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F V M A ADVOCATE ISSUE 1 - Jan - Feb 2015 | www.fvma.org

The 86th FVMA Annual Conference APRIL 9-12, 2015

Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa, Lake Buena Vista, Florida (At the Walt Disney World速 Resort)

(Conference Details: pages 13-23)

Building the Dynamic Veterinary Team


President's

MESSAGE

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7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, Florida 32809 Phone – (407) 851‑3862 Toll Free – (800) 992‑3862 Fax – (407) 240‑3710 info@fvma.org | www.fvma.org

t has been a great year of service as your President, and it is with renewed energy and resolve that I extend greetings from the FVMA Executive Board and staff, as we begin 2015. We expect the coming months to be concentrated on providing those services our members and others in the veterinary profession have come to expect from us, as well as the execution of our recently formulated FVMA Strategic Plan 2015-2017.

Officers Dr. Donald H. Morgan President Dr. Richard M. Carpenter President-Elect Dr. Richard B. Williams Treasurer Dr. Jerry L. Rayburn Past President Mr. Philip J. Hinkle Executive Director

District Representatives Dr. Alex M. Steverson District 1–Big Bend Dr. Richard C. Sutliff District 2–Northeast Dr. Marc A. Presnell District 3–Central Dr. Rachel Klemawesch District 4–Tampa Bay Dr. Marc D. Pinkwasser District 5–Treasure Coast Dr. Ronald W. Todd Jr. District 6–South Florida Dr. Mary Smart District 7–Southwest Dr. James M. Brechin District 8–Northwest Dr. Kelly J. Sloan-Wade District 9–Space Coast Dr. Stephen Shores AVMA Delegate Dr. Ernest C. Godfrey AVMA Alternative Delegate Dr. Amanda House FAEP Representative to the FVMA Executive Board Ex Officio Dr. James W. Lloyd, Dean College of Veterinary Medicine

FVMA Staff

Sandra P. Brooks Accounting/Membership Director Kelly Callihan Director of Conferences & Events Amber Coon Executive Assistant Ann Deal Director of Administration & Communications Ralph E. Huber Industry Relations Director Alssa Mathews Multimedia Art & Design Director Beni Jean Price Financial/Membership Coordinator Betsy Pynes Meetings and Events Coordinator Ann Wade Communications & Public Relations Director

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I wish to reiterate the board’s expectation of members’ input and collaboration, so we may be assured that the FVMA will achieve the development goals in advocacy, education, member programs, and leadership which it has set for itself. Please get a copy of the strategic plan brochure from your executive board district representative and familiarize yourselves with it; and I invite you to become engaged in this important process over the next three years. In a few days, your FVMA Legislative Committee will lead the 2015 delegation in Tallahassee, to dialogue with our elected officials, and to advocate for the protection and enhancement of the veterinary profession. Advocacy is one of the four pillars of development our strategic plan identifies, and if you will not be joining us this year, make a note on your calendar for next year. You can become active now however, in the grass roots advocacy program in your district. The local Political Action Team leader will be very happy to fill you in on how you can become involved. I also wish to extend a personal invitation to the 86th FVMA Annual Conference in Orlando from April 9-12. The scientific program is second to none, offering 270 CE hours which include a full day of innovative, hand-on wet labs on Thursday, April 9, to be followed on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, by lecture sessions featuring a wide array of topics in small animal veterinary medicine and practice management, along with workshops and more wet labs. I wish to highlight our extensive technician and staff schedule, and I encourage you to promote this important aspect of the Annual Conference with your staff. Industry Partners are fully on board again this year, and I urge members to support them by making sure to visit and enjoy the exhibit hall often during the conference. For all the details of the 86th FVMA Annual Conference, visit the website at: http://www. eventscribe.com/2015/FVMAannual/. You will find that it is a handy tool for planning your conference itinerary. Additionally, it is not too early to remind you to save the date for TGAVC. The 3rd Annual TGAVC will be held October 29 to November 1, 2015, in Boca Raton. I look forward to welcoming you and your team to the 86th FVMA Annual Conference. I also anticipate that you will commit to being active in your association in order to help achieve the goals of its strategic plan. Yours in service,

Donald H. Morgan, DVM

In This Issue 4 | In Remembrance 6 | Member Spotlight 8 | HCCE 9 | Are Employee Discounts Taxed?

10 | Disposal of Controlled Substances-An Update 13 | 86th FVMA Annual Conference 25 | Call To Serve 28 | Practice Pulse


In Remembrance HAROLD LAURENCE GORE, DVM July 13, 1925 – January 26, 2015 The FVMA was profoundly saddened to learn of the passing of Dr. Harold Laurence “Larry” Gore, Sr., who passed away on Monday, January 26, at the age of 89. Dr. Gore passed away in Fayetteville, Georgia where he lived. Dr. Gore served as Executive Director of the FVMA for 21 years (1969-1990). He leaves behind fondest memories and the deep respect of members of the FVMA and its staff, particularly Executive Director Philip Hinkle, whom he hired 29 years ago. For his exemplary service to the association and veterinary medicine, Dr. Gore was honored by the FVMA in 1988, when he was presented with its Distinguished Service Award. He was honored further when he was named a Champion of Veterinary Medicine in 2003 by the FVMA. Dr. Gore was preceded in death by his wife, Marie Gore; and sons Harold and Robert. He is survived by his daughters, Carol Ann Gallagher, Marilyn Sue Rodenski and Mary Ellen Hatfield; son, Edward; seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. A graveside service for Dr. Gore was held on January 29, 2015, at Camp Memorial Park in Fayetteville, Georgia.

ROBERT M. KUHN, DVM

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r. Robert M. Kuhn, 88, of Stuart, Florida and Bryson City, North Carolina, passed away on Sunday, December 7, 2014. A former FVMA Executive Board Member, Dr. Kuhn was also the founder and Past President of Tri-County Veterinary Medical Association (Treasure Coast Veterinary Medical Association). The FVMA honored Dr. Kuhn in 2006, with its Lifetime Achievement Award to recognize his impressive lifetime career and his service and contributions to the advancement of the veterinary profession. A native Floridian born in Homestead, Dr. Kuhn graduated from Homestead High School, fulfilled his military obligation in the U.S. Army, and then went on to the University of Georgia School of Veterinary Medicine. He opened a mixed practice of equine, bovine and small animals in Stuart, Florida in 1953. He operated the Stuart Animal Hospital until retirement in 1986. Because he was the sole veterinarian in the Stuart area when he began to practice, Dr. Kuhn became known as the Founding Father of Veterinary Medicine in Martin County. His career was marked by diversity and challenge. He was the veterinarian for the Ivan Tors Movie Studio during the filming of the "Gentle Ben" series in South Florida, and he cared for a wide variety of animals, including bears, lions, tigers, ostriches, alligators and other wild animals. Dr. Kuhn did research for Cornell University virus research lab, for development and use of distemper vaccines in dogs, researched vaccines for cattle and for heartworm prevention. He is considered a pioneer in open-heart surgery for the treatment of heartworms. Dr. Kuhn continued to provide his services when he retired, as a surgeon volunteer at the no-kill animal clinic in Jupiter. Dr. Kuhn is survived by his wife of 38 years, Jonnie-Ruth Kuhn; children Donna Keller (David), Barbara Fell (Ron), Randy Kuhn, Jeffrey Smith (Rebecca) and Zach Smith; his brother John and sister Dorothy; 7 grandchildren, 2 great-grandchildren, and his last two beloved dogs, Crystal and Dutchnick. Memorial contributions may be made in his name to the Humane Society of the Treasure Coast, 4100 SW Leighton Farm Avenue, Palm City, Florida 34990.

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WYLAND CRIPE, DVM

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r. Wyland ‘S’ Cripe, who was a recipient of the Florida Veterinary Medical Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999, has passed away. Dr. Cripe died at the age of 93, on December 28, 2014, twelve days after the passing of his beloved wife of 71 years, Marnelle, who died on December 16. Dr. Cripe was honored by the FVMA for his work to advance veterinary medicine, including his service as professor emeritus, a former administrator, and founding faculty member of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. Born August 5, 1921, in Flora, Indiana, Wyland Cripe graduated from Stanford University, and was a part of the US Naval Pilot Training program during World War 2. He flew seaplanes on sub patrol in the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean, and returned to civilian life at the end of the war. He was a member of the first graduating class at the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine in 1952. Dr. Cripe established and operated a combined large and small animal veterinary practice in Elk Grove, California where he also served on the local school board and on the Sacramento County Board of Education. From 1968 through 1970, he was the director of the University of California, Davis, Universidad de Chile Veterinary Medicine exchange program, through the Ford Foundation in Santiago, Chile where he lived and helped to establish livestock operations and mobile veterinary clinics. In 1971, he moved to Venezuela, where he led a United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization team at the International Research Institute. He first became interested in water buffalo and their utilization for human resources in Third World countries during this time. He continued his research at UFCVM and became recognized as a world authority on water buffalo. Along with colleagues Drs. Maarten Drost and Joe Wright, he successfully performed the world’s first Water Buffalo Embryo Transfer in 1982. He was also instrumental in establishing the university’s Rural Animal Medicine Services (RAMS). He retired in 1989, as Associate Professor Emeritus. Dr. Wyland Cripe is survived by his daughters: Aline Hommes (Rudi) of Washington, DC, Carra Cripe of Sacramento, California, Kirsti Cripe Rauser (Tim) of Wilton, California, Elizabeth Vaughan (Mike) of Fort Lauderdale, and Anna Moo (Terry) of Newberry; and grandchildren, Jayna McLeod (Deke) of San Diego, California, Martin Hommes (Caro) of Washington, DC, Christopher Moo of Sacramento, California, and Amanda Moo of Gainesville, Florida. A scholarship fund has been set up with the University of California, Davis, College of Veterinary Medicine. A memorial gift can be made online at http://bit.ly/1HZxh1u In addition, remembrances may be sent to: University of Florida Foundation Account #5729, for the Drost Project (in honor of Dr. Wyland 'S' Cripe), c/o Maarten Drost DVM, 2105 NW 15th Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32605-5216, or online at http://drostproject. org.

WAYNE LEE MOGAVERO, DVM

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r. Wayne Mogavero, passed away on November 4, 2014, after a seven-month struggle with lymphoma. Dr. Mogavero founded and operated Tails-A-Waggin Animal Hospital and Pet Resort of Fort Meyers. He was known for his excellent work with clients and in the surgery room. He performed approximately 2000 surgeries a year on small animals of all types. Originally from Long Island, New York, he graduated from Ross University and moved to Florida in 1986, to establish his practice. His main interest was in orthopedic and soft tissue surgery, as well as internal medicine. Dr. Mogavero provided his service in Fort Meyers for over twenty years, and at the time of his diagnosis, his life centered on his four children and a ranch, which also was home to three horses, four cats, three dogs, an Amazon parrot and a cockatoo. His four children eulogized him as a devoted and loving father who was a hero and role model who taught them to show love and compassion towards fellow human beings and animals.

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Member Spotlight

DR. MICHAEL WONG OF MIAMI, FLORIDA

A Doctor’s Act Of Kindness

The above is a quotation on www.yellowpages. com when you google FVMA member Dr. Michael Wong. There are also countless other words of praise and excellent reviews about this South Florida veterinarian elsewhere on the web; about his work, and very recently for an act of kindness he provided during the Christmas holidays. His story is one worth telling. The owners of a 4-year-old dachshund called Lola, thought they would never see their beloved pet again. The Pembroke Pines couple, Sumey and David Hageman, decided to turn Lola over to an animal rescue group when they realized they could not afford the surgery she needed that would enable her to walk. Lola needed surgery to repair a slipped disc which was preventing her from walking. The surgery cost was $6,000, which was an expense the couple could not meet. When a pet is surrendered, it is not usually returned to its family, and the Hagemans did not expect to see Lola again. Dr. Wong, who often works with the rescue group, learned that the couple’s reason for giving up their pet was financial, and he asked if he could give Lola back to the family after the surgery. He is quoted in a news article as saying that it was while he was doing the surgery that it

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“I live in Kentucky... I just saw the news (via Facebook) where you helped that paralyzed dog by performing a $6000 neuro/spinal surgery to save its life and then made sure that family got their dog back for Christmas. This news has completely restored my belief that there are people/veterinarians like you in this world who will do a thing like this.”

came to him that the family should have their dog back. And the rescue group agreed. That set the ball rolling that resulted in his unique gift. Dr. Wong turned over Lola to Sumey Hageman on Christmas Eve. Needless to say, the Hagemans were overjoyed by the wonderful gift from Dr. Wong, and they have referred to his generosity as a “Christmas miracle.” Michael Wong, DVM, DACVIM-Neurology, operates Southeast Veterinary Neurology in Miami, Florida which he founded in 2010. A 2005 graduate of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine (UFCVM), he has been a member of the FVMA since then. He is one of fewer than 200 board-certified veterinary neurologists in North America. He graduated magna cum laude from UFCVM, then completed a medical and surgical internship at Red Bank Veterinary Hospital in New Jersey. He received his neurology and neurosurgery training during a three-and-a-half-year residency at North Florida Neurology in Orange Park. After his residency, he successfully passed his neurology certifying examination and became board-certified. He was one of the first veterinary neurologists to complete the Advanced Neurosurgical Course.


Dr. Wong has lectured at the local, state and national levels, and has instructed veterinary students at the University of Florida. He has also been an FVMA distinguished speaker at the Association’s Annual Conference. He has published articles on magnetic resonance imaging, new treatments for encephalitis, treatment of brain tumors, and neurosurgery. He enjoys all aspects of neurology, neurosurgery, and MRI, but his passions include spinal surgery, seizure management and management of

encephalitis, and MRI in the diagnosis of neurological disease. Dr. Michael Wong is a busy veterinarian, but finds time to enjoy spending time with his wife, their Chihuahuas, their Pug named Rowdy, and their newest addition, Diego. The FVMA salutes Dr. Wong for expressing his humanity through his generous gift to Lola and the Hagemans.

“Dr. Wong is a truly remarkable and caring veterinary neurologist. He is very thorough and professional in his diagnosis and takes the time to keep you informed. Everyone in his practice makes you feel at home…”

Dr. Michael Wong with his staff: Front Row left to right: Mayra Heredia, Genesis Mendoza, Rachel Teichberg, Michelle Jara Back Row: Jose Araujo, Matt Mowry, Dr. Wong, Lisa Oliva, Jennifer Lake, Jovani Rosado

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EVALUATING YOUR NEED FOR HEALTH CARE CLINIC ESTABLISHMENT PERMIT (HCCE) This is the time of the year when HCCE Permit renewal notices from the Division of Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics, Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) are sent to veterinarians. To sum up the HCCE Permit:  Veterinarians who want to order prescription drugs using their clinic or corporation name need the permit.

practitioners in a group practice, but requires a “qualifying practitioner” to be named on the permit. That practitioner is responsible for all record keeping, storage and handling of all prescription drugs ordered and dispensed under the HCCE. 4. An Individual practice where there is a sole practitioner that orders prescription drugs under his/her name and license, does not need the HCCE permit.

5. A Veterinarian who has previously been issued an HCCE permit, but who has decided to purchase drugs under his/her individual license instead, should return the renewal notice to the Department of Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics, Division of the  Veterinarians who are in a partnership do not Department of Business and Professional Regulation qualify for the permit. They have to either order in along with a letter or simple note stating he/she is one veterinarian’s name or incorporate and obtain not renewing the permit. the HCCE Permit. 6. The law does not prohibit the use of Rx drugs How do practitioners evaluate whether or not by practitioners in a group practice that were purchased by another member of the group at that they need an HCCE Permit? establishment.  Veterinarians who order under their own names and license numbers do not need the permit, regardless of other associates or relief veterinarians also using the drugs.

Points to Remember 1. HCCE allows corporations to purchase and maintain prescription drugs in one corporate inventory to be dispensed by qualifying practitioners who work with them. 2. All licensed veterinarians have the legal authority to purchase and own prescription drugs. 3. HCCE Permit is required by any multi-veterinarian clinic or solo practitioner who orders drugs through a corporation’s name. The permit covers all the

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7. An HCCE Permit is renewable every two years for a fee of $225, made payable only by cashier’s check or money order to the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. 8. For help and other information concerning HCCE Permits, contact the Department of Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics, Division of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation at (850) 7171800, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or the FVMA helpline at (800) 992-3862.


employee on property or services you offer to customers in the ordinary course of the line of business in which the employee performs substantial services. However, it does not apply to discounts on real property or discounts on personal property of a kind commonly held for investment (such as stocks or bonds). Employee. For this exclusion, treat the following individuals as employees.

Are Employee Discounts Taxed by the IRS? It’s tax season! And everyone’s focused on getting taxes filed, and filed right. Understanding the variables involved in filing taxes is useful to all, including businesses. In this regard, the FVMA fielded a request from a member for information on how employee discounts are taxed. The practice owner was specifically referring to discounts offered to employees for services provided for their pets. According to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), employees who receive a discount on services from their employer in excess of 20% should be taxed on the difference between the total discount and the 20%. For example, if the service normally costs $100 and the employee is charged $80, there is no tax consequence. But if the employee is charged only $60, the employee would have additional compensation (added to their W-2) of $20 and payroll taxes would have to be paid by both employer and employee on this amount. Fringe Benefits The discounts on services a practice owner offers to employees are categorized as fringe benefits by the IRS. And fringe benefits (there are some exceptions), are generally included in an employee’s gross income.

 A current employee.  A former employee who retired or left on disability.  A widow or widower of an individual who died while an employee.  A widow or widower of an employee who retired or left on disability.  A leased employee who has provided services to you on a substantially full-time basis for at least a year if the services are performed under your primary direction or control.  A partner who performs services for a partnership. Exclusion from wages. You can generally exclude the value of an employee discount you provide an employee from the employee's wages, up to the following limits.  For a discount on services, 20% of the price you charge nonemployee customers for the service.  For a discount on merchandise or other property, your gross profit percentage times the price you charge nonemployee customers for the property.

According to the IRS, “Any fringe benefit you provide is taxable and must be included in the recipient’s pay unless the law specifically excludes it.” These benefits are subject to income tax withholding and employment taxes.

Determine your gross profit percentage in the line of business based on all property you offer to customers (including employee customers) and your experience during the tax year immediately before the tax year in which the discount is available. To figure your gross profit percent-age, subtract the total cost of the property from the total sales price of the property and divide the result by the total sales price of the property.

As mentioned earlier, there are exclusions that apply to certain fringe benefits, and employee discounts is included in these exclusions, but it is exempt only up to certain limits.

The web link below is for Publication 15-B - Main Content which is a comprehensive document from the IRS on Fringe Benefits.

The below is the IRS’ guidance on Employee Discounts This exclusion applies to a price reduction you give an

http://www.irs.gov/publications/p15b/ar02.html#en_ US_2014_publink1000193672 www.fvma.org  |  9


DISPOSAL OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES - An Update

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isposal of controlled substances from veterinary practices can be a challenge to veterinarians, especially when pertinent laws and rules change, as was the case late last

year. When the FVMA began receiving calls near the end of 2014, from members asking question on the subject of pharmaceutical disposal, a bit of research led us to a new DEA rule that had been made. The DEA made 21 CFR Parts 1300, 1301, 1304, 1305,1307, and 1317 Disposal of Controlled Substances; Final Rule on disposal of controlled substances on September 9, 2014. It became effective on October 9, 2014, and in relation to veterinarians, it had important provisions. The rule established more options for the secure disposal of controlled substances by practitioners and their clients, among other things. While the majority of the calls the FVMA received have been for guidance on drug disposal in general, one practitioner who had retired and was closing on the sale of his practice, asked for help in determining what to do with the drugs he held in his practice. Was he allowed to transfer them to the new owner?

Proper Disposal Is Important Proper pharmaceutical disposal is an important issue. There can be environmental consequences as well as the potential for abuse. How one disposes of unwanted pharmaceuticals, whether it is because a doctor is retiring and will no longer need them, or they may be outdated, damaged, or otherwise unusable, is guided by the laws and rules that are in place. 10  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

What does the DEA’s final rule mean for veterinary practices? 21 CFR Parts 1300, 1301, 1304, 1305, 1307, and 1317 Disposal of Controlled Substances The final rule establishes more options for disposal by practitioners and clients, and contains a provision to request assistance from the local DEA Special Agent in Charge (SAC) for instructions on the following: ■ Transfer of the substance to another DEA registered person authorized to possess it ■ Give the substance to a DEA agent ■ Destroy the substance in the presence of a DEA agent or other authorized person ■ Dispose of it by other means as the SAC may determine to assure that the substance does not become available to unauthorized persons. ■ The SAC may authorize a registrant regularly needing to dispose of controlled substances to do so as instructed by the SAC without getting prior approval in each instance, on the condition that the registrant keeps records and file reports as specified by the SAC. ■ Client education on pharmaceutical disposal should be updated to include the new disposal options (authorized takeback events, mail-back programs, and collection receptacle locations) available to clients and other ultimate users. These options are not available to registrants for disposal of their controlled substance inventory or stock. ■ Only one copy of DEA form 41 is needed when required [21 CFR 1317.05(a)(4)(i)]. It is important to note that the final rule specifies [21 CFR 1304.21(e)] that a DEA form 41 is not needed for destruction of a controlled substance dispensed by a practitioner for immediate administration at the practitioner’s


registered location, when the substance is not fully exhausted (e.g., some of the substance remains in a vial, tube, or syringe after administration but cannot or may not be further utilized). Instead, this destruction needs to be recorded per 21 CFR 1304.22(c). ■ Specific wording added to the regulations, clarifying that the SAC may instruct a registrant to dispose of a controlled substance by transferring it to a registrant authorized to transport or destroy the substance. ■ Expanded disposal options for registered practitioners (21 CFR 1317.05).

Methods of Disposal

■ On-site destruction ■ Reverse distribution ■ Returns or recalls The following is a DEA link of the pertinent regulation on methods of disposal: http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/21cfr/ cfr/1317/subpart_a.htm#1

Record Keeping The veterinary practitioner should maintain copies of the records documenting the transfer and disposal of controlled substances for a period of two years.

The Expanded Disposal Options for Registered Practitioners 21 CFR 1317.05 Registrant Disposal. (a) Practitioner inventory. Any registered practitioner in lawful possession of a controlled substance in its inventory that desires to dispose of that substance shall do so in one of the following ways: (1) Promptly destroy that controlled substance in accordance with subpart C of this part using an on-site method of destruction; (2) Promptly deliver that controlled substance to a reverse distributor's registered location by common or contract carrier pick-up or by reverse distributor pick-up at the registrant's registered location; (3) For the purpose of return or recall, promptly deliver that controlled substance by common or contract carrier pick-up or pick-up by other registrants at the registrant's registered location to: The registered person from whom it was obtained, the registered manufacturer of the substance, or another registrant authorized by the manufacturer to accept returns or recalls on the manufacturer's behalf; or (4) Request assistance from the Special Agent in Charge of the Administration in the area in which the practitioner is located. (i) The request shall be made by submitting one copy of the DEA Form 41 to the Special Agent in Charge in the practitioner's area. The DEA Form 41 shall list the controlled substance or substances which the registrant desires to dispose. (ii) The Special Agent in Charge shall instruct the registrant to dispose of the controlled substance in one of the following manners: (A) By transfer to a registrant authorized to transport or destroy the substance; (B) By delivery to an agent of the Administration or to the nearest office of the Administration; or (C) By destruction in the presence of an agent of the Administration or other authorized person.

(5) In the event that a practitioner is required regularly to dispose of controlled substances, the Special Agent in Charge may authorize the practitioner to dispose of such substances, in accordance with subparagraph (a)(4) of this section, without prior application in each instance, on the condition that the practitioner keep records of such disposals and file periodic reports with the Special Agent in Charge summarizing the disposals. The Special Agent in Charge may place such conditions as he/she deems proper on practitioner procedures regarding the disposal of controlled substances.

DEA Registered Reverse Distributors in Florida ARX Returns, Inc. – (727) 919-2527 Pharmacy Returns Logistics – (386) 935-0876 PharmaLink, Inc. – (727) 669-8187 CAVU Medical Products & Services LLC – (813) 749-7113 RX Reverse Distributors, Inc. – (772) 388-1212 Woodfield Distributor LLC – (561) 998-3885

A Practitioner Can Transfer Pharmaceuticals to Another And in the case of the retiring doctor who was selling his practice, the FVMA was advised that he was allowed to make such a transfer, based on the definition of “wholesale distribution” in F.S. 400.003(54)(f). “There is an exemption from the definition of "wholesale distribution" in §499.003(54)(f) which provides for a one-time transfer of drugs from one pharmacy to the other in case of a sale (see below). Although there is no specific exemption applicable to veterinarians, the principle is the same. A detailed inventory and invoice must be prepared showing the drugs being transferred (with Lot #s and expiration dates) signed by the selling vet and the buying vet. The document needs to have both vets’ signatures to demonstrate that vet #1 (who has the authority to possess and dispense drugs) is transferring to vet # 2 (who has the same authority). If there is an HCCE involved on either side of the transaction, the designated vet under the HCCE is the person signing.”

§499.003(54)(f)

(54) “Wholesale distribution” means distribution of prescription drugs to persons other than a consumer or patient, but does not include: (f) The sale, purchase, or trade of a prescription drug between pharmacies as a result of a sale, transfer, merger, or consolidation of all or part of the business of the pharmacies from or with another pharmacy, whether accomplished as a purchase and sale of stock or of business assets.

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It’s a soft chew. Kills both fleas and ticks. It’s prescription only.

Now a pprove d to kill m ore ticks!

NexGardTM (afoxolaner) is the protection you asked for, and patients will beg for. NexGard is FDA-approved to kill fleas, prevent flea infestations, and kill Black-Legged (deer) ticks, Lone Star ticks and American Dog ticks. NexGard is available only with a veterinarian’s prescription, and features anti-diversion technology monitored by Pinkerton® Consulting & Investigations.

NexGard and FRONTLINE VET LABS are trademarks of Merial. ®PINKERTON is a registered trademark of Pinkerton Service Corporation. ©2014 Merial Limited, Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. NEX14TTRADEAD (06/14).

TM

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: For use in dogs only. The most common adverse reaction is vomiting.  Other adverse reactions reported are dry/flaky skin, diarrhea, lethargy, and anorexia.  The safe use of NexGard in pregnant, breeding, or lactating dogs has not been evaluated. Use with caution in dogs with a history of seizures.


The 86 FVMA Annual Conference th

distinguished Speakers

Dr. Elizabeth Bailey Dr. Carsten Bandt Dr. David Bradley Mr. Greg Brown Dr. Mauricio Dujowich Dr. Wade Gingerich Dr. Darryl Heard Dr. Peter Helmer Dr. Andrew Hillier Dr. Adam Honeckman

Dr. Anita Kiehl Dr. Matthew Johnson Dr. Donna Manley Ms. Katrina Lafferty Dr. Nancy Loes dr. suzanne plamondon Ms. Heidi Reuss-Lamky Ms. Denise Rollings Dr. Sheri Ross Dr. Oreta Samples

WET LAB OFFERINGS

Dr. Bill Saxon Ms. Melissa Siekaniec Dr. Chris Smithson Ms. Joan Spencer Dr. Heather Wamsley Dr. Heidi Ward Dr. Michael whicker Dr. Anne Wortinger

Wet Lab

dental extraction Canine Dental Extraction

Dental laboratory Dental Nerve Block Laboratory

dental radiography Dental Radiography

Saturday 1:10 pm - 5:00 pm Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC Wade Gingerich, DVM, DAVDC

Saturday 8:00 am - 11:50 am Heidi Reuss-Lamky

Saturday 1:10 pm - 5:00 pm Denise Rollings, CVT, VTS Dentistry Jeanne Perrone, CVT, VTS Dentistry

LVT, VTS (Anesthesia, Surgery)

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $295 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $495

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Techs $75 Wet Lab Only Fee: Techs $125

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Techs $75 Wet Lab Only Fee: Techs $125

This lab is useful for veterinarians at all skill levels when it comes to surgical extractions in the dog. Participants will be given instruction on surgical extraction techniques for the major teeth, including maxillary and mandibular canines, maxillary fourth premolars, and mandibular first molars. Using cadaver specimens, principles of proper instrumentation, flap development, alveolar bone removal and management, tooth sectioning, and tension-free closure will be discussed and practiced. Participants will have the flexibility to choose which procedures to perform based on their own experience level.

Attendees with have the opportunity to perform a variety of oral nerve block techniques utilizing canine and feline skull models as follows: Canine dental blocks to include the mandibular, middle mental, maxillary and infraorbital nerve blocks, and feline blocks demonstrated will include the mandibular, maxillary, and infraorbital nerve blocks. Helpful tips and pointers will also be discussed. Prior attendance to the lecture portion entitled Dental Nerve Blocks for Technicians is strongly advised.

This combination lecture and wet lab begins with the first hour discussing safety, terminology, normal and abnormal anatomy, and mounting of dental radiographs followed by hands on training. Learn how to take a diagnostic intraoral radiograph using the latest state of the art equipment taught by some the most highly trained veterinary technicians in veterinary dentistry. There is a low teacher to student ratio to ensure everyone takes all the images necessary to obtain full mouth radiographs of a dog and cat using cadaver heads. This is the most effective way to learn intraoral dental radiography because it imitates real life patients without the stress of having to monitor anesthesia while trying to learn at the same time.

WORKSHOPS

Workshop

dental radiography

clinical pathology

Friday, April 10, 2015

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Dental Radiography Reading & Interpretation Lab Session

Canine Mast Cell Tumor

Cytology

1:30 pm - 6:10 pm

8:00 am - 11:50 am

Heather Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM

1:10 pm - 5:00 pm

Culture and Sensitivity Interpretation

Christopher Smithson

DVM, DAVDC Open – DVM Participants This lab will include dental radiography reading and interpretation of normal anatomy and common oral pathology in a setting that will allow for in depth discussion and interaction based on actual cases.

At ogram Pr A-Glance

Race ApprovED -

CYtology

Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM Heather Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP

(Limited to 60 DVMs & Techs) Techs $35 | Vets $35

(Limited to 60 DVMs & Techs) Techs $35 | Vets $35

This workshop is designed to provide attendees with information necessary to interpret clinical findings, fine needle aspirates and histopathology results from dogs with mast cell tumors to determine what additional forms of diagnostics are necessary to provide prognostic and therapeutic recommendations.

This presentation provides indications, techniques and basic principles of cytology from a clinical pathologist and oncologist’s viewpoint. Includes a cytology overview, immediately followed by instructional presentation. Groups will rotate thru microscope cases. Clinical interactive cases will be reviewed in open discussion.

American Association of Veterinary State Boards RACE Provider #532

microbiology

9:00 am - 10:50 am

Elizabeth Bailey, DVM Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM (No Charge- Must Pre-register) The workshop will begin with a presentation introducing principles of culture and sensitivities and interpretation of results to maximize antimicrobial efficacy.

This program has been approved for 270 hours of continuing education credits in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE approval; however participants should be aware that some boards have limitations on the number of hours accepted in certain categories and/or restrictions on certain methods of delivery of continuing education. Call FVMA Meetings and Events Coordinator, at (800) 992-3862 for further information.


Reserve Your Room Today FVMA Room Block Deadline March 19! Hotel Information Customize your stay from one of the following Room Rate: (Rates Include the Hotel's $14.95 Daily Resort Fee) Room Type Single Rate Double Rate Triple Rate Quad Rate Resort View Guestrooms $164.00 $164.00 $184.00 $204.00 Water View Room $174.00 $174.00 $194.00 $214.00 Downtown Disney View $184.00 $184.00 $204.00 $224.00 1-Bedroom Island Suite $264.00 $264.00 $284.00 $304.00 1-Bedroom Tower Suite $445.00 $445.00 $465.00 $485.00

Special Group Rates Begin at $164

FVMA's

The daily charge of $14.95 will be inclusive of the rate. The Resort (Hotel Services) Program includes the following: Wired and wireless in-room Wayport® High Speed Internet. (In-room WebTV® not included.); Cyber Café (24 hour access) located on the 1st floor of the main building; Pool Ambassador, offering personalized pool amenities and services; Daily Membership to the Fitness Center (guest room key required for entry) and Spa, including unlimited use of Fitness Center; Equipment, lockers, hot tubs, sauna, steam room and shower facilities; Minimum age for Spa guests is 18 years. (Membership does not include Spa treatments or services); Weekday New York Times Newspaper available in lounge; In room coffee and tea; Complimentary self parking; Disney Bus Transportation – Daily to Disney ® Theme Parks(Magic Kingdom, Epcot, Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studio, Typhoon; Lagoon and Blizzard Beach. Nightly Transportation to Downtown Disney; Marketplace and Pleasure Island (Beginning At 6pm).

Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa

HigHlighted events

4 Register

• Annual Awards Ceremony/Installation of Officers Friday, April 10, 2015 | Time: 7:30 p.m.

An Evening In the Tropics

• FVMA Foundation's Benefit

SATURday, April 11, 2015 | Time: 6:30 p.m. (For Details, see page 23) • Bingo Raffle drawing Saturday, April 11, 2015 | Time: 3:45 p.m.

Across the street from Downtown Disney 1900 E. Buena Vista Drive, Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830

Make Your Room Reservations Now! Call: 866-397-6516 and mention “FVMA”

Easy Ways to

Register today & save! After March 6 add $75 per registrant.   Mail:

  Online:

• Christian Breakfast SUnday, April 12, 2015 | Time: 7:00 A.m.

FVMA 7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, FL 32809

www.fvma.org info@fvma.org

• Disney Character Breakfast SUnday, April 12, 2015 | Time: 8:00 A.m.

 Phone:

  Fax:

(800) 992-3862 (407) 851-3862

(407) 240-3710

!

REGI

STER TODAY


Building the Dynamic Veterinary Team

Vets

Earn up to 28 Hours

World-Class CE

Techs

Earn up to 24 Hours

presenting 270 hours of stimulating, quality continuing education delivered by an outstanding array of distinguished speakers in an environment that enriches the entire veterinary team (A maximum of 28 credit hours can be earned at this conference.)

LECTURE, LAB & Workshop TOPICS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Cardiology Clinical Pathology Critical Care Cytology Nephrology Emergency Medicine Therapeutic Lasers Wound Closure, Suture Selection, Surgical Devices Soft Tissue or Orthopedic Surgery Hospice & Euthanasia Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery Hematology Rabbit Medicine & Surgery Avian Medicine & Surgery Exotic Pet Medicine & Surgery

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Dermatology Internal Medicine Diagnostic Pathology Oncology Practice Management Feline Preventive Medicine Anesthesia Supplement: Improving life Surgical Nursing Hemodialysis Urology Clinical Pathology Nursing Internal Medicine OSHA Compliance Ophthalmic Surgery USDA EICC, SAIM, Nutrition

The 86th FVMA Annual Conference APRIL 9-12, 2015

Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa, Lake Buena Vista, Florida

(At the Walt Disney World® Resort)

Pre-register By March 6th& Save!

Special Room Rate Ends March 19th

World-class Continuing Education for e v e r y m e mb e r o f t h e V e t e r i n a r y T e am www.fvma.org  |  15


Your FEATURed Speakers

Invitation to Attend

Dr. Jonathan Abbott

Dr. Rick Alleman

Dr. Jason Arble

Dr. Dennis T. Crowe

Dr. Mary Gardner

Dr. John Harvey

Ms. Shelley Johnson

Dr. Kelvin Kow

Dr. Brook Niemiec

Dr. Michael Schaer

Dr. Thomas Schubert

Dr. Andre Shih

Dr. Andrew Specht

Dr. Robert Swinger

Dr. Ernie Ward

Mr. Jason Wernli

Dr. Stephen White

WET LAB OFFERINGS

Wet Lab

Basic Ultrasound

Surgery

Surgery

Abdominal Ultrasound – Normals Seminar

Extracapsular Suture Stabilization

Medial Patella Luxation

Thursday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Jason Arble, DVM, DACVR

Thursday 8:00 am - 11:50 am

Thursday 1:10 pm - 5:00 pm

Matthew Johnson

Matthew Johnson

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595 This seminar series and combined wet lab will introduce the veterinarian to entry level abdominal ultrasound imaging in the small animal practice. The seminar consists of four, 50-minute lectures. The basic physics, an overview of instrumentation, common artifacts, and scanning techniques will be reviewed as well as normal anatomy and appearance of the abdominal organs.

DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $295 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $495 This laboratory will discuss the underlying pathological processes that contribute to the disease process. You will learn how to diagnose complete and partial cruciate injuries. This laboratory will teach you how to do a complete stifle exploratory examination for meniscal injury, meniscal repair or release, as well as extracapsular suture placement using isometric principles of the stifle joint.

rehabilitation & laser therapy Ophthalmic Surgery Rehabilitation & Ophthalmic Surgery Laser Therapy Thursday

Thursday 8:00 am - 11:50 am Suzanne Plamondon

DVM, MBA, CVA, CCRT, DABVP

1:10 pm - 5:00 pm Robert Swinger, DVM, DACVO Carmen Colitz, DVM, PhD, DACVO

advanced Dentistry

Level 2 Dentistry

Thursday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Brook Niemiec,

DVM, DAVDC, DEVDC, FAVD

Michael Peak, DVM, DAVDC

◉ Dentalaire ◉ Miltex ◉ Patterson Veterinary ◉ VTS (Veterinary Transplant Services, Inc) ◉ Zoetis

DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595 This laboratory will discuss the underlying pathological conditions that contribute to the disease process. You will learn how to diagnose as well as grade medial patella luxation based on physical examination findings as well as radiographic changes that commonly accompany or contribute to the condition.

advanced Ultrasound Abdominal Advanced Ultrasound Friday 8:00 am - 5:20 pm Jason Arble, DVM, DACVR

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $595 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $795 Part 1 - Bonded Sealants & Composite Restorations 1 hour lecture and 3 hours of hands on laboratory Attendees will learn how to perform bonded composites in veterinary dentistry.

Part 2 - Periodontal Surgery 1 hour lecture and 3 hours of hands on laboratory

Learn advanced periodontal surgery procedures to save periodontally diseased teeth including.

Dental extraction Feline Dental Extraction Saturday 8:00 am - 11:50 am Wade Gingerich, DVM, DAVDC Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC

A N I M A L H E A L T H

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $295 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $495

A Division of I-MED Pharma Inc.

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $125 | Techs $75 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $150 | Techs $125

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $325 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $525

This 4-hour lecture/lab will open with an overview of laser technology and its uses in general practice. This session will include innovative ways to market the laser to your clients. Following the lecture, students will participate in an interactive presentation of cases, protocols, and treatments on live canines, and outcomes.

Improve your proficiency in performing practical eyelid, conjunctival, corneal and orbital surgeries. Receive step-by-step instructions on entropion correction, eyelid reconstruction, prolapsed third eyelid gland replacement, corneal debridement techniques, conjunctival grafting, corneal laceration repair and enucleation.

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595 This seminar series and combined wet lab are designed for veterinarians who want to further their training in small animal ultrasound. Lectures will briefly review ultrasound physics and artifacts, and assist the participants in fine-tuning the image. Normal intraabdominal structure will be reviewed and abnormal intra-abdominal pathology will be emphasized.

We all know how challenging feline dental extractions can be; and when it comes to dental extractions, cats aren’t small dogs! This lab will focus on the techniques, equipment and instruments that will ensure successful and complication-free feline extractions and crown amputations. Participants will be instructed on how to surgically extract the maxillary and mandibular canines, maxillary fourth premolar, and mandibular first molar, as well as crown amputation of the mandibular canine and third premolar with tension-free flap closure.

c o n tin u i ng e d u cati o n c r e dit This program is approved by:

 Sponsor of Continuing Education in New York State

 Florida Board of Veterinary Medicine, DBPR FVMA Provider #31

www.fvma.org  |  16


THURSDAY− April 9

DVM

Surgery

Abdominal Ultrasound – Normals Seminar Sponsored by 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

FRIDAY− April 10

Wet Lab

Supplies by

Jason Arble, DVM, DACVR

Extracapsular Suture Stabilization 8:00 am - 11:50 am

Matthew Johnson, DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 | Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $295 | Wet Lab Only Fe

This seminar series and combined wet lab will introduce the veterinarian to entry level abdominal ultrasound imaging in the small animal practice. The seminar consists of four, 50-minute lectures. Wet lab participants will be introduced to basic ultrasound image manipulation (knobology), physics and artifacts of abdominal ultrasound, learn scanning techniques, know how to identify normal abdominal structures through scanning of live animals. Interaction between the radiologist and the participants will be encouraged.

Cranial cruciate injury is the most common cause of hin laboratory will discuss the underlying pathological pr process. You will learn how to diagnose complete and will teach you how to do a complete stifle exploratory ex repair or release, as well as extracapsular suture place stifle joint.

8:00 am 8:50 am 9:00 am 9:50 am 10:10 am 11:00 am 11:10 am 12:00 pm 1:30 pm 2:20 pm 2:30 pm 3:20 pm 4:20 pm 5:10 pm 5:20 pm 6:10 pm

Small Animal Abdominal Advanced Ultrasound

Wet Lab

8:00 am - 5:20 pm Jason Arble, DVM, DACVR With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

Sponsored by Supplies by

Medicine for the Technician

SATURDAY− April 11

DVM / TECH

Basic Ultrasound

Advanced Ultrasound Wet Lab

SUNDAY− April 12

TECH

Renal Disease/Feline Medicine Beyond Diet... What Else Should You Know About Treating Chronic Kidney Disease? Specht Beyond Fluids... What Else Should You Know About Acute Kidney Injury Specht Beyond Azotemia... What You Need to Know About Proteinuria in Dogs and Cats Specht Kidney Disease Myths... Recognizing the Problems and Avoiding Common Mistakes Specht The Iris Guidelines for Kidney Disease - What’s Out There and How Can It Help You? Specht

USDA Accreditation Module 1: Introduction to the New National Veterinary Accreditation Program Whicker Module 2: Role of Agencies (State, Federal, International) and Health Certificates Whicker Module 9: Interstate and International Health Certificates for Category I Animals Whicker

Critically Evaluating Iris Guidelines - What Do We Really Know Specht Where Have All the Cats Gone …. Steps to Return Cats to Your Practice Manley Meow to Vaccines …. 2013 AAFP Feline Vaccination Guidelines Manley

2:10 pm 3:00 pm

Nutrition/Practice Management Supplements: Addison’s Disease Nursing Consideration for the Neurologic Patient Session 1 of 2 Improving Quality of Life! Wortinger Siekaniec Loes They Do It in Human Medicine, Why We Should Supplements: Improving Quality of Life! Backyard Chickens Blood Film Evaluation Session 1 of 2 Use the Nursing Process Session 2 of 2 Wortinger Harvey Siekaniec Loes Cooking with Blood Chemistries- Understanding Blood Film Evaluation Session 2 of 2 Nursing Consideration for the Renal Feline The 5 Most Important Practice Management What Your Machines Are Telling You Siekaniec Duties Harvey Wortinger Ward, Ernie 5 Ways Every Team Member Can Become a Differential Diagnosis of Anemia in Dogs Session Blood Products and Patient Delivery Counseling Clients in Crisis Better Clinic Leader 1 of 2 Wortinger Siekaniec Harvey Ward, Ernie Differential Diagnosis of Anemia in Dogs Session Oxygen Administration Diarrhea 5 Ways To Grow Your Clinic in 2015 and Beyond 2 of 2 Wortinger Siekaniec Ward, Ernie Harvey

4:00 pm 4:50 pm

Disinfection and Disease- What We Need To Know Wortinger

8:00 am 8:50 am 9:00 am 9:50 am 10:50 am 11:40 am 1:10 pm 2:00 pm

5:00 pm 5:50 pm

Clinical Pathology

Neurology The Neurological Examination, Keep It Be Mysterious Schubert Keeping the Head on Straight; A Revie Syndromes Schubert Seizures, You May Be Surprised, They A Schubert The Dog’s A Dragging, How To Diagnos About Paraparesis/Paraplegia Schubert Down in All Four? The Causes and Trea Quadriparesis Schubert Sterile CNS Inflammatory Diseases, We Gme But Now We Know Better Schubert Lameness or Weakness? Orthopedic o Tell the Difference Schubert Call It Syringohydromyelia or Just Plai Malformation Syndrome. Schubert

Medicine for the Technician

Protozoal Infections of Blood Cells Harvey

Options Beyond Force Feeding Siekaniec

5 Things You Must Do during Every Exam To Improve Your Practice Ward, Ernie

Differential Diagnosis of Bleeding Disorders in Dogs Harvey

Importance of Technician PEs Siekaniec

5 Ways To Make Your Clinic Happier, Healthier and More Productive Ward, Ernie

Culture & Sensitivity

Canine

Canine Works 8:00 a

Heather Heidi W

(Limi Tech

Cytolo

1:10 p

Heidi W Heather

(Limi Tech

Practice Management/Team Building

Critical Care/Tech Anesthesia

N

Rockstar Implementation! Session 1 of 2 Johnson, Shelly

Advanced Catheterization Techniques Ruess-Lamky

F W

Rockstar Implementation! Session 2 of 2 Johnson, Shelly

Hypothermia—What’s the Hype? Ruess-Lamky

N C W

11:00 am 11:50 am

Getting to the Heart of the Matter with Clients Johnson, Shelly

P W

12:00 pm 12:50 pm

Creating Milestones in Everything We Do Johnson, Shelly

The Pain Stops Here: Loco-Regional Anesthetic Techniques Ruess-Lamky Anesthetic Monitors—Understanding Their Use & Limitations Ruess-Lamky

9:00 am 9:50 am

Culture & Sensitivity Interpretation Workshop

10:00 am 10:50 am

Elizabeth Bailey, DVM | Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM

9:00 am -10:50 am

(No ChargeMust Pre-register)

Workshop

Z W


Scientific Progr Surgery Equipment Sponsored by Wet Lab

Medial Patella Luxation 1:10 pm - 5:00 pm

Equipment Sponsored by Wet Lab

A

Matthew Johnson, DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA

ee: Vets $495

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 | Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

ndlimb lameness in canine patients. This rocesses that contribute to the disease partial cruciate injuries. This laboratory xamination for meniscal injury, meniscal ement using isometric principles of the

Medial patella luxation is a common condition diagnosed in small and large breed canine patients as well as feline patients. This laboratory will discuss the underlying pathological conditions that contribute to the disease process. You will learn how to diagnose as well as grade medial patella luxation based on physical examination findings as well as radiographic changes that commonly accompany or contribute to the condition.

Practice Management/Team Building

Surgery

Dermatology

Surgical Site Infections… Where Are We Now Dujowich

Atopic Dermatitis White

Team Synergy Session 2 of 2 Johnson, Shelley

Cardiology Cough in Geriatric, Small Dogs: Cardiac Disease, Respiratory Disease or Both? Abbott Current Therapy of Canine Heart Failure Abbott

Ureteral Surgery in Cats Dujowich

Food Allergy White

Are Not All Emergencies

Internal Business Controls Session 1 of 2 Johnson, Shelley

Diagnosis and Management of Pericardial Disease Abbott

Monster Wounds and Monster Repairs Dujowich

Fleas and the Pruritic Mites White

se and What To Do

Internal Business Controls Session 2 of 2 Johnson, Shelley

GDV Surgery, Management, and Prevention Dujowich

Demodectic Mange White

atment of Quadriplegia/

Leaders Amongst Us Session 1 of 2 Johnson, Shelley

The Basic Abdominal Exploratory Dujowich

Cutaneous Manifestations of Internal Disease White

e Used To Call Them All

Leaders Amongst Us Session 2 of 2 Johnson, Shelley

Echocardiography - Placing Findings in Clinical Context Abbott Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular [Boxer Dog] Cardiomyopathy Abbott Diagnostic Approach to Feline Cardiac Disease Abbott

Polytrauma Triage and Management Dujowich

Autoimmune Skin Diseases White

or Neurological? How To

Feline Cardiomyopathy I - An Update Abbott

Thoracic Surgery Dujowich

A Practical Guide to Managing Otitis Externa White

in SM Caudal Occipital

Management of Canine Congenital Cardiac Disease Abbott

Small Breed Issues Dujowich

Dermatology Disasters White

t Simple and It Won’t

Team Synergy Session 1 of 2 Johnson, Shelley

ew of Vestibular

Mast Cell Tumor/Cytology

r Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP Ward, DVM, DACVIM

Rabbit and Rodent Dermatology White

Internal Medicine Current Review of Canine Gastrointestinal Diseases Session 1 of 2 Honeckman Current Review of Canine Gastrointestinal Diseases Session 2 of 2 Honeckman

ited to 60 DVMs & Techs) hs $35 | Vets $35

Staph Pyoderma Session 1 of 2 Hillier

Advances in Pancreatitis in Dogs and Cats Honeckman

Old Age Is Not A Disease-But It Sure Is a Killer Gardner

Feline Diabetes Mellitus Saxon

Staph Pyoderma Session 2 of 2 Hillier

Dyspneic Cats - How To Make Them Breathe More Easily Honeckman

Chronic Kidney Disease in Cats Saxon

Ward, DVM, DACVIM r Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP

Flea Control Hillier

Icteric Cats - More Than Just Hepatic Lipidosis Honeckman

Veterinary Hospice- It Is NOT About Prolonging Suffering Session 1 of 2 Gardner Veterinary Hospice- It Is NOT About Prolonging Suffering Session 2 of 2 Gardner

ited to 60 DVMs & Techs) hs $35 | Vets $35

New Approaches to the Itchy Dog Session 1 of 2 Hillier

Reviving the ECG Honeckman

Assessing Quality of Life- Helping the Undecided Client Gardner

The 2014 Practitioners' Case Challe Trends in Diagnostic Testing Session Saxon

New Approaches to the Itchy Dog Session 2 of 2 Hillier

Use and Misuse of ACE-inhibitors Honeckman

Don't Up-Sell…Up-Serve Gardner

The 2014 Practitioners' Case Challe Trends in Diagnostic Testing Session Saxon

e Mast Cell Tumor shop am - 11:50 am

Workshop

ogy Workshop

pm - 5:00 pm

Workshop

Nursing

Dermatology Miscellaneous Diseases That Fall Through the Cracks White

Hematology

Radiology

Critical Care/Hospice

Feline/Internal Medicine

Being Ready for the Most Catastrophic Trauma Cases Feline Hyperthyroidism Crowe Saxon Damage Control Surgery-What Is It and What It Entails Crowe

Feline Pancreatitis Saxon

Euthanasia/Google

The 2014 Practitioners' Case Challe Trends in Diagnostic Testing Session Saxon

Critical Care

7:00 am - 7:50 am - Christian Fellowship Breakfast | 8:00 am - 8:50 am - Complimentar

Fluid Therapy Wortinger

Unique Features of Feline Hematology Harvey

Thoracic Radiographic Image Interpretation Arble

Nutritional Support: When Putting Food in the Cage Isn’t Enough Wortinger

Abdominal Radiographic Image Interpretation Arble

Pancreatitis Wortinger

Leukogram Interpretation Session 1 of 2 Harvey Leukogram Interpretation Session 2 of 2 Harvey

Zoonosis: What Is All the Fuss About? Wortinger

Lymphoid Neoplasms Harvey

Musculoskeletal Radiographic Image Interpretation Arble

The Art of Euthanasia and the Science of Death Session 1 of 2 Gardner The Art of Euthanasia and the Science of Death Session 2 of 2 Gardner Prime Real Estate on Google - How To Get on the FIRST Page Session 1 of 2 Gardner Prime Real Estate on Google - How To Get on the FIRST Page Session 2 of 2 Gardner

Hemodialysis in Acute and Chronic Kid Disease Bandt Extracorporeal Blood Purification in D and Cats Bandt Fluid Therapy and Transfusion Therapy Critical Patient Bandt


ram at-a-glance advanced Dentistry

Rehabilitation & Laser Therapy Co-Sponsored by

Level 2 Dentistry 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wet Lab

Rehabilitation & Laser Therapy 8:00 am - 11:50 am Suzanne Plamondon, DVM, MBA, CVA, CCRT, DABVP

Brook Niemiec, DVM, DAVDC, DEVDC, FAVD Michael Peak, DVM, DAVDC

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $125 | Techs $75 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $150 | Techs $125

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $595 | Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $795 Part 1 - Bonded Sealants and Composite Restorations | 1 hour lecture and 3 hours of hands on laboratory

This 4-hour lecture/lab will open with an overview of laser techn general practice. This session will include innovative ways to ma clients. Following the lecture, students will participate in an int of cases, protocols, and treatments on live canines, and outcomes to DVMs (who examine the patient and prescribe treatment) a perform the laser treatment).

Attendees will learn how to perform bonded composites in veterinary dentistry. Indications, preparation, techniques, and mechanics of bonding will be covered in the preparatory lecture. Part 2 - Periodontal Surgery | 1 hour lecture and 3 hours of hands on laboratory Learn advanced periodontal surgery procedures to save periodontally diseased teeth including. Indications and contraindications, equipment needs, full and envelope flaps, treating the exposed root surface, and guided tissue regeneration. Dentistry Common Oral Pathology/Disease Niemiec Periodontal Disease Niemiec Periodontal Therapy for the General Practitioner Niemiec Dental Radiology Interpretation Niemiec Dental Extractions Made Easier Niemiec Surgical Extractions/Complications Niemiec Increasing Dental Compliance Niemiec Dental Therapy, the Next Level Niemiec

Critical Care A Critical Examination of Therapeutic Procedures for Emergency Support for Dogs Presenting with Dyspnea Crowe New Therapeutics that Decrease Oxidative Stress Crowe

Laser/Clinical Pathology/Dental X-Ray Veterinary Laser Therapy: The Science Made Simple Bradley

Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Reflections (A Historical Account from 65 to 2015) Crowe Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Use in Emergency Conditions: A Critical Review Crowe Need to Know Life Saving Emergency Procedures Crowe

Spleens That Go Bump in the Night Kiehl Grading of Tumors: What Does a General Practitioner Need to Know? Kiehl

Electrolyzed Water in Practice - Understanding the Importance of this New Modality Crowe A Critical Look at Supplemental Oxygen Delivery Methods Crowe Use of a Targeted Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Coil in Practice Crowe

Medicine/Rabbit Medicine Update on Leptospirosis in Florida: What Happened in 2013-2014 Bandt What Is New in Treating Acute Kidney Disease? Bandt

enge: Advancing Medicine: n 1 of 3

enge: Advancing Medicine: n 2 of 3

enge: Advancing Medicine: n 3 of 3

Dogs

y in the

Dental Radiography Reading/Interpretation Lab Session 1:30 pm - 6:10 pm

Workshop

Tips for Minimizing Acute Kidney Injury in the Older Pet Ross

How To Fix Hypotension in Critical Cases Session 2 of 2 Shih

Rabbit Anesthesia & Analgesia Heard

Proteinuric Renal Disease in Dogs: A Practical Approach Ross

Update CPR Shih

Rabbit Dentistry Heard

Feeding Tubes…Not Just for Yellow Cats Ross

Update Analgesics Shih

Common Medical and Surgical Problems of Rabbits Heard

Backyard Chickens

OSHA

Online Marketing and Social Media in 2015 Session 1 of 3 Wernli

Online Marketing and Social Media in 2015 Session 3 of 3 Wernli

No Additional Charge

Update on Chronic Kidney Disease, Evidence Based Medicine Bandt Introduction, Husbandry and Nutrition of Rabbits in the Clinic Heard

Increasing Customer Compliance Session 2 of 2 Wernli

Online Marketing and Social Media in 2015 Session 2 of 3 Wernli

Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC (DVM Participants)

See PageAnesthesia/Critical 7 for details Renal Disease Care Managing Difficult Urinary Tract Infections Anesthesia in Critical Cases Session 1 of 2 Session 1 of 2 Ross Shih Managing Difficult Urinary Tract Infections Anesthesia in Critical Cases Session 2 of 2 Session 2 of 2 Ross Shih How To Fix Hypotension in Critical Cases Managing Urinary Incontinence Session 1 of 2 Ross Shih

limentary Disney Character Breakfast

dney

Veterinary Laser Therapy: Clinical Applications and Implementation Bradley

Client Care/Practice Management Client Retention - Implementing Protocols That Will Keep Pet Owners Coming Back! Session 1 of 3 Wernli Client Retention - Implementing Protocols That Will Keep Pet Owners Coming Back! Session 2 of 3 Wernli Client Retention - Implementing Protocols That Will Keep Pet Owners Coming Back! Session 3 of 3 Wernli Increasing Customer Compliance Session 1 of 2 Wernli

Internal Medicine

Feline/Canine

Feline Case Challenges Session 1 of 2 Alleman & Schaer

Feline Denta 8:00 am - 11

Feline Case Challenges Session 2 of 2 Alleman & Schaer

Wade Gingeric Christopher Sm

Is My Dog Bleeding Alleman & Schaer

Wet Lab Only Fe With Conf. Reg. F

So Why the Confusion About the Effusion? Session 1 of 2 Alleman & Schaer So Why the Confusion About the Effusion Session 2 of 2 Alleman & Schaer

Canine Dent 1:10 pm - 5:0

Is Your Patient Sick from Infectious Disease Session 1 of 2 Alleman & Schaer

Wet Lab Only Fe With Conf. Reg. F

Christopher Sm Wade Gingeric

Is Your Patient Sick from Infectious Disease Session 2 of 2 Alleman & Schaer

Cytology

Internal Medicine

Anesthesia

Sponsored by Patterson Veterinary

Introduction to Working with Backyard Poultry in Your Clinic Heard

Workplace Safety for the Veterinary Clinic – OSHA Compliance Session 1 of 4 Spencer

FNA Cytology Practical Tips and Overview of Cytodiagnosis Wamsley

Clinical Management of Backyard Poultry Heard

Workplace Safety for the Veterinary Clinic – OSHA Compliance Session 2 of 4 Spencer

FNA Cytology Interactive Case Session Wamsley

Common Disease Issues of Backyard Poultry Session 1 of 2 Heard

Workplace Safety for the Veterinary Clinic – OSHA Compliance Session 3 of 4 Spencer

FNA Cytology of Neoplasia Interactive Case Session Wamsley

Common Disease Issues of Backyard Poultry Session 2 of 2 Heard

Workplace Safety for the Veterinary Clinic – OSHA Compliance Session 4 of 4 Spencer

Lymph Node Cytology Evaluation Wamsley

The Difficult -To-Diagnose Anemic Patient Session 1 of 2 Alleman & Schaer The Difficult -To-Diagnose Anemic Patient Session 2 of 2 Alleman & Schaer Pitfalls in Cytology Await Us All Session 1 of 2 Alleman & Schaer Pitfalls in Cytology Await Us All Session 2 of 2 Alleman & Schaer

From the Exam Roo Rollings Dental Pathology Rollings Feline Dentistry Rollings Home Care Rollings


Sponsored by

Equipment Co-Sponsored by

Ophthalmic Surgery 1:10 pm - 5:00 pm

Wet Lab

Wet Lab

A N I M A L H E A L T H A Division of I-MED Pharma Inc.

Robert Swinger, DVM, DACVO Carmen Colitz, DVM, PhD, DACVO With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $325 | Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $525

nology and its uses in arket the laser to your teractive presentation s. The program is open and technicians (who

Improve your proficiency in performing practical eyelid, conjunctival, corneal and orbital surgeries. Receive step-by-step instructions on entropion correction, eyelid reconstruction, prolapsed third eyelid gland replacement, corneal debridement techniques, conjunctival grafting, corneal laceration repair and enucleation. Surgery/Renal

Avian Physical Exam Session 1 of 2 Helmer Avian Physical Exam Session 2 of 2 Helmer

Platelet Rich Plasma - What’s the Evidence? Johnson, Matthew Decision Matrix for Medial Patella Luxation and Cranial Cruciate Injury in the Small Breed Dog Johnson, Matthew

Avian Clinical and Diagnostic Techniques Session 1 of 2 Helmer

Wound Management Johnson, Matthew

Avian Clinical and Diagnostic Techniques Session 2 of 2 Helmer

Extracapsular Suture Stabilization Johnson, Matthew Diagnostic Staging and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease Session 1 of 2 Ross Diagnostic Staging and Management Of Chronic Kidney Disease Session 2 of 2 Ross

Commonly Used and Abused Avian and Exotic Medications Helmer Rabbit and Rodent Dental Diseases Helmer

Oncology Preventing and Treating Adverse Effects of Chemotherapy Kow Advances in Anti-Cancer Chemotherapy Kow Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Nasal and Brain Tumors Kow Clinical Approach to Skin Lumps & Bumps Kow Updates in Management of Canine & Feline Soft Tissue Sarcomas Kow Canine Osteosarcoma. Treatment Options Beyond Amputation and Chemotherapy Kow

Ophthalmology Lesions in the Lens Swinger Management of Common Ocular Emergencies Swinger New Developments in Veterinary Ophthalmology – Surgical and Pharmacological Advancements Swinger Improving Your Ophthalmic Exam Skills

Swinger

Feline Ophthalmology Swinger Glaucoma in Veterinary Medicine – Surgical and Medical Management Swinger

Suture Science and Selection Session 1 of 2 Brown

Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease Ross

Corneal Ulcers – Why Some Just Won’t Heal! Swinger

Suture Science and Selection Session 2 of 2 Brown

Non-Surgical Urolith Management Ross

What’s Normal? A Review of the Fundic Exam Swinger

e Dental Surgery

ee: Vets $495 Fee: Vets $295

Hematology: The Old Fashioned Way Samples

Wet Lab

mithson, DVM, DAVDC ch, DVM, DAVDC

ee: Vets $495 Fee: Vets $295

Wet Lab

Heidi Reuss-Lamky, LVT, VTS (Anesthesia, Surgery)

Wet Lab Only Fee | Techs $125 With Conf. Reg. Fee | Techs $75

The Complete Red Blood Cell Samples

Dental Radiography 1:10 pm - 5:00 pm

Lab Testing Procedures for the Discriminating Technician Samples

Denise Rollings, CVT, VTS Dentistry Jeanne Perrone, CVT, VTS Dentistry

Veterinary Nursing: Small Animal Samples

Dentistry/Anesthesia A Face Only a Mother Could Love: Anesthetic Considerations for Brachycephalic Breeds Lafferty You Gotta Know How To Hold ‘Em: Exotic Animal Restraint Lafferty

Wet Lab

Wet Lab Only Fee | Techs $125 With Conf. Reg. Fee | Techs $75

Small Mammal Anesthesia and Critical Care: Tips and Tricks of the Trade Lafferty Case by Case: Creating the Right Anesthetic Protocols for Your Canine and Feline Patients Lafferty CRI Use for Anesthesia and Analgesia Lafferty Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go: Considerations and Preparation for Anesthetic Recoveries Lafferty

ANIMAL HEALTH

BRONZE

Double Platinum

Thank you to Our Early Bird Sponsors

A Division of I-MED Pharma Inc.

Rabies Titer Testing

Anesthesia and Analgesia for Avian Patients Lafferty

Zoonotics of Small Animal Species Samples

SUNDAY− April 12

om to the Dental Table

Dental Nerve Block 8:00 am - 11:50 am

SILVER

tal Surgery 00 pm

Wet Lab

GOLD

al Surgery 1:50 am

Dental Nerve Block/Dental Radiology

Rabies Titer Test 1:00 pm-7:00 pm Saturday Only

Chatfield $80.00 pre-registration $100.00 on-site registration

SATURDAY− April 11

ch, DVM, DAVDC mithson, DVM, DAVDC

Clinical Pathology/Nursing Advanced Parasitology: A Method to the Madness Samples By the Gallon: A Guide to Clinical Urine Analysis Samples

FRIDAY− April 10

Exotics/Surgery

THURSDAY− April 9

Ophthalmic Surgery


Phone

Preferrred Address

Clinic Name

Name

Email 

$395.00 $595.00 $395.00 $595.00 $295.00 $495.00 $295.00 $495.00

  Thur. Medial Patella Luxation   Thur. Abdominal Ultrasound - Normals   Fri. Advanced Abdominal Ultrasound   Sat. Feline Dental Extractions   Sat. Canine Dental Extractions

  Member, Graduated 2011...............................$350.00

  Non-Resident.................................................$475.00   (Current Member of State VMA or Military)

$

D

Total Spouse/Guest Fee 

$

$80.00

E

(U.S. Funds drawn on U.S. Banks)

Veterinarian Registration FORM

Name as It Appears on Card

Credit Card Number

Florida Veterinary Medical Association | 7207 Monetary Drive • Orlando, FL 32809

Signature 

Expiration Date 

After March 6, 2015 Add $75 Per Registrant

Total Events Fee $

Cocktails -6:30pm Dinner - 7:00pm

   Visa    Mastercard   American Express Discover

Total WL/WS Fee 

Quantity: _____ X $95

An Evening of Dinner, Dancing, Fun & Great Prizes!

Method of Payment   Check/Money Order    Charge My Credit Card Below $

C

  Rabies Titer ( $100 On-site)

$25.00 Sat., FVMAF Reverse Raffle/Dinner $95.00  

Sat., FVMA Business Luncheon  

$

Total Registration Fee   $

N/A

$35.00 N/A

  Sun. Culture and Sensitivity Interp. WS $0.00 (Must be Pre-Registered to attend)

  Sat. Cytology WS

Child’s Name – Please Print Legibly

  Children’s Registration $0.00

Spouse/Guest Name – Please Print Legibly (Spouse registration only allows entrance to the exhibit hall and social events. Spouses who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

  Spouse/Guest Registration................................ $50.00

Spouse/Guest Registration & Titer Testing Social Events

Total Payment (A,B,C,D,E)

B

AVMA Accredited Veterinary School Name (Proof of current enrollment required)

$35.00 N/A

$325.00 $525.00

$125.00 $150.00

  Sat. Canine Mast Cell Tumor WS

Workshops (WS)

$395.00 $595.00

  Thur. Extracapsular Suture Stabilization

  Member, Graduated 2012...............................$300.00

  Non-FVMA Member.......................................$600.00   Veterinary Student..............................................$0.00

$295.00 $495.00

  Thur. Ophthalmic Surgery

  Member, Graduated 2013-2014...........................$0.00

  Thur. Rehab. & Laser Therapy

$595.00 $795.00

  FVMA 2015 Member.......................................$475.00

 Thur. Level 2 Dentistry

(Includes Conference Proceedings on DVD)

With Conf. Reg. Wet Lab Only

Wet Labs (WL)

Registration Fee

$

Veterinarian Registration

A Total Membership Dues  My 2015 FVMA Membership is current  I would like to join and take advantage of the discounted registration fee. I qualify for the following: Categories: (please check one)   Regular Member $255.00  Recent Graduate (within last 2 years) $141.00  State/Federal Employee $141.00   Part-Time Employed $141.00 (Employed at FVMA Member practice & work 20 hrs per week or less)   Non-Florida Resident $104.00

FVMA Membership *To register at the discounted registration rate below, your 2015 FVMA dues must be current!

86th FVMA Annual Conference April 9-12, 2015 Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa Lake Buena Vista, FL


86th FVMA Annual Conference April 9-12, 2015 Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa Lake Buena Vista, FL

3rd TEAM MEMBER

*A discount is offered to the Clinic Name 3rd and any additional team Address member from the same FVMA member practice. Phone Email 

2nd TEAM MEMBER Name: Email:

1st TEAM MEMBER Name: Email:

With Conf. Reg. Wet Lab Only

Name: Email:

Wet Labs (WL) & Workshops (WS)

$125.00 $125.00 $125.00 N/A

$75.00 $75.00 $75.00 $35.00

$125.00 $125.00 $125.00 N/A N/A N/A

  Thur. Rehab. & Laser Therapy WL   Sat. Dental Nerve Block WL   Sat. Dental Radiography WL   Sat. Canine Mast Cell Tumor WS   Sat. Cytology WS   Sun. Culture and Sensitivity Interp. WS

B Name:

  $50.00 Spouse/Guest

  $0.00 Children’s Registration

Name:

Sat., FVMAF Reverse Raffle/ Dinner

  $95.00 Quantity: ________

Sat., Titer Testing Total   $80.00

$

E

D

After March 6, 2015 Add $25 Per Registrant

$

(This registration only allows entrance to the exhibit hall and social events. Those who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

$75.00 $75.00 $75.00 $35.00 $35.00 $35.00 N/A

$

D E

(Must be Pre-Registered to attend)

$35.00

Total Wet Labs & Workshops Fee

With Conf. Reg. Wet Lab Only

Registration Fee  CVT  CVA $ 100.00 A   Veterinary Assistant   Practice Manager   Other Admin. Staff

Wet Labs (WL) & Workshops (WS)

Registration Fee  CVT  CVA $ 125.00 A   Veterinary Assistant   Practice Manager   Other Admin. Staff

With Conf. Reg. Wet Lab Only

N/A

B $

C

Total Wet Labs & Workshops Fee

$

C

Spouse/Guest Registration $

$

$

(This registration only allows entrance to the exhibit hall and social events. Those who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

Name:

  $50.00 Spouse/Guest

Spouse/Guest Registration

(Must be Pre-Registered to attend)

  Thur. Rehab. & Laser Therapy WL   Sat. Dental Nerve Block WL   Sat. Dental Radiography WL   Sat. Canine Mast Cell Tumor WS   Sat. Cytology WS $35.00   Sun. Culture and Sensitivity Interp. WS

Registration Fee  CVT  CVA $ 125.00 A   Veterinary Assistant   Practice Manager   Other Admin. Staff

Wet Labs (WL) & Workshops (WS)

$125.00 $125.00 $125.00 N/A N/A N/A

B

$75.00 $75.00 $75.00 $35.00 $35.00 $35.00 $

Total Wet Labs & Workshops Fee $

(Must be Pre-Registered to attend)

  Thur. Rehab. & Laser Therapy WL   Sat. Dental Nerve Block WL   Sat. Dental Radiography WL   Sat. Canine Mast Cell Tumor WS   Sat. Cytology WS   Sun. Culture and Sensitivity Interp. WS

Spouse/Guest Registration

C

Name:

  $50.00 Spouse/Guest (This registration only allows entrance to the exhibit hall and social events. Those who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

  $0.00 Children’s Registration

  $80.00

Sat., Titer Testing Total

  $95.00 Quantity: ________

Sat., FVMAF Reverse Raffle/ Dinner

Name:

E

D

  $0.00 Children’s Registration

$

$

Name:

Sat., FVMAF Reverse Raffle/ Dinner   $95.00 Quantity: ________

Sat., Titer Testing Total   $80.00

$    Visa    Mastercard   American Express Discover Expiration Date 

Total Team Member Payment (1,2,3) Method of Payment   Check/Money Order    Charge My Credit Card Below $ Credit Card Number  

Signature 

Florida Veterinary Medical Association | 7207 Monetary Drive • Orlando, FL 32809

Name as It Appears on Card

Veterinary team Registration FORM


AnEvening in theTropics FVMA FOUNDATION BENEFIT

REVERSE RAFFLE & AUCTION

$t9Inc5ludes:

e Tick er n cing -Din & Dan cket -DJ affle ti f Fun! - R ight o -N

Saturday, april 11, 2015 | 6:30 pM

What is a reverse raffle? It’s where we save the best for last! A reverse raffle is an “elimination raffle”, the object is NOT to have your number called. The last 10 tickets drawn will win the grand prizes, between $100 and $2,500 in cash! Throughout the evening raffle tickets are drawn and their numbers removed from the board. Great door prizes will also be randomly given away throughout the drawing! For only $95 receive one ticket for the reverse raffle drawing and your ‘evening in the tropics’ will include a delicious dinner, live auction, DJ and dancing plus your chance to win cash and fabulous prizes!

Work hard, play harder! Reward your entire team with a night of dinner, dancing, laughing and tons of fun! All for a great cause! Call FVMA at (800) 992-3862 to reserve a table for 10 = $950

dinner

treat yourself & your staff! have fun and support a great cause!

dJ & d ancin g cocktails

The FVMA Foundation contributes to:  Animal Disaster Relief  Continuing Education  Public Education in Animal Health and Welfare  Veterinary & Veterinary Technician Scholarships  Youth Organizations  Research Programs

More than $5,000 in cash and prizes to be given aWay!

• door prizes • gift cards • and Much More


Protect your livelihood with all the right coverage through AVMA PLIT. We are the most trusted source of professional, business and personal coverage for every stage of your career.

our expertise is Workers’ Compensation Umbrella Liability

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Personal Excess (Umbrella) Liability For a coverage comparison of your entire insurance portfolio to the PLIT Program, call 800-228-PLIT (7548) or visit avmaplit.com

CAUTION: Federal (USA) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Description: NEXGARD™ (afoxolaner) is available in four sizes of beef-flavored, soft chewables for oral administration to dogs and puppies according to their weight. Each chewable is formulated to provide a minimum afoxolaner dosage of 1.14 mg/lb (2.5 mg/kg). Afoxolaner has the chemical composition 1-Naphthalenecarboxamide, 4-[5[3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-4, 5-dihydro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-3-isoxazolyl]-N[2-oxo-2-[(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)amino]ethyl. Indications: NEXGARD kills adult fleas and is indicated for the treatment and prevention of flea infestations (Ctenocephalides felis), and the treatment and control of Black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis), American Dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), and Lone Star tick (Amblyomma americanum) infestations in dogs and puppies 8 weeks of age and older, weighing 4 pounds of body weight or greater, for one month. Dosage and Administration: NEXGARD is given orally once a month, at the minimum dosage of 1.14 mg/lb (2.5 mg/kg). Dosing Schedule: Body Weight 4.0 to 10.0 lbs. 10.1 to 24.0 lbs. 24.1 to 60.0 lbs. 60.1 to 121.0 lbs. Over 121.0 lbs.

Afoxolaner Per Chewable (mg)

Chewables Administered

11.3 One 28.3 One 68 One 136 One Administer the appropriate combination of chewables

NEXGARD can be administered with or without food. Care should be taken that the dog consumes the complete dose, and treated animals should be observed for a few minutes to ensure that part of the dose is not lost or refused. If it is suspected that any of the dose has been lost or if vomiting occurs within two hours of administration, redose with another full dose. If a dose is missed, administer NEXGARD and resume a monthly dosing schedule. Flea Treatment and Prevention: Treatment with NEXGARD may begin at any time of the year. In areas where fleas are common year-round, monthly treatment with NEXGARD should continue the entire year without interruption. To minimize the likelihood of flea reinfestation, it is important to treat all animals within a household with an approved flea control product. Tick Treatment and Control: Treatment with NEXGARD may begin at any time of the year (see Effectiveness). Contraindications: There are no known contraindications for the use of NEXGARD. Warnings: Not for use in humans. Keep this and all drugs out of the reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion, contact a physician immediately.

24  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Precautions: The safe use of NEXGARD in breeding, pregnant or lactating dogs has not been evaluated. Use with caution in dogs with a history of seizures (see Adverse Reactions). Adverse Reactions: In a well-controlled US field study, which included a total of 333 households and 615 treated dogs (415 administered afoxolaner; 200 administered active control), no serious adverse reactions were observed with NEXGARD. Over the 90-day study period, all observations of potential adverse reactions were recorded. The most frequent reactions reported at an incidence of > 1% within any of the three months of observations are presented in the following table. The most frequently reported adverse reaction was vomiting. The occurrence of vomiting was generally self-limiting and of short duration and tended to decrease with subsequent doses in both groups. Five treated dogs experienced anorexia during the study, and two of those dogs experienced anorexia with the first dose but not subsequent doses. Table 1: Dogs With Adverse Reactions. Treatment Group Afoxolaner

Oral active control

N1

% (n=415)

N2

% (n=200)

Vomiting (with and without blood)

17

4.1

25

12.5

Dry/Flaky Skin

13

3.1

2

1.0

Diarrhea (with and without blood)

13

3.1

7

3.5

Lethargy

7

1.7

4

2.0

Anorexia

5

1.2

9

4.5

1 Number of dogs in the afoxolaner treatment group with the identified abnormality. 2 Number of dogs in the control group with the identified abnormality. In the US field study, one dog with a history of seizures experienced a seizure on the same day after receiving the first dose and on the same day after receiving the second dose of NEXGARD. This dog experienced a third seizure one week after receiving the third dose. The dog remained enrolled and completed the study. Another dog with a history of seizures had a seizure 19 days after the third dose of NEXGARD. The dog remained enrolled and completed the study. A third dog with a history of seizures received NEXGARD and experienced no seizures throughout the study. To report suspected adverse events, for technical assistance or to obtain a copy of the MSDS, contact Merial at 1-888-637-4251 or www.merial.com/ nexgard. For additional information about adverse drug experience reporting for animal drugs, contact FDA at 1-888-FDA-VETS or online at http://www.fda.gov/ AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth. Mode of Action: Afoxolaner is a member of the isoxazoline family, shown to bind at a binding site to inhibit insect and acarine ligand-gated chloride channels, in particular those gated by the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), thereby blocking pre- and post-synaptic transfer of chloride ions across cell membranes. Prolonged afoxolaner-induced hyperexcitation results in uncontrolled activity of the central nervous system and death of insects and acarines. The selective toxicity of afoxolaner between insects and acarines and mammals may be inferred by the differential sensitivity of the insects and acarines’ GABA receptors versus mammalian GABA receptors.

Effectiveness: In a well-controlled laboratory study, NEXGARD began to kill fleas four hours after initial administration and demonstrated >99% effectiveness at eight hours. In a separate well-controlled laboratory study, NEXGARD demonstrated 100% effectiveness against adult fleas 24 hours post-infestation for 35 days, and was ≥ 93% effective at 12 hours post-infestation through Day 21, and on Day 35. On Day 28, NEXGARD was 81.1% effective 12 hours post-infestation. Dogs in both the treated and control groups that were infested with fleas on Day -1 generated flea eggs at 12- and 24-hours post-treatment (0-11 eggs and 1-17 eggs in the NEXGARD treated dogs, and 4-90 eggs and 0-118 eggs in the control dogs, at 12- and 24hours, respectively). At subsequent evaluations post-infestation, fleas from dogs in the treated group were essentially unable to produce any eggs (0-1 eggs) while fleas from dogs in the control group continued to produce eggs (1-141 eggs). In a 90-day US field study conducted in households with existing flea infestations of varying severity, the effectiveness of NEXGARD against fleas on the Day 30, 60 and 90 visits compared with baseline was 98.0%, 99.7%, and 99.9%, respectively. Collectively, the data from the three studies (two laboratory and one field) demonstrate that NEXGARD kills fleas before they can lay eggs, thus preventing subsequent flea infestations after the start of treatment of existing flea infestations. In well-controlled laboratory studies, NEXGARD demonstrated >94% effectiveness against Dermacentor variabilis and Ixodes scapularis, 48 hours post-infestation, and against Amblyomma americanum 72 hours post-infestation, for 30 days. Animal Safety: In a margin of safety study, NEXGARD was administered orally to 8- to 9-week-old Beagle puppies at 1, 3, and 5 times the maximum exposure dose (6.3 mg/kg) for three treatments every 28 days, followed by three treatments every 14 days, for a total of six treatments. Dogs in the control group were sham-dosed. There were no clinically-relevant effects related to treatment on physical examination, body weight, food consumption, clinical pathology (hematology, clinical chemistries, or coagulation tests), gross pathology, histopathology or organ weights. Vomiting occurred throughout the study, with a similar incidence in the treated and control groups, including one dog in the 5x group that vomited four hours after treatment. In a well-controlled field study, NEXGARD was used concomitantly with other medications, such as vaccines, anthelmintics, antibiotics (including topicals), steroids, NSAIDS, anesthetics, and antihistamines. No adverse reactions were observed from the concomitant use of NEXGARD with other medications. Storage Information: Store at or below 30°C (86°F) with excursions permitted up to 40°C (104°F). How Supplied: NEXGARD is available in four sizes of beef-flavored soft chewables: 11.3, 28.3, 68 or 136 mg afoxolaner. Each chewable size is available in color-coded packages of 1, 3 or 6 beef-flavored chewables. NADA 141-406, Approved by FDA Marketed by: Frontline Vet Labs™, a Division of Merial Limited. Duluth, GA 30096-4640 USA Made in Brazil. 1050-4493-02 Rev. 4/2014

™NexGard and FRONTLINE VET LABS are trademarks of Merial. ©2014 Merial. All rights reserved.


eterinary V e h t o t rence Volunteer to Make a Diffe

Community and our State.

The mission of the Florida Veterinary Medical Association is to advance the veterinary medical profession, promote animal health and well-being, and protect public health. The FVMA was founded in 1928. The association has evolved to become a strong and stable entity, with highly respected programs, dedicated leadership, necessary resources and professional staff. The Association is supported by a strong foundation of membership engagement, and the continued involvement of its members is vital to its evolutionary process of growth and achievement. Members are therefore encouraged to consider available opportunities to volunteer and to serve the needs of the veterinary profession in Florida. Volunteers are invited for the following FVMA committees. Volunteer to serve and make a difference to the veterinary community in Florida. Animal Welfare Committee – The purpose is to engage in activities approved by the FVMA Executive Board that involve or promote animal welfare and/or the human/animal bond. College Advisory Committee – The purpose shall be to promote cooperation between the membership of the association and the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine and to advise and aid the college in student orientation programs, fund raising, student scholarships and loans, curriculum and client referral procedures, and to promote Association membership among staff and students. Continuing Education Program Committee – The purpose is to secure guest speakers and be responsible for the arrangement and timing of the professional sessions of the Association’s continuing education conferences. Disaster Preparedness Committee – The purpose is to work with other animal support groups, animal welfare organizations and governmental agencies to ensure the most efficient and effective emergency response network to preserve animal life and to provide emergency care during a disaster. Food Animal Practice Committee – The purpose is to work through the FVMA on all developments related to food animal veterinary medicine, to coordinate practitioner activity, and to advise on actions to be taken in order to safeguard the professional interest of food animal veterinarians in state. Legislative Committee – The purpose is to be responsible for studying proposed legislation emanating from any source

whatever, to support by whatever means advisable, the passage of legislation favorable to the veterinary profession, the livestock industry and allied medical groups. Likewise, the committee shall exercise vigilance and attempt to suppress any legislation deemed undesirable or detrimental to the veterinary profession, the livestock industry and allied medical groups. The committee is encouraged to enlist the aid of the membership whenever deemed necessary to accomplish its responsibilities. One Health Committee – The purpose is to be responsible to appraise the membership of zoonotic and emerging disease events that may have an impact on the veterinary profession and the public it serves. The committee will also be responsible for developing veterinary public health information releases and, as directed, will maintain liaison with various public health agencies and various animal industries for the purpose of obtaining current disease information. Outreach Committee – The purpose is to formulate procedures for the Peer Assistance Program that will assist chemically addicted, impaired, injured or informed members and to assist families of deceased members to maintain or equitably dispose of the deceased member's practice. The committee shall also act as the association's liaison to the Physicians Recovery Network. Committee of Continuous Existence (formerly PAC) – The purpose is to solicit and expend funds in accordance with the guidelines established by and reflected in the CCE Bylaws. Veterinary Assistant/Technician Certification Committee – The purpose is to promulgate standards of curriculum, ethics and certification of Veterinary Assistants and Technicians in Florida. Veterinary Technician Career Development Committee – The purpose is to work together with the accredited Veterinary Technician Program in Florida and the FVMA for the career advancement of Veterinary Technicians in Florida. This committee is composed of veterinarians and technicians. Young Veterinary Medical Council – The purpose is to provide encouragement, community, and services to FVMA members to aid in the transition from school to professional life in their final year of veterinary school through the first 5 years after graduation. Volunteer and Be Involved! Contact the FVMA at info@fvma.org, or by calling (800) 992-3862. www.fvma.org  |  25


We’re growing! Come and grow with us as a

Chief of Staff.

Lead a caring veterinary medical team in a full-service hospital, practice human-quality medicine with state-of-the-art technology, and be rewarded for your talent and dedication.

Step into a Banfield hospital and feel the energy and compassion we bring to pet care. We’re seeking highly engaged leaders who are committed to making an impact in the lives of pets and people every day – Those who are passionate about preventive care, as well as coaching and mentoring others to help them succeed. Putting pets first, through partnership, is what sets Banfield apart. If you’re looking for an organization that ensures the highest level of veterinary care is practiced, as well as one that is devoted to your professional development, Banfield is the place for you! Excellent compensation offered and one of the most generous benefits packages in the profession.

Apply today at Banfield.com/Careers

Save the Dates

T G 2 A0 V1 C5

3rd Annual

Not your typical

Reptile

Gulf-Atlantic

The

Gulf-Atlantic Veterinary Conference

“Experience the Difference”

Boca Raton resort & Club, a waldorf astoria resort

October 29-November 1, 2015 Boca Raton, FL www.tgavc.org

Equine-EXCLUSIVE

11th annual

Promoting Excellence

symposium

Naples grande beach resort October 15-18, 2015 | Naples, FL www.faep.net 26  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Not your typical education. AAHA’s veterinary education stands out. Join us at AAHA Tampa 2015 to see why. aaha.org/aahatampa2015


98% Success Rate. Guaranteed.

 Specialized Treatment in a Warm, Homelike Environment.  Focus on Customer Service Excellence with Individualized Patient Care.  Over 15 Years of Experience.  Short, 48 Hour Stay.

The Cat Thyroid Center “Dr. Ott and his team are true professionals who always go above and beyond in the care of both the patient and the patient’s people. The Cat Thyroid Center has treated two of my family members and both of these demanding ladies had absolutely no complaints at the level of service and attention they received during their I-131 spa treatment.” -Dr. William Walsh, A Pet’s Friend Animal Hospital, Venice, FL “Over the years I have referred literally dozens of hyperthyroid cats to the Cat Thyroid Center. Every client I have sent has been very impressed and happy with the service they and their pet has received. The feedback I get is always positive, and I will continue to refer my clients to Dr. Ott for I-131 treatment.” -Dr. Andrew King, Cat Hospital of Sarasota, Sarasota, FL “The Cat Thyroid Center offers excellent medical care and makes sure the patient and client feel at home. Dr. Ott does an amazing job following up with cases both with the owners and with me. He is always available when any questions arise. His compassion and knowledge make the Cat Thyroid Center superior when it comes to treatment and as a result we highly recommend him.” -Dr. Sherri Basso, The Cat Hospital of Orlando, Orlando, FL

The Gentle Cure for Hyperthyroidism

717 S. Tamiami Trail Ruskin, FL 33570 813.641.3425 www.catthyroid@cs.com

www.fvma.org  |  27


PRACTICE Got a question? The FVMA can help. One of the benefits of membership in the FVMA is our Helpline, (800) 992-3862, available to members daily, Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 6:00 pm. Our Helpline also provides insight to the FVMA staff, of the challenges and concerns of our members. In this feature we will highlight topics from the questions we received in preceding weeks, in an effort to keep our members up-to-date on current concerns as well as regulatory and legislative changes.

Question:

Are pet massage therapists required to work under the direct supervision of a Veterinarian in order to perform pet massages?

A: It is understood from Florida statues and rules (the applicable sections are reproduced below), that massage therapists may perform massage on animals for pleasure only; but if they are performing massage as a treatment for any kind of ailment, it would have to be done under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian, understanding that the veterinarian is responsible for any harm that may be done to the patient by the massage therapist. 474.202 Definitions. (9) “Practice of veterinary medicine” means diagnosing the medical condition of animals and prescribing, dispensing, or administering drugs, medicine, appliances, applications, or treatment of whatever nature for the prevention, cure, or relief of a wound, fracture, bodily injury, or disease thereof; performing any manual procedure for the diagnosis of or treatment for pregnancy or fertility or infertility of animals; or representing oneself by the use of titles or words, or undertaking, offering, or holding oneself out, as performing any of these functions. The term includes the determination of the health, fitness, or soundness of an animal. Florida Administrative Code Chapter 61G18-17 (1) All tasks which may be delegated to a veterinary aide, nurse, laboratory technician, intern, or other employee of a licensed veterinarian shall be performed only under the “immediate supervision” of a licensed veterinarian as that phrase is defined in subsection 474.202(5), F.S., with the exception of the following tasks which may be performed without the licensed veterinarian on the premises:

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(a) The administration of medication and treatment, excluding vaccinations, as directed by the licensed veterinarian; and (b) The obtaining of samples and the performance of those diagnostic tests, including radiographs, directed by the licensed veterinarian.

Question:

What are the minimum standards for a mobile veterinary clinic?

A: 61G18-15.0025 Minimum Standards for a Mobile Veterinary Practice for Agricultural Animals. The following minimum standards shall apply to mobile veterinary medical practices for agricultural animals: (1) Mobile units utilized by veterinarians: (a) Shall be clean and orderly. (b) Shall contain the following: 1. Sterile syringes and needles. 2. All pharmaceuticals and biologics shall be maintained at the temperature recommended by the manufacturer in a refrigeration device that is powered by a stable energy source and is capable of maintaining a constant temperature. A thermometer shall be included where the biologics are being stored. 3. Antiseptic intravenous equipment. 4. If controlled substances are on the unit, a locking secure cabinet for storage and an accurate controlled substance log. 5. When surgery is to be performed, the following shall be maintained: a. Surgical instruments, b. Access to a means of sterilization, c. Suture material, and d. Intravenous equipment.


6. An American Veterinary Medical Association approved chemical method of euthanasia. 7. Segregated area or container for the storage of expired drugs. (2) When working with known infectious diseases within a herd, precautions shall be used to prevent transmission of infectious agents to another animal whether or not within the herd. (3) Veterinarians must have a written agreement with a clinic or hospital for the provision of long term hospitalization, surgery, or radiology, if these services are not provided by the mobile clinic. (4) Veterinarians must furnish a permanent address at which the veterinarian can be reached so that their clients can request veterinary medical records.

Rulemaking Authority 474.206, 474.215(6) FS. Law Implemented 474.215(6) FS. History–New 7-4-95, Amended 7-22-10, 9-26-12, 6-16-14.

Question:

What is the appropriate method of disposal of blood from collection tubes that was taken from healthy animals for routine testing, pre-surgical screening, etc., and urine taken to determine if a bladder infection, interstitial cystitis, or other non-contagious conditions exist? A: The liquid may be disposed into a sanitary sewer or other septage system; empty or full tubes may be disposed into the solid waste stream.

Question:

Are syringes used in blood collection from healthy animals considered infectious waste after the needle is removed? And are syringes used during vaccinations considered infectious waste (without the needles)?

Question:

A: No, providing the animal is not a primate. All discarded sharps are biomedical waste and should be discarded in a sharps disposal container immediately after they have been used. The syringe without a needle may be disposed as solid waste.

A: No. But some municipalities may have ordinances that prohibit the disposal of the animal tissue into the solid waste stream. It is more common for vets to dispose of these tissues with the euthanized animals through an animal crematory.

Is a veterinarian required to report an employee who stole and forged a prescription blank in order to obtain a controlled substance?

Are testicles, ovaries/uteruses, de-clawed nails, ear crops, or any other elective surgical tissues from healthy animals considered hazardous biomedical wastes and must they be disposed of in a red bag?

Question:

Should clients be allowed to take their deceased pets that were either euthanized or died from an undiagnosed illness, home from the veterinary hospital for a home burial?

Question:

A: There is no statutory affirmative duty on a veterinarian to report the attempt to obtain a controlled substance by fraud, as in the case of a pharmacist. See §465.015(3), F.S. If the employee had stolen from the veterinarian’s stock, then she/he may have an affirmative duty to report to DEA.

A: Clients may only take those that have not been diagnosed with a zoonotic disease.

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Veterinary Practices for Sale (800) 636-4740 psbroker.com Florida: Dixie County - 3,500sf on +1 acre, Unlimited Possibilities. FL20. Florida: Levy County – 2,200sf on +1 acre. Gross income >$500K. FL72. Florida: Pinellas County – 1,500sf full service SA w/3-exam rooms.FL74. Florida: Pinellas County – 2,700sf Emergency w/4-exam rooms. FL73. Florida: St Lucie County - 2,200sf on +1/2 acre on major hwy. 2-Dr. FL71. Florida: Sarasota County – AAHA – 1-1/2 Dr. Gross >$1M. SA w/RE. FL76. Guam – SA in US Territory! 3,000sf, 4-exam rooms.Tourist area! GUAM1. Illinois: Chicago Suburb – Multi-Dr. 2,200sf w/RE. 3-exam rooms. IL2. Maine: York County - 2,000sf on +3.6 acres prime real estate. ME5. New York: Onondaga County - 2,400sf ER in Great Family Area! NY7. N. Carolina: Brunswick County – 4,000sf SA on +1.5 acres. NC10. Oregon: Linn County – 1,800sf w/RE in town center. Gross >$330K. OR2. Pennsylvania: Westmoreland County – 4,300sf on +4.7 acres. PA5. Vermont, Orleans County – 4,400sf on +3 acres. Immaculate! VT3.

> Buyer Representation > Seller Representation > Practice Appraisals > Free Non-Binding, Confidential Consultations

30  |  FVMA ADVOCATE


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS Florida Practices for Sale

Florida Practices for Sale

New Listings! Pasco VETERINARIANS County. Elegant 3,500+SF facility surrounded by affluent RELIEF neighborhoods, commercial properties, and industry parks. Solo doctor, small animal Reliefpractice or part-time veterinarian with rehabilitation element grossed in excessavailable of $500K in 2013.in Minimal the Tampa  30and years of experience as $940K a practice owner. boarding, area: no grooming, no emergencies offered. for Practice andEnjoy Real Estate. surgery and working with people, small animal only. Call Dr. Joe Priest at (#FL33O)

New Listings! Pasco County. Elegant 3,500+SF facility surrounded by affluent neighborhoods, commercial properties, and industry parks. Solo doctor, small animal practice with rehabilitation element grossed in excess of $500K in 2013. Minimal boarding, no grooming, and no emergencies offered. $940K for Practice and Real Estate. (#FL33O)

New Listings! Treasure Coast. Close to beaches. Solo doctor, small animal practice located in 2,160SF facility amidst shopping and restaurants. Gross in excess of $754K in EXPERIENCED VETERINARIAN FOR 2013. $180K+ RELIEF income to new owner. $855K for PracticeAVAILABLE and Real Estate.(FL27H)

New Listings! Treasure Coast. Close to beaches. Solo doctor, small animal practice located in 2,160SF facility amidst shopping and restaurants. Gross in excess of $754K in 2013. $180K+ income to new owner. $855K for Practice and Real Estate.(FL27H)

(813) 230-5998. (Exp. Issue 1,2,3/15:1289)

ORLANDO AND SURROUNDING AREAS: Small animal Polk with County. 3,000SF facility busy 4-lane highway.Florida Gross inincluding excess of $2M practitioner over 25 years ofon service to Central 10 with continual growth. New owner’s income communication to exceed $370K! $2,530K Practice years of practice ownership. Excellent skillsfor and client& Real Estate. (#FL72S) pleasing personality to maximize returns! Good diagnostic, medical and surgical Duval skill sets. Please contact Brianneighborhood K. Martinminutes at (407) 461-3722 County. 2,400SF facility inDr. residential from I-95. 1.5 doctor, or bkmpetvet@aol.com. (Exp. 1/15:2755) small animal practice with someIssue acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. $825K for Practice and Real Estate. (#FL18D)

Experienced RelieftoVeterinarian Available for Capeon the Sold! Congratulations Drs. Wade Burrington and Sandra Yetson-Burrington Coral/Ft.sale Myers owner of Del Prado and Pine Island Pet of theirArea. practice,Former Apollo Animal Hospital, to Dr. Jacqlyn Diana. (#FL13A) Vet in Cape Coral, Florida. Available for medical and routine office Congratulations Dr. Rhonda Kirwan on the sale ofin herabdominal practice, Animal Hospital calls plusSold! advanced dentalto procedures. Experienced and of Bonita, to Dr.in-house Linda Kitchen!(#FL15K) cardiac ultrasound, blood chemistry, laser and have used both Cornerstone and Infinity Impromed software. Contact Dr. Jim Sharp at Sold!- Congratulations to Dr. Mike Harris on the sale of her practice, Wells Road 810-533-3598 or Medical vetseanarian@comcast.net. Veterinary Center, to Dr. Michelle Sands! (#FL25C) (Exp. Issue 1&2:15627) 1610Veterinarian Frederica Road * needed: Saint Simons 31522 Associates to Island, join ourGA 4 doctor, Toll Free: 800.333.1984 * www.simmonsinc.com progressive, small animal practice located in Northwest Florida. We are Email: southeast@simmonsinc.com a well-equipped practice with modern diagnostic, surgical, and dental Licensed Florida Real Estate Broker equipment, full in-house laboratory, a pleasant work environment with well trained, kind and friendly staff. We are seeking a caring, compassionate, energetic, motivated veterinarian who desires to practice quality medicine, has strong interpersonal, customer service and communication skills. New graduates considered. Very attractive compensation and generous benefits package. Call 850-682-2626 or fax resume to 850-689-0712. Florida Practices for Sale (Exp. Issue 1/15: 4967)

New Listings! Pasco County. Elegant 3,500+SF facility surrounded by affluent neighborhoods, commercial properties, and industry parks. Solo doctor, small animal practice with practice rehabilitation element for grossed sale in excess of $500K in 2013. Minimal no grooming, and no emergencies offered. for Practice and Real Estate. SMALLboarding, ANIMAL HOSPITAL FOR SALE IN$940K FT. LAUDERDALE, (#FL33O) FL: FULLY EQUIPPED FOR MEDICAL, SURGICAL AND

Polk County. 3,000SF facility on busy 4-lane highway. Gross in excess of $2M with continual growth. New owner’s income to exceed $370K! $2,530K for Practice & Real Estate. (#FL72S) Duval County. 2,400SF facility in residential neighborhood minutes from I-95. 1.5 doctor, small animal practice with some acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. $825K for Practice and Real Estate. (#FL18D) Sold! Congratulations to Drs. Wade Burrington and Sandra Yetson-Burrington on the sale of their practice, Apollo Animal Hospital, to Dr. Jacqlyn Diana. (#FL13A) Sold! Congratulations to Dr. Rhonda Kirwan on the sale of her practice, Animal Hospital of Bonita, to Dr. Linda Kitchen!(#FL15K) Sold!- Congratulations to Dr. Mike Harris on the sale of her practice, Wells Road Veterinary Medical Center, to Dr. Michelle Sands! (#FL25C)

1610 Frederica Road * Saint Simons Island, GA 31522 Toll Free: 800.333.1984 * www.simmonsinc.com Email: southeast@simmonsinc.com Licensed Florida Real Estate Broker

Florida Practices for Sale Florida Practice Listings!

New Listings! Pasco County. Elegant 3,500+SF facility surrounded by affluent neighborhoods, commercial properties, and industry parks. Solo doctor, small animal FREE PRACTICE practice with rehabilitation element grossedCONSULTATION in excess of $500K in 2013. Minimal boarding, no grooming, and no emergencies offered. $940K for Practice and Real Estate. (#FL33O)

IN-HOUSE LAB SERVICES. CONTACT LLOYD W GEORGE, Florida– Solo Dr.Close small animal,Solo 2014 gross New Listings! Treasure Coast. Close to beaches. Solo doctor, small animal practice North New Listings! Treasure Coast. to beaches. doctor, small $790k, animal practice DVM FOR DETAILS wge1928@aol.com (Exp. Issue established, well equipped, well staffed. Quaint small located in 2,160SF @ facility amidst shopping and restaurants. Gross1/15:1064) in excess of $754K in Well located in 2,160SF facility amidst shopping and restaurants. Gross in excess of $754K in 2013. $180K+ income to new owner. $855K for Practice and Real Estate.(FL27H)

2013. $180K+ income to new $855K for Practice and Real Estate.(FL27H) town atmosphere. Prx.owner. & RE. Eastern Panhandle– Solo Dr. Small animal, 2014 Polk County. 3,000SF facility on busy 4-lane highway. Gross in excess of $2M with Gross $900k, office, 3 exam rooms, $270K continual growth. 2400sq. New owner’sft.income to exceed $370K! $2,530Kapprox. for Practice & Real Estate.debt (#FL72S) after income to owner. Prx. & RE. New– Dermatology Practice– Solo Dr. Board Certified Duval County. 2,400SF facility in residential neighborhood minutes from I-95. 1.5 doctor, Derm. Prx. With 3 locations in NE Fl. Boasts great reputation. small animal practice with some acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. $825K for Has established clients and referrals. 2013 gross $660k. Practice and Real Estate. (#FL18D) Practice and Real Estate. (#FL18D) New– West Coast of Fl.– For the Feline enthusiast...an all SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE FOR SALE  – Naples, Fl. area, sm. an. Sold! Congratulations to Drs. Wade Burrington and Sandra Yetson-Burrington on the Cat Sold! Congratulations Drs. AAHA Wade Burrington and Sandra Yetson-Burrington on the hospital. Solo toDr., freestanding office, great staff. hospital for sale. Needs full time DVM (currently run with 18-20 dvm hrs/ sale of their practice, Apollo Animal Hospital, to Dr. Jacqlyn Diana. (#FL13A) sale of their practice, Apollo Animal Hospital, to Dr. Jacqlyn Diana. (#FL13A) 2014 gross $840K. Near the Gulf Coast! Prx. & RE. week) to reach full potential, or will make great semi-retirement practice. Pinellas Co.– Solo Kirwan Dr. inongreat 2500 sq.ft. Full lab with Vet Scan, computerized. Sold!Abaxis Congratulations to Dr.digital Rhondax-ray, Kirwantotally on the sale of her practice,Grossing Animal Hospital New– Sold! Congratulations to Dr. Rhonda the salelocation. of her practice, Animal Hospital of Bonita, Linda Kitchen!(#FL15K) of Bonita,experienced to Dr. Linda Kitchen!(#FL15K) $500,000+ Replytoto:Dr.smah4sale@gmail.com Exp. Issue 1/15: 9504) Office, staff, well established. 2014 gross $575K. Prx. and Real Estate available, close to the Beach.

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE FOR SALE – JACKSONVILLE, FL: Polk County. 3,000SF facilitypractice on busy at 4-lane Gross in excess of $2M with Thirty five year old small animal the highway. five point intersection continual growth. New owner’s income to exceed $370K! $2,530K for Practice & Real of Normandy Jacksonville , Florida. 7500 square foot building, Estate.Blvd., (#FL72S) two story, facing two streets, vacant site. Owner is retiring. Duval County. 2,400SF facility in residential neighborhood minutes from I-95. 1.5 doctor, Call Dr. Devegowda Gopal, (904) 786-4919. (Exp. Issue 1,3 &5/15:1106) small animal practice with some acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. $825K for

Sold!- Congratulations to Dr. Mike Harris on the sale of her practice, Wells Road Veterinary Medical Center, to Dr. Michelle Sands! (#FL25C)

Equipment for sale

For Sale  – ( 1 ) Automatic x ray processor ( Hope Mini Max ) 4 sale. Works excellent. Will help withRoad transport. $ 575.00 Naples area.GA 31522 1610 Frederica * Saint Simons Island, Toll Free: * www.simmonsinc.com ( 2 ) VSSI stainless cages (4 ) 800.333.1984 22"x22"x28" 4 sale $ 275.00 ea. Naples area. Email: southeast@simmonsinc.com (Exp. Issue 1/15:9504) Contact: jimbodvm02892@gmail.com Licensed Florida Real Estate Broker

Sold!- Congratulations to Dr. Mike Harris on the sale of her practice, Wells Road Veterinary Medical Center, to Dr. Michelle Sands! (#FL25C)

Contact Dr. Richard Alker for further practice information.

850.814.9962 1610 Frederica Roador* Richard@tpsgsales.com Saint Simons Island, GA 31522 Toll Free: 800.333.1984 www.simmonsinc.com Showcase Properties of* Central Florida, Broker Email: southeast@simmonsinc.com Licensed Florida Real Estate Broker


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Advocate Issue 1 , 2015  
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