had him as an instructor at the CVM. Looking forward to the April Annual Conference in Tampa, this year will be exciting, our first time back in Tampa in several years. This year will be a big step-up into the convention center because our meetings have outgrown the hotel accommodations. Get your registrations in early! I look forward to seeing many of you in Tampa and once again express my appreciation and honor to have served the FVMA and each of you as president this past year. Sincerely,

Dr. James M. Brechin District 8–Northwest Dr. Kelly J. Sloan-Wade District 9–Space Coast Dr. Ernest C. Godfrey AVMA Delegate Dr. Amanda House FAEP Representative to the FVMA Executive Board Ex Officio Dr. James W. Lloyd, Dean UF College of Veterinary Medicine

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Richard M. Carpenter, DVM

In This Issue 3 | 4 | 6| 8 | 10 | 12 |

In Remembrance Member Spotlight Membership & Certification Zika Virus & Animals 2016 FVMA General Election Legislative Action Days

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In Remembrance

FVMA Past President

PAUL NICOLETTI, DVM, MS October 26, 1932 – January 31, 2016

T

he FVMA is greatly saddened to mark the passing of Dr. Paul Nicoletti, which occurred on Sunday, January 31, 2016. Dr. Nicoletti will be greatly missed by the Association, and he has left a void which will not be easily filled. Dr. Nicoletti’s life as a veterinarian, activist and mentor was an exemplary example to those he worked for and with. In more than 41 years as an active member of the FVMA, Dr. Nicoletti served organized veterinary medicine with honor and distinction. He served as the president of the FVMA, the AVMA, American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, the Alachua County Veterinary Medical Association, and Animal Disease Research Workers in the Southern States. He was also a member of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, the Florida Cattlemen’s Association, and the American Association of Food Hygiene Veterinarians. His commitment to organized veterinary medicine extended to lengthy service on various committees of the Association. At the time of his passing he was a member of the FVMA’s One Health Committee. Another of Dr. Nicoletti’s lasting contributions was to Florida agriculture as he worked to improve the procedures used to control bovine brucellosis, or Bang’s disease. He was an internationally recognized authority on bovine brucellosis, and his efforts led to the eventual eradication of the disease in Florida. His leadership helped to mitigate the economic toll of brucellosis on the Florida cattle industry and led to improved food safety and better protection of human health. He spent the bulk of his career with the USDA and the University of Florida’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Nicoletti grew up on a small dairy farm in his birthplace of Goodman, MO. He qualified as a veterinarian at the University of Missouri’s College of Veterinary Medicine in 1956, and went on to earn a master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1962. He worked as a USDA regional epidemiologist in Albany, New York from 1962 to 1968, then from 1968 to 1972, he served in Iran as an epizootiologist for the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization. When he returned to the United States he went back to work as a regional epidemiologist with the USDA, then in 1978, he joined the faculty at the University of Florida’s College of Veterinary Medicine from where he retired in 2003. Over the course of his long and distinguished career, Dr. Nicoletti received numerous awards and honors. In 1994, he was named Veterinarian of the Year by the Florida Veterinary Medical Association, and in 2003, he was presented with the Distinguished Service Award by the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. His most prestigious award came in 2010, when he was recognized with the Meyer-Steele Gold Head Cane Award, the highest honor of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society. This award recognizes scientists who have significantly advanced human health through the practice of veterinary epidemiology and public health. Dr. Nicoletti was preceded in death by his wife, Earlene Nicoletti in 2011 and daughter, Diana Nicoletti. His children, Nancy Leader of Hattiesburg, MS and Julie Nicoletti of Louisville, CO; sister, Ruthann Eads of Grove, OK and four grandchildren, Joel Parker, Beth Leader, Julia Leader and Daniel Leader survive him.

RICHARD K. SOUGHERS, DVM Dr. Richard K. Soughers passed away on November 30, 2015 in Cape Coral, FL. Dr. Soughers was a member of the FVMA from 2007. He was a graduate of The Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Class of 1961. Before retiring to Cape Coral in 2004 where he continued to practice part-time, he operated a veterinary clinic in Mooresville, IN for 37 years. In Cape Coral, he worked at Eastside Animal Hospital, and was also a missionary in Haiti. Dr. Soughers was born in Hymera, IN. He is survived by his widow Barbara Smetzer, daughter, Rev. Tara Soughers of Plainville, MA, son K. Richard of Plainfield, IN, and stepchildren www.fvma.org |

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Teresa (Joel) Smetzer-Hicks of Austin, TX, David Roger Smetzer (Tiffany) of St. Joseph, IL and Lisa Scott (Scott Brokaw) of Leesburg, VA. Grandchildren Ari Dehn and Gregory Dehn of Plainville, MA. He is also survived by brother Allen (Shirley) Soughers and sister Betty Kirby of Denver, CO. Dr. Soughers was a member of St. John’s Episcopal Church on Pine Island, FL. He was very much loved and appreciated by his clients and all who knew him.

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Member Spotlight

DR. RUTH-ANNE RICHTER takes the reins of the FAEP

as Council President

Ruth-Anne Richter, BSc, DVM, MS is the new president of the FAEP Executive Council. Dr. Richter, who has served on the council for many years, was installed as president during the 53rd Annual Ocala Equine Conference which took place from January 22–24, 2016 in Ocala, Marion County, Florida. She succeeds Corey Miller, DVM, MS, DACT, who remains on the Council as immediate past president. Dr. Richter is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, American Association of Equine Practitioners, International Society for Equine Locomotor Pathology, and North American Veterinary Regenerative Medicine Association. She is certified by Vet-Stem®, and is a member of the Vet Stem Advisory Committee. Dr. Richter has dedicated herself to the FAEP and the veterinary profession while maintaining a very busy schedule as an equine surgeon. This year as president, she will lead the planning and execution of the FAEP's first-class continuing education programs for equine veterinarians and team members, and along with her colleagues on the council, will work to ensure that the Foot Symposium, Promoting Excellence Symposium, and the Ocala Equine Conference remain relevant, innovative and world-class scientific programs. She has been pivotal in planning and executing FAEP Imaging wet labs, and the primary organizer of the FAEP's Foot Symposium. Dr. Richter received her veterinary degree from the Atlantic Veterinary College on Prince Edward Island, Canada in 1995 after finishing a Bachelor of Science degree. She pursued an equine internship at Mississippi State University, and following a year in private practice, began a surgical residency at the University of Illinois. She completed her surgical residency and concurrent Master of Science degree in 2000. Since then, she has worked as a staff surgeon/associate at Reid and Associates in West Palm Beach, the Equine Specialty Hospital in Ohio and East End Equine in Long Island, New York. Prior to attending veterinary school, Dr. Richter was farm manager for Christilot Boylen, a member of Canada’s Dressage Team. Dr. Richter’s specialties include equine sports medicine and diagnostic imaging, particularly ultrasound, lameness and surgery. She also has an interest in regenerative medicine techniques. She recently authored a book chapter for Current Therapy in Equine Practice, 7th Edition on the use of therapeutic shoes in horses with tendon and ligament injuries.

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MEMBERSHIP AND CERTIFICATION Bringing Members of the Veterinary Care Team

UNDER THE FVMA UMBRELLA

A

s of January 1, 2016, certified veterinary assistants (CVA) and certified veterinary technicians (CVT) become affiliate members of the FVMA when they renew their certification and become members of the Florida Association of Certified Veterinary Assistants (FACVA) and the Florida Association of Credentialed Veterinary Technicians (FACVT) respectively. These are now subsidiary organizations under the operating umbrella of the FVMA.

This renewal period which started at the beginning of the year on January 1, provides recertification and membership in the FVMA for one fee; $55 for certified veterinary technicians, and $25 for certified veterinary assistants. As the organized veterinary medicine entity working since its inception in 1928 to protect and enhance the practice of veterinary medicine in Florida, the FVMA has operated a team member development program for more than 40 years through its certification of veterinary technicians. The launch of the FACVT and FACVA is the achievement of an important milestone in the Association’s evolution as it seeks to bring all the segments of the diverse veterinary medicine sector under its umbrella and extend the benefits of association membership to all the veterinary professionals in Florida who contribute to the sector and derive their livelihoods from it. This year the FVMA will also launch the Florida Association of Animal Care Technicians (FAACT) for non-credentialed on-thejob-trained team members who have worked in the profession in the capacity of a technician for at least five years, and the Florida Association of Veterinary Practice Managers (FAVPM). The FACVA and FACVT, as subsidiary organizations that operate under the FVMA umbrella, now offer all the benefits of membership in the Association to certified veterinary assistants and certified veterinary technicians. Membership in the FVMA which is one of the strongest veterinary associations in the United States comes with many tangible benefits. Membership also presents the opportunity for veterinary professionals who live and work in Florida to be a part of a collective voice of more than 4,500 members who derive the benefits of the Association’s programs that protect and advance animal health and well-being and the veterinary medical profession in Florida. FVMA President, Richard Carpenter expresses that the launch of the FVMA’s new subsidiary organizations was a step whose time 6  |  FVMA ADVOCATE


had come. “Affiliate membership is in recognition of the outstanding contributions to the veterinary profession provided by these veterinary professionals,” he says. “Offering membership to CVAs and CVTs and other team members is also important to the FVMA because it is our aim to work to develop and grow these important team members of the diverse veterinary medical profession in Florida. We will implement special programs that support their professional development, growth and aspirations, be the driving force to propel growth in team member employment, and promote an environment where these team members are respected for their valuable services.” As a member of the FACVA and FACVT under the umbrella of the FVMA, a veterinary assistant or a veterinary technician becomes an invested member of the FVMA, adding to the FVMA’s powerful voice which advocates for the veterinary profession. They will also enjoy member programs tailored specifically for veterinary team members, and other benefits offered by their professional associations, including: • Membership card to enable access to all member benefits • Professional membership certificate suitable for framing for the workplace • Membership lapel pin recognizing the affiliation with the FVMA • Quarterly newsletter and other communication resources • Access to the Association Veterinary Career Network for employment opportunities • Complimentary or reduced price CE for professional growth and development • A network of more than 1,000 credentialed veterinary technicians and certified veterinary assistants to strengthen and advance professional development • A professional FVMA staff available as a resource to ensure continued professional development and advancement within the veterinary profession The FVMA has begun a concentrated and sustained marketing outreach to veterinary assistants, veterinary technicians and students that will run through summer and to the end of 2016. It is envisioned that these two associations will be vibrant and active, as will the FAACT and FAVPM, which will be launched later in the year.

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THE ZIKA VIRUS AND ANIMALS Source: Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

The alarm about the spread of Zika virus which was publicly unheard of in the United States a few months ago, has extended to pet owners in our state. The FVMA began receiving calls in February from members who sought guidance in responding to the concerns of their patients’ owners and caretakers. As a result, we went looking for answers. The below is information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on its website. About Zika Virus Disease Zika virus disease (Zika) is a disease caused by the Zika virus that is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week after being bitten by an infected mosquito. People usually don’t get sick enough to go to the hospital, and they very rarely die of Zika. For this reason, many people might not realize they have been infected. Once a person has been infected, he or she is likely to be protected from future infections. Zika virus was first discovered in 1947 and is named after the Zika forest in Uganda. In 1952, the first human cases of Zika were detected and since then, outbreaks of Zika have been reported in tropical Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Zika outbreaks have probably occurred in many locations. Before 2007, at least 14 cases of Zika had been documented, although other cases were likely to have occurred and were not reported. Because the symptoms of Zika are similar to those of many other diseases, many cases may not have been recognized. In May 2015, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) issued an alert regarding the first confirmed Zika virus infection in Brazil and on Feb 1, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared Zika virus a public health emergency of

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international concern (PHEIC). Local transmission has been reported in many other countries and territories. Zika virus likely will continue to spread to new areas.

Zika Virus and Animals How are animals involved in outbreaks of Zika virus? At this time, animals do not appear to be involved in the spread of Zika virus. Zika virus was first discovered in a monkey with a


mild fever in the Zika Forest of Uganda in the 1940s. However the prevalence of Zika virus in monkeys and other nonhuman primates is currently unknown. At this time there have been no reports of other animals becoming sick with Zika or of being able to spread Zika to people or other animals. Can animals spread Zika virus? There is no evidence that Zika virus is spread to people from contact with animals. Zika virus is transmitted to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito (A. aegypti and A. albopictus). These are the same mosquitoes that spread dengue and chikungunya viruses. More information on Zika virus transmission is available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ zika/index.html What types of animals are known to get infected or sick with Zika? Nonhuman primates, such as monkeys and apes, have shown the ability to become infected with Zika virus. Only a few naturally and experimentally infected monkeys and apes have had any signs of illness at all, and then it was only a mild, transient fever without any other symptoms. Can pets or other animals other than non-human primates get infected or sick with Zika? There have not been any reports of pets or other types of animals becoming sick with Zika virus. There is limited evidence from one study done in Indonesia in the late 1970s that horses, cows, carabaos (water buffaloes), goats, ducks, and bats could become infected with Zika, but there is no evidence that they develop disease or pose a risk for Zika virus transmission to humans.

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If a pregnant animal is infected with Zika virus, will her offspring have microcephaly? Microcephaly has not been reported among populations of monkeys and apes in areas with previous or ongoing Zika virus transmission. This type of birth defect is not known to be associated with Zika virus infection in animals. Are animals in the United States at risk of becoming sick with Zika? Animals in the United States are not at risk of becoming sick with Zika virus. Only monkeys and apes have shown the ability to become infected with Zika virus. The risk of monkeys and apes in the United States becoming infected with Zika virus is low. All monkeys and apes imported into the United States undergo a mandatory 31-day quarantine period on arrival. The monkeys and apes are held indoors or in screened enclosures where the risk of mosquito contact is low. Any monkey or ape that may have entered quarantine with an active Zika virus infection would not be able to pass it to others without mosquitoes. Monkeys and apes develop antibodies to Zika virus within 14 days of infection; once antibodies develop a person or primate can no longer spread the virus. All imported monkeys and apes should be free of Zika virus by the end of the quarantine period and thus pose no risk of infecting local mosquito populations What are the requirements for bringing pets or other animals into the United States? Some animals, including monkeys and apes, are not allowed to be imported as pets under any circumstances. Each state and US territory has its own rules for pet ownership and importation, and these rules may be different from federal regulations. You can find more information about animal importation at: http://www. cdc.gov/importation/index.html

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ON THE 2016 FVMA ELECTION BALLOT ELECTION OF FVMA TREASURER & THE PROPOSED REVISED FVMA BYLAWS

The FVMA mailed out election ballots to members on Monday, February 29, 2016. Two items are on the ballot for members to vote on:

Treasurer of the FVMA Executive Board

Two candidates qualified to run for the Office of Treasurer: 1. Dr. Donald H. Morgan of Largo, Past President of the FVMA, and 2. Dr. Christine M. Storts of Port Canaveral, former District 9 Representative to the FVMA Executive Board.

As required by FVMA Bylaws, the ballot also contains a provision for a write-in candidate for the Office of Treasurer. All other seats that were open for election were uncontested, and in accordance with FVMA Bylaws those candidates are deemed duly elected.

Dr. Donald H. Morgan

Dr. Christine M. Storts

Education:

Education:

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, 1964

Licensure:

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 1982

Licensure:

Florida, 1991 - present

Florida, 1966 - present Professional Experience:

Professional Experience:

Atlantic Animal Clinic, 1994 - present Animal Emergency Clinic of Central Brevard, 1991 - 1994 Orange County Health Department, 1990 - 1991

Bluffs Animal Hospital, 1971 - present Captain, US Air Force US Air Force Veterinary Corp, 1964-1967 Memberships and Affiliations:

American Veterinary Medical Association Florida Veterinary Medical Association American Animal Hospital Association FVMA Executive Board District 4 Representative, 2011 - 2013 FVMA President-Elect, 2013 FVMA President, 2014 FVMA Legislative Committee FVMA Political Action Committee FVMA Strategic Planning Committee Pinellas County VMA Pinellas Animal Foundation President, Greater Largo Chamber of Commerce President, Largo Jaycees Chair, Largo Medical Center Board of Trustees Awards and Accomplishments:

• • • •

FVMA Lifetime Achievement Award, 2011 FVMA Veterinarian of the Year Award, 2007 FVMA Gold Star Award (2) Largo Citizen of the Year, 1977

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Memberships and Affiliations:

Florida Veterinary Medical Association FVMA Executive Board District 9 Representative, 2007-2014 FVMA Budget & Finance Committee FVMA Legislative Key Contact FVMA Legislative Committee President, Brevard County Veterinary Medical Association Past President, Brevard County Veterinary Medical Association College Advisory Committee Brevard County Animal Services (volunteer) Central Brevard Humane Society (volunteer) Hubbs-Sea World Marine Mammal Stranding Network Florida Wildlife Hospital Awards and Accomplishments:

FVMA Gold Star Award, 2004


Proposed Revised FVMA Bylaws In 2015, a Bylaws Review Task Force was appointed by FVMA President Dr. Richard Carpenter at the direction of the FVMA Executive Board, to undertake a review of the FVMA Bylaws. The board had determined that with the significant changes in the law affecting non-profit organizations, the current bylaws were legally deficient. Four past presidents and the treasurer were appointed to the task force, with Dr. Jim Kanzler as chair. The other members were Drs. John R. Bass, Jan Hasse, Janet Whitlock, and Richard B. Williams. The task force presented their proposed revisions to the board for approval at the end of December 2015, which they subsequently approved. In accordance with the bylaws, the board has included the Proposed Revised FVMA Bylaws on the ballot for ratification by the FVMA membership. The current Bylaws of the FVMA, As Amended September 10, 2006 and the Proposed Revised FVMA Bylaws of the Florida Veterinary Medical Association, Inc., Amended 2015 are available for review on the FVMA website, www.fvma.org. Ballots must be mailed to the FVMA in the return envelope provided, and postmarked on or before Tuesday, March 15, 2016. For any questions, please contact the FVMA at info@fvma.org.

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LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

FVMA LEGISLATIVE ACTION DAYS 2016 – an exercise in grassroots political advocacy

As 2016 began, the FVMA readied itself in preparation for our annual Legislative Action Days at the end of January. The Association was monitoring 23 bills before the Florida Legislature that could have an impact on the practice of veterinary medicine in the state. Florida’s Legislative Session began 90 days early this year, convening on January 12, 2016. The FVMA team, led by its executive board and legislative committee, also included political action team leaders from around the state, representatives of local VMAs, and students of UF College of Veterinary Medicine. Tallahassee based lobbyists, Mixon and Associates, joined the FVMA delegation for their two days of grassroots political advocacy on January 28 and 29, which has been described as “energetic and a great success.” Members of the FVMA group arrived in the State Capital on Wednesday, January 28 to participate in an afternoon legislative workshop which briefed the attendees on the Senate and House bills the FVMA had been monitoring which were filed in 2015. The workshop also introduced members who were attending for the first time and being exposed to the legislative process, and the FVMA’s political advocacy program, to the Association’s proactive advocacy strategies. It served as well, to lay out the strategy for day two of Legislative Action Days, when the delegates would

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meet with the Senators and Representatives from the particular districts in which they resided and worked. Of the 23 bills that were being monitored by the FVMA as it prepared for the 2016 Legislative Session, the Association had identified several as “priority bills” which warranted its keen attention. Below is an abbreviated summary of proposed legislation that FVMA members supported and opposed, and lobbied for or against during Legislative Action Days.

FVMA SUPPORTED THE FOLLOWING BILLS SB 1082/HB 973- Evaluation of Students with Impairing Conditions Who are Preparing for Licensure as Health Care Practitioners or Veterinarians. Created a hardship evaluation program for students with financial hardships who were preparing for licensure as health care practitioners or veterinarians; required submission of monthly progress reports to the Department; required that identity of participating students be protected in billing for services and progress reports; provided for funding from Medical Quality Assurance Trust Fund.


SB 334/HB 91- Severe Injuries Caused by Dogs Provided for discretionary, rather than mandatory, impoundment of dogs that cause severe injuries to humans; removed the requirement for automatic euthanasia for unclassified dogs that cause severe injuries to humans; exempted law enforcement dogs from dangerous dog law.

SB 1050/HB 11- Regulated Professions and Occupations When originally filed, the bill created the definition of “Veterinary Acupressure” and “Veterinary Massage” as exempted modalities in F.S.474 The Veterinary Practice Act. Further it exempted those unlicensed individuals performing such services to the public, from licensure within the Department.

SB 440/HB 217 - Care for Retired Law Enforcement Dogs Created the Care for Retired Law Enforcement Dogs Program within the Department of Law Enforcement; required the department to contract with a not for profit to administer and manage the program; created annual appropriations of $300,000

The FVMA argued that these therapies to animal patients fall within the scope of the practice of veterinary medicine; that if law makers decided to deregulate these therapies, we strongly urged that they remain under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian who maintains a veterinarian-client-patient relationship to ensure patients receive safe and effective care.

FVMA OPPOSED THE FOLLOWING BILLS SB 680 (Ring) - Awarding Pet Owners "Loss of Companionship" This bill may have been introduced with the best intentions, but its unintended consequence would have made veterinary care too costly for many pet owners, thereby placing affordable care out of the reach of many Florida residents. Specifically, SB 680 would have been the first law in the country to authorize emotionbased damages, for loss of companionship, in regular veterinary malpractice cases. The FVMA met with the bill sponsor and discussed our concerns and opposition to this bill. The bill died in its first Committee of Reference.

The FVMA vehemently opposed the Bill and was successful in having veterinary medicine removed from the Bill in its entirety. A comprehensive Legislative report will be disseminated to members following the close of the 2016 Legislation Session, March 11, 2016. The FVMA has matured in carrying out its grassroots advocacy, forging strong relationships that have been instrumental in the successes experienced in the Florida Legislature. Members are encouraged to become active in the advocacy program of the FVMA which has paid great dividends in advancing the veterinary medical profession, promoting animal health and well-being, and protecting public health.

The Legislative Action Days for 2016 are over, but the legislative advocacy work of the FVMA continues!

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At m e r a nc og la Pr A-G

Licensing Renewal Deadline May 31, 2016 This program 532-19450 is approved by the AAVSB RACE to offer a total of 331.00 CE Credits (30.00 max) being available to any one veterinarian: and/or 128.00 Veterinary Technician CE Credits (24.00 max). This RACE approval is for the subject matter category(ies) of: Category One: Scientific; Category Three: Non-ScientificPractice Management/Professional Development; using the delivery method(s) of: Seminar/LectureLab/Wet Lab. This approval is valid in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE; however, participants are responsible for ascertaining each board’s CE requirements. Call FVMA, at (800) 992-3862 for further information.


Reserve Your Room Today... FVMA Room Block Deadline: March 16, 2016! Hotel Information The 87th FVMA Annual Conference is proud to welcome attendees to the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel & Marina, the perfect setting for relaxation, where you can unwind while you get the CE you need. One of the most popular hotels in Downtown Tampa, the Tampa Marriott features first-class accommodations and modern amenities, on-site restaurants, a rejuvenating spa, state-of-the-art fitness center and amazing rooftop pool. • To Ensure Your Accommodations at the host hotel, Reserve Your Room Today! Request FVMA Room Block Special Rate of $199.00 plus taxes. • Call Group Reservations Department, 888-789-3090. • Group Rate Extended Stay Three Days Prior and Post Conference, Based Upon Availability • Reduced Valet Parking for Conference Attendees is $15 overnight • Discounted Valet Parking for Non-Hotel Guest Attending Function is $13 • Discounted Guestroom Internet of $1 Per Night for non-Marriott Reward Members • Complimentary Guestroom Internet for Marriott Reward Members

Hotel Reservations Deadline: March 16, 2016 Online Reservations: https://aws.passkey.com/g/53042316 Telephone Reservations: 888-789-3090

event HigHlights • ATTENDEE WELCOME RECEPTION & COCKTAILS Friday, April 15, 2016 | Time: 6:15 p. m. • Awards ceremony & officer installation Friday, April 15, 2016 | Time: 7:30 p. m. • Bingo Raffle drawing Saturday, April 16, 2016 | Time: 3:45 p.m.

Festival on the Bay

• FVMA Foundation charitable gala SATURday, April 16, 2016 | Time: 7:00 p.m. (For Details, see page 25) • Christian Breakfast SUnday, April 17, 2016 | Time: 7:30 A.m.

Tampa Marriott

Waterside Hotel & Marina 700 South Florida Avenue, Tampa, Florida 33602

Make Your Room Reservations Now! Call: 888-789-3090 and mention “FVMA”

FOUR Easy Ways To Register

Register today & save! After March 16 add $75 for veterinarians & $25 For TEam Members.   Mail:

  Online:

FVMA 7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, FL 32809

www.fvma.org info@fvma.org

 Phone:

  Fax:

(800) 992-3862 (407) 851-3862

(407) 240-3710

REGISTER

!!

NOW


Featured Speakers

A. Rick Alleman

david dycus Eric Daniel Garcia

DVM, PhD, DABVP, DACVP DVM, MS, CCRP, DACVS-SA

R. Michael Peak

DVM, DAVDC

Alan Rebar

DVM, PhD, DACVP

Karen Tobias

DVM, MS, DACVS

IT & Digital Marketing Consultant

Chris Reeder

DVM, DACVD

Heather L. Wamsley

BS, DVM, PhD, DACVP (Clinical)

DVM, MS, DACVECC

Tim Hackett

BVSc, DACVD, MANZCVS (Canine Medicine)

Andrew Hillier

Thomas Miller

Michael Schaer

Tom Schubert

Jessica M. Stine

DVM, DACVIM, DACVECC

Jason Wernli

CO-Founder allyDVM Inc.

DVM, DABVP, DACVIM (Neurology)

DVM, MS, DACVO

DVM, DACVO

Michael Willard

DVM, MS, DACVIM-SA

Distinguished Speakers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Jason Arble, DVM, MSc, DACVR Elizabeth Bailey, DVM ed bayó, JD Megan Brashear, BS, CVT, VTS (ECC) Greg Brown, MBA Cherie T. Buisson, DVM Kara M. Burns, MS, MEd, LVT, VTS (Nutrition) Bernadine Deann Cruz, DVM Mauricio Dujowich, DVM, DACVS Jennifer Dupre-Welsh, CVT, VTS (Anesthesia, Analgesia), CVPP Alex Gallagher, DVM, MS, DACVIM Wade GingErich, DVM, DAVDC Meghan HARMAN, DVM, DACVECC Lauren Harris, DVM, DACVECC Peter Helmer, DVM, DAVBVP-Avian Practice Matthew Johnson, DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Anita R. Kiehl, DVM, MS, DACVP Laurie McCauley, DVM, DACVSMR, CCRT, CVA, CVC Cathy Meeks, MS, DVM, DACVIM (Internal Medicine) Laura Nafe, DVM, MS, DACVIM (SAIM) Rachel Poulin, RVT, VTS (SAIM) Denise S. Rollings, CVT, VTS (Dentistry) Nicole Salas, DVM, DACVS Brian A. Scott, DVM, DACVD Layla Shaikh, VMD, DACVR Andre Shih, DVM, DACVAA, DACVECC Melissa Siekaniec, CVT, VTS (ECC) Meg Sleeper, VMD, DACVIM (Cardiology) Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC Alan Spier, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Cardiology) Robert swinger, DVM, DACVO Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM


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 17 hands-on Wet labs  3 exciting Workshops

wet labs

thursday Rehabilitation & Laser Therapy (DVM & Technicians) 8:00 am - 12:00 pm Laurie McCauley DVM, DACVSMR, CCRT, CVA, CVC

wet labs

Tim Hackett, DVM, MS, DACVECC Mauricio Dujowich, DVM, DACVS

Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC Wade Gingerich, DVM, DAVDC

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $125 | Techs $75 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $150 | Techs $125

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $545 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $745

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

Extracapsular Suture Stabilization 8:00 am - 12:00 pm

Medial Patella Luxation 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Advanced Small Animal Abdominal Ultrasound 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Matthew Johnson DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA

Matthew Johnson DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA

friday

Jason Arble, DVM, DACVR Assisted by:

Kathleen Gelatt, DVM, DACVR Danielle Mauragis, CVT, AS Layla Shaikh, VMD, DACVR Andrew Fox, DVM

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $349 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $549

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $349 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $549

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

Combined Cystotomy & Perineal Urethrostomies in Cats

Tension Relieving Techniques and Other Wound Management Tips

Feline Dental Extractions 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

(Lab B is a repeat of Lab A)

(Lab B is a repeat of Lab A)

Michael Peak, DVM, DAVDC Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC

Karen Tobias, DVM, MS, DACVS

Karen Tobias, DVM, MS, DACVS

saturday wet labs

Mastering the Soft Tissue Aspects of Oral and Periodontal Surgery 8:00 am - 12:00 pm

Clinical Techniques for Emergency Medicine 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Lab A - 8:00 am - 9:50 am Lab B - 10:30 am - 12:20 pm

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $225 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $425

Lab A - 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm Lab B - 4:00 pm - 5:50 pm

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $545 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $745

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $295 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $495

Dental Nerve Blocks & Dental Prophylaxis (Technicians Only) 9:00 am - 12:50 pm Denise S. Rollings, CVT, VTS-Dentistry

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Techs $95 Wet Lab Only Fee: Techs $125

workshop

wet lab

sunday

Continuing Education Approval:

WORKSHOP

Culture and Sensitivity Interpretation (DVM Only) 9:00 am - 10:50 am

Work Shop

Elizabeth Bailey, DVM Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology)

DVM Only | Free Workshop Must Pre-Register | Limited Availability  Florida Board of Veterinary Medicine, DBPR FVMA Provider #31  Sponsor of Continuing Education in New York State  American Association of Veterinary State Boards Race, Provider #532


DVM

9:00 am 9:50 am

Brachycephalic Syndrome Tobias

10:10 am 11:00 am

Wound Management: My Favorite Dressings Tobias

11:10 am 12:00 pm

Tension-Relieving Techniques Tobias

1:30 pm 2:20 pm 2:30 pm 3:20 pm

Tracheal Collapse: Diagnosis, Medical Management and Surgical/Interventional Options Tobias Help! My Dog's Bile Acids are High! Tobias

4:20 pm 5:10 pm

Head and Neck Conditions: A Case-Based Review Tobias

5:20 pm 6:10 pm

Oral Surgery: Tumors, Fistulas and More Tobias

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WET LAB

Dermatology C u t

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Basic Ophthalmology

Treating Staph Pyoderma: Case-Based Discussion Hillier What to Do About Drug Resistant and Methicillin Resistant Staph Infections Hillier

Matthew Johnson DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA

Itchy, Itchy Dogs - Making the Most of Your Treatment Options Part 1-2

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $349 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $549

Hillier

Itchy, Itchy Dogs - Making the Most of Your Treatment Options Part 2-2 Hillier

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Matthew Johnson DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA

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FRIDAY− April 15

Orthopedic Surgery

8:00 am 8:50 am

Medicine for the Technician

DVM / TECH

g

Surgery

TECH

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $349 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $549

Funky Scary Skin Lesions - Managing "Gross" Skin Diseases Hillier Skin Diseases of Cats - New Diseases and New Insights on Old Diseases Hillier Overcoming the Barriers to Practicing Great Dermatology Hillier

Ophthalmic Examination a Tips and Tricks for the General Practitioner 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Dr. Jessica Stine, DVM, DACVO Dr. Thomas Miller, DVM, DACVO With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $275 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $475

Avian

Medicine for the Technician

Emergency Medicine

Respiratory Diseases

Dermat

Avian and Exotic Pet Clinical Pathology Part 1-2 Helmer

Nursing Consideration for the Neurologic Patient Siekaniec

The Trauma Patient: Stabilization and Diagnostics Harmon

Approach to the Coughing Dog Nafe Approach to the Coughing Cat Nafe

SUNDAY− April 17

saturDAY− April 16

7:00 am - 7:

8:00 am 8:50 am 9:00 am 9:50 am

Coping with Anesthetic Emergencies Brashear

Avian and Exotic Pet Clinical Pathology Part 2-2 Helmer

They Do It in Human Medicine, Why We Should Use the Nursing Process Siekaniec

Respiratory Pattern in Disease: Localization for Dyspnea Harmon

10:50 am 11:40 am

The Cry of the Blocked Cat Brashear

Common Medications Used in Avian/ Exotic Practice Helmer

Nursing Consideration for the Renal Feline Siekaniec

Coagulation Medicine: How Do I Monitor Coagulation Without a Fancy Machine? Harmon

1:10 pm 2:00 pm

Emergency Triage and Trauma Management Brashear

Avian and Exotic Pet Radiology Part 1-2 Helmer

Blood Products and Patient Delivery Siekaniec

2:10 pm 3:00 pm

Heatstroke in Dogs Brashear

Avian and Exotic Pet Radiology Part 2-2 Helmer

4:00 pm 4:50 pm

Respiratory Emergencies Brashear

5:00 pm 5:50 pm

Sweet Wound Care and Bandaging Brashear

Medicine for the Technician

9:00 am 9:50 am

Nursing Care of Parvo Brashear

10:00 am 10:50 am

The Euthanasia and Grieving Process Brashear

11:00 am 11:50 am

Practical Laboratory Skills Brashear

12:00 pm 12:50 pm

Approach to the Respiratory Distress Patient Nafe

Practical Scott

Canine and Feline Transfusion Therapy: How and When? Harmon

Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approach to Pleural Effusion Nafe

Suds not Today Scott

Oxygen Administration Siekaniec

Canine and Feline Transfusion Reaction: What to Do? Harmon

Update on Feline Nasal Diseases Nafe

Atopic De Scott

Avian/Exotic Anesthesia and Analgesia Part 1-2 Helmer

Option Beyond Force Feeding Siekaniec

How I Manage Anemia Harmon

Update on Respiratory Diagnostics Nafe

Managin Scott

Avian/Exotic Anesthesia and Analgesia Part 2-2 Helmer

Importance of Technician PEs Siekaniec

How I Manage Thrombocytopenia Harmon

Update on Tracheal Collapse Nafe

After All T Scott

Anesthesia

Emergency & Critical Care

Opthalmology

Orthope

7:00 am - 8:50 AM - Laws & Rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine | 7:00 am - 8:50 A Uncomplicated Monitoring Techniques for the Why Did My Dogs Eye Turn White? - DDx and Top 10 Or Corals and Crotalids Veterinary Technician Management for the White Eye Harris Salas Dupre Miller Multi-Modal Anesthesia & Analgesia Protocols Dupre

Anaphylaxis - Is It the True "Great Pretender"? Harris Measuring Lactate in the ER - Why Do We Care? Harris Serotonin Syndrome Harris

Why Did My Dogs Eye Turn Red? - DDx and Management for the Red Eye Miller Why Did My Dogs Eye Turn Blue? - DDx and Management for the Blue Eye Miller Ocular Pharmacology - What Are My Drug Choices, and When Do I Use Them? Miller

Feline Or ment Salas

Surgical U Salas

Canine O Hindlimb Salas


Sci e n t ific P r o g r Advanced Ultrasound

Dentistry

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With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

O

A N I M A L H E A L T H A Division of I-MED Pharma Inc.

tology

Hospice Care

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and Diagnostics:

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Advanced Small Animal Abdominal Ultrasound 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

C u t

Surgery

Client Care

Dental Radiography Interpretation Part 1-2 Smithson

Surgical Site Infections: Where Are We Now? Dujowich

Dental Radiography Interpretation Part 2-2 Smithson

Extrahepatic Billiary Obstruction (EXBO) Dujowich Monster Wounds & Monster Repairs Dujowich

Client Retention - Implementin Pet Owners Coming Back! Part Wernli Client Retention - Implementin Pet Owners Coming Back! Part Wernli Client Retention - Implementin Pet Owners Coming Back! Part Wernli

What went Wrong with these Dental Cases? Gingerich & Smithson

The Septic Abdomen Dujowich

Increasing Customer Complianc Wernli

Ask the Expert Gingerich & Smithson Updates for the Management of Feline Stomatitis and Canine Epulides Gingerich Diseased Teeth, Should They Stay or Go? Part 1-2 Gingerich

Adrenal Surgery Diagnosis, Challenges and Management Dujowich The Basic Abdominal Exploratory Dujowich

Increasing Customer Complianc Wernli

Polytrauma Triage and Management Dujowich

Online Marketing and Social M Wernli

Diseased Teeth, Should They Stay or Go? Part 2-2 Gingerich

Update on Cruciate Ligament Diseases Dujowich

Online Marketing and Social M Wernli

Ophthalmology

Emergency Medicine

Orthopedic Surgery

Online Marketing and Social M Wernli

Gastroenterology

Cytolog

:50 AM - Dispensing Legend Drugs | 7:00 am - 7:50 AM - Dispensing Legend Drugs | 7:00 am - 7:50 AM - Dispensing Legend Drugs | 7:00 am - 7:50 AM - Disp Basics of Euthanasia Buisson

How to Avoid CATastrophes: A Review of Feline Ophthalmology Part 1-2 Stine

A Practitioner's Guide to Fracture Management Part 1-3 Dycus

Prebiotic, Probiotics, Symbiotics, Oh My! What's Bugging Our Patients? Gallagher

Cytolo 8:00 am

Euthanasia Words and Wisdom Buisson

How to Avoid CATastrophes: A Review of Feline Ophthalmology Part 2-2 Stine

A Practitioner's Guide to Fracture Management Part 2-3 Dycus

Drug Therapies in GI Disease Gallagher

Heathe Heidi W

l, Profitable, Dermatology Veterinary Hospice Care Buisson

Management of Canine Corneal Ulcers Stine

Not All Fluids Are the Same Schaer

A Practitioner’s Guide to Fracture Management Part 3-3 Dycus

Regurgitation and Dysphagia: Dealing With Esophageal Diseases Gallagher

t Drugs - Topical Therapy

Adding a Hospice Program to Your Practice Buisson

Geriatric Canine & Feline Ophthalmology: Let's Learn Some New Tricks Part 1-2 Stine

Intravenous Overload Schaer

A Surgeon's Perspective on the Current Trends for the Management of Osteoarthritis Dycus

Chronic Vomiting in the Cat Gallagher

Canine Works 1:00 pm

ermatitis Today

Q&A: Hospice Case Studies and Discussion Buisson

Geriatric Canine & Feline Ophthalmology: Let's Learn Some New Tricks Part 2-2 Stine

Septic Shock Schaer

Hip Dysplasia: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Treatment Dycus

Clinical Approach to Chronic Diarrhea Gallagher

Heidi W Heathe

ng the Atopic Patient

Adding In-Home Hospice Services to Your Practice Buisson

Canine Glaucoma: How to Handle the Pressure Stine

Pit Viper Envenomation Schaer

Regenerative Medicine in Orthopedics: A New Approach to an Old Problem Dycus

IBD: What Is it and How Do We Treat It? Gallagher

These Ears!

Tough Cases in Euthanasia Buisson

Ocular Diseases in Diabetic Dogs: What to Tell Your Client Stine

Pictures Worth 1000 Words Schaer

Common Orthopedic Soft Tissue Injuries of the Forelimb Dycus

Pancreatitis in the Dog and Cat: Diagnosis and Treatment Gallagher

edic / Respiratory

Compassion Fatigue / Practice Management

Emergency Medicine

Urology

Gastroenterology

AM - Laws & Rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine | 7:00 am - 8:50 AM - Laws & Rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine | Achieving Happiness in Veterinary Medicine Part rthopedic Diseases You Need to Know Treat for the Treatable Part 1-2 Liquid Gold: Urinalysis Part 1-2 Clinical Approach to Increased Liver Enzymes 1-3 Gallagher Schaer Wamsley Buisson rthopedic Diseases and Pain Manage- Achieving Happiness in Veterinary Medicine Part Treat for the Treatable Part 2-2 Liquid Gold: Urinalysis Part 2-2 Chronic Liver Disease in the Dog 2-3 Gallagher Schaer Wamsley Buisson Achieving Happiness in Veterinary Medicine Part Upper Airway Diseases More on Clinical Pearls UA Case-Based Refresher Part 1-2 Chronic Liver Disease in the Cat 3-3 Gallagher Schaer Wamsley Buisson Orthopedic Diseases - Forelimb and Sock It to Me: Creating a Culture of Respect in Your Interventional Urology: How Can It Help My UA Case-Based Refresher Part 2-2 b Practice Patients? Wamsley Gallagher Buisson

 17 hands-on Wet labs  3 exciting Workshops  full conference details

Host Hotel Special Room Rate & Pre-re


r am a t - a - g l a n c e Gastroenterology

Infectious Diseases / Suture

ng Protocols That Will Keep 1-3

Understanding the Transmission of Tick-Borne Pathogens With Public Health Implications Alleman

Rehabilitation Overview of Exercises, When, What, Why and How to Treat Geriatric Patients Part 1-2 McCauley

Practice Management

ng Protocols That Will Keep 2-3

Disorders Causing Regurgitation Willard

More Than Just E. Canis: The Increasingly Complicated Story of Ehrlichiosis Alleman

Overview of Exercises, When, What, Why and How to Treat Geriatric Patients Part 2-2 McCauley

How to Walk and Talk Like a Cruz

ng Protocols That Will Keep 3-3

Hematemesis/GI Blood Loss Willard

Is It Immune-Mediated or Vector-Borne Diseases Part 1-2 Alleman

Neuro-Rehabilitation: A Logical Look at Helping These Patients McCauley

Communicating Care When Cruz

ce Part 1-2

Canine Pancreatitis Willard

Is It Immune-Mediated or Vector-Borne Diseases Part 2-2 Alleman

Assistive Devices for Geriatric Patients McCauley

Senior Moments - How to E Clients Cruz

ce Part 2-2

Chronic Small Bowel Diarrhea in Dogs Willard Protein-Losing Enteropathies in Dogs Willard Chronic Large Bowel Diarrhea in Dogs Willard

Hemoparasites of the Dog and Cat Alleman The Complete Urinalysis With Emphasis on the Microscopic Evaluation of Urine Sediment Alleman Suture Science and Selection Part 1-2 Brown

Intro to Lasers, the Science, the Variables and the Secrets McCauley

The Feminine Touch to Custo Cruz

edia in 2016 Part 1-3

Media in 2016 Part 2-3

Media in 2016 Part 3-3

gy / Mast Cell Tumor

Suture Science and Selection Part 2-2 Brown

Surgery / Wound Management

Gastroenterology / Neurology

Therapeutic Lasers: Do They Work and What Is the Research to Prove It? McCauley How to Strengthen and Stretch the Muscles That Support the Spine McCauley Limb Joint Mobilization - An In-Depth Look at How the Limb Joints Move and How to Obtain Improved Range of Motion McCauley

Dentistry

Dentistry

How to Handle the Idiot Bo Cruz

How to Make a Great First Im Cruz The Boomer Bang Cruz

Clinical Pathology

pensing Legend Drugs | 7:00 am - 7:50 AM - Dispensing Legend Drugs | 7:00 am - 7:50 AM - Dispensing Legend Drugs | 7:00 am - 7:50 AM - Dispensing Leg A Case-Oriented Approach to chn C u t Combined Cystotomy & Oral Masses: The Good the Bad Dental Radiology Te ic Interpreting the Hemogram: W Chronic Hepatic Diseases in Dogs W et and Red Cell Response Part 1-3 Work and the Ugly Part 1-2 Perineal Urethrostomies W e Positioning and t L ab Shop Willard Rebar L ab Peak in Cats Techniques Lab A - 8:00 am - 9:50 am A Case-Oriented Approach to 8:00 am - 12:00 pm Oral Masses: The Good the Bad Interpreting the Hemogram: W Lab B - 10:30 am - 12:20 pm Biliary Tract Diseases er Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP Denise S. Rollings, CVT, VTS and Red Cell Response Part 2-3 and the Ugly Part 2-2 Willard Karen Tobias, DVM, MS, DACVS Rebar Ward, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology) (Dentistry) Peak With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $225 A Case-Oriented Approach to Congenital Portosystemic Shunts Nerve Blocks and Pain Management Interpreting the Hemogram: W Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $425 and Red Cell Response Part 3-3 for the Dental Patient in Dogs Rebar Peak Willard Chemical Confusion: An Introdu C u t Down in All Four? The Causes Tension Relieving Techniques and and e Mast Cell Tumor Feline Dental to Biochemical Profiling The Basics of Oral Anatomy Treatment of Quadriplegia/ W et Rebar Other Wound Mgmt. Tips Work shop Extractions Quadriparesis L Rollings ab Shop C u t Schubert Lab A - 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm m - 5:00 pm 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm W et Lab B - 4:00 pm - 5:50 pm A Case-Oriented Approach to Michael Peak, DVM, DAVDC L ab From the Exam Room to the How to Treat CNS Trauma of the Profiling the Urinary System Ward, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology) Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC Rebar Head and Back Dental Table Karen Tobias, DVM, MS, DACVS er Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP Schubert Rollings With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $295 A Case-Oriented Approach to Sterile CNS Inflammatory Diseases, Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $495 With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $225 Profiling the Liver Part 1-2 Dental Abnormalities We Used to Call Them All GME but Rebar Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $425 Now We Know Better Rollings Schubert A Case-Oriented Approach to Profiling the Liver Part 2-2 Feline Dentistry Rebar Rollings e

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Dermatology

Dentistry

Neurology

| 7:00 am - 8:50 AM - Laws & Rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine | 7:00 am - 8:50 AM - Laws & Rules governing the practice of veterin c h n ic Lameness or Weakness? Orthopedic or Neurological? How to Approach to the Atopic Dog Dental Nerve Blocks & Te Culture and Sensitivity Tell the Difference Work Reeder W et Dental Prophylaxis Shop Interpretation Workshop Schubert g

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Flea Control and Beyond Reeder

Denise S. Rollings, CVT, VTS-Dentistry

Call It Syringohydromyelia or Just Plain SM Caudal Occipital Malformation Syndrome (COMS) Is Becoming More Prevalent Schubert

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Techs $95 Wet Lab Only Fee: Techs $125

Recognizing Neurological Disease Schubert

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(No Charge- Must Pre-register)

Otitis Externa: It's Not That Simple Reeder

9:00 am - 12:50 pm

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Elizabeth Bailey, DVM Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology)

Cutaneous Manifestations of Internal Disease Reeder

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9:00 am - 10:50 am

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Special Needs of the Neurological Patient Schubert

 362 hours  pre-register by march 16th and save! at www.fvma.org

egistration Discount Ends March 16th


DVM

TECH

DVM / TECH

WET LAB

Diabetes / Clinical Pathology / Neurology

Emergency & Critical Care

Anesthesia Case Scenarios Shih

The Uncomplicated Diabetic Patient - Back to the Basics Meeks

Treating Shock Part 1-2 Hackett

How to Treat Refractory Hypotension Shih

The Complicated Diabetic Patient - When Insulin Isn’t Enough Meeks

Treating Shock Part 2-2 Hackett

Shih

Anesthesia Monitoring Capnograph and ECG

Grading of Tumors: What Does a General Practitioner Need to Know? Kiehl

Vascular Access Techniques Hackett

Effectively Communicate with the Aged

Update in Chronic Pain Shih

Spleens That Go Bump in the Night Kiehl

Small Animal Trauma Hackett

tomer Care

Blood Gas Made Simple Shih

Transfusion Medicine Hackett

oss and Other Irritating People

Pulmonary Thromboembolism (PTE) Diagnosis and Treatment Shih

The Neurological Examination, Keep It Simple and It Won’t Be Mysterious Schubert Keeping the Head on Straight; a Review of Vestibular Syndromes Schubert

mpression, Again and Again

Choose the Correct Antibotics for the Perioperative Case Part 1-2 Shih

Seizures, You May Be Surprised, They Are Not All Emergencies Schubert

Hackett

Choose the Correct Antibotics for the Perioperative Case Part 2-2

The Dog’s a Dragging, How to Diagnose and What to Do About Paraparesis/Paraplegia Schubert

Hackett

a Woman but Be Heard Like a Man

n You Don’t Have the Time

Shih Cardiology

Practice Management

Cardiology

Dietary Medicine

Respiratory Emergencies

Hackett

Urogenital Emergencies

FRIDAY− April 15

Anesthesia / Pain Management

Metabolic Disasters

Inventory Control / Medicine for the Technician

Radiology

Diabetes Mellitus/Diabetic Ketoacidois (DKA) Part 1-2 Poulin

Abdominal Radiographic Image Interpretation Part 1-2 Shaikh

gend Drugs The ABCs of ECGs Part 1-2 Sleeper

Developing the Ultimate Social Media Policy Garcia

White 3

The ABCs of ECGs Part 2-2 Sleeper

Using Mobile Technology to Increase Compliance & Build Loyalty Part 1-2 Garcia

Pet Food Labels - Demystifying the Package Burns

Diabetes Mellitus/Diabetic Ketoacidois (DKA) Part 2-2 Poulin

Abdominal Radiographic Image Interpretation Part 2-2 Shaikh

White 3

Your Pet Has a Murmur!! Sleeper

Using Mobile Technology to Increase Compliance & Build Loyalty Part 2-2 Garcia

Bring Back the Bounce: Managing Osteoarthritis in Pets Burns

Fanconi Syndrome Poulin

Radiographic Special Procedures - Techniques and Pitfalls Shaikh

Update on Treating Canine Heart Failure Sleeper

Marketing: How to Have Fun With Your Entire Team Garcia

ECG Part 1 - Rhythm Analysis Spier

Chronic Kidney Disease - Getting Your Picky Patients to Eat Burns

Are You Controlling Inventory or Is the Inventory Controlling You? Part 1-2

Thoracic Radiographic Interpretation Part 1-2 Shaikh

At-Home Tips and Tricks for Treating Congestive Heart Failure Sleeper

Optimizing Your Digital Presence Featuring Real Case Studies from Real Veterinary Practices Part 1-2 Garcia

ECG Part 2 - Treatment Spier

Calm the Angry GI Tract - Nutrition in Vomiting and Diarrhea Burns

Are You Controlling Inventory or Is the Inventory Controlling You? Part 2-2

Thoracic Radiographic Interpretation Part 2-2 Shaikh

The Coughing Cardiac Patient Sleeper

Optimizing Your Digital Presence Featuring Real Case Studies from Real Veterinary Practices Part 2-2 Garcia

Interpretation of Chest X-rays: The Cardiologist's Perspective Spier

Feline Nutrition - Cats Are Not Small Dogs Burns

Musculoskeletal Radiographic Image Interpretation Appendicular Skeleton Shaikh

Feline Cardiomyopathy Sleeper

Optimize Your Website for Local Visibility Search Garcia

Drugs and the Heart: Why Are There So Doggone Many? Spier

FLUTD: What Is All the Stress? Burns

Musculoskeletal Radiographic Image Interpretation - Axial Skeleton Shaikh

uction

Practice Management

Cardiology

Medicine for the Technician Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): Discusses IBD in Detail Part 1-2 Poulin

An Introduction to Diagnostic Cytology Part 2-2 Rebar

Using Facebook for Maximized Success in 2016 Part 2-2 Garcia

The Coughing Dog Spier

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): Secondary Diseases Associated with Uncontrolled IBD Part 2-2 Poulin

Cytology of Pleural and Peritoneal Effusions Rebar

Developing a Reputation Management Strategy Part 1-2 Garcia

From Murmur to Failure: Management of Canine Heart Disease Spier

Leptospirosis Poulin

Cytology of Lymph Nodes Rebar

Developing a Reputation Management Strategy Part 2-2 Garcia

Management of Congestive Heart Failure Spier

SUNDAY− April 17

Clinical Pathology

nary medicine | 7:00 am - 8:50 AM - Laws & Rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine An Introduction to Diagnostic Cytology Using Facebook for Maximized Success in 2016 Feline Cardiomyopathy Part 1-2 Part 1-2 Spier Rebar Garcia

saturDAY− April 16

White 3


*To register at the discounted registration rate below, your 2016 FVMA dues must be current!

Phone

Preferrred Address

Clinic Name

Name

A

Total Membership Dues

Email 

$

D

Total Spouse/Guest Fee 

$

Veterinarian Registration FORM

Name as It Appears on Card

Credit Card Number

(U.S. Funds drawn on U.S. Banks)

E

After March 16, 2016 Add $75 Per Registrant

Total Events Fee $

Dinner - 7:00 pm

An Evening of Dinner, Dancing, Fun & Great Prizes!

$25.00 Fri., FVMA Business Luncheon   Sat., FVMA Foundation Charitable Gala $95.00   Quantity: _____ X $95

Social Events

Florida Veterinary Medical Association | 7207 Monetary Drive • Orlando, FL 32809

Signature 

Expiration Date 

   Visa    Mastercard   American Express Discover

Total WL/WS Fee 

Method of Payment   Check/Money Order    Charge My Credit Card Below $

C

Child’s Name – Please Print Legibly

Spouse/Guest Name – Please Print Legibly   Children’s Registration $0.00

lunch for Friday & Saturday and non-ticketed social events. Those who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)   Spouse/Guest Registration $75.00

(This registration allows entrance to the exhibit hall, and includes

Spouse/Guest Registration

(Must be Pre-Registered to attend) Sat. Cytology     Sat. Canine Mast Cell Tumor Sun. Culture and Sensitivity Interpretation  

Workshops (WS)

$

Total Registration Fee   $

Sat. Combd. Cystotomy & Perineal (in Cats)  Lab A (8:00 am - 9:50 am)  Lab B (10:30 am - 12:20 pm) $225.00 $425.00 Sat. Tension Relieving & Wound Mgmt. Tips  Lab A (1:30 pm - 3:20 pm)  Lab B (4:00 pm - 5:50 pm) $225.00 $425.00

$150.00 $525.00 $595.00 $595.00 $545.00 $745.00 $549.00 $549.00 $595.00 $475.00 $495.00

With Conf. Reg. Wet Lab Only

  Thur. Rehab. & Laser Therapy $125.00   Thur. Ophthalmic Surgery - Level II $325.00   Thur. Abdominal Ultrasound - Normals $395.00   Thur. Oral and Periodontal Surgery $395.00   Thurs. Canine Dental Extractions $345.00   Thurs. Clinical Techniq. for Emergency Medicine $545.00   Fri. Extracapsular Suture Stabilization $349.00   Fri. Medial Patella Luxation $349.00   Fri. Advanced Abdominal Ultrasound $395.00   Fri. Ophthalmic Examination & Diagnostics $275.00   Sat. Feline Dental Extractions $295.00

Wet Labs (WL)

Total Payment (A,B,C,D,E)

B

AVMA Accredited Veterinary School Name (Proof of current enrollment required)

  FVMA 2016 Member.......................................$525.00   Member, Graduated 2014-2015........................ $50.00   Member, Graduated 2013...............................$350.00   Member, Graduated 2012...............................$400.00   Non-Resident.................................................$525.00   (Current Member of State VMA or Military)   Non-FVMA Member.......................................$650.00   Veterinary Student..............................................$0.00

(Includes Lunch Fri & Sat and Conference Proceedings on DVD)

Registration Fee

$

Veterinarian Registration

 My 2016 FVMA Membership is current  I would like to join and take advantage of the discounted registration fee. I qualify for the following: Categories: (please check one)   Regular Member $255.00  Recent Graduate (within last 2 years) $141.00  State/Federal Employee $141.00  Part-Time Employed $141.00 (Employed at FVMA Member practice & work 20 hrs per week or less)   Non-Florida Resident $104.00

FVMA Membership

April 14-17, 2016 Tampa convention center and Tampa marriott waterside hotel & Marina tampa, FLorida

87th FVMA Annual Conference


87th FVMA Annual Conference April 14-17, 2016 Tampa convention center and Tampa marriott waterside hotel & Marina tampa, FLorida

Clinic Name Address

Phone Email 

3rd TEAM MEMBER Name: Email:

2nd TEAM MEMBER Name: Email:

1st TEAM MEMBER Name: Email:

$125.00 $125.00 Free Free

B

$125.00 $

C

Total Wet Labs & Workshops Fee

  $75.00 Spouse/Guest

Spouse/Guest Registration

Wet Lab Only

$125.00 $125.00 Free Free

$

C

B

$125.00

$

Wet Labs (WL) & Workshops (WS) With Conf. Reg.   Thur. Rehab. & Laser Therapy WL $75.00   Sat. Dental Radiology Positioning and Techniques WL $95.00   Sat. Cytology WS (Must Pre-Register to Attend) Free   Sat. Canine Mast Cell Tumor WS Free (Must Pre-Register to Attend)   Sun. Dental Nerve Blocks & Dental Prophylaxis WL $95.00

Includes Lunch - Friday & Saturday

$ 150.00 A Member Reg. Fee  CVT  CVA Non-Member Reg. Fee  CVT  CVA $ 195.00 A   Veterinary Assistant   Practice Manager   Other Admin. Staff

Total Wet Labs & Workshops Fee

$

Wet Labs (WL) & Workshops (WS) With Conf. Reg.   Thur. Rehab. & Laser Therapy WL $75.00   Sat. Dental Radiology Positioning and Techniques WL $95.00   Sat. Cytology WS (Must Pre-Register to Attend) Free   Sat. Canine Mast Cell Tumor WS Free (Must Pre-Register to Attend)   Sun. Dental Nerve Blocks & Dental Prophylaxis WL $95.00

Includes Lunch - Friday & Saturday

$ 150.00 A Member Reg. Fee  CVT  CVA Non-Member Reg. Fee  CVT  CVA $ 195.00 A   Veterinary Assistant   Practice Manager   Other Admin. Staff

B

  $75.00 Spouse/Guest

Spouse/Guest Registration

Wet Lab Only

$ 150.00 A Member Reg. Fee  CVT  CVA Non-Member Reg. Fee  CVT  CVA $ 195.00 A   Veterinary Assistant   Practice Manager   Other Admin. Staff Includes Lunch - Friday & Saturday Wet Lab Only

$125.00 $125.00 Free Free

$

C

$125.00

$

Wet Labs (WL) & Workshops (WS) With Conf. Reg.   Thur. Rehab. & Laser Therapy WL $75.00   Sat. Dental Radiology Positioning and Techniques WL $95.00   Sat. Cytology WS (Must Pre-Register to Attend) Free   Sat. Canine Mast Cell Tumor WS Free (Must Pre-Register to Attend)   Sun. Dental Nerve Blocks & Dental Prophylaxis WL $95.00 Total Wet Labs & Workshops Fee   $75.00 Spouse/Guest

(This registration allows entrance to the exhibit hall, and includes lunch for Friday & Saturday and non-ticketed social events. Those who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

Spouse/Guest Registration

(This registration allows entrance to the exhibit hall, and includes lunch for Friday & Saturday and non-ticketed social events. Those who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

D

(This registration allows entrance to the exhibit hall, and includes lunch for Friday & Saturday and non-ticketed social events. Those who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

Name:

Sat., FVMA charitable gala/ Dinner

  $95.00 Quantity: ________

After March 16, 2016 Add $25 Per Registrant

$

Name:

D

Name:

$

Name:

Name:

  $95.00 Quantity: ________

Sat., FVMA charitable gala/ Dinner

  $0.00 Children’s Registration

D

  $0.00 Children’s Registration $

  $0.00 Children’s Registration Name:

Sat., FVMA charitable gala/ Dinner   $95.00 Quantity: ________

$

   Visa    Mastercard   American Express Discover Expiration Date 

Total Team Member Payment (1,2,3)

Method of Payment   Check/Money Order    Charge My Credit Card Below $ Credit Card Number  

Signature 

Florida Veterinary Medical Association | 7207 Monetary Drive • Orlando, FL 32809

Name as It Appears on Card

Veterinary team registration


$t 9Inc5ludes:

e Tick ner cing n i -D & Dan et -DJ ffle tick Fun! - Ra ight of -N

FVMA foundation Charitable Gala

- Festival on the Bay Reverse Raffle and auction Saturday, April 16, 2016 | 7:00 PM

Enjoy an evening of DELECTABLE food, dancing & fun while supporting a great cause!

For just $95 - get your ticket for a chance to win thousands of dollars in the reverse raffle and door prizes. Plus dinner & dancing. An evening to let your hair down and have some fun!

Dinner

TREAT YOURSELF & YOUR STAFF!

Top 10 Grand Prizes

$100 to $2,500

More than $5,000 in cash and prizes to be given away!

Top 10 Grand Prizes

To Aid The FVMA Foundation

SUPPORT A WORTHY CAUSE AND WIN BIG! Reward your entire team and have loads of fun, all for a great cause! Call FVMA at (800) 992-3862 to reserve a table of 10 for $950.

$2500 $1000 $400 $250 $200 $175 $150 $125 $100 $100

Cock tails

DJ & Dancin The FVMA Foundation contributes to:  Animal Disaster Relief  Continuing Education  Public Education in Animal Health and Welfare  Veterinary & Veterinary Technician Scholarships  Youth Organizations  Research Programs

g


REMINDER - MAY 31, 2016

License Renewal Deadline

Is Fast Approaching

Veterinarians must complete a minimum of 30 hours of CE every two years, to renew their licenses. The deadline for acquiring the required CE this year is May 31. The guide for the required continuing education that Florida veterinarians need for licensure purposes, is Rule Chapter 61G18-16, Florida Administrative Code of Chapter 474, Florida Statutes. The rule directs that licensed veterinarians must renew their licenses every two years in the even numbered year. The last renewal date was June 1, 2014. The next renewal date then, is June 1, 2016. The code stipulates “All licensed veterinarians shall be required to obtain continuing professional education which contributes to the advancement, extension or enhancement of professional skills and knowledge in the field of veterinary medicine.” It also spells out requirements pertaining to the hours of CE and types or categories of CE accepted, as well as standards that must be upheld and adhered to by the providers of continuing education. The Requirements for Active Status License Renewal • Completion of 30 hours of continuing professional education in veterinary medicine every two years. • No less than one hour of CE in the area of dispensing legend drugs • No less than two hours of CE in the area of the laws and rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine (Chapters 455 and 474, F.S. and Rule Title 61G18, F.A.C.) • Not more than fifteen hours are to be non-interactive, correspondence courses. • Computer on-line courses that involve on-line, real time, live or delayed participatory questioning or responses are not correspondence courses. • Not more than five hours in complementary and alternative medicine modalities. • Not more than five hours of CE in business, practice management courses or stress and impairment seminars. • Five hours of CE in laws and rules may be obtained once during the biennium by attending a full day or eight hours of a Board of Veterinary Medicine meeting where disciplinary hearings are conducted by the board. The attendee must sign in with the executive director of the board or designee before the meeting begins; must remain in continuous attendance; must sign out with the executive director of the board or designee at the end of the meeting day or at a time earlier as affirmatively authorized by the board.

26  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

One hour of CE equals a minimum of fifty minutes and a maximum of sixty minutes. Total hours of lecture time cannot be added up and divided into 50 minute intervals to obtain one hour credit for each 50 minute interval. Florida Licensed Veterinarians may obtain the required CE of one (1) hour in the area of dispensing legend drugs and two (2) hours in the area of laws and rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine at the 87th FVMA Annual Conference, April 14–17, 2016, in Tampa, FL, before the renewal deadline.


It’s a soft chew. Kills both fleas and ticks. It’s prescription only.

Now a pprov to kill m ed ore ticks!

NexGardTM (afoxolaner) is the protection you asked for, and patients will beg for. NexGard is FDA-approved to kill fleas, prevent flea infestations, and kill Black-Legged (deer) ticks, Lone Star ticks and American Dog ticks. NexGard is available only with a veterinarian’s prescription, and features anti-diversion technology monitored by Pinkerton® Consulting & Investigations.

NexGard and FRONTLINE VET LABS are trademarks of Merial. ®PINKERTON is a registered trademark of Pinkerton Service Corporation. ©2014 Merial Limited, Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. NEX14TTRADEAD (06/14).

TM

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: For use in dogs only. The most common adverse reaction is vomiting.  Other adverse reactions reported are dry/flaky skin, diarrhea, lethargy, and anorexia.  The safe use of NexGard in pregnant, breeding, or lactating dogs has not been evaluated. Use with caution in dogs with a history of seizures.


usda vETERINARY mEDICINE lOAN rEPAYMENT pROGRAM In 2015, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced in November that it would offer awards totaling more than 4.5 million dollars to 49 veterinarians toward repayment of veterinary student loans in return for their service in shortage areas.

The USDA makes these awards annually through the federal Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP).

Veterinarians who participate in this program commit to three years of service in a designated veterinary shortage area in food animal practice or public practice, and receive monetary awards to pay off student loan debt.

Currently, the loan payments are subject to a 39 percent federal withholding tax. The USDA includes that amount in each award to offset the liability.

The program offers a maximum loan repayment of $75,000 to any one veterinarian, but awardees are eligible to apply for a renewal award. Requests for applications to the program in 2016 are expected to be published by the USDA next month. This year’s application process which begins in April should culminate with the USDA making offers to individual veterinarian applicants in September, 2016. With recruitment of veterinarians to rural areas being a great challenge, this USDA program is a huge plus for the practice of the profession in rural America. Meanwhile, high student loan debt is a reality for most veterinary school graduates who are driven to work in locations with larger populations and higher pay. The program therefore offers relief in two areas where it is sorely needed, alleviation of student loan debt and the services of veterinarians in areas that need this essential service. The program ultimately improves the well-being of livestock and contribute to providing a safe food supply. In 2015, the USDA received 137 applications and offered 49 awards. Participants must serve in one of three types of shortage situations:

28  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Awardees filling type 1 shortage areas need to dedicate at least 80 percent of their time to providing food animal veterinary services. Type 2 shortages are in rural areas where awardees must provide food animal veterinary services at least 30 percent of the time. Awardees filling type 3 shortage areas must commit at least 49 percent of their time to public practice.

The USDA’s VMLRP is authorized by the National Veterinary Medical Services Act which was enacted in 2003 to help qualified veterinarians to offset significant portions of their debt incurred when pursuing their doctorate in veterinary medicine or equivalent qualifications. It is administered by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture. For more information on the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program, the contact person is: Joseph Perez Program Analyst Policy and Oversight Division Email: jperez@nifa.usda.gov Ph: (202) 401-3486 Fax: (202) 401-7752


Veterinary Hospice Lap of Love provides in-home hospice and euthanasia services to local families that want to be in the comfort of their own home during the last days or moments of their pet's life. ♥ Tampa - St. Pete ♥ Broward County ♥ Palm Beach County ♥ South Martin County ♥ Orlando ♥ Jacksonville ♥ St. Augustine ♥ Miami-Dade County ♥ Gainesville

CAUTION: Federal (USA) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Description: NEXGARD™ (afoxolaner) is available in four sizes of beef-flavored, soft chewables for oral administration to dogs and puppies according to their weight. Each chewable is formulated to provide a minimum afoxolaner dosage of 1.14 mg/lb (2.5 mg/kg). Afoxolaner has the chemical composition 1-Naphthalenecarboxamide, 4-[5[3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-4, 5-dihydro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-3-isoxazolyl]-N[2-oxo-2-[(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)amino]ethyl. Indications: NEXGARD kills adult fleas and is indicated for the treatment and prevention of flea infestations (Ctenocephalides felis), and the treatment and control of Black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis), American Dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), and Lone Star tick (Amblyomma americanum) infestations in dogs and puppies 8 weeks of age and older, weighing 4 pounds of body weight or greater, for one month. Dosage and Administration: NEXGARD is given orally once a month, at the minimum dosage of 1.14 mg/lb (2.5 mg/kg). Dosing Schedule: Body Weight 4.0 to 10.0 lbs. 10.1 to 24.0 lbs. 24.1 to 60.0 lbs. 60.1 to 121.0 lbs. Over 121.0 lbs.

Afoxolaner Per Chewable (mg)

Precautions: The safe use of NEXGARD in breeding, pregnant or lactating dogs has not been evaluated. Use with caution in dogs with a history of seizures (see Adverse Reactions). Adverse Reactions: In a well-controlled US field study, which included a total of 333 households and 615 treated dogs (415 administered afoxolaner; 200 administered active control), no serious adverse reactions were observed with NEXGARD. Over the 90-day study period, all observations of potential adverse reactions were recorded. The most frequent reactions reported at an incidence of > 1% within any of the three months of observations are presented in the following table. The most frequently reported adverse reaction was vomiting. The occurrence of vomiting was generally self-limiting and of short duration and tended to decrease with subsequent doses in both groups. Five treated dogs experienced anorexia during the study, and two of those dogs experienced anorexia with the first dose but not subsequent doses. Table 1: Dogs With Adverse Reactions. Treatment Group Afoxolaner

Chewables Administered

11.3 One 28.3 One 68 One 136 One Administer the appropriate combination of chewables

NEXGARD can be administered with or without food. Care should be taken that the dog consumes the complete dose, and treated animals should be observed for a few minutes to ensure that part of the dose is not lost or refused. If it is suspected that any of the dose has been lost or if vomiting occurs within two hours of administration, redose with another full dose. If a dose is missed, administer NEXGARD and resume a monthly dosing schedule. Flea Treatment and Prevention: Treatment with NEXGARD may begin at any time of the year. In areas where fleas are common year-round, monthly treatment with NEXGARD should continue the entire year without interruption. To minimize the likelihood of flea reinfestation, it is important to treat all animals within a household with an approved flea control product. Tick Treatment and Control: Treatment with NEXGARD may begin at any time of the year (see Effectiveness). Contraindications: There are no known contraindications for the use of NEXGARD. Warnings: Not for use in humans. Keep this and all drugs out of the reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion, contact a physician immediately.

www.fvma.org |

Oral active control

N1

% (n=415)

N2

% (n=200)

Vomiting (with and without blood)

17

4.1

25

12.5

Dry/Flaky Skin

13

3.1

2

1.0

Diarrhea (with and without blood)

13

3.1

7

3.5

Lethargy

7

1.7

4

2.0

Anorexia

5

1.2

9

4.5

Number of dogs in the afoxolaner treatment group with the identified abnormality. 2 Number of dogs in the control group with the identified abnormality. In the US field study, one dog with a history of seizures experienced a seizure on the same day after receiving the first dose and on the same day after receiving the second dose of NEXGARD. This dog experienced a third seizure one week after receiving the third dose. The dog remained enrolled and completed the study. Another dog with a history of seizures had a seizure 19 days after the third dose of NEXGARD. The dog remained enrolled and completed the study. A third dog with a history of seizures received NEXGARD and experienced no seizures throughout the study. To report suspected adverse events, for technical assistance or to obtain a copy of the MSDS, contact Merial at 1-888-637-4251 or www.merial.com/ nexgard. For additional information about adverse drug experience reporting for animal drugs, contact FDA at 1-888-FDA-VETS or online at http://www.fda.gov/ AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth. Mode of Action: Afoxolaner is a member of the isoxazoline family, shown to bind at a binding site to inhibit insect and acarine ligand-gated chloride channels, in particular those gated by the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), thereby blocking pre- and post-synaptic transfer of chloride ions across cell membranes. Prolonged afoxolaner-induced hyperexcitation results in uncontrolled activity of the central nervous system and death of insects and acarines. The selective toxicity of afoxolaner between insects and acarines and mammals may be inferred by the differential sensitivity of the insects and acarines’ GABA receptors versus mammalian GABA receptors. 1

the fvma |

@floridavma |

Effectiveness: In a well-controlled laboratory study, NEXGARD began to kill fleas four hours after initial administration and demonstrated >99% effectiveness at eight hours. In a separate well-controlled laboratory study, NEXGARD demonstrated 100% effectiveness against adult fleas 24 hours post-infestation for 35 days, and was ≥ 93% effective at 12 hours post-infestation through Day 21, and on Day 35. On Day 28, NEXGARD was 81.1% effective 12 hours post-infestation. Dogs in both the treated and control groups that were infested with fleas on Day -1 generated flea eggs at 12- and 24-hours post-treatment (0-11 eggs and 1-17 eggs in the NEXGARD treated dogs, and 4-90 eggs and 0-118 eggs in the control dogs, at 12- and 24hours, respectively). At subsequent evaluations post-infestation, fleas from dogs in the treated group were essentially unable to produce any eggs (0-1 eggs) while fleas from dogs in the control group continued to produce eggs (1-141 eggs). In a 90-day US field study conducted in households with existing flea infestations of varying severity, the effectiveness of NEXGARD against fleas on the Day 30, 60 and 90 visits compared with baseline was 98.0%, 99.7%, and 99.9%, respectively. Collectively, the data from the three studies (two laboratory and one field) demonstrate that NEXGARD kills fleas before they can lay eggs, thus preventing subsequent flea infestations after the start of treatment of existing flea infestations. In well-controlled laboratory studies, NEXGARD demonstrated >94% effectiveness against Dermacentor variabilis and Ixodes scapularis, 48 hours post-infestation, and against Amblyomma americanum 72 hours post-infestation, for 30 days. Animal Safety: In a margin of safety study, NEXGARD was administered orally to 8- to 9-week-old Beagle puppies at 1, 3, and 5 times the maximum exposure dose (6.3 mg/kg) for three treatments every 28 days, followed by three treatments every 14 days, for a total of six treatments. Dogs in the control group were sham-dosed. There were no clinically-relevant effects related to treatment on physical examination, body weight, food consumption, clinical pathology (hematology, clinical chemistries, or coagulation tests), gross pathology, histopathology or organ weights. Vomiting occurred throughout the study, with a similar incidence in the treated and control groups, including one dog in the 5x group that vomited four hours after treatment. In a well-controlled field study, NEXGARD was used concomitantly with other medications, such as vaccines, anthelmintics, antibiotics (including topicals), steroids, NSAIDS, anesthetics, and antihistamines. No adverse reactions were observed from the concomitant use of NEXGARD with other medications. Storage Information: Store at or below 30°C (86°F) with excursions permitted up to 40°C (104°F). How Supplied: NEXGARD is available in four sizes of beef-flavored soft chewables: 11.3, 28.3, 68 or 136 mg afoxolaner. Each chewable size is available in color-coded packages of 1, 3 or 6 beef-flavored chewables. NADA 141-406, Approved by FDA Marketed by: Frontline Vet Labs™, a Division of Merial Limited. Duluth, GA 30096-4640 USA Made in Brazil. 1050-4493-02 Rev. 4/2014

™NexGard and FRONTLINE VET LABS are trademarks of Merial. ©2014 Merial. All rights reserved.

florida-veterinary-medical-association |  29


The Cat Thyroid Center

98% Success Rate. Guaranteed.

“Dr. Ott and his team are true professionals who always go above and beyond in the care of both the patient and the patient’s people. The Cat Thyroid Center has treated two of my family members and both of these demanding ladies had absolutely no complaints at the level of service and attention they received during their I-131 spa treatment.” -Dr. William Walsh, A Pet’s Friend Animal Hospital, Venice, FL

 Specialized Treatment in a Warm, Homelike

“Over the years I have referred literally dozens of hyperthyroid cats to the Cat Thyroid Center. Every client I have sent has been very impressed and happy with the service they and their pet has received. The feedback I get is always positive, and I will continue to refer my clients to Dr. Ott for I-131 treatment.” -Dr. Andrew King, Cat Hospital of Sarasota, Sarasota, FL

Environment.  Focus on Customer Service Excellence with

“The Cat Thyroid Center offers excellent medical care and makes sure the patient and client feel at home. Dr. Ott does an amazing job following up with cases both with the owners and with me. He is always available when any questions arise. His compassion and knowledge make the Cat Thyroid Center superior when it comes to treatment and as a result we highly recommend him.” -Dr. Sherri Basso, The Cat Hospital of Orlando, Orlando, FL

Individualized Patient Care.  Over 15 Years of Experience.  Short, 48 Hour Stay.

The Gentle Cure for Hyperthyroidism

717 S. Tamiami Trail Ruskin, FL 33570 813.641.3425 www.catthyroid@cs.com

Protect your livelihood with all the right coverage through AVMA PLIT. We are the most trusted source of professional, business and personal coverage for every stage of your career.

our expertise is

your strength Workers’ Compensation Business Property & Liability Employment Practices Liability Umbrella Liability Commercial Auto Flood Data Breach Professional Liability Veterinary License Defense Professional Extension (Animal Bailee) Embryo & Semen Storage Coverage Safety & Risk Management Resources Personal Auto Homeowners Renters Personal Excess (Umbrella) Liability •

For a coverage comparison of your entire insurance portfolio to the PLIT program, call 800-228-PLIT (7548) or visit avmaplit.com.

30  |  FVMA ADVOCATE


Florida Practices for Sale FLORIDA ANIMAL REPRODUCTIVE New! Pasco County: Rapidly growing area. $995K+ gross. No Emergencies, grooming or boarding. LeasedBANK facility. (FL10N) CENTER & FROZEN SEMEN

New! Pasco County: Rapidly growing area. $995K+ gross. No Emergencies, grooming or boarding. Leased facility. (FL10N)

44441.75 Summit Blvd. Charlotte County: doctor, small animal practice in leased 1,100SF facility. NoWest Emergencies, boarding or grooming offered. $214K Personal Palm Beach, FL 33406 income to buyer.(FL14P)

Charlotte County: 1.75 doctor, small animal practice in leased 1,100SF facility. No Emergencies, boarding or grooming offered. $214K Personal income to buyer.(FL14P)

Sarasota County. facilityP.A. on approximately 1 acre corner lot near Dr. I. 4000+SF Arun, DVM., up and coming new neighborhood. 2 doctor, small animal practice. $1M+ www.bestpetdoctor.com gross. No Emergencies. (FL22E)

Sarasota County. 4000+SF facility on approximately 1 acre corner lot near up and coming new neighborhood. 2 doctor, small animal practice. $1M+ gross. No Emergencies. (FL22E)

Florida Practices for Sale

561-439-7900

Infertility work up for males & females. Induction of Price Reduced! Jacksonville. Solo doctor practice, well equipped leased Estrus. Timing. soundness. facilityOvulation on Monument Road.Breeding $675K+gross in 2014. No emergencies or grooming. (FL42J) Semen Freezing. High Risk Pregnancy Management. Sold! Suncoast. Congratulations to Dr. & Glenn Smith on the sale of Artificial Insemination Fresh, cooled Frozen Sunshine Animal Hospital to Dr. Kristen Brauer. (FL10C) Semen. Electro Ejaculator. Genetic Testing. Kennel Sold! Pasco County. Congratulations to Dr. Valerie Management consultation. Diagnosis and Fucci on the sale of Veterinary Rehabilitation and Wellness Center to Dr. David Sheridan. Management of Post Partum Disorders. Medical (FL33O) management of Pyometria. Timed-pre-planned C-sections with laser. Medical management of BPH Vaginoscopy. Vaginal Cytology. Elective abortion. 1610 Frederica Road * Saint Simons Island, GA 31522 Vulvuloplasty. Estrus suppression. Dystocia Toll Free: 800.333.1984 * www.simmonsinc.com Email:during southeast@simmonsinc.com management office hours. Licensed Florida Ultrasound Real Estate Broker Cooled Semen Shipment.

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Price Reduced! Jacksonville. Solo doctor practice, well equipped leased facility on Monument Road. $675K+gross in 2014. No emergencies or grooming. (FL42J) Sold! Suncoast. Congratulations to Dr. Glenn Smith on the sale of Sunshine Animal Hospital to Dr. Kristen Brauer. (FL10C) Sold! Pasco County. Congratulations to Dr. Valerie Fucci on the sale of Veterinary Rehabilitation and Wellness Center to Dr. David Sheridan. (FL33O)

1610 Frederica Road * Saint Simons Island, GA 31522 Toll Free: 800.333.1984 * www.simmonsinc.com Email: southeast@simmonsinc.com Licensed Florida Real Estate Broker

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florida-veterinary-medical-association |  31


PRACTICE Pulse Got a question? The FVMA can help. One of the benefits of membership in the FVMA is our Helpline, (800) 992-3862, available to members daily, Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 6:00 pm. Our Helpline also provides insight to the FVMA staff, of the challenges and concerns of our members. In this feature we will highlight topics from the questions we received in preceding weeks, in an effort to keep our members up-to-date on current concerns as well as regulatory and legislative changes.

Question:

Can we "advertise" on the bottom of our invoices and monthly reminders, "Refer a new medical client and receive a $25 credit on your account"? We also currently offer a $10 credit to new clients that mention our website ad at their first appointment. Is this legal?

A: Section 474.214(1)(k), Florida Statutes speaks to the payment of a credit for referring a new client, which would provide grounds for disciplinary action: (k)  Paying or receiving kickbacks, rebates, bonuses, or other remuneration for receiving a patient or client or for referring a patient or client to another provider of veterinary services or goods. So the payment of "other remuneration" (i.e. a credit) for the referral would constitute a violation. Providing a credit for mentioning the website at the first appointment does not involve a referral of another and thus, is not a violation.

Question:

I am looking into purchasing a new electronic message board to place below our roadside business sign. The message board will change every 6 seconds with a new phrase. How do we promote our "specials" and/or "discounts" to avoid being in violation for not using a disclaimer since our space will be limited? Is a disclaimer still required? What words are acceptable vs non-acceptable?

A: The promotion of any "specials" or "discounts" is governed by §455.24, Florida Statutes: 455.24  Advertisement by a veterinarian of free or discounted services; required statement.—In any advertisement for a free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment by a person licensed under chapter 474, the following statement shall appear in capital letters clearly distinguishable from the rest of the text: THE PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT. However, the required statement shall not be necessary as an accompaniment to an advertisement of a licensed health care provider defined by this section if the advertisement appears in a classified directory the primary purpose of which is to provide products and services at free, reduced, or discounted 32  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

prices to consumers and in which the statement prominently appears in at least one place.

Question:

I graduated for Auburn CVM in 2014 and became licensed in Florida. My license will be up for renewal in May 2016. Where do I turn in my CE hours? As long as they are RACE approved, they count, right? A: If this will be your first license renewal, you actually don’t have to turn in any CE hours! Florida Administrative Code 61G18-16 Continuing Education Requirements for Active Status License Renewal states: (5) A licensed veterinarian shall not be required to complete a continuing education requirement prior to the first renewal of his license, but it shall be required prior to any subsequent renewal. The Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) Board of Veterinary Medicine is the regulatory and licensing agency in our state for the practice of veterinary medicine. When you receive your renewal notice in late April or early May this year, you will affirm your CE attendance or confirm your CE exemption, but you do not have to turn in any proof of CE hours. The FVMA recommends that you keep a file of all your CE certificates in a safe, retrievable place as the Department performs random audits each renewal cycle. Any programs approved by RACE are acceptable for your continuing education requirements. The below is an excerpt of section of 61G18-16.003 with some additional approved course providers: (2) Approved courses are deemed scientific if continuing education courses are provided by: (a) National, State and International veterinary association meetings and Board meetings; (b) Board Certified Specialties recognized by the AVMA; (c) University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine sponsored courses, including clinical grand rounds, veterinary resident’s seminars and Board specialty review sessions; (d) The Registry of Approved Continuing Education Courses (RACE); and (e) United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services. Contact the DBPR at: DBPR Board of Veterinary Medicine


1940 N Monroe St Tallahassee, FL 32399 (850) 487-1395 www.myfloridalicense.com

Question:

What does the law require of a veterinarian who makes house calls when he administers a Rabies inoculation?

A: The standard of care for a house call is not significantly different from a regular practice. Rule 61G18-15.006 says the following: Veterinarians practicing on a house-call basis and who practice where the animal is kept must meet the requirements of Rule 61G18-15.002 or 61G18-15.0035, F.A.C., except that no premises permit is required. So, even though he is working on a house call basis, the veterinarian has to create and maintain records as required by 61G18-18.002: 61G18-18.002 Maintenance of Medical Records. (1) There must be an individual medical record maintained on every patient examined or administered to by the veterinarian, except as provided in (2) below, for a period of not less than three years after date of last entry. The medical record shall contain all clinical information pertaining to the patient with sufficient information to justify the diagnosis or determination of health status and warrant any treatment recommended or administered. (2) When a veterinarian is providing services to a client owning or leasing 10 or more animals of the same species at a location where the client keeps the animals, one medical record may be kept for the group of animals. This record must include the species and breed of the animals, and the approximate number of the animals in the group. However when one specific animal is treated, the record must include the identification, diagnosis, and treatment regime of the individual animals examined and treated at each visit to the location, as well as all other information required by this rule. (3) Medical records shall be created as treatment is provided or within 24 hours from the time of treatment and include the date of each service performed. They shall contain the following information: Name of owner or agent Patient identification Record of any vaccinations administered Complaint or reason for provision of services History Physical examination to include, but not limited to patient weight, temperature, pulse, and respiration, or noted exceptions to the collection of said information Any present illness or injury noted Provisional diagnosis or health status determination (4) In addition, medical records shall contain the following information if these services are provided or occur during the examination or treatment of an animal or animals: Clinical laboratory reports Radiographs and their interpretation

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Consultation Treatment – medical, surgical Hospitalization Drugs prescribed, administered, or dispensed along with the route, strength, and dosage of the drug and time said drug was administered if not otherwise discernible from the record Tissue examination report Necropsy findings (5) A veterinarian shall maintain confidentiality of all patient records in his/her possession or under his/her control. All patient records shall not be disclosed without the consent of the client. Appropriate disclosure may be made without such consent: (a) in any civil or criminal action, unless otherwise prohibited by law, upon the issuance of a subpoena from a court of competent jurisdiction and proper notice by the party seeking such records to the client or his/her legal representative; (b) when required by the Board's rules. (6) A veterinarian shall, upon a written request, furnish, in a timely manner without delays for legal reviews, a true and correct copy of all of the patient records to the client, or to anyone designated by the client. Such records release shall not be conditioned upon payment of a fee for services rendered, except for the reasonable cost of duplication. (7)(a) Reasonable costs of duplication of written or typed documents or reports shall not be more than $1.00 per page for the first 25 pages, and shall not be more than 25 cents per page for each page in excess of 25 pages. (b) Reasonable costs of reproducing x-rays, and such other special kinds of records shall be the actual costs. The phrase “actual costs” means the cost of the material and supplies used to duplicate the record, as well as the labor costs and overhead costs associated with such duplication. (8) It is understood that there may be several files in different locations. Sufficient cross indexes are to be maintained for prompt retrieval when required. (9) Medical records may be maintained in an easily retrievable electronic data format; however, the licensee shall be responsible for providing an adequate backup system to assure data is not lost due to system failure. Veterinarians doing house calls for large animals don’t carry scales. They instead provide an estimated weight. Also, the rule allows for “noted exceptions to the collection of said information” so the veterinarian can either state “scale not available” or “visually estimated weight.” The bottom line is that what the law and rules require of ANY treatment, which a rabies shot qualifies as, is that the veterinarian create and maintain records. That being the case, the record should include a brief examination and WTPR. In the instance there is no scale and the weight is a guesstimate, the veterinarian should take the TPR.

End Note:

The ultimate responsibility in the practice of veterinary medicine lies with the licensed veterinarian. Professional discretion must always be exercised.

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florida-veterinary-medical-association  |  33


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS RELIEF VETERINARIANS

EXPERIENCED, PERSONABLE, RELIABLE SMALL ANIMAL RELIEF VETERINARIAN AVAILABLE: Tampa based but working statewide for short or long term temporary assignments. Positive attitude, compassionate care, commitment to excellence. Contact Linda Jack: Ljackvet@gmail.com, (336) 430-9062.(Exp. Issue 1 &2/16:25411) RSVP (Relief Services for Veterinary Practitioners) is seeking veterinarians for full time, part time and sporadic relief work in the state of Florida. Moonlighters are welcome! Choose when and where you work, for premium pay! For more information or to apply, please visit www.reliefvet.com or call 800-256-4078. (Exp. Issue 5 & 6/15, 1-4/16:3041) Relief or part-time veterinarian available in the Tampa area: 30 years of experience as a practice owner. Enjoy surgery and working with people, small animal only. Call Dr. Joe Priest at (813) 230-5998 (Exp. Issue 5,6/15; 1/16:1289) EXPERIENCED SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARIAN AVAILABLE St. Lucie, Okeechobee, Indian River and Martin counties. R. A. Swiezy, DVM – (772) 418-1939 (Exp. Issue 1/16; ID #26336) Small animal relief veterinarian for Orlando and surroundings areas with 20 years experience. Good diagnostic and medical skill sets; Proficient in surgery. I enjoy meeting clients and their pets. Please contact Dr. Scott Wells at 4docscott@gmail.com or (763) 639-9841. (Exp. Issue 1/16; 21575) Position for 2nd full-time (4 days per week on average) veterinarian - We have digital xray, ultrasound, digital dental xray, in house lab, class 4 therapeutic laser, etc and are AAHA accredited. Additionally, my nurses are fantastic! My clinic is located in a very affluent area of south Florida. NEW OR RECENT GRADUATES are welcome to apply. We are closed weekends and holidays. We are five minutes from the beautiful Jupiter beaches. We are heavily influenced by season, so I hope to hire end of September. Please peruse our website, www.TequestaVeterinaryClinic.com. Personality counts! Email resume to joisuttondvm@yahoo.com. If you are a new grad, consider spending a week with us before you graduate so we can get to know you.(Exp. Issue 1/16; 8931) RELIEF VET: MSU 1977 GRAD. Small animal. Lakeland but willing to travel. March - June 2016 Contact mlife3737@gmail.com/ 517 803 7737 Michael Lifsey (Exp. Issue 1/16: 65043) Experienced Veterinarian Available: for Cape CoralFt. Myers surrounding areas. Former practice owner Del Prado Pine Island Pet Vet. Available for medical and routine office call procedures. I am experienced in abdominal and cardiac ultrasound, in house blood chemistry and advanced dentistry. Contact Dr. Jim Sharp 810533-3598 or vetseanarian@comcast.net (Exp. Issue 1 & 2/16:5121) Relief/Part-time Veterinarian, Palm Beach & Broward Counties Available November through May.Former practice owner and shelter veterinarian. Resume, References upon request. Contact: Randy Feld DVM Ph: 781-572-2437 Email: rfelddvm@gmail.com

(Exp. Issue 1& 2/16: 5121)

Associates wanted Full time Veterinary Position Available: Full time, on call emergency veterinary position available immediately at Marathon Veterinary Hospital located at 5001 Overseas Hwy. in Marathon, Fl. If interested, please call Dr. Gerry Diethelm at 305-743-7099 or email DrGerry@marathonvet.com. (Exp. Issue 1/16:26709)

Full Time associate Veterinarian needed: at Bryan Hight Veterinary Hospital in Bainbridge, GA with caring, well trained staff to work with and assist you. New Grads welcome. Bryan Hight Veterinary Hospital is a 2 doctor, exclusively small animal practice. We have been at this location since 1970. At Bryan Hight Veterinary Hospital, we offer a fully equipped in house lab, digital radiography and surgery center. Benefits include salary that exceeds average industry standards, retirement and memberships. Along the way, we know you’ll build a loyal client base and we’ll help you sharpen your edge through continuing education. Bainbridge, GA is located in the southwest corner of Georgia, surrounded by the serenity of nature, filled with excitement and history and home to true southern hospitality. Bainbridge is located in the center of large quail plantations. Also, Bainbridge, GA is only hours away from one of the most popular beaches along the gulf coast of Florida. Contact information Kaley Hart 229-733-5022 or Fax resume at 229-888-3779 (Exp. Issue 1/16:8928) Associate V eterinarian needed part-time: Days, hours and salary open for discussion. Please call Dr. Dan Bowen, Animal Medical Clinic of Punta Gorda. 941639-9600 or reply by email to Docbowen@yahoo.com (Exp. Issue 1 & 2/16:4917) Experienced associate veterinarian wanted: for AAHA certified Orchid Springs Animal Hospital in Winter Haven, FL. Full-time hours available are from 1 pm to 9 pm or part-time from 5 pm to 9 pm. Learn more at: www.osahvets.com. Please send resume to gaston@osahvets.com (Exp. Issue 1/16:27588)

practice for sale SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE FOR SALE – JACKSONVILLE, FL: Thirty five year old small animal practice at the five point intersection of Normandy Blvd., Jacksonville , Florida. 7500 square foot building, two story, facing two streets, vacant site. Owner is retiring. Call Dr. Devegowda Gopal, (904) 786-4919. (Exp. Issue 1,2/16:1106) Veterinary hospital Pinellas County Florida; rapid growth established 14 years. Near major streets and nationally recognized stores; few miles from specialists and emergency clinic; Plenty of room to grow clients and even add a full day that currently is not utilized. In fact you will need to hire another vet to keep up with the demand of this hospital. Located on 1 acre in the most densely populated counties in the country. Building and land will be offered as a lease with the right to purchase based upon the right of first refusal. Purchase price will be based upon a MAI appraisal. If you wish the veterinarian or staff may live on the huge premises. Outbuildings and warehouses and lands could be readily be made to develop boarding and grooming. Horses are allowed and although in the city it is Farm Residential grandfathered in. Sale of hospital will be based upon a mutually accepted professional appraisal. Live where it is beautiful and the people want to take care of their animals.Near the beaches and the active cities of Tampa and St Pete. Call 727-437-8353 leave message please. Thomas Cogley D.V.M.; PhD (Exp. Issue 1/16 :1106) Clinic for sale St.Petersburg Florida (one of best cities in USA) fully equipped 2 exam rooms;prep/surgery/with everything you need to start scheduling appointments:laser;anesth esia;surgery tables; pulse oximeters;surgical packs;c-arm fluoroscopy; endoscopes; cbc-chem machines newish;stainless tables exam autoclave;microscopes;exam lights; surgery lights;ss cages too much to list,professional plaza in middle of everything and no other vets for miles. $95,000 727-492-1831 Dr C. (Exp. Issue 1/16 :1106)


Florida Practice Listings! North Florida– Solo Dr. small animal, 2015 gross $831k, Well established, well equipped, well staffed. Prx. & RE. owner motivated...priced to sell. West Coast of Fl.– Feline enthusiast, solo Dr. Feline Prx. AAHA freestanding office, 2014 gross $840K. Prx.+RE. Under Contract. West Coast– 24 hr. E-clinic & Specialty Prx. 2015 gross $2.5mm MRI, CT, Hyperbaric chamber, and more. Eastern Panhandle– Solo Dr. 2015 gross ~$816K, high net, same location for over 30 years. New lab & X-ray equip. along with some new remodeling-Prx + RE. Central Florida.– 1 Dr. Prx + RE 2015 gross $825K, digital Xray & In house lab, great staff. North Central Fl.– Solo Dr. small animal, $360k gross with only 27 hour week. Great 1st practice for young Dr. or Dr. that just wants to work part time. Buyer Representation‌...Valuations‌...Exit Strategies

Contact Dr. Richard Alker for further practice information.

850.814.9962 or Richard@tpsgsales.com Showcase Properties of Central Florida, Broker

  ĆŹ  Ready to Sell? Buy? Need an Appraisal?

Practices for Sale – Nationwide!

FL: Brevard County - Motivated! 2,000sf SA with nearly ½ acre landscaped RE in great location. 3-exam rooms. FL82. FL: Brevard County - Great Location! Profitable, 1,800sf SA w/2exam rooms in well-maintained leasehold. Owner ready to retire. FL83. FL: Charlotte County - Huge Growth Potential! 1,300sf SA in busy shopping plaza. 2-exam rooms and well-equipped. FL80. FL: Hillsborough County - A Start-Up Dream! 18,000sf kennel w/3+ acres. Potential to add vet services. Upscale Clientele. FL79. FL: Indian River County - Feline! 1,765sf beautiful leasehold facility on busy highway. Turn-Key. FL84. FL: Martin County - Atlantic Treasure Coast! 1,600sf SA in upscale shopping plaza, minutes to the beach. 2-exam rooms. FL81. Other Practices Available: Amador County & Santa Barbara County, California; El Paso County & Jefferson County, Colorado; Bay County & Northwestern UP, Michigan; Saint Louis & Southeast, Missouri; Lewis & Clark County, Montana; Middlesex County, New Jersey; Elmira, New York; Northwestern North Carolina; Cuyahoga County, Ohio; Texas County, Oklahoma; Northwestern Pennsylvania; Northeastern, Texas.

Contact us at 1.800.636.4740 for a  FREE APPRAISAL WITH LISTING  FREE Non-Binding, Confidential Consultation! Email: info@psbroker.com | Visit our website: psbroker.com

Practice Sales | Valuations Associate Buy-Ins | Buyer Representation

“Couldn’t have... or wouldn’t have wanted to do it without you!� ~ Dr. Susan Brosman Get a personal touch with your practice sale. Call for a complimentary consultation today and receive non-corporate service with trusted PSA advisor, Rebecca Robinson, CBI.

Current practice listings: www.PracticeSalesAdvisors.com 844.4.PSA.HELP | 912.230.3389 | Rebecca@PracticeSalesAdvisors.com | 200 Plantation Chase Suite 16 | St. Simons Island, GA 31522

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florida-veterinary-medical-association |  35


Florida Veterinary Medical Association 7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, FL 32809

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage PAID Orlando, FL Permit #793

We Have Sold More Veterinary Practices Than Anyone.

Advocate Issue 1 2016  

A Publication of the Florida Veterinary Medical Association.

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