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F V M A ADVOCATE ISSUE 1 | 2018

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President's MESSAGE Welcome to 2018! I know it doesn’t quite roll off of the tongue yet. 7 207 Monetary Drive Orlando, Florida 32809 Phone – (407) 851‑3862 Toll Free – (800) 992‑3862 Fax – (407) 240‑3710 info@fvma.org | www.fvma.org

OFFICERS

Dr. Alex M. Steverson President Dr. Marc A. Presnell President-Elect Dr. Donald H. Morgan Treasurer Dr. Richard C. Sutliff Past President Mr. Philip J. Hinkle Executive Director

DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVES Dr. Scott Richardson District 1–Big Bend Dr. Julia Conway District 2–Northeast Dr. Todd Fulton District 3–Central Dr. Rachel Klemawesch District 4–Tampa Bay Dr. Susan M. Carastro District 5–Treasure Coast Dr. Marta P. Lista District 6–South Florida Dr. Mary Smart District 7–Southwest Dr. James M. Brechin District 8–Northwest Dr. Kelly J. Sloan-Wade District 9–Space Coast Dr. Ernest C. Godfrey AVMA Delegate Dr. Richard B. Williams AVMA Alternate Delegate Dr. Jacqueline S. Shellow FAEP Representative to the FVMA Executive Board Ex Officio Dr. James W. Lloyd, Dean UF College of Veterinary Medicine

Last year was another eventful year for the FVMA. The beginning of a new year is a great time to reflect on the previous year, and express gratitude for our members, staff, and our achievements as an organization. Florida weathered yet another busy hurricane season. Hurricane Irma is still fresh in many peoples’ minds. While most of the state was fortunate not to have sustained major damage, many of our members felt a much greater impact. Our FVMA team quickly pulled together in preparation for the storm and in response to its aftermath. The FVMA is now coordinating to distribute funds from our hurricane relief drive to those individuals and practices that sustained significant economic damages. We continue to develop our meeting opportunities as the small and large animal conferences had banner years. The lecture halls, wet labs, and exhibit halls were all well attended, and we anticipate even more opportunities to appear in the near future! Our very popular Gulf-Atlantic Veterinary Conference was created by some very forward-thinking FVMA members several years ago, and was named “Gulf-Atlantic” with the idea it could be held at a different resort every few years. It has become so popular at its current location in Boca Raton that no one wants it moved! So, we are developing some regional conferences for those portions of the state that are a long distance from our two flagship conferences. We are coming to the end of our five-year strategic plan. It’s hard to believe it was almost five years ago that the FVMA executive board along with some other key leadership met with stra‑ tegic plan facilitator Bob Harris to develop our current plan. The staff and the board have been focused and working hard to fulfill the vision and I can say we’re almost there! It’s exciting to think about what the next strategic planning meeting will create! The FVMA has completed a renovation of the Charlie Bild Condominium near the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. This will allow for a renewal of the Charlie Bild visiting practitioner program in conjunction with the college, and is another example of a great program for FVMA members created by a few visionary veterinarians. I’ve talked about the past and what we’ve accomplished in 2017. I’ve also talked quite a bit about a number of small groups of forward-thinking veterinarians that have led the FVMA to where it is today. As time marches on, we need more committed, creative veterinarians to help us create a vision for the future of veterinary medicine. Come join us. “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.” Margaret Mead “You can’t stop the waves, but you can learn to surf.” Jon Kabat-Zinn Respectfully yours, Alex M. “Steve” Steverson, DVM

FVMA MISSION

THE MISSION OF THE FLORIDA VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION IS TO ADVANCE THE VETERINARY MEDICAL PROFESSION, PROMOTE ANIMAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND PROTECT PUBLIC HEALTH. 2  |  FVMA ADVOCATE


In Remembrance Dr. Robert R. Hase Jr.

With great sadness, the FVMA mourns the passing of Dr. Robert R. Hase Jr., distinguished member of our association for more than 45 years. Dr. Hase passed away on January 7, 2018, at the age of 73. A long-time practitioner in Pasco County and a leader in the veterinary community, Dr. Hase was a respected and influential member of the FVMA. The FVMA will always be grateful for his exemplary service as the chair of various association committees, and for selflessly serving the veterinary profession in Florida. The FVMA honored Dr. Hase during his years of dedicated service to the association with the FVMA’s Distinguished Service Award in 2017, Gold Star Award in 2009, and Veterinarian of the Year Award in 1998. At the time of his passing, Dr. Hase was serving as the vice-chairman of the Florida Board of Veterinary Medicine, to which he was appointed by Governor Rick Scott in January, 2014. He was a 1970 graduate of the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine, and since 1972, he operated Bayonet Point Animal Clinic in New Port Richey, Florida. He was also an

active member of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and a proud member of the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). He was a charter member of the Pasco Hernando Veterinary Medical Association, and a member of the Suncoast Veterinary Medical Association of Port Richey, and he served as chairman of the Pasco County Animal Control Advisory Board until his passing. Dr. Hase was an authority on animal abuse and was frequently called upon to testify in court on such cases. Last October, Dr. Hase received a proclamation honoring his 45 years of veterinary medicine practice from the Pasco County Board of County Commissioners. Dr. Hase will be sorely missed. Dr. Hase is survived by his wife Margaret; son, Robert R. III; daughter, Katherine (Drew); brother, Nils (Chris); and three grandchildren. A memorial visitation and service for the late Dr. Robert R. Hase Jr. was held at Faupel Funeral Home in Port Richey, FL, on Saturday, January 13, 2018.

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Do I Need to add Veterinary License Defense Coverage? ‘Yes!’ - Terry Takash, Esq. Disclosure notice: Terry Takash is a partner at the law firm of Lewis Brisbois, the national coordinating counsel for the AVMA PLIT program’s veterinary license defense coverage (an endorsement to the professional liability insurance policy). The firm receives payment from the PLIT’s insurance carrier to defend veterinarians who secure the license defense endorsement. The FVMA thanks the AVMA for their permission to publish this article.

I have seen thousands of regulatory matters resolved favorably for veterinarians insured through the AVMA PLIT program since 2003. The vast amount of favorable outcomes is due in no small part to the coverage afforded by the license defense endorsement. Regulatory agencies across the country receive complaints from the public against veterinarians daily. Over the last dozen years, veter‑ inarians have reported approximately 5,000 license defense claims. Yet, even with this volume of complaints, the gross majority of veterinarians reading this have likely not expe‑ rienced a state regulatory or licensing agency investigation.

4  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

This may well be because you are an excellent practitioner, or simply that you’re lucky. But it is worth noting that the gross majority of the thousands of cases defended since 2003 involved excellent medical care provided by exceed‑ ingly qualified veterinarians. What many veterinarians fail to realize is that all it takes is a complaint. In many states, the regulatory agency is obli‑ gated by statute to investigate every complaint that poten‑ tially constitutes a violation of the veterinarian’s practice act. The complaint against the veterinarian to the licensing agency can be, and often is, frivolous, false and completely


bereft of merit. Still, the veterinarian may be subject to an investigative interview, a facility inspection, a demand for veterinary records, etc. In most cases, the veterinarian is required to respond, in writing, to the allegations. In some states, the specific allegations are not disclosed to the vet‑ erinarian. Rather, the state agency simply requests that the veterinarian provide written detail as to the nature of care as well as a description of the interaction between the vet‑ erinarian and the complainant. Having counseled hundreds of professionals who faced licensing board investigations, I know this can be an extremely stressful exercise. The state licensing agency has no agenda or axe to grind. The regulatory agency is simply responding to a complaint and attempting to gather facts to provide an analysis on the merit of the complaint. Yet, the activity that the agency must undertake almost always requires some involvement of the veterinarian. While in some instances the veterinarian may not be legally obli‑ gated to cooperate in the investigation, in my experience, a failure to cooperate often results in a more protracted and aggressive investigation. More often than not, the veteri‑ narian’s failure to cooperate in the investigation results in a formal prosecution of the veterinarian’s license. Almost every complaint made to the regulatory agency leads to some level of investigative activity. Still, few investigations result in a “formal complaint” being filed against the vet‑ erinarian. A formal complaint is a public document or pleading that lists specific charges against the veterinarian’s conduct and seeks discipline to the veterinarian’s license. Disciplines can range from reprimand to revocation. The license defense endorsement through the PLIT pro‑ gram entitles the veterinarian to legal counsel from the very beginning of the process. From the first time you are con‑ tacted by the licensing agency and notified that a complaint has been made against you, immediately report your claim to the PLIT office because you are entitled to representation

if the complaint addresses a veterinary incident. The endorsement provides coverage for legal expenses (up to the endorsement limits) incurred in the defense of your license. Do not delay your claim reporting. In every state in the country the PLIT program has law‑ yers versed in administrative and regulatory law. These attorneys are familiar with the licensing agency’s process, attorneys, and investigators. The lawyers who respond on behalf of the PLIT insured veterinarians are experienced in protecting veterinary licenses. The vast majority of the licensing matters opened around the country are subse‑ quently closed with findings that the veterinarian’s conduct did not violate the applicable state law governing the prac‑ tice of veterinary medicine. These closures are largely due to the complaint’s lack of merit. However, this closure rate is also undoubtedly due in no small part to the excellent representation provided through the PLIT program. No matter how confident you are in the quality of care you provide, and no matter how certain you are of a merit‑ less complaint, your confidence will not stop an investiga‑ tion. License defense counsel will assist you in responding to the state licensing board investigator’s request for infor‑ mation and will protect the license that is your livelihood. From a cost efficiency viewpoint, it is in fact a ‘no brainer.’ If a veterinarian does not carry the endorsement and has to retain private counsel, a ten minute teleconference with the attorney may exceed the cost of this premium. The license defense endorsement spares the veterinarian finan‑ cial expense, as well as the cost of the stress and aggrava‑ tion contemplated by a regulatory agency investigation or prosecution. In the past, we have represented many veteri‑ narians who opted to skip the license defense endorsement. Subsequent to the closure of their licensing cases, each voiced deep regret about skipping the endorsement. The truth is that the relatively inexpensive cost of this endorse‑ ment can provide invaluable peace of mind.

This article contains only a general description of coverages and does not include all the benefits and limitations found in the policies. Coverages may vary. All references to coverage are subject to the policy’s conditions and exclusions. The insurance policy and not this article will form the contract between the insured and the insurance company.

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|  5


REMINDER - MAY 31, 2018

LICENSE RENEWAL DEADLINE

IS FAST APPROACHING

Veterinarians in Florida must complete a minimum of 30 hours of CE every two years, to renew their licenses. The deadline for acquiring those required CE this year is May 31, 2018. The guide for the required continuing education that Florida veterinarians need for licensure purposes, is Rule Chapter 61G18-16, Florida Administrative Code of Chapter 474, Florida Statutes. The rule directs that licensed veterinarians must renew their licenses every two years in the even-numbered year. The last renewal date was June 1, 2016. The next renewal date then, is June 1, 2018. 61G18-16 of the Florida Administrative Code specifies how many hours of particular CE-earning modalities are acceptable, as well as the types and categories of CE veterinarians may pursue in the biennium in order to be licensed for the succeeding period. It goes on to define the standards that must be upheld and adhered to by continuing education providers.

Requirements for Active Status License Renewal in Florida

61G18-16.002 Continuing Education Requirements for Active Status License Renewal (1) reads: “All licensed veterinarians shall be required to obtain continuing professional education which contributes to the advancement, extension or enhancement of professional skills and knowledge in the field of veterinary medicine.” The CE requirements contained therein include: • Completion of 30 hours of continuing professional education in veterinary medicine every two years. • No less than one hour of CE must be in the area of dispensing legend drugs. • No less than two hours of CE must be in the area of the laws and rules governing the practice of veterinary medicine as contained in Chapters 455 and 474, Florida Statutes, and Rule Title 61G18, F.A.C. • Not more than fifteen hours can be non-interactive, correspondence courses. • Not more than five hours in complementary and alternative medicine modalities.

Other Important Guidance From 61G18-16.002 F.A.S. •

One hour of CE equals a minimum of fifty minutes and a maximum of sixty minutes. Total hours of lecture time cannot be added up and divided by 50-

6  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

minutes to obtain 1 hour credit for each 50-minute interval. •

Computer online programs that involve online, real time, live or delayed participatory questioning or responses are not correspondence courses.

Five hours of CE in laws and rules may be obtained once during the biennium by attending a full day or eight hours of a Board of Veterinary Medicine meeting where disciplinary hearings are conducted by the board. The attendee must sign in with the executive director of the board or designee before the meeting begins; must remain in continuous attendance; must sign out with the executive director of the board or designee at the end of the meeting day or at a time earlier as affirmatively authorized by the board. A licensee may receive continuing education credit for attending the Board meeting only if he or she is attending solely for the purpose of obtaining CE.

Licensees must retain certifications of attendance or provider verification documenting completion of continuing education for a period of not less than three years from the date the course was taken.

Failure to comply with the continuing professional education requirements shall prohibit license renewal and result in delinquent status at the end of the biennium.


Evaluating Your Need for

HEALTH CARE CLINIC ESTABLISHMENT PERMIT (HCCE)

A

health care clinic establishment permit (HCCE) is required for the purchase of a prescription drug by a place of business at one general physical location owned and operated by a professional corporation or professional limited liability company, or a corporation that employs a veterinarian as a qualifying practitioner. HCCE Permits are granted by the Division of Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR). The law, Section 499.01(2)(t) Florida Statutes, pertaining to the HCCE became effective nine years ago, on January 1, 2009.

How does the HCCE permit requirement affect licensed practicing veterinarians in Florida?

In summary, the HCCE Permit is for veterinarians who want to order prescription drugs in their clinic or corporation name. Veterinarians who order prescription drugs under his or her own name and license number do not need the permit, regard‑ less of other associates or relief veterinarians also using the drugs. And veterinarians who are in a partnership do not qualify for the permit. They have to either order in one veterinarian’s name or incorporate and obtain the HCCE Permit.

How do practitioners evaluate whether or not they need an HCCE Permit? Points to Remember

1. HCCE allows corporations to purchase and maintain pre‑ scription drugs in one corporate inventory to be dispensed by qualifying practitioners who work with them. 2. All licensed veterinarians have the legal authority to pur‑ chase and own prescription drugs. 3. HCCE Permit is required by any multi-veterinarian clinic or solo practitioner who orders drugs through a corpora‑ tion’s name. The permit covers all the practitioners in a group practice, but requires a “qualifying practitioner” to be named on the permit. That practitioner is responsible for all record keeping, storage and handling of all pre‑ scription drugs ordered and dispensed under the HCCE. 4. An Individual practice where there is a sole practitioner that orders prescription drugs under his/her name and license, does not need the HCCE permit. 5. A Veterinarian who has previously been issued an HCCE permit, but who has decided to purchase drugs under his/ her individual license instead, should return the renewal notice to the Department of Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics Division of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, along with a letter or simple note stating he/ she is not renewing the permit.

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6. The law does not prohibit the use of Rx drugs by practitio‑ ners in a group practice that were purchased by another member of the group at that establishment. An HCCE Permit is renewable every two years and must be renewed biennially on the last day of the issue month, for a fee of $255, made payable only by cashier’s check, corporate or business check, or money order to the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. For application requirements, visit: http://www.myfloridalicense.com/DBPR/ drugs-devices-and-cosmetics/health-care-clinic-establishment/ Applicants may download a printable application, complete it and submit to the DBPR with the application fee. Mailing Address: Department of Health Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics 2601 Blair Stone Road Tallahassee, FL 32399-1047 For help and other information concerning HCCE Permits, contact the Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics Program (850) 7171800, or the FVMA helpline at (800) 992-3862.

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FVMA LEGISLATIVE CHAIR’S MID

A strong FVMA delegation of executive board members, veterinarian members, students of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, and staff of the Association attended Legislative Action Days 2018 in Tallahassee, Florida on January 17 & 18. The group engaged in a round of visits to the offices of their legislators in the State Capital. Legislative Action Days was held the week after the Legislative Session commenced on January 9. The session is scheduled to end on March 9, 2018. This yearly FVMA activity is an integral part of the FVMA’s advocacy program to meet face-to-face with state senators and members of the House of Representatives in order to tell Florida’s lawmakers about the Association’s work and to advocate for its members and the veterinary profession, and to support animal and public health in Florida. Legislative Action Days is also a great learning experience which allows FVMA members to learn and participate in the affairs of state. FVMA’s strong advocacy program over the years has opened many doors at the leadership level to the Association, and has enabled it to be regarded as an important voice of veterinary medicine in Florida. FVMA has scored significant victories for the veterinary profession by the passage of important pieces of legislation that protect veterinarians’ ability to practice their profession unencumbered, in the

8  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

best interests of their patients, owners and care-givers, and the public. Legislative Action Days is one of the best opportunities that members have to be involved in the work of their Association, and is an excellent opportunity for the involvement of members of the local veterinary medical associations.

BILLS IN THE 2018 SESSION FVMA PRIORITY SUPPORT BILL The FVMA’s priority legislation, SB 1728/HB 1221 Veterinary Medicine bill was filed in the House of Representatives on January 4 and in the Senate a day later. Sponsors in the House of Representatives were Sam H. Killebrew of District 41, along with co-sponsors, Larry Ahern, District 66, Evan Jenne, District 99, Jake Raburn, District 57, and Clay Yarborough of District 12. In the Senate, the FVMA bill was sponsored by Travis Hutson from District 7. Throughout this session, the Association, through its Legislative Committee, has also been actively monitoring some 19 other bills which would have an impact on the practice of veterinary medicine if they were passed and signed into law.


D-SESSION REPORT By Dr. Richard Williams, Chair SB 1728/HB 1221 VETERINARY MEDICINE & ITS STATUS

Filed on January 4 and January 5, 2018 in the House of Representatives and the Florida Senate respectively, and subsequently referred to committees of the House and Senate, the FVMA asked the bill sponsors to postpone movement of the bill in early February. It had become apparent at that time that the leadership of the House would not support passage of the bill due to their stiff resistance to any measure at this time to further regulate professions. FVMA has sought to pass SB 1728/HB 1221 Veterinary Medicine into law to strengthen the Veterinary Medicine Act by providing necessary definitions to assist in the regulation of the practice of veterinary medicine as well as the enforcement of the statutory prohibition against the unlicensed practice of veterinary medicine. The proposed bill’s definitions contain language consistent with the definitions in the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Model Practice Act, a definition of the term “examination” applicable to veterinarians; and clarify that a “patient” may include a herd, collection, or group of animals. The bill also defines the term “veterinary dentistry,” and clarifies that a veterinarian/client/patient relationship can be established if a second veterinarian has access to patient records and has been authorized by the veterinarian with the prior relationship to provide reasonable and appropriate medical care. The FVMA feels this clarification of the VCPR is important for multi-veterinarian practices as well as for situations where one veterinarian may be covering for another veterinarian who is absent or unavailable. It is also consistent with the standard of practice in human medicine.

OTHER BILLS BEING MONITORED PRIORITY OPPOSE BILLS As it had succeeded in doing during last year’s Legislative Session, the FVMA once again fought the introduction of a bill to award compensatory damages for loss or damage of a pet. FVMA has vehemently opposed the passage of SB 1488/ HB 1257 Harm to Domestic Companion Animals, Police Animals and Service Animals and in meetings between FVMA Legislative Action Days delegates and members of the Senate and House of Representatives, presented leaders in Tallahassee with its Oppose Position Brief which is produced on Pg. 25. If it became law, this bill would authorize damages that may be recovered for loss or harm of a domestic companion, police, or service animal. Under this bill, the owner of such animal would be able to recover the following, but not limited to, damages: 1. Monetary or replacement value of the animal,

2. Veterinary expenses incurred in treating the animal, 3. Reimbursement of animal training expenses, 4. including, but not limited to, the cost of any specialized training for police animals and service animals, 5. Burial or cremation expenses, 6. Loss of breeding potential of the animal, 7. Loss of companionship, 8. Punitive damages, if the person is found liable for recklessly, indifferently, or intentionally causing the serious injury to or death of the animal. With the very strong opposition of the FVMA, this bill has seen no movement in either chamber of the Florida Legislature. OTHER OPPOSE BILLS SB 86 Animal Hoarding - This new legislation would define

what constitutes “animal hoarding” and classify this behavior as an act of animal cruelty. Specifically, a person convicted of animal hoarding would be charged with a Class 3 Felony and ordered to undergo a psychological evaluation. It also would allow a court to order the seizure of any animal whose health and welfare is in imminent danger if the court finds probable cause to believe that a violation has occurred. While the FVMA is against the hoarding of animals, it could not support this bill as it did not define what consti‑ tuted hoarding. Status: No Movement SB 674/HB 463 Steroid Use in Racing Greyhounds – This bill

provides that a positive test result for anabolic steroids in certain samples taken from a greyhound violates the prohibition of racing of animals that are impermissibly medicated or determined to have a prohibited substance present, etc. With advice from members, the FVMA opposed this bill because it would eliminate the use of low-level Methyltestosterone in racing female greyhounds, which is used to control the estrus cycles of racing females. This elimination would result in female greyhounds having to be removed from kennels for 4-6 weeks during estrus. Removal of 50 % of greyhounds from kennels twice a year because it was not allowed to use steroids to prevent estrus would effectively kill the industry in Florida. After the FVMA met with legislators the bill language was corrected to exempt the use of steroids for estrus prevention. Continued on Page 23

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An Alternative Approach to THE ROUTINE SUBCONJUNCTIVAL ENUCLEATION TECHNIQUE Robert Swinger, DVM, DACVO

Veterinary Ophthalmologist, Animal Eye Guys of South Florida

Over the past fifteen years, I can confidently say that I have removed over 500 animal eyes, which is something a Veterinary Ophthalmol‑ ogist does not like to brag about. Our mission is to save eyes and maintain vision, but despite best efforts, enucleation is very common. In veterinary medicine, enucleation is defined as the removal of the globe, nictitating membrane, eyelids, and depending on the technique, the conjunctiva. Removal of the globe is indicated for blind, painful eyes or in cases where nonresectable intraocular tumors are present. The three most commonly described techniques for enucleation are the subconjunctival, lateral, and transpalpebral approaches. The main ob‑ jectives of the subconjunctival technique are to remove the globe, nictitating membrane, and eyelid margins (in that order) while leaving be‑ hind as much soft tissue as possible to mini‑ mize the orbital depression. The lateral ap‑ proach removes the tissues in a similar order, but first partially excises and reflects the eye‑ lids with a medial attachment. The transpalpe‑ bral technique is often utilized in cases with as‑ sociated ocular surface infections or neoplasia. This method involves suturing the palpebral fissure closed and removing the globe, nictitat‑ ing membrane, and conjunctiva as one encased unit, thus preventing contact between the ocu‑ lar surface and orbital contents. The goal of this article is to recommend a mod‑ ification to the subconjunctival enucleation technique that provides improved exposure of the globe, extraocular muscles, optic nerve,

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Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 3


Figure 5 Figure 4

and vascular structures of the orbit, making your surgery simpler and faster. Following induction of general anesthesia, sterile surgical preparation of the periorbital tissues is performed. A lateral canthotomy is performed and the eyelid margins are excised 5-mm posterior to the mucocutaneous junc‑ tion in a single continuous fashion (Fig. 1,2,3) using Mayo scissors. The nictitating membrane is then grasped and excised at its base (Fig. 4,5). The bulbar conjunctiva is then incised 3-5mm posterior to the limbus and the extraocular muscles are transected near their scleral at‑ tachments (Fig. 6). The retractor bulbi muscle fibers and optic nerve are severed (Fig. 7) with curved enucleation scissors and the remaining conjunctiva is excised. To improve the cosmet‑ ic postoperative appearance, an orbital mesh‑ work, anchored to the periosteum, is placed using 3-0 non-absorbable suture (Ethilon™ or Prolene™) (Fig. 8). An additional step not shown in photographs that provides improved postoperative analgesia is to secure a 2x3cm gelatin sponge (GELFOAM®) hydrated with 0.5ml of both lidocaine and bupivacaine under the periosteum meshwork. The subcutaneous tissues are closed with 5-0 absorbable suture (Vicryl™) in a simple continuous pattern. The skin is apposed with 5-0 non-absorbable suture (Ethilon™ or Prolene™) in a simple interrupted

Figure 6

Figure 7

Figure 8

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to excision. Easier access to the optic nerve is particularly important in cats because tight palpebral fissures and short optic nerves make an enucleation a more challenging procedure. The optic chiasm can be damaged if excessive traction is placed on the globe. This has been reported to cause blindness in the contralateral eye following enucleation.

Robert Swinger, DVM, DACVO Figure 9

or cruciate pattern (Fig. 9). Patients were pre‑ scribed appropriate postoperative antibiotic, an‑ ti-inflammatory, and analgesic medications and encouraged to use elizabethian collars to limit complications associated with self-trauma. The modification described above recommends removal of the eyelids and nictitating mem‑ brane prior to excising the globe. In my expe‑ rience, hemorrhage is minimal and easily con‑ trolled with direct pressure. This method of enucleation offers good visibility and better ac‑ cess to the globe and extraocular muscles. Fol‑ lowing eyelid margin and nictitating membrane removal, the globe can be easily visualized and manipulated. Extraocular muscles can easily be followed to their attachments and the globe can be positioned to visualize the optic nerve prior

ATTENDEES OF THE 89TH FVMA ANNUAL CONFERENCE WILL EXPERIENCE

Cutting-Edge Instruction and Lectures in Ophthalmology Thursday through Saturday

12  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Veterinary Ophthalmologist, Animal Eye Guys of South Florida Dr. Robert Swinger completed his undergraduate work and received his Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Illinois in 2003. After completing internships in small animal medicine and surgery he went on to complete both an ophthalmology internship and residency. He launched Animal Eye Guys in 2011 and currently practices in Fort Lauderdale and Hollywood, Florida. Dr. Swinger is board certified and a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists. Dr. Robert Swinger is a distinguished speaker at the 89th FVMA Annual Conference, April 5-8, 2018, Tampa, Florida.


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ADVANCED CANINE DENTAL EXTRACTIONS

DV

Thursday | 8:00 am - 12:00 pm Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC | Wade Gingerich, DVM, DAVDC

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ADVANCED SMALL ANIM ABDOMINAL ULTRASOUN

Friday | 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Ralph Harvey, DVM, MS, DACVAA Michelle McConnell, LVT, VTS (Anesthesia)

Jason Arble, DVM, MSc, DACVR, MRCVS

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $150 | Techs $95 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $205 | Techs $150

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $425 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $625

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DENTAL PROPHYLAXIS

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Wade Gingerich, DVM, DAVDC | Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC

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Saturday | 8:00 am - 12:00 pm Denise S. Rollings, AAS, CVT, VTS (Dentistry)

Visit www.fvma.org or Call (800) 9 FLORIDA LICENSED VETERINARIANS!

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With Conf. Reg. Fee: Techs $95 Wet Lab Only Fee: Techs $150

REGIONAL BLOCKS

WET LABS SELL OUT FAS RESERVE YOUR SEAT TOD

DISPENSI THE PRAC

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SATISFIES FLORIDA’S 3-HOUR CE REQU

Attendees should leave the presentations with a fi medicine, as required by Florida administrative co will be provided education on the requirements o

Saturday | 1:10 pm - 3:10 pm

Denise S. Rollings, AAS, CVT, VTS (Dentistry) With Conf. Reg. Fee: Techs $95 Wet Lab Only Fee: Techs $150

Edwin Bayó, JD

 1 hour in Dispensing Legend Drugs |  2 hours in Laws & Rules Governing th

REGISTER TODAY & SAV


& ST

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Heather Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP | Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM

Robert Swinger, DVM, DACVO

992-3862

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Friday | 8:00 am - 12:00 pm

Matthew Johnson, DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA

DIAGNOSIS OF NEOPLASIA WORKSHOP

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

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EXTRACAPSULAR SUTURE STABILIZATION

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With Conf. Reg. Fee: Techs $95 Wet Lab Only Fee: Techs $150

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Sunday | 9:00 am - 12:50 pm

Heather Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP | Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM

MEDIAL PATELLA LUXATION

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DV

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

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ST!!! DAY!

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Saturday | 1:10 pm - 5:10 pm

Thursday | 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

pm

MAL ND

OPHTHALMIC SURGERY

LABORATORY AND MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC FOR TECHNICIANS

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SEMINAR

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WORKSHOPS DV

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SURGERY

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BDOMINAL

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SOUND

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Wet Labs & Workshops

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With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $150 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $205

Friday | 1:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Matthew Johnson, DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

ING LEGEND DRUGS & LAWS AND RULES GOVERNING CTICE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE

UIREMENT

firm grasp of the areas of dispensing legend drugs and the laws and rules governing the practice of veterinary ode for biennial professional continuing education for all veterinarians licensed by the State of Florida. Attendees of Chapter 455, F.S., Rule 61G18, F.A.C., and the Florida Veterinary Practice Act, Chapter 474, F.S.

SATURDAY, APRIL 7th | 7:00 AM TO 7:50 AM he Practice of Veterinary Medicine | SUNDAY, APRIL 8th | 7:00 AM TO 8:50 AM

VE | WWW.FVMA.ORG


Featured Speakers CLARKE ATKINS

MBA, DVM, DACVIM DVM, DACVIM (INTERNAL MEDICINE & CARDIOLOGY), DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR, EMERITUS

LAUREN HARRIS

RALPH HARVEY

LISA RADOSTA

SHEILAH ROBERTSON

DVM, MS, DACVAA

DVM, DACVECC

LECTURE TOPICS

DVM, DACVB

BVMS (HONS), PhD, DACVAA, DECVAA, DACAW, DECAWBM (WSEL), MRCVS

• ANESTHESIA AND PAIN • MANAGEMENT • • BEHAVIOR AND TRAINING • CARDIOLOGY • CLINICAL PATHOLOGY • COMPASSION FATIGUE • • DENTISTRY • DENTISTRY FOR THE • TECHNICIAN • • DERMATOLOGY • • DISPENSING LEGEND • DRUGS • • EMERGENCY MEDICINE • AND CRITICAL CARE • • END OF LIFE CARE • • EXOTICS • • FELINE MEDICINE • IMMUNE-MEDIATED DISEASES

RACE APPROVED:

ANNE BARGER

MEGAN BRASHEAR

DVM, MS, DACVP

PETER HELMER

DVM, DABVP (AVIAN PRACTICE)

TIMOTHY HACKETT

DVM, MS, DABVP (FELINE)

DVM, MS, DACVECC

ADAM HONECKMAN

ALICE JEROMIN

DANI MCVETY

NATASHA STANKE

ROBERT SWINGER

DVM, DACVIM (SMALL ANIMAL INTERNAL MEDICINE)

CHRISTOPHER SMITHSON

DVM, DACVS-SA

DVM, DAVDC

INTERNAL MEDICINE LAWS & RULES GOVERNING THE PRACTICE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE MEDICINE FOR THE TECHNICIAN NEUROLOGY ONCOLOGY OPHTHALMOLOGY PRACTICE MANAGEMENT RADIOLOGY RENAL MEDICINE RESPIRATORY MEDICINE SURGERY ULTRASOUND

ELIZABETH COLLERAN

BS, CVT, VTS (ECC)

DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS

MARK ACIERNO

• • • • • • • • • • •

DVM, DACVO

DVM

MICHAEL WONG

DVM, DACVIM (NEUROLOGY)

JASON ARBLE, DVM, MSc, DACVR, MRCVS EDWIN BAYÓ, JD TONY BUFFINGTON, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Emeritus) MICHAEL CANFIELD, DVM, DACVD JASON COE, DVM, PhD WADE GINGERICH, DVM, DAVDC MATTHEW JOHNSON, DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA ANDREW MACKIN, BSc, BVMS, MVS, DVSc, FANZCVS, DACVIM (SAIM) KARA MAGNEHEIM, BAS, CVT MICHELLE MCCONNELL, LVT, VTS (Anesthesia) TANIA OTERO, BVetMed JESSICA PRITCHARD, VMD, MS, DACVIM (SAIM) CAROL REINERO, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM), PhD DENISE ROLLINGS, CVT, VTS (Dentistry) BRYAN ROTHLEIN, DVM PATRICIA STIMPSON, CVT HEATHER WAMSLEY, BS, DVM, PhD, DACVP (Clinical) HEIDI WARD, DVM, DACVIM ELIZABETH WATSON, DVM, MS (Anatomy and Forensic Sciences), DACVR

CE HOURS FOR:

 American Association of Veterinary State Boards RACE, Provider #532

 Florida Board of Veterinary Medicine, DBPR FVMA Provider #31  Sponsor of Continuing Education in New York State

• • • • • • • •

RPH, DVM, DACVD

 Veterinarians - 30 credit hours  Team Members - 27 credit hours


Host Hotel TAMPA MARRIOTT

WATERSIDE HOTEL & MARINA 700 SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE, TAMPA, FLORIDA 33602

MAKE YOUR ROOM RESERVATIONS NOW! CALL: 888-789-3090 AND MENTION “FVMA”

The 89th FVMA Annual Conference is proud to welcome attendees to the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel & Marina, the perfect setting for relaxation, where you can unwind after you get the CE you need, across the street at the Tampa Convention Center. One of the most popular hotels in Downtown Tampa, the Tampa Marriott features first-class accommodations and modern amenities, on-site restaurants, a rejuvenating spa, state-of-the-art fitness center and amazing rooftop pool. • To Reserve Your Room, Call the Group Reservations Department, 888-789-3090 and Request the FVMA Room Block Special Rate of $205.00 plus taxes. • Group Rate Extended Stay Three Days Prior and Post Conference, Based Upon Availability • Reduced Overnight Valet Parking for Conference Attendees is $24 per night • You Can Also Conveniently Reserve Online: https://aws.passkey.com/go/FVMA

RESERVE YOUR ROOM TODAY...

FVMA ROOM BLOCK DEADLINE: MARCH 14, 2018!

ECHNICIA T AND 

R I A N - 30 A N UDING WET L

ABS

WO

- 27 N KSHOPS C R

PRESENTING 302 HOURS OF STIMULATING, WORLD-CLASS CONTINUING EDUCATION TO ENRICH THE ENTIRE VETERINARY TEAM PRE-REGISTER BY MARCH 14TH & SAVE!

OURS INCL EH

VETERI

THE FVMA |

@FLORIDAVMA |

FLORIDA-VETERINARY-MEDICAL-ASSOCIATION


*To register at the discounted registration rate below, your 2018 FVMA dues must be current!

Phone

Preferrred Address

Clinic Name

Name

Email 

$

VETERINARIAN REGISTRATION FORM

Name as It Appears on Card

Credit Card Number

(U.S. Funds drawn on U.S. Banks)

Expiration Date 

Total Spouse/Guest Fee $

Legibly

E

$

After March 14, 2018 Add $100.00 Per Registrant

Total Events Fee

Florida Veterinary Medical Association | 7207 Monetary Drive • Orlando, FL 32809

Signature 

D

Legibly

  Fri., Award Ceremony & Installation of Officers (Held at the Marriott Waterside Hotel) No Fee   Sat., FVMA Foundation Reverse Raffle (1 in 300 Chance to Win $5,000) $100.00   Sat., Tampa Bay Sunset Dinner Cruise $95.00   Sat., Tampa Bay Sunset Dinner Cruise Children (Ages 4-12) $49.95

Social Events

Children Name – Please Print Legibly

  Children’s Registration (Does Not Include Lunch) $0.00

   Visa    Mastercard   American Express Discover

Total WL/WS Fee 

$95.00

Spouse/Guest Name – Please Print Legibly

  Spouse/Guest Registration

(This registration allows entrance to the exhibit hall, and includes lunch for Friday & Saturday and non-ticketed social events. Those who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

Method of Payment   Check/Money Order    Charge My Credit Card Below $

C

$895.00 $595.00 $595.00 $595.00 $625.00 $595.00 $595.00 $625.00 $205.00 $205.00

Spouse/Guest Registration

$

Total Registration Fee   $

$695.00 $395.00 $395.00 $395.00 $425.00 $395.00 $395.00 $425.00 $150.00 $150.00

With Conf. Reg. Wet Lab Only

Total Payment (A,B,C,D,E)

B

AVMA Accredited Veterinary School Name (Proof of current enrollment required)

  Thur. Basic Small Animal Ultrasound   Fri. Medial Patella Luxation   Fri. Extracapsular Sutrue Stabilization   Fri. Advanced Ultrasound   Sat. Anesthesia Machine Trouble Shooting Lab   Sun. Diagnosis of Neoplasia WS

  Thur. Opthalmic Surgery

  Thur. Advanced Canine Dental Extractions

  Thur. Feline Dental Extractions

  Thur. Clinical Techniq. for Emergency Medicine

(Includes Conference Proceedings on DVD)

  FVMA 2018 Member.......................................$525.00   Member, Graduated 2017-2018........................ $50.00   Member, Graduated 2016...............................$350.00   Member, Graduated 2015...............................$400.00   Non-Resident.................................................$525.00   (Current Member of State VMA or Military)   Non-FVMA Member.......................................$650.00   Veterinary Student..............................................$0.00

Wet Labs (WL) & Workshop (WS)

Registration Fee

$

VETERINARIAN REGISTRATION

A Total Membership Dues  My 2018 FVMA Membership is current  I would like to join and take advantage of the discounted registration fee. I qualify for the following: Categories: (please check one)   Regular Member $255.00  Recent Graduate (within last 2 years) $141.00  State/Federal Employee $141.00  Part-Time Employed $141.00 (Employed at FVMA Member practice & work 20 hrs per week or less)   Non-Florida Resident $104.00

FVMA MEMBERSHIP

89TH FVMA ANNUAL CONFERENCE APRIL 5-8, 2018 TAMPA CONVENTION CENTER AND TAMPA MARRIOTT WATERSIDE HOTEL & MARINA TAMPA, FLORIDA


89TH FVMA ANNUAL CONFERENCE APRIL 5-8, 2018 TAMPA CONVENTION CENTER AND TAMPA MARRIOTT WATERSIDE HOTEL & MARINA TAMPA, FLORIDA

FVMA AFFILIATE MEMBERSHIP

Email 

TEAM MEMBER REGISTRATION Name Clinic Name Preferrred Address Phone

Registration Fee Includes CE (excluding those with additional fees), lunch on Friday & Saturday, non-ticketed social events, access to the exhibit hall, and a digital copy of Conference Proceedings.

With Conf. Reg. Wet Lab Only

Wet Labs (WL) & Workshop (WS) WET LAB

$

C

$95.00 $150.00

  Sat. Dental Prophylaxis (WL) $95.00 $150.00   Sat. Regional Blocks (WL) $95.00 $150.00   Sat. Anesthesia Machine Troubleshooting (WL) $95.00 $150.00

WORKSHOP

  Sat. Laboratory and Medical Diagnostic (WS)

Total Wet Labs & Workshop Fee

A

Total Membership Dues

Social Events

(Held at the Marriott Waterside Hotel)

$

  Fri., Award Ceremony & Installation of Officers

(1 in 300 Chance to Win $5,000)

  Sat., FVMA Foundation Reverse Raffle

  Sat., Tampa Bay Sunset Dinner Cruise

  Sat., Tampa Bay Sunset Dinner Cruise Children (Ages 4-12)

Total Social Event Fees

$100.00

$95.00

$49.95

No Fee

D

After March 14, 2018 Add $50 Per Registrant

$

The FVMA offers affiliate membership to team members in the following categories: Certified Veterinary Technician (CVT) – graduates of AVMA-accredited veterinary technology programs who have passed the Veterinary Technician National Exam; dual certification/membership Certified Veterinary Assistant (CVA) - graduates of the FVMA’s CVA program; dual certification/membership Veterinary Practice Manager (VPM) – current or previously employed veterinary practice or hospital managers Animal Care Technician (ACT) – on-the-job trained veterinary technicians with at least 3 years of experience. Please visit www.fvma.org/team-members for applications to these entities.

$ 195.00

$ 150.00

 My 2018 FVMA Affiliate Membership is current.  I would like to join and take advantage of the discounted registration fee; my affiliate membership application is enclosed (Note: Incomplete applications may result in delayed membership and conference registration.) You may add your total membership dues to Box A to the right or pay separately on your application. CVT - $55, VPM - $55, ACT - $35

Registration Fee (Includes Conference Proceedings) Member Reg. Fee  CVT   CVA   VPM   ACT Non-Member Reg. Fee  CVT  Technician/Assistant  Practice Manager  Admin Staff

Spouse/Guest Registration

B

  $95.00 Spouse/Guest Name: (This registration allows entrance to the exhibit hall, and includes lunch for Friday & Saturday and non-ticketed social events. Those who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)   $0.00 Children’s Registration (Does Not Include Lunch.) Name: $

$

Total Registration Fee

Total Team Member Payment (A,B,C, and D)

   Visa    Mastercard   American Express Discover Expiration Date  Signature 

Florida Veterinary Medical Association | 7207 Monetary Drive • Orlando, FL 32809

Method of Payment   Check/Money Order    Charge My Credit Card Below $ (U.S. funds drawn on U.S. banks) Credit Card Number   Name as It Appears on Card

TEAM MEMBER REGISTRATION


Continued from Page 9 Status: SB 674/HB 463 has been amended in Committee to include language that exempts steroids used for birth control for the greyhound, or steroids otherwise prescribed by a veterinarian not employed by a greyhound permit holder, to treat an injury or an illness. With this amendment, the bill has moved through the Senate Committees and was placed on Special Order Calendar.

SB 1006/HB 1443 – Disaster Response and Preparedness - SB

1006 would add the definition of “comfort animal” to mean an animal, other than a pet or a service animal, which provides emotional support to help improve the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive condition of an individual. It would also require that information on emergency preparedness address the different types of shelters available, such as special needs shelters and shelters that accept individuals with service animals, comfort animals, or pets. HB 1443 directs the Division of Emergency Management to include specified persons in state emergency management plan & public awareness programs, provide guidance regarding Federal Government reimbursements, develop specified informational materials and evacuation strategies, establish and maintain certain registry; requires certain shelters to accept service & comfort animals; it requires FCS institutions & state universities to participate in emergency management activities under certain conditions; excludes certain students from school performance calculations & provides for payment of school district salaries during a state of emergency. FVMA opposition to this bill primarily stemmed from the fact that it would allow any animal, be it a horse, pig, goat, cow, or snake, as long as it is called a "comfort animal" into the shelter. Status: Both bills have been stalled in the Legislature.

SB 1356/HB 249 – Companion Animal Public-Private Partnership Act – This legislation would stipulate that an animal shelter

may not euthanize an animal if a rescue organization has indicated it will take custody of the animal. In addition to any required spay or neuter deposit, an animal shelter may assess a fee, not to exceed the standard adoption fee, for an animal released to a rescue organization. This would not apply to: a. An animal suspected of carrying and exhibiting signs of rabies, as determined by a licensed veterinarian. b. A dog classified as dangerous pursuant to s. 767.12, 55 Florida Statutes c. An animal experiencing irremediable suffering. Status: SB 1356/HB 249 has seen no movement since the beginning of the session.

HB 1305 – Florida Orca Protection Act - This legislation would

establish the Florida Orca Protection Act effective July 1, 2018, and it would prohibit any person from: a. Holding in captivity an orca, whether wild-caught or captive-bred, for any purpose, including, but not limited to, display, performance, or entertainment purposes; b. Breed or impregnate an orca held in captivity in this state; c. Export, collect, or import the semen, other gametes, or embryos of an orca held in captivity for the purpose of artificial insemination; d. Export, transport, move, or sell an orca located in the state to another state or country unless authorized by federal law or if the transfer is to another facility in North America that meets standards equivalent to or more stringent than those provided under the United States Animal Welfare Act. However, an orca located in the state on July 1, 2018, may continue to be held in captivity for entertainment purposes until December 31, 2019, and may be used thereafter for educational presentations only. Status: HB 1305 has not moved in the House since January 12.

OTHER SUPPORT BILLS SB 82 – Alternative Treatment Options for Veterans - This

legislation would define “equine therapy” and “service animal training therapy.” Specifically, this bill would authorize the Department of Veterans’ Affairs to contract with certain individuals and entities to provide these alternative treatment options for certain veterans. Status: Introduced and no movement.

SB 132/HB 153 – Animals - This legislation would prohibit

the importation of animals from outside the state in order to: prevent inhumane conditions in the transport and sheltering of animals, increase adoption opportunities for local dogs and cats, reduce the transmission of intraspecies and zoonotic diseases, and prevent the needless euthanasia of local dogs and cats. It would not apply to a public animal shelter or animal control agency operated by a humane organization, or by a county, municipality, or other incorporated political subdivision, which imports animals during an emergency or a natural disaster declared by the Governor or the President of the United States. In addition, this bill would require animal rescue organizations to: 1. Prepare, maintain, and make available for public inspection and dissemination certain records for a specified period, 2. Extend an existing monthly reporting requirement to animal rescue organizations, and 3. Provide for the sterilization of all dogs and cats sold or released for adoption from animal rescue organizations. Status: SB 132/HB 153 has had no movement in the Senate or House.

|  23


SB 163/CS/HB 145 – Nonnative Animals - This legislation would

give the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission the ability to establish a pilot program to mitigate the impact of priority invasive species on the public lands or waters of this state. In implementing this pilot program, the Commission may enter into contracts with entities or individuals to capture or destroy animals belonging to priority invasive species. Status: SB 163/CS/HB 145 has been added to Special Order Calendar.

SB 776/HB 491 – Theft - This legislation would impose

a fine of $10,000 if a person steals a commercial farm animal, including an animal of the equine, bovine, swine class, or other grazing animal; a bee colony of a registered beekeeper; or an aquaculture species raised at a certified aquaculture facility.

Status: SB 779/HB 491 passed through two committees each in the Senate and the House.

SB 952/HB 473 – Cruelty to Animals - Citing this act as "Ponce’s Law"; this bill authorizes a court to prohibit certain offenders from owning or having contact with animals, etc. Status: SB 952/HB 473 Has stalled in Committee in the Senate but has been favorable in its Committees of Reference in the House.

SB 982/HB 763 – Care for Retired Law Enforcement Dogs - This legislation would provide a stable funding source for veterinary care that is provided to these dogs. The department would select the corporation not-for-profit through a competitive grant award process that meet all of the following criteria: a. Be dedicated to the protection or care of retired law enforcement dogs; (b) Be exempt from taxation under s. 501(a) of the Internal Revenue Code; b. Have maintained such tax-exempt status for at least 5 years; c. Agree to be subject to review and audit at the discretion of the Auditor General in order to ensure accurate accounting and disbursement of state funds; d. Demonstrate the ability to effectively and efficiently disseminate information and to assist former handlers and adopters of retired law enforcement dogs in com plying with this section Status: SB 982/HB 763 has been placed on Special Order Calendar in the Senate.

SB 1253 – Veterinary Care for Retired Military Working Dogs - Creates Veterinary Care for Retired Military Working Dogs Program within the Department of Veterans Affairs; requires the department to contract with a nonprofit corporation to administer the program; provides selection criteria; provides for disbursement of program funds; provides for payment & use of administrative fees; and provides appropriation.

24  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Status: SB 1253 has been placed on Special Order Calendar after being favorable in its three Committees of Reference.

SB 1376/HB 907 – Emergency Evacuation of Domestic Companion and Service Animals - This legislation would make it unlawful for an owner or caretaker of a domestic companion or service animal to knowingly and intentionally leave the animal outdoors and unattended when an evacuation of the area has been ordered by state or local authorities due to weather or other emergency conditions. If possible, such animal shall be evacuated with the animal’s owner or caretaker. However, an animal can be taken to the following if evacuation with a person is not an option: a. Delivered to a licensed kennel, shelter, or pound, temporary animal shelter established for the purposes of the emergency, or other suitable animal care facility established by law enforcement, animal control, or an animal welfare organization; or b. Secured in an indoor area that is as protective of the animal as possible under the circumstances and provides proper shelter according to state and local laws. Status: SB 1576/HB 907 has seen no movement in either chamber of the Legislature.

CS/CS/SB 1576 – Animal Welfare/HB 823 - Lost or Stray Dogs or Cats – These proposed bills require specified entities that take receivership of lost stray dogs or cats to adopt written policies and procedures to ensure that every reasonable effort is made to quickly and reliably return owned animals to their owners, etc. Status: CS/CS/SB 1576 is winding its way through Senate Committees, while HB 823 has seen no movement since its first reading in January.

HB 2199 - University of Florida: Institute for Comparative Veterinary Diagnostics - Provides an appropriation for the University of Florida: Institute for Comparative Veterinary Diagnostics. Status: After receiving a favorable vote in the Higher Education Appropriations Subcommittee in November 2017, it was assigned to the Appropriations Committee then had a first reading on January 9, 2018. No further movement has been reported.

HB 3207 - Zoo Miami - Expansion/Renovation of the Animal Hospital and Rehab Facilities - This new legislation would designate the non-recurring sum of $1,000,000 from the General Revenue Fund to the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to fund the Zoo Miami Expansion/Renovation of the Animal Hospital and Rehab Facilities as described in Appropriations Project Request. Status: HB 3207 has seen no movement from January 10, when it was reported to be in its first Committee of Reference.


OPPOSE

FLORIDA HB 1257 & SB 1488

Harm to Domestic Companion Animals, Police Animals and Service Animals The Florida Veterinary Medical Association respectfully requests that you vote to oppose HB 1257 and SB 1488. These bills seek to define damages for animal-related litigation, but in a way are far out-of-step with Florida law and well out of the legal mainstream of American jurisprudence. Of greatest concern is that they would introduce, for the first time in the country, broad loss of companionship damages for injuries to pets. As a result, if this legislation passes, liability costs would raise the prices of important Florida pet care, services and products. This result will hurt, not help, Florida pets. Also, the impact of this new liability would be felt broadly. For example, car insurance rates could increase from pets injured in car accidents, and pet owners would be sued when their pets get in scuffles with other pets. The Wall Street Journal studied this issue in an article titled “Pet Plaintiffs” and found “just about everyone would potentially bear more liability.” HB 1257 & SB 1488 Are Out-of-Step with Florida Liability Law Losing a Close Relationship Is Not Compensable with the Exception of a Spouse or Minor Child Florida, like other states, carefully limits when someone can be compensated for emotional loss or distress, including for the loss of a companion. Injuries to pets, just as to human best friends, many close relatives and cherished possessions, do not fit within these restrictive categories. This bill would put pets above all of these other relationships. • Common law damages for loss of consortium or companionship are strictly limited in Florida to injuries only affecting spouses and minor children. See Gates v. Foley, 247 So. 2d 40 (Fla. 1971) (for spouse); U.S. v. Dempsey, 635 So. 2d 961 (Fla. 1994) (for minor children). • The Florida Wrongful Death Act allows emotion-based damages for spouses, minor children, and parents of a minor child. Other individuals related to and financially dependent on the decedent, including adult children living at home, can seek only economic damages. Fla. Stat. § 768.21. • Loss of companionship, under these laws, is not allowed for injuries or deaths based on any other relationship, including with a non-married partner, siblings, grandparents, cousins, and human best friends. See, e.g., Bashaway v. Cheney Bros., Inc., 987 So. 2d 93 (Fla. 1st DCA 2008) (denying claims for same sex couple); Cruz v. Broward County Sch. Bd., 800 So. 2d 213 (Fla. 2001) (same for adult children). • As recently as October 2017, the Florida Court of Appeals affirmed that loss of companionship is inappropriate in pet cases. See Boutin v. SARVEC, 2017 WL 44460979 (FL. 5th DCA Oct. 3, 2017). People certainly experience loss of companionship in many situations, but this harm is generally not compensable in litigation. This is true regardless of the facts of a given case or how understandable the emotional loss. Punitive Damages Are Already Available for Injuries to Pets HB 1257 and SB 1488 conflict with Florida’s punitive damages law, which punishes and allows compensation for any injury caused by intentional misconduct or gross negligence, including for pets. See Fla. Stat. § 768.72. This misconduct must be shown by “clear and convincing” evidence. See Fla. Stat. § 768.73. These bills would lower these standards, but only in pet cases. As a result, owners could inject punitive damages into pet cases for conduct traditionally not warranting punitive damages. This Legislation Re-Defines “Owner” and “Pet” in Ways Inconsistent with Florida Law This legislation allows property rights to a pet to vest in someone who does not

own the pet. The result will be litigation over who in a family is the pet’s primary caretaker or which person has the closest professional relationship to an animal. The legislation also includes skunks, rats and reptiles as examples of pets for which loss of companionship would be available. HB 1257 & SB Will Put Florida Out of Mainstream American Jurisprudence Florida already has among the most liberal liability laws for pets. It is one of only 4 states (along with California, Illinois, and Washington) that allow emotion-based damages for intentional, malicious acts against a pet. See LaPorte v. Associated Independents, Inc., 163 So. 2d 267 (Fla. 1964). There is no legal basis or precedent in any other state for lowering this standard and allowing emotion-based damages for acts of negligence, recklessness or indifference. • State Courts: Claims seeking noneconomic damages for pet injuries have been sought in some 35 states under a variety of common law theories. Regardless of the tort, court or circumstance, these states have not created special law to allow for loss of companionship when pets are injured from non-intentional acts. • State Legislation: Legislation seeking broad emotion-based damages for negligence or gross negligence has been filed in about 15 states; none have passed. Only 7 states have statutes of any kind defining damages for pet litigation. Hawaii, Nevada, Maryland, and Connecticut do not allow loss of companionship or any other non-economic damages. Illinois, Tennessee and Oregon allow some noneconomic damages, but only in narrow circumstances: Oregon for attacks against a service animal for a physically impaired person; Illinois for intentional, malicious acts; and Tennessee only when a pet is injured on the owner’s property or while on a leash. Pet liability law is remarkably consistent across the country. No state allows emotion-based damages on a wide-scale basis for acts of negligence, recklessness or indifference as sought in HB 1257 and SB 1488. Also, the “loser pays” provision, which allows the prevailing party to recover attorney fees and costs, would create special law for pets. In Florida and throughout the country, people pursuing tort claims are responsible for their own litigation costs. HB 1257 & SB 1488 Would Hurt, Not Help Florida Pets The Florida Legislature has traditionally focused on laws that advance, not hinder, pet welfare, including passing animal cruelty statutes and authorizing trusts that provide for a pet’s care after an owner dies. In these situations, pet welfare can be advanced without negative consequences. That is not true here. Put simply, pets do not benefit when owners get loss of companionship damages for their injuries – only the owners do. But, pets will suffer when owners can no longer afford important pet care, products and services – including food, walkers, kenneling, veterinary care and medicine – because of increased liability costs. While some owners will “spend anything” on their pets’ care, most owners have limited resources. Studies have confirmed what veterinarians have seen first-hand: families avoid preventive care, do not treat ill pets or euthanize pets over finances. If owners have to pay more because of liability costs, pets that do not get the care they need will suffer needlessly. Conclusion Florida already has expansive liability laws for injuries to pets. New emotion-based liability for acts of negligence is not needed to appreciate the human-pet bond. The current legal environment encourages responsible pet ownership, protects animals from abuse, and promotes affordable, quality care. HB 1257 and SB 1488 will disrupt this balance. They will lead to new pet litigation that will isolate Florida in American jurisprudence and put cherished Florida pets at risk.


PRACTICE GOT A QUESTION? THE FVMA CAN HELP.

One of the benefits of membership in the FVMA is our Helpline, (800) 992-3862, available to members daily, Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 6:00 pm. Our Helpline also provides insight to the FVMA staff, of the challenges and concerns of our members. In this feature we will highlight topics from the questions we received in preceding weeks, in an effort to keep our members up-to-date on current concerns as well as regulatory and legislative changes.

QUESTION:

I’m requesting guidance for a client situation. I have been seeing a client who displays signs of significant mental illness. I saw her last in January, for a consultation to remove her healthy senior cat’s microchip. She had concerns regarding her personal security related to the microchip (she seemed primarily concerned that her personal information was accessible due to the microchip). At the time, we discussed that microchip removal would not jeopardize her personal information, and I directed her to contact AVID to discuss having her personal information removed. After this exchange, she muttered several rather paranoid sentences, which were vaguely threatening (I can’t remember the details). She has been very erratic in the past, and made a few scenes in which she was throwing things around the room, yelling, talking to herself, challenged consent forms, etc.….but not quite to this level. I made notes in our computer to contact a manager immediately if this client became agitated in the future, and made all management aware, so that we could call the police if she actually did become violent. My questions: 1. Is there a point at which we will be allowed to reveal her name and our concerns to some type of health authority? 2. Are we obligated at any point to do so? 3. What are our options if she continues to behave in this manner? I would really like to facilitate this client getting the help she needs, if she is not already under the care of a mental health professional. A: FVMA legal counsel advises: Revealing your concerns to anyone absent a specific threat to you (and your staff) may open you to civil liability. This elderly and paranoid woman so far is just that. If she makes a scene in the office sufficient to require the presence of law enforcement, then at that time law enforcement can be given all appropriate information and they can act accordingly. A law enforcement official can initiate an involuntary commitment (Baker Act). If you were the client’s physician

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or a mental health professional, you would have certain obligations and rights under the Baker Act. Under your relationship, you have no obligations, and your options are as described. If she calls and tells staff that she is coming to your office to commit a crime, you can inform law enforcement and then terminate the VCPR relationship and have a no-trespass notice issued by law enforcement.

QUESTION:

I recently received a brochure from a chiropractor in my area that is advertising to the public that he is treating animals. I was wondering if this is in violation of the practice act and what I should do about it, if anything. A: According to Section 474.202(9); F.S., treatment of whatever nature for the prevention, cure, or relief of a wound, fracture, bodily injury, or disease in an animal constitutes the practice of veterinary medicine. The practice of chiropractic medicine is defined pursuant to Section 460.403(9), F.S., by reference to the "human body" only. Therefore, a chiropractic physician cannot hold himself or herself out as an animal chiropractor, or engage in the treatment of any animal independently. A veterinary aide may render auxiliary or supporting assistance under the responsible supervision of a licensed veterinarian, who shall remain responsible for all acts performed under her or his supervision, see §474.203(6), F.S. The Board of Veterinary Medicine has stated that all tasks which may be delegated to a veterinary aide shall be performed under "immediate supervision," with two exceptions: the administration of medication or treatment (excluding vaccinations) as directed by the licensed veterinarian, and the obtaining of samples or performance of diagnostic tests directed by the veterinarian. See rule 61G18:17.005(1), F.AC. If a licensed veterinarian has first examined the animal and created a valid physician-patient-client relationship, that veterinarian can direct the performance of treatment


(i.e. manipulation) to a veterinary aide, and such treatment can take place under "responsible supervision," which does not require the on premises presence of the veterinarian. If a chiropractic physician enters into such a relationship with a licensed veterinarian, then “he or she can perform treatment modalities on animals under the veterinarian's off premises responsible supervision.”

QUESTION:

A local pharmacy is asking for my NPI number before they will fill a prescription. I thought it was illegal for veterinarians to have an NPI number? A: You are correct. It is illegal for a veterinarian to have a National Provider Information (NPI) number. NPI numbers were developed for use associated with human healthcare, and are not intended for veterinary use. According to the federal government, businesses cannot insist on NPI numbers from veterinarians. Veterinarians who need to deactivate an existing NPI number can do so by submitting an NPI Update Form, which can be found here: https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/CMS-Forms/CMS-Forms/downloads/cms10114.pdf. Conflicts have also occurred when some pharmacies inappropriately require DEA numbers for prescriptions that were not controlled substances. The DEA says it strongly opposes the use of a DEA registration number for any purpose other than for transactions of controlled substances. Use of DEA registration numbers as identification is not appropriate, according to the DEA. When asked for an NPI number, or for a DEA registration number for non-controlled substance prescriptions, veterinarians instead can provide their state license number. Although a pharmacy might find it convenient to use NPI and DEA numbers, ultimately, it’s a veterinarian’s state veterinary medical license that authorizes the prescribing of drugs for their patients.

QUESTION:

We do not typically note in the record that a patient is authorized for future refills- each time a refill is requested, a doctor reviews the chart and authorizes the refill at that time. This doctor may or may not be the one who has previously examined the patient- the patient’s valid VPC relationship is with the hospital,

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not an individual doctor. What the particular doctor would like to happen is for non-doctor staff members (technicians or receptionists) to authorize refills for medications like HW or flea control without a doctor, based on our hospital’s requirements (annual exam and HW test). Is the doctor able to delegate this prescribing ability to designated staff members based on hospital standards, or does it need to be noted in the record that x number of refills are authorized by the original doctor? And if refills are designated in the record for a particular medication, do the refills all need to be dispensed under the original prescribing doctor’s name? A: Our legal counsel disagrees with the statement that the VCP relationship is with the hospital. The hospital does not prescribe or practice veterinary medicine. Because several vets work at the hospital and they are aware of their relative skills, one vet can authorize a prescription without having to conduct a full-blown examination. A quick review of the chart would be sufficient to establish the VCP relationship. Our legal counsel’s suggestion is that the original doctor who initiated the drug therapy be the one under whose name the subsequent refills are dispensed. He or she can authorize the refills consistent with the hospital requirements. If that doctor leaves the practice, another doctor can perform the quick check, confirm everything, and create the new VCP relationship. When the tech or receptionist fills the refill, they are not prescribing. The vet is not delegating the decision to prescribe or authorize the refill (something the vet can’t do). What the vet is doing is delegating the task of delivering the medication the vet previously prescribed or authorized to the client. Once again, the prescribing vet should be the one that initially authorized or the one that took over. It should not be the vet owner who never examined the patient.

END NOTE: The ultimate responsibility in the

practice of veterinary medicine lies with the licensed veterinarian. Professional discretion must always be exercised.

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS VETERINARIANS WANTED VETERINARIAN WANTED – CENTRAL FLORIDA, SMALL ANIMAL HOSPITAL IN CENTRAL FLORIDA SEEKING A FULL-TIME VETERINARIAN: The hospital is a 30 year wellestablished, full service practice that is located in the very center or "Heart" of Florida that is a small town and affordable community. The area is considered to be a "vacation haven" because it is right off the Interstate-4 corridor therefore making it close and easy to access either the east or west coast beaches, Tampa and Orlando attractions, and less than 30 minutes away from Walt Disney World. The hospital has a full in-house IDEXX diagnostic and outside reference lab; digital radiography with on-line access to specialists; surgical laser machines; 3 exam rooms; video otoscope; fully-equipped surgical suite; digital dental radiology and a fully-equipped dental surgery area with high speed drills; ultrasound; Cornerstone practice management computer system; and an experienced and congenial support staff. It is also within very close proximity to a variety of board-certified medical and surgical specialists as well as emergency clinics. Compensation includes a guaranteed salary for an average 32/36 hour work week and every other Saturday from 8 to 12 noon. If 20% of production is higher than salary, the amount above the paid salary is paid after the end of the year as a bonus. Compensation package also includes vacation, health insurance with vision and dental options, professional liability insurance, Florida dues, licenses and membership fees, and continuing education stipend. Please contact David Wilkinson, DVM at Heart of Florida Animal Hospital in Haines City, Florida to discuss interest by e-mail to wilkdc@tampabay.rr.com or by fax to 863-422-5744. Upon receipt of e-mail, resume, or cover letter, a convenient time for both to discuss and answer questions over phone will be made before an interview time/visit will be established.(1/18: ID#5632) VETERINARIAN WANTED – TAMPA BAY, FL: BluePearl Veterinary Partners is seeking a full time ER clinician to join our team in Tampa Bay, Florida. Our BluePearl hospitals in Tampa Bay offer specialty and emergency veterinary care, with ER, Critical Care, Internal Medicine, Surgery, Ophthalmology, Neurology, Cardiology and Dermatology. We practice high quality, progressive medicine in a collaborative environment. Our case load is high and diverse. We are looking for a hardworking, motivated, compassionate ER doctor- preferably internship trained. We offer competitive salaries and comprehensive benefits. BluePearl is an Equal Opportunity Employer. For details or to apply to this position, go to https://www.bluepearljobs.com/career-areas/ (1/18; ID#28251) TOWN & COUNTRY ANIMAL HOSPITAL OF COLLIER COUNTY, NAPLES FL.: We are seeking a FULL TIME ASSOCIATE VETERINARIAN. T&C is an AAHA accredited two doctor practice that offers a full line of small animal medical, general dentistry and soft tissue surgical services. We also offer a comprehensive range of small animal reproductive services under the direction of a Board-Certified Diplomat of the American College of Theriogenologists. The practice employs a full array of in-house state-of-the-art diagnostic, digital and laser technologies. Interested applicants would mostly likely be more recent graduates with less than five years previous working experience, a genuine interest in soft tissue surgery and participation in small animal reproductive medicine through continuing education and a mentoring process. We offer a fixed annual salary, annual bonus plan participation, comprehensive paid personal and professional benefits, continuing education opportunities and a hospitable environment for work-life balance, long-term professional development and growth. Please email your resume in confidence to employment@mynaplesvet.com

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to arrange for an immediate interview. Please visit our website (mynaplesvet.com) for further information about the practice. (1/18; ID#598) VETERINARIAN WANTED – KEY LARGO, FL: Full time DVM - Island Hammock Pet Hospital, 3 doctor companion animal practice, Key Largo, Florida. Strong compensation package, experienced staff, rewarding work environment. We operate a new, AAHA accredited, AAFP designated Cat Friendly, state of the art facility, utilizing efficient business practices. Learn more at www.IHPH.net. The Keys offers some of the best fishing and SCUBA diving available in North America. Island life is a laid back, semi-rural lifestyle. All of the advantages of a large metropolitan area are within a 45 minute drive. If you love the water and sun, the Florida Keys is a great place to live. To learn more about the position, please send your resume to careers@IHPH.net. (1/18; ID#10524) VETERINARIAN WANTED – RIVERVIEW, FL, BOYETTE ANIMAL HOSPITAL: Full time veterinarian needed for 9 doctor companion animal practice located in Riverview, FL, a growing suburb of Tampa. Our practice is well equipped with digital radiography, Idexx in-house lab equipment, central pharmacy, well pet center and digital dental radiography. We provide general medical and surgical veterinary care as well as boarding, grooming and dog training. We have a staff of 65 wonderful employees many of whom have been with us for over 10 years. We do not advertise and have grown solely through word of mouth referrals and community involvement. Compensation closely and uniquely tied to your ability to provide value to our patients and their families. - Starting salary: 90,000 - 125,000 commensurate with experience and special skills/training - Association dues - Health Insurance - Professional liability insurance - Uniform and CE allowance For further information contact Dr. Bob Encinosa at 813-205-0987 or Drbobenc@aol.com (1/18; ID#10540) VETERINARIAN WANTED - CAPE CORAL, FL: Our AAHA certified, well established small animal hospital has an opening for a full time veterinarian. Located in beautiful Southwest Florida, Kindness Animal Hospital offers an experienced support staff, excellent clientele and wonderful patients. Applicant must be interested in practicing high quality medicine and surgery. The ability to work independently as well as collaborate with other doctors is imperative. Competitive compensation and benefits based on experience. Grow your career with our great team atmosphere and enjoy out beautiful surrounding community. Please submit resume to Linda Morris at kindesswest@kindnessanimalhospital.com or call 239-542-PETS.(1/18; ID#26125) VETERINARIAN WANTED – OVIEDO, FL: Vet Needed 40 hours a week location In Oviedo, FL 32765, salary negotiable . Please contact Dr Greg Murray at 407-448-4649 to discuss further. (1/18; ID#28110) VETERINARIAN WANTED – SPRING HILL, FL: Associate Veterinarian – live and work where the manatees swim! The Animal Medical Clinic of Spring Hill FL is looking for an Associate Veterinarian to join our clinic. Located on the Nature Coast north of Tampa we are ideally situated for the perfect blend of professional accomplishment and enjoyable personal life. No evenings, weekends or on-call, you would work 4 1/2 days caring for our patients, and have ample time for recreation in this unspoiled corner of Florida, or take in the culture and excitement of nearby Tampa Bay. If you are a seasoned doctor, you will find our well-equipped clinic ad supportive

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staff allows you to practice excellent medicine and enjoy a good wage on our salary/production system. Our local network of specialists gives you access to the most advanced diagnostics and treatment in the profession. If you are a recent graduate, AMC is the perfect place to begin your career. Our mentoring program guides you through the difficulties of practice and helps you start off on the right foot. From reviews of radiographs to methods of dealing with clients and work flow, we address every aspect of daily practice, preparing you for a long and productive career. Interested? Email us at amcspringhill@earthlink.net or call at 352-686-0671 to speak with Anna or Denise. (1/18; ID#5911) VETERINARIAN WANTED - KEYSTONE HEIGHTS, FLORIDA: Springlake Animal Hospital is seeking an enthusiastic associate to join our growing practice. We are looking for preferably a full time veterinarian, but will consider a part time veterinarian to potentially split time between two clinics. Both clinics are currently primarily small animal clinics that are located in North Florida between Gainesville and Jacksonville. Experienced clinicians or new graduates are welcome to apply. This is a full service veterinary hospital with digital x-ray, blood work, and computer integration. We are seeking a caring, motivated veterinarian with good communication skills who desires to practice quality medicine and provide great client service. We offer a competitive compensation. A benefit package will also be included for a full time position. Interested candidates should contact Amy Wells at (352) 473-8222 and email a resume to springlakehosp@yahoo.com (1/18; ID#26042) VETERINARIAN WANTED – DUNEDIN, FL: The Animal Hospital of Dunedin on the sunny Gulf Coast of Florida is looking for a goal oriented, highly motivated, responsible, and enthusiastic veterinarian excited to provide high-quality veterinary medicine in a team oriented practice. You are invited to join the staff of a five doctor, progressive, integrative, and high producing practice. Our practice also includes an internist service that brings the state of the art diagnostic equipment and specialist to our practice making it more convenient for our clients and patients. You’ll develop your own clientele while practicing in a group setting. The potential for success in this setting is limitless for a hard working individual. Compensation depends on experience and motivation to serve your clients’ and patients’ medical care needs. New graduates with similar goals and ideals will be considered. Experience or interest in Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine is a plus as you will be joining a team that includes Dr. Gregory Todd and Dr. Michael Bartholomew both who have published & lectured about TCVM. All Florida licensed or eligible applicants welcome. So bring your positive personality and come plan a successful career! Please contact Dr. Gregory Todd at 727733-9351, or e-mail your information to drgtahd@gmail.com . We are looking forward to meeting you! (1/18; ID#5015)

RELIEF VETERINARIANS RELIEF/PART-TIME VETERINARIAN AVAILABLE – TAMPA, FL: Relief or part-time veterinarian available in the Tampa area: 30 years of experience as a practice owner. Enjoy surgery and working with people, small animal only. Call Dr. Joe Priest at (813) 230-5998 or email priestdvm@gmail.com. (6/17 & 1/18: ID#2492)

VET TECHNICIANS & STAFF TECHNICIAN WANTED – GAINESVILLE, FL: Affiliated Veterinary Specialists (AVS), a BluePearl Veterinary Partner, is seeking a Full-Time Emergency clinician to join our team in Gainesville. Exceptional interpersonal skills are a must for our group as we are a fun, energetic team that is highly focused on outstanding patient care, exemplary client and referring veterinary service and progressive growth. Your schedule would be an average of three shifts per week covering the duties of the emergency service (receiving cases and overseeing hospitalized patients) with rotating weekend duty. BluePearl is an Equal Opportunity Employer. For details or to apply to this position, go to https://www.bluepearljobs.com/career-areas/(1/18; ID#950)

30  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

PRACTICES FOR SALE OR LEASE PROPERTY FOR SALE – SOUTHWEST, FL: SW Florida-Single doctor practice in newly built 4000+ sq. ft free-standing building has room and business for growth with the potential addition of 1-2 more veterinarians. Gross revenues exceed $500,000 from one doctor, primarily, with boarding and grooming facilities for our clients. Wellequipped with radiology, in-house lab, dental machine, Avimark management software... Area emergency and specialty clinics offer after hours support. Ocean, beaches, boating, fishing, wildlife, SUN!!! Practice and real estate are included in the sale. Call 912-306-6618 for more information and to schedule your practice visit. Inquiries by potential buyers include submitting a confidentiality agreement we will provide. (1/18; ID #5459) PRACTICE FOR SALE – SOUTH WEST, FL : Exclusive small animal practice South West Florida. 1.2 doctor grossing 780K in 2017. No emergencies, well equipped. Growing area with lots of potential for practice growth. Free standing building built in 2008 real estate available for lease or purchase. If interested please contact us at NPAH05@AOL.COM. (1/18; ID #26587)


PS BROKER Florida Practice Listings! Sold-Southwest Florida– 1.5 Dr. Practice with 2016 gross of just over $1mm. Free standing office 3800 sq.ft. All the bells and whistles and not far from the beach. North Florida– Solo Dr. small animal, 2016 gross $887k, Well established, new digital X-ray. High net...Priced to sell. Just Listed– Central Fl.– 2 Dr. Practice with 2016 gross of $1.3mm+. 2500 sq. ft. office with 2800 sq.ft. pet resort. Well equipped and well established. New Listing– Sarasota County– 1.5 Dr. Practice 2017 gross about $730K. Nice free standing office on major 4 lane. Well established and well equipped in a rapidly growing area. Are Corporate Groups contacting you about buying your Practice? If so, let us help you make sure you get your best deal!!!

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“Simmons & Associates’ advisors provided me with the insight necessary to be successful in this competitive profession. Their dedication to our profession is unquestioned, as they daily demonstrate the highest degree of ethical standards and professionalism. Colleagues enlisting their help are assured of a personal touch, a sincere effort to satisfy, and a team of hard-working professionals.” – Richard Swanson, DVM, Past President, AVMA

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Advocate Issue 1, 2018  

Published by the Florida Veterinary Medical Association. Your Invitation to attend the 89th FVMA Annual Conference, April 5-8, 2018. Details...

Advocate Issue 1, 2018  

Published by the Florida Veterinary Medical Association. Your Invitation to attend the 89th FVMA Annual Conference, April 5-8, 2018. Details...

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