Page 1

F V M A ADVOCATE ISSUE 3 - 2015 | www.fvma.org

88th President of the

Florida Veterinary Medical Association

Richard M. Carpenter, DVM


President's MESSAGE Colleagues: 7 207 Monetary Drive Orlando, Florida 32809 Phone – (407) 851‑3862 Toll Free – (800) 992‑3862 Fax – (407) 240‑3710 info@fvma.org | www.fvma.org

Officers Dr. Richard M. Carpenter President Dr. Richard C. Sutliff President-Elect Dr. Richard B. Williams Treasurer Dr. Donald H. Morgan Past President Mr. Philip J. Hinkle Executive Director

District Representatives Dr. Alex M. Steverson District 1–Big Bend Vacant District 2–Northeast Dr. Marc A. Presnell District 3–Central Dr. Rachel Klemawesch District 4–Tampa Bay Dr. Marc D. Pinkwasser District 5–Treasure Coast Dr. Marta P. Lista District 6–South Florida Dr. Mary Smart District 7–Southwest Dr. James M. Brechin District 8–Northwest Dr. Kelly J. Sloan-Wade District 9–Space Coast Dr. Stephen Shores AVMA Delegate Dr. Ernest C. Godfrey AVMA Alternative Delegate Dr. Amanda House FAEP Representative to the FVMA Executive Board Ex Officio Dr. James W. Lloyd, Dean College of Veterinary Medicine

FVMA Staff

Sandra P. Brooks Accounting/Membership Director Kelly Callihan Director of Conferences & Events Amber Coon Executive Assistant Ann Deal Director of Administration & Communications Ralph E. Huber Industry Relations Director Alssa Mathews Multimedia Art & Design Director Beni Jean Price Financial/Membership Coordinator Betsy Pynes Meetings and Events Coordinator Ann Wade Communications & Public Relations Director

2  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

As we rapidly move along in this year, we already have many irons in the fire. Some of these issues we expected and some we have not, but rest assured, your FVMA staff and leadership is actively involved in the events. I attended the Board of Veterinary Medicine meeting in Tampa on the first of June and would pass on to the membership, if you have never attended one of these sessions it would be well worth your time when one is close enough to you to make the trip. The actions and discussions by the board are interesting, if not amazing at times. The scope of issues and concerns presented to the Board are a fascinating glimpse into what is taking place all around our State. And, remember, you can get CE credit for the “rules & regs” requirement for license renewal. Also in May, I was privileged to attend both the Coating ceremony for the second year veterinary students as they move into their third year of their CVM education. Dr. Rick Sutliff addressed the students and presented the 2015 Champion of Veterinary Medicine to Dr. Diane Kitchen. Then, with Phil, Dr. Sutliff and other representatives of the FVMA, I attended the College graduation breakfast and addressed the graduating class of 2015. Your FVMA was well represented and acknowledged for being present. As I mentioned in the last issue of the Advocate, communication is a big concern we are focusing on and I am really pleased with the progress made in getting the new FVMA website up and running. The main focus was to improve the function and usability of the site and allow us to incorporate more avenues to communicate with the members. If you have not visited the new website, I encourage you to do so as soon as you have a moment. I believe you will be impressed – I was – and the staff has worked very hard to learn to use and navigate around in the software to help keep us informed on its use if we need help. We are looking forward to the next FVMA Conference which is going to be back in Tampa next April. Plans are well underway to accommodate the Conference CE program and attending members and staff. More information will be coming your way and be sure to use the new website to keep up with information provided there. I am anticipating going to the AVMA Conference this year in Boston. The House of Delegates has much to discuss and there are a number of issues of interest to all of us that will be on the agenda. We should be bringing back a lot of interesting reports on the activities there. Don’t forget the TGAVC conference in Boca Raton in October, another great meeting sponsored by your FVMA and an opportunity for lots of CE and fellowship for our members and guests. Thank you again for allowing me to serve. We will continue to focus on member needs and involvement and encourage all of you to stay in touch with your District Representatives or the FVMA office. Sincerely,

Richard Carpenter, DVM

In This Issue 4 | In Remembrance 6 | Legislative Wrap-up 8 | 2015 Champion of Veterinary Medicine 9 | Member Spotlights 11 | Meet Our President

15 | 3rd Annual Gulf-Atlantic Veterinary Conference 26 | 2015 UFCVM Coating Ceremony 30 | Clinical Investigator Award 32 | Practice Pulse 35 | Classified Advertisements


In Remembrance

GEORGE RANDOLPH BROCKWAY, DVM

Dr. George Randolph Brockway, 68, of Holiday, Florida, passed away on May 3, 2015. A retired small animal veterinarian, Dr. Brockway owned and operated Advanced Veterinary Hospital until retirement in 2010. Dr. Brockway was born in Olympia, Washington. He gradu‑ ated from Michigan State University in 1994, and practiced in

Nevada and Oregon before moving to Florida in 2000. On retirement, he pursued his interest in restoring antique motorcycles and cars. Dr. Brockway is survived by his wife, Karen Oneal Brockway; family and friends.

CLARENCE L. CAMPBELL, JR., DVM Dr. Clarence L. Campbell, Jr., 93, of Tallahassee, passed away at his home on May 17, 2015. Dr. Campbell was a life member of the FVMA, and was awarded the Association’s Veterinarian of the Year Award in 1985. He was also honored with the Distinguished Service Award of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. He was employed by the State of Florida initially as a field veterinarian with the Florida Livestock Sanitary Board, and was appointed assistant state veterinarian in 1948. In 1953, he accepted appointment as state veterinarian and served in that capacity for 38 years until he retired in 1991. He has the record of being the longest tenured state veterinarian in the US, and he was respected nationally as one of the most accomplished state veterinarians in U.S. history.

ROBERT S. MULLINS, DVM

Dr. Robert Stewart “Doc” Mullins passed away at the age of 87 on May 25, 2015, in Starke, Florida. Doc Mullins was a life member of the FVMA, who was honored with the Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 1998. He joined the FVMA in 1954, right after graduating from Auburn University with his doctorate of veterinary medicine in 1953. Dr. Mullins practiced small and large animal veterinary medicine in Starke for 55 years and retired in 2010. He served his community also as a member of the First United Methodist Church of Starke, the American Legion Post 56, the local Rotary Club where he served as past president, the local Boy Scouts for which he was Charter Representative for Troop 79, and he

During his lengthy tenure with the State of Florida, Dr. Campbell was noted for his efforts to rid Florida of animal diseases and to prevent the introduction of foreign animal diseases into the state and the country. One of his most notable achievements was leading his team to eradicate the cattle fever tick from Florida in 1961, and the screwworm in 1962. Dr. Campbell once served as president of the United States Animal Health Association. He retired from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services in 1991. He was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on September 24, 1921, and received his early education in Sebring, Florida. He attended pre-veterinary training at Florida Southern College and received his Veterinary Medicine Degree from The Ohio State University. Dr. Campbell is survived by his wife, the love of his life, Dorothy Watford, whom he married in 1950. Together they shared almost 65 years of marital bliss. They loved animals of all kinds and found joy in raising Arabian horses on their farm in Tallahassee. Donations in honor of Dr. Campbell may be made to Triple R Horse Rescue of Tallahassee. was a former Clay Electric Co-op Board of Trustees member. Doc Mullins retired from the co-op board in 2012, after serving for District 5 since 1988, during which he served two terms as president, as vice president, sec‑ retary and treasurer. He was also a veteran of the United States Navy, having served from 1945 to 1947, and was a veterinarian for Florida State Prison in Raiford for 30 years. Robert S. “Doc” Mullins, DVM, is survived by his wife, Laurie; two sons, Robert Jr. and Glenn; a daughter, Patricia; 13 grand‑ children; and three great grandchildren.

ROSE MARIE THREATTE, VMD Dr. Rose Marie Threatte, died peacefully at her home in Hilliard, Florida, at the age of 65. She is survived by her brothers, Leslie Lee Threatte, of El Cerrito, California, and James Bruce Threatte, of Kissimmee, Florida Dr. Threatte was born in 1949, in Gainesville, Florida, where she attended high school. She received a Bachelor of Science from Florida Presbyterian College in 1971, and graduated from the University of Florida College of Pharmacy in 1974, and received a PhD in 1978. 4  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

She worked as a research scientist for Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and later attended the University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, from which she graduated in 1990. She moved to Callahan, Florida, and practiced veterinary medicine as owner and medical director of the Animal Clinic of Nassau County until her retirement in 2013. Dr. Threatte had many hobbies, which included music, golf, wood and metal working, and landscape painting. She was much loved by her many friends.


The Science of Compassion, the Technology for Hope.™

3884 Forest Hill Boulevard, West Palm Beach, FL 33406

Surgery Emergency/Critical Care Internal Medicine Neurology/Neurosurgery Cardiology Oncology Nuclear Medicine Radiology Ophthalmology On-Site CT/MRI Radiation Therapy Sports Medicine Pain Management Mobile Surgery Service Blood and Tissue Bank Continuing Education Bereavement Services

Veterinary Hospice Lap of Love provides in-home hospice and euthanasia services to local families that want to be in the comfort of their own home during the last days or moments of their pet's life. ♥ Tampa - St. Pete ♥ Broward County ♥ Palm Beach County ♥ South Martin County ♥ Orlando ♥ Jacksonville ♥ St. Augustine ♥ Miami-Dade County ♥ Gainesville

24 Hours a Day 7 Days a Week 365 Days a Year

561-434-5700 Palm Beach Veterinary Specialists is locally owned and operated.

www.PalmBeachVetSpecialists.com

Protect your livelihood with all the right coverage through AVMA PLIT. We are the most trusted source of professional, business and personal coverage for every stage of your career.

our expertise is Workers’ Compensation Umbrella Liability

Business Property & Liability

Commercial Auto

Veterinary License Defense Storage Coverage Homeowners

your strength

Flood

Employment Practices Liability

Data Breach

Professional Liability

Professional Extension (Animal Bailee)

Safety & Risk Management • Resources

Renters

Embryo & Semen

Personal Auto

Personal Excess (Umbrella) Liability For a coverage comparison of your entire insurance portfolio to the PLIT Program, call 800-228-PLIT (7548) or visit avmaplit.com

www.fvma.org  |  5


FVMA 2015

Legislative

Wrap-Up

Front Left to Right: Dr. Charli Jane Braun, Dr. Rachel Klemawesch, Dr. Kim Donovan, Dr. Christy Layton, Mrs. Kelsey McKenna, Ms. Caitlin Spindler, Dr. Don Morgan, Cynthia Rogers, Dr. Kelly Sloan-Wade, Dr. Christine Storts, Mrs. Kristina Carpenter, Dr. Jenifer Chatfield, Dr. Jacqueline Shellow, Mr. Barry Faske, Dr. Adriana Odachowski, Dr. Lee Burstiner Back Left to Right: : Phil Hinkle, Mr. Brett Zager, Dr. Mike Haworth, Mr. Don Thompson, Dr. Bob Encinosa, Dr. Alex “Steve” Steverson, Dr. Brian Ermeling, Dr. Richard Carpenter

T

he FVMA was successful with its 2015 legislative agenda, making this the second consecutive year that the association secured passage of its priority legislation. As many bills take two to three years to pass, this FVMA’s achievement is truly one to celebrate! The Association’s 2015 priority legislative initiative was undertaken to promptly restore a veterinarian’s ability to dispense compounded medications to his/her patient’s owner or caregiver. In June 2014, the Florida Board of Pharmacy implemented a rule change that inadvertently restricted a veterinarian's ability to fully utilize compounded drugs for administering and dispensing to their patients’ owners and caretakers. The Rule required medical practitioners to sign an agreement with compounding pharmacies when ordering compounded medications, not to dispense them. The FVMA’s priority legislation was supported by the Board of Pharmacy who agreed there was a need to fix this unintended consequence of its 2014 Rule.

6  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

The Florida Veterinary Medical Association’s 2015 Priority Legislation, House Bill 1049-Practice of Pharmacy, was signed by Governor Rick Scott and became law effective July 1, 2015. Florida veterinarians are now able to dispense compounded medications directly to their patients’ owners and caregivers. The passage of HB 1049 is a significant legislative victory for the members of the FVMA and the veterinary medical profession in Florida.

The Practice of Pharmacy Law • • •

Aligns Florida’s Pharmacy Regulations with the established standards of the practice of veterinary medicine. Reestablishes licensed veterinarians’ ability to dispense compounded medication to their patients’ owners or caregivers that will ensure successful treatment outcomes. Fixes the unintended consequences to the practice of veterinary medicine when the Florida Board of Pharmacy amended its rules in June 2014.


The success of the 2015 FVMA priority legislative initiative was the result of the hard work of a coalition of supporters, who along with the FVMA staff, dedicated much time and effort to ensure a successful outcome. The FVMA is grateful to Marcy Bliss, President of Wedgewood Pharmacy and the team at Wedgewood Pharmacy, and other coalition partners, Pet Health Pharmacy, Veterinary Pharmacies of America, Diamondback Pharmacy, and US Compounding, its lobbyists, Mixon and Associates, and the members of the FVMA Legislative Committee. We extend special thanks to champions for veterinary medicine, Senator Jack Latvala and Representative Kathleen Peters, who sponsored the bill in the Florida Senate and House of Representatives! The FVMA not only achieved passage of its priority legislation, it also assisted in two other bills becoming law (Public Records/ Animal Medical Records and Medication and Testing of Racing Animals). Below is a summary of the primary bills supported, opposed and monitored by your FVMA legislative team during the 2015 Legislative Session.

Bills Supported • Senate Bill 1180 and House Bill 1049 - Practice of Pharmacy (See details above) House Bill 1049 was signed by the Governor on June 10, 2015, and will become law on July 1, 2015. (Senate Bill 1180 was tabled and referred to HB 1049) • Senate Bill 716 and House Bill 1287- Public Records/Animal Medical Records. This Bill was advanced by the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine and provides an exemption from public records requirements for certain animal medical records held by a state college of veterinary medicine that is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education. Senate Bill 716 was signed by the Governor on May 21, 2015, and will become law on July 1, 2015. (House Bill 1287 was laid on the table and referred to SB 716) • Senate Bill 226 and House Bill 239 - Medication and Testing of Racing Animals. The FVMA was approached by Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam to provide input and support for this legislation. This Bill revises provisions that prohibit use of certain medications or substances on racing animals; revises penalties; revises timeframe in which certain prosecutions must begin; revises procedures; authorizes the Division of Pari-mutuel Wagering of DBPR to solicit input from DACS for purposes of adopting certain rules. House Bill 239 was signed by the Governor on June 2, 2015, and will become law on July 1, 2015. (Senate Bill 226 was laid on the table and referred to HB 239) • Senate Bill 2 and House Bill 129 - Greyhound Racing Injuries These bills if adopted would have required injuries to racing greyhounds to be reported on a form adopted by the Division of Pari-mutuel Wagering in the Department of Business and Professional Regulation within a certain timeframe and exempted injuries to certain animals from reporting requirements. SB 2, also known as the “Victoria Q. Gaetz Racing Greyhound Protection Act,” passed in the Senate on March 3, 2015, but died in messages to the House. House Bill 129 died in its first committee

of reference, the Business and Professions Subcommittee.

Bills Opposed • Senate Bill 670 and House Bill 207- Pet Services and Advocacy Programs These bills were almost identical to those introduced in 2014. If adopted they would authorize counties, by referendum, to create independent special taxing districts and levy ad valorem taxes to provide funding for pet services and advocacy programs. The governing body of the tax district would be appointed by the County Commission and would not be accountable to the taxpayers. The potential statewide implication of this legislation would be the imposition of a significant property tax increase on citizens and business. Based on the 2014 Statewide Taxable Value at $ 1,391,611,734,036 (Source: Florida Department of Revenue published December 2014) the potential revenue that would have been generated statewide by the .10 mill cap, established in this proposed legislation, is $139,161,173 per fiscal year. Because this figure is based on the 2014 taxable values, it is subject to increases proportionate to the increase of taxable values each year thereafter. Senate Bill 670 died in its first committee of reference, the Community Affairs Committee and House Bill 207 died in its first committee of reference, the Local Government Affairs Subcommittee.

Bills Closely Monitored • Senate Bill 420 and House Bill 627-Animal Control This legislation provides a procedure for adopting or humanely disposing of impounded stray livestock, except cattle, as an alternative to sale or auction; requires a county animal control center to establish fees and be responsible for damages caused while impounding livestock; authorizes certain municipal animal control officers to take custody of an animal found neglected or cruelly treated or to order the owner of such an animal to provide certain care at the owner’s expense. Senate Bill 420 was signed by the Governor on May 14, 2015, and will become law on July 1, 2015. (House Bill 627 was tabled and referred to SB 420) • Senate Bill 262 and House Bill 187- Racing Animals These bills were referred to as the "Greyhound Safety Act." If adopted, it would have prohibited the Division of Pari-mutuel Wagering within the Department of Business and Professional Regulation from granting a license or permit to applicants with a prior conviction of animal cruelty; required the division to immediately revoke a license or permit of a person found guilty of animal cruelty subsequent to obtaining the license or permit, and established a fine for making false statements on injury records. Senate Bill 262 died in its first committee of reference, the Regulated Industries Committee and House Bill 187 died in its first committee of reference, the Business and Professions Subcommittee. THANKS TO ALL OF OUR MEMBERS AND PARTNERS WHO MADE 2015 A GREAT LEGISLATIVE YEAR! Respectfully Submitted: Dr. Steven Shores, Legislative Chair & Dr. John R. Bass, Legislative Co-chair www.fvma.org  |  7


Dr. Diane Lynn Kitchen

2015 Champion of Veterinary Medicine

Dr. Diane Lynn Kitchen, of Island Grove, Florida, is the FVMA’s 2015 Champion of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Kitchen was named “Champion” to recognize her significant contributions to the veterinary profession and to veterinary medicine in Florida. The FVMA Champion of Veterinary Medicine is honored by the annual presentation of six scholarship awards in his or her honor, to students of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. Scholarships are won by two freshman, sophomore, and junior students. The FVMA presented Dr. Kitchen with the “Champion” plaque during the UFCVM’s sophomore coating ceremony which was held on May 8, on the campus of UF. During the ceremony, two students, Kelsey Arellano and Matthew Parisi, were presented with fifteen hundred dollar scholarships and award plaques by Dr. Kitchen and FVMA President-elect, Dr. Richard Sutliff. Dr. Kitchen has been committed to her professional development and service to 8  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

the veterinary profession since graduating mixed and small animal practices. from the University of Tennessee in In 2006, she joined the Florida 1984. She is the Veterinarian Manager Department of Agriculture and Consumer of the Bovine Program of the Florida Services, Division of Animal Industry to Department of Agriculture and Consumer serve the wider Florida community, where Services; Division of Animal Industry. she has dedicated herself to the health After graduation, she undertook a one and welfare of the food animal industry year internship at Texas A&M University, in Florida. She has worked to revive and then continued a further three years, from sustain the annual Harvey Rubin Memorial 1985 to 1988, for her residency. Food Animal Veterinary Conference Shortly thereafter, Dr. Kitchen in partnership with the FVMA and the commenced a distinguished professional Florida Cattlemen’s Association, which career. was held for the 8th year in March, 2015. From Texas A&M, she went to Quail Her dedication to this effort has made a Roost Farm in North Carolina where she significant contribution to the profession worked for a couple of years breeding and and the food animal industry in Florida. training Thoroughbreds, caring for Angus cattle, and importing and exporting exotic animals. She then came to the UF College of Veterinary Medicine for six years as a graduate teaching assistant and research assistant, and earned her PhD in 1997. At the same time, beginning in 1990, and for sixteen years, Dr. Kitchen operated a private referral practice in equine and food animal veterinary medicine. She also offered Dr. Rick Sutliff, FVMA President-elect, presenting relief veterinary services to the 'Champion' award plaque to Dr. Kitchen.


Member Spotlights FVMA Presents Special Service Award To FVMA Student Representative GEOFF LANDUA

The UFCVM Senior Also Wins Prestigious Simmons Business Aptitude Award FVMA Student Representative, at UFCVM, Geoffrey Landau, won a prestigious national competition that recognizes business excellence in veterinary medicine. He was also recognized by the FVMA for exemplery work at the college on the Association's behalf. Geoffrey Landau, graduated this year, after being named the winner of the Simmons Business Aptitude Award. He was presented the Simmons Award in January. Geoff Landau served as FVMA Student Representative with distinction throughout his years at the college, and Geoff Landau receiving his service award proved to be an outstanding organizer from FVMA Executive Director Phil Hinkle. of FVMA-sponsored UFCVM activities and programs, including the Closing the Gap Roundtable at the Association’s Annual Veterinary Conference, and the Student

Mentoring Panels held on campus during the course of the academic year. The $15,000 Simmons award, which is given to senior students, is intended to bring attention to the importance of business education in veterinary practice. As UF’s nominee for the award, he submitted a marketing project in a national contest and was selected from among 17 national and international candidates. He plans to begin his professional veterinary career by joining a small animal clinic in the Atlanta area as an associate. His long-term goal however, is to own a veterinary practice. The award is funded through the Simmons Educational Fund, a nonprofit corporation founded in 2002 by Simmons and Associates, a company that specializes exclusively in veterinary practice sales, valuations, and negotiations. The FVMA made a special presentation of a plaque to Mr. Landau during the UFCVM Seniors Breakfast, held on May 22, 2015, in recognition of his hard work and dedication as FVMA Student Representative.

Dr. Walter Woolf Brings Photo Credits: Thompson Brand Images

New Dog Park to His Hometown

Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn doing the honor of opening the New Tampa Rotary Dog Park. Dr. Woolf sits on the bench to the Mayor's left. Walter Woolf, VMD, has given his service to the veterinary profession for a long time. Fifty-four years is a long time, and recently on May 2, he was present for the inauguration of one of his latest efforts, the New Tampa Rotary Dog Park. He helped the Rotary Club of New Tampa and the City of Tampa to make the park a reality as the project sponsor. A member of the Interbay Rotary Club of Tampa, Dr. Woolf

supports many community causes including the Rotary Club’s Ride for Autism and the Humane Society. Situated 30 miles from downtown Tampa, the dog park is a welcome Dr. Walter Woolf alternative for residents who before, drove 45 minutes or more to take their pets off their leashes. Dr. Wolf says his company, Air Animal Inc., jumped at the chance to participate in the venture with Rotary and the City, as it is important for dogs to run, play and socialize. The park features lots of trees for shade during the heat of the Florida summer. Owners and caretakers will also find water fountains for pets and people, seating areas, sanitation station and separate areas where large and small dogs can run loose. Air Animal Inc. has served pet owners all over the U.S. and internationally since 1977, and is recognized as a premier pet mover. Today, Dr. Woolf has the honor of life membership in the FVMA. He was conferred with the Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award and made a life member during the FVMA’s 73rd Annual Conference in 2001. He became an FVMA member the year he graduated with his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1960. He has served on various FVMA committees and has been an avid supporter of the FVMA Foundation. www.fvma.org  |  9


Dr. Dana Zimmel

UF Veterinary Hospital Chief of Staff Named Associate Dean for Clinical Services Dana N. Zimmel, DVM, an equine medicine specialist and the University of Florida Veterinary Hospital’s chief of staff, was recently named associate dean for clinical services and chief medical officer at the UF College of Veterinary Medicine. College Dean, James Lloyd, DVM, PhD, made the announcement of Dr. Zimmel’s appointment saying, “Dr. Zimmel has an impressive history with this college, both as a longtime equine medicine clinician and as a capable administrator.” She became college chief of staff in 2010. She joined the university in 2002, and worked in extension, then large animal medicine,

before taking on her leadership roles. As chief of staff, the hospital’s caseload grew from 20,542 patients in 2011, to 32,871 patients in 2014. Dr. Zimmel also spearheaded an Dr. Dana N. Zimmel effort to collaborate with Marion County veterinarians to open an emergency and critical care veterinary clinic in Ocala in 2012.

Honored with UFCVM DISTINGUISHED AWARDS

THREE FVMA MEMBERS

Natalie Isaza, DVM

At the graduation ceremonies on Saturday, May 23, 2015, the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine honored three outstanding FVMA members, who have been or are attached to the college, with its 2015 Distinguished Awards. The three veterinarians were singled out by UFCVM for their excellence in areas such as community outreach, higher education leadership, public health and technical training.

Natalie Isaza, DVM Dr. Isaza received the Alumni Achievement Award. She is a 1994 graduate of UFCVM and the Barbara and Arnold Grevior Shelter Medicine Community Outreach Professor. She developed the Merial Shelter Medicine Clerkship, now known as the Veterinary Community Outreach Program, which is an elective rotation that gives veterinary students valuable hands-on experience with spayneuter surgery and community veterinary medicine. Dr. Isaza also administers a donor-funded program known as Helping Alachua’s Animals Receive Treatment and Surgery, which helps cover the cost of treating shelter animals for medical issues beyond basic spay and neuter. She is a co-founder of the St. Francis House Pet Care Clinic in Gainesville.

Pamela Ginn, DVM Pamela Ginn, DVM

Dr. Ginn received the Special Service Award. Dr. Ginn has received many awards for her teaching, including the American College of Veterinary Dermatologists’ Excellence in Teaching Award in 2011. She was named associate dean for students and instruction at UFCVM in 2012, and has played a key leadership role in curricular revision and documentation, student wellness, and establishment of student learning outcomes.

Glen Wright, DVM

Glen Wright, DVM 10  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Dr. Wright who graduated from UFCVM in 2006, received the Outstanding Young Alumni Award. Dr. Wright, who earned his undergraduate degree from Florida A&M University in 2002, was recruited back to FAMU for the job he now holds as director of the veterinary technology program. Prior to that, he worked for several private small-animal veterinary practices in the Southeastern United States. He helped guide the FAMU program through accreditation by the American Veterinary Medical Association and serves on the UF Veterinary College Admissions Committee.


Meet our President

Richard M. Carpenter, DVM

FVMA President | 2015-2016

A

t his installation, the new FVMA President said he looked forward to the year of his tenure, with the aim of achieving a sense of inclusiveness for Florida veterinarians. He resolved to raise the awareness level among Association members and non-members about the Association’s services and its accomplish‑ ments on behalf of veterinary medicine in Florida. Dr. Richard M. Carpenter’s installation occurred during the FVMA’s 86th Annual Conference held in April, in the presence of a roomful of Association leaders, members, colleagues, friends and family. He used the opportunity presented at the elegant swearing-in ceremony to draw attention to the importance of one of his predecessor’s primary attainments and to describe the direction he wished

to focus on in the year of his of the FVMA’s committee structure, presidency. And he called on the expanding the relationship with the FVMA membership to involve College of Veterinary Medicine at the themselves in working to enhance University of Florida, and encouraging their organization, and to play an awareness among students that the FVMA active role in organized veterinary is a viable, active organization they should medicine in their communities. be a part of. “It will be an exciting year, I Dr. Carpenter succeeded very much look forward to serving you and Don Morgan, DVM, retired our Association,” he said, offering thanks veterinarian from Pinellas County, in advance for support and service from who remains on the FVMA the membership, whom he said he will be Executive Board as immediate past calling on this year to serve the profession president. In November 2014, Dr. and the Association. He told the Advocate Morgan led a strategic planning further, “This year will be focused on exercise which was facilitated by being nimble in our preparedness to Robert “Bob” Harris who is noted address issues, and steadfast attention will for his expertise in association best be placed on projects started in the past practices and sustainability. that need to be finished.” In his address after being sworn Dr. Carpenter joined the FVMA a few in, the new FVMA President months after moving to Florida from told the audience that the FVMA Virginia in 1995. He was appointed to serve will focus on carrying out the on the Executive Board as representative objectives of its strategic plan; for District 7 from 2010 through 2011, and and specifically, he planned on was subsequently elected for a full fouraddressing the communications year term in 2011. He served as presidentshortfalls of the Association. elect in 2014. The FVMA Strategic Plan 2015He took appointments on various 2017 identifies contact and communication association committees and on local with members, the local associations and with those veterinary professionals who are not yet members of the Association as crucial to enabling its four identified developmental goals of advocacy, education, member support, and leadership strength. “Significant things have been transpiring, and in your organization we intend to continue, and to keep our membership informed,” Dr. Carpenter said. He also identified other areas that he wanted to prioritize this year, including the strengthening Dr. Carpenter receives President's Gavel from Dr. Don Morgan www.fvma.org  |  11


ns Carpenter at Dr. Carpenter & BualttoCon ference nu An MA FV

Dr. Carpenter with Representative on Mrs. Buttons Carpenter and Distr the Executive Boar 7 d Dr. Mary Smict art

veterinary medical association boards, including the Caloosa VMA and Ridge Veterinary Medical Association, both in District 7. His wife Kristina “Buttons” Carpenter became an active FVMA member spouse. She was the organizer and point person for the FVMA Foundation Silent Auction at FVMA Annual Conferences over several years. Dr. Carpenter and Buttons comprised the silent auction team, and this led to his being asked to fill the District 7 Representative vacancy created, when Dr. Jim Kanzler, who represented that district, assumed duties as president-elect in 2010. Dr. Carpenter says, “I saw the importance of what the FMVA was doing and committed to supporting and participating however and wherever I can.” From a Small Iowa Town to a Lifetime of Service With his roots in a small town in Indiana, and many of his relatives being farmers or making a living from the farming community, it was not surprising that he went into a profession that took care of animals. After graduating from Iowa State University in 1974, Dr. Carpenter practiced food animal medicine in Iowa until 1986. He also served on the County Board of Health and the City Council as city treasurer. He then moved to Virginia and worked in laboratory animal medicine at the University of Virginia Medical School until 1994. In 1995, he left the University and spent a short time doing relief and part-time work in small animal medicine before moving to Fort Myers, Florida to be near his wife’s parents. He and Buttons Carpenter have lived in Fort Myers ever since. In Florida, Dr. Carpenter has worked as a relief veterinarian, opened a new practice, sold it and worked for Lee County Animal Services. Finally, in 2007, he opened the current small animal practice where he provides service as a part-time veterinarian,

Clinic the staff of the Aninal Dr. Carpenter andKe ng ssi Cro lly At

the Animal Clinic At Kelly Crossing. In the Fort Myers community, he became involved with the Humane Society and Lee County Animal Services. He also served on the board of the Animal Refuge Center and was a teacher in the Heritage Institute’s veterinary technology program over a two-year period. Dr. Carpenter tells the Advocate what he enjoys most as a practicing veterinarian is not an easy question to answer, as there are so many aspects of the profession that are truly satisfying; but he does treasure working with his great professional colleagues and staff over time, and describes his experience as “rewarding.” Starting in Iowa, Dr. Carpenter always belonged to the local veterinary medical organization as well as the State association. Likewise in Virginia, he was a member of the Virginia VMA. As a faculty member at the University, he did not get involved in any of the local veterinary associations there. His first contact on moving to Florida he says, was with the officers of the Caloosa VMS in Fort Myers, which led to his membership in the FVMA. And for many years, he also led the planning and hosting of the Annual Peter Piper Memorial Continuing Education Conference, along with the Caloosa VMS, which is held on Sanibel Island. The Peter Piper Conference is celebrating its 40th anniversary this August. For Dr. Carpenter, service is the heart of what veterinary medicine is all about. “Get active in your local Associations and your State organization, and, if motivated, in the National organization. Attend local meetings, express your feelings and ideas to your local and State representatives,” he says, encouraging fellow veterinarians to be engaged. “You don’t necessarily have to be there to be heard, but you must speak out to have a say,” he says. “We cannot possibly hope to attend every meeting or event, but we should be aware of what is taking place in our profession

The FVMA must be the voice of the Florida veterinary community. This is why I see it so important that all veterinarians belong to the Association. We cannot and will not all agree on every issue, but without a collective voice as a profession we will have no say at all in the future.

12  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

~ Richard Carpenter, DVM


and use our voices and, when necessary, our actions to guide and influence the direction of our profession.” he says, stressing that in his opinion, it is very important for members of the profession to become involved in organized veterinary medicine. “Veterinary medicine is inherently a service profession. We serve the animal owning public specifically and animal life in general. Specifically related to organized veterinary medicine, we need to be aware of the responsibilities we took on when we graduated from veterinary college and the personal commitment each of us made when we took the Veterinarian’s Oath. Individually we cannot have an effect on the scope and direction of veterinary medicine, therefore, our hope is in the collective effort of veterinarians beginning at the local level in our community associations, then expanding and participating in our State organizations, and finally membership in the National organization.” From his point of view, there are two important issues facing veterinary medicine that requires the attention of the FVMA and the involvement of all Florida veterinarians. “At the moment, I see our profession being attacked on two major fronts,”

he says, “First is from within – we have situations where members of our profession are not protecting the integrity of the profession with honesty and animal welfare as our focus. Greed has, in some cases, slipped into areas and has diluted the Oath we took to protect the animals, enhance our knowledge, and protect human health. Secondly, we have been, and continue to be attacked from those not trained in veterinary medicine, who would make a profit from the animal owners by deception and false information. There are many areas of concern, but I find the pet food industry and the online, so called, discount pharmacies as two of the major threats to the wellbeing of our animal population. I could take hours to expand on just these two areas, but make no mistake, a profit motive drives these areas with little or no regard to the safety or welfare of our pets. One simple statistic we all live with that is a glaring example is the estimate that 80% or so of our pets are overweight and pet food marketing bears much responsibility for that fact.” “What happens to our pets and animals in our care eventually comes back to haunt us in the future,” he says, warning, “There will be a reckoning at some point where false and incomplete information fostered on the public must be taken into account.”

“The FVMA must be the voice of the Florida veterinary community. This is why I see it so important that all veterinarians belong to the Association. We cannot and will not all agree on every issue, but without a collective voice as a profession we will have no say at all in the future.” “One of the statements on our Strategic Planning Brochure is a quote by Abraham Lincoln, “the best way to predict the future is to create it.” Nothing could be more true for our profession,” he continues; and underscoring the necessity of membership to be engaged, “We need to be proactive in protecting the animals, their health, and their owners. Only then will we provide adequate health and wellbeing of those animals we are responsible for.” Dr. Carpenter’s intent when he and Mrs. Buttons Carpenter moved to Fort Myers was a slowed-down pace, perhaps to spend more time golfing and to enjoy a semiretirement. Things have not panned out exactly as planned, and for that, the FVMA and Lee County community members and their pets, are benefiting. And he is intent on making progress in the short time he will serve as FVMA President to add to its growth, and to benefit his profession and the Association, saying, “My specific goal is to leave it at least a little better than when I started.”

Dr. Carpenter along with family and colleagues on his installation

Dr. Carpenter & Mrs. Kristina Carpenter www.fvma.org  |  13


It’s a soft chew. Kills both fleas and ticks. It’s prescription only.

Now a pprove d to kill m ore ticks!

NexGardTM (afoxolaner) is the protection you asked for, and patients will beg for. NexGard is FDA-approved to kill fleas, prevent flea infestations, and kill Black-Legged (deer) ticks, Lone Star ticks and American Dog ticks. NexGard is available only with a veterinarian’s prescription, and features anti-diversion technology monitored by Pinkerton® Consulting & Investigations.

NexGard and FRONTLINE VET LABS are trademarks of Merial. ®PINKERTON is a registered trademark of Pinkerton Service Corporation. ©2014 Merial Limited, Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. NEX14TTRADEAD (06/14).

TM

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: For use in dogs only. The most common adverse reaction is vomiting.  Other adverse reactions reported are dry/flaky skin, diarrhea, lethargy, and anorexia.  The safe use of NexGard in pregnant, breeding, or lactating dogs has not been evaluated. Use with caution in dogs with a history of seizures.


gulf-atlantic veterinary conference

Schedule At-A-Glance thursday, OCTOber 29, 2015 7:00 am – 1:30 pm Wet Lab Attendee Check-In 7:30 am – 12:00 pm TGAVC’s Annual Fishing Tournament 7:30 am – 12:00 pm TGAVC’s Annual Golf Tournament 8:00 am – 5:00 pm Wet Labs Eric Garcia IT & Digital Marketing Consultant

Mary Gardner DVM

Andrew Specht DVM, DACVIM

Todd R. Tams DVM, DACVIM

Wade Gingerich DVM, DAVDC

Andrew Hillier BVSc, MANZCVS, DACVD

Friday, OCTOber 30, 2015 7:00 am – 5:30 pm Pre-Registration Packet Pick-up 7:00 am – 5:30 pm On-Site Registration Open 8:00 am – 5:10 pm Continuing Education Sessions / Wet Labs 11:30 am – 6:15 pm Exhibit Hall Open 5:10 pm – 6:15 pm TGIF Welcome Reception 6:30 pm – 10:00 pm A Spooktacular Reverse Raffle And Auction

Jason Wernli AllyDVM, Inc.

distinguished speakers

 DR. ELIZABETH BAILEY  Mr. Edwin BayÓ, Esq.  DR. GARETH BUCKLEY  DR. carmen colitz  DR. MAURICIO DEJOWICH  DR. ALEX GALLAGHER  DR. DARRYL HEARD  DR. MEGHAN HERRON  DR. matthew johnson  DR. PETER KINTZER  MS. HEIDI REUSS-LAMKY

cytology

7:30 am – 6:00 pm Pre-Registration Packet Pick-up 7:30 am – 6:00 pm On-Site Registration Open Continuing Education Sessions / Wet Labs 7:00 am – 5:50 pm 8:00 am – 4:00 pm Exhibit Hall Open 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm Trick or Treat in the Exhibit Hall 2:45 pm – 3:00 pm Kids Costume Contest on the Exhibit Hall Stage

Sunday, NOVEMber 1, 2015 7:30 am – 12:30 pm On-Site Registration Open 7:00 am – 7:50 am Christian Fellowship Breakfast 7:00 am – 12:50 pm Continuing Education Sessions • Program Subject to Change •

clinical pathology

microbiology

Saturday

Saturday

Sunday

The Neurological Examination – The Key to Neurology

Cytology

Mast Cell Tumor

8:00 am - 12:00 pm

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Culture and Sensitivity Interpretation

Michael Wong

Heather Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP (Clinical) Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM

Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM Heather Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP (Clinical)

Free Workshop | Must Pre-Register Limited Availability

Free Workshop | Must Pre-Register Limited Availability

Free Workshop | Must Pre-Register Limited Availability

3:20 pm - 5:10 pm DVM, DACVIM (Neurology)

9:00 am - 10:50 am Elizabeth Bailey, DVM Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM Free Workshop | Must Pre-Register Limited Availability

WORKSHOPS

Friday

r ksh op

Neurology

 DR. laurie mccauley  ms. denise rollings  DR. BRIAN SCOTT  DR. J. CATHARINE SCOTT-MONCRIEFF  DR. MEG SLEEPER  DR. robert swinger  DR. HEATHER WAMSLEY  DR. HEIDI WARD  DR. MICHAEL A. WONG  MS. ANN WORTINGER

Saturday, OCTOber 31, 2015

wo

cynthia ward VMD, PhD, DACVIM (Internal Medicine)

At m ra ce og an Pr A-Gl

race approved: This program was reviewed and approved by the AAVSB program for 340 hours of continuing education. Participants should be aware that some boards have limitations on the number of hours accepted in certain categories and/or restrictions on certain methods of delivery of continuing education. Please contact the AAVSB/RACE program at race@aavsb.org or (877) 698-8482 should you have any comments/concerns regarding this program’s validity or relevancy to the veterinary profession, or if you have questions regarding this notification.


Enjoy first-rate amenities at the Boca Raton Resort & Club, A Wa l d o r f A s t o r i a Res o r t !

modern-day luxury resort living

501 East Camino Real, Boca Raton, Florida, 33305

Old world elegance with

The Boca Raton Resort & Club, A Waldorf Astoria Resort, has reigned as an icon of elegance for more than 80 years. It was built by legendary American architect Addison Mizner, and today, the resort remains faithful to its glamorous past, while radiating the charm and energy of a premiere Florida coastal destination.

Reserve Your Room Today! Special Room R ates End September 27, 2015! Situated on 356 acres in fabled South Florida, the Boca Raton Resort & Club, carefully combines a fresh look and modern amenities, while embracing the purpose and design of the original vision. This eclectic, private village offers the best of all worlds: a famous spa, championship golf and tennis, expansive beach and luxury marina just steps from sumptuous rooms and suites. With deep roots in the past, this completely unique hotel is truly a destination for the future. • • • • •

Seven Luxurious Resort Pools Opulent Beach Amenities The Palace Spa Exclusive Marina Water Sport & Excursions

• • • • •

Fitness Center Sport Clinics & Amenities Golf Tennis Camp Boca Family Fun Activities

• • •

Exclusive On-Site Shopping Sculpture Tour of the Resort’s Baker Sponder Gallery Boca Raton Surf School

“Kids Fun Time Schedule” Friday: 9am-4:30pm Kids Quest Club ($70/day) Includes Lunch & T-Shirt

Pre-registration required (Call 561 239-9541)

Saturday: 9:00am-4:30pm Kids Quest Club ($70/day) Includes Lunch & T-Shirt

Pre-registration required (Call 561 239-9541)

Saturday: 2:00pm-2:45pm Trick or Treat in the Exhibit Hall Saturday: 2:45pm-3:00pm Kids Costume Contest on the Exhibit Hall Stage

Come as You Aren’t & Celebrate!!!


T G 2 A0 V1 C5 Come and Join Us at the 3rd Annual

Gulf-Atlantic Veterinary Conference Boca Raton, FLorida

29 01

October November

Experience

the TGAVC Difference!

It is an alternative for small animal veterinarians and team members who want to earn their CE in a sumptuous, personalized and relaxing environment.

to Enrich the Mind & Refresh the Body & Soul

Experience the Difference

World-Class CE for You, World-Class Fun for Your Family


welcome to the 3 rd annual

our featured speakers

Rick Alleman DVM, PhD, DABVP, DACVP

la

WET LAB OFFERINGS

et

bs

w

Justine Lee DACVECC, DABT

debbie boone BS, CCS, CVPM

Jason Arble DVM, MSc, DACVR

Donna Manley DVM

Megan Brashear BS, CVT, VTS (ECC)

Denis marcellin-little gregory Ogilvie DEDV, DACVS, DECVS, DACVSMR DVM, DACVIM, DECVIM-CA (Oncology)

Basic Ultrasound Basic Abdominal Ultrasound

Thursday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Jason Arble, DVM, MSc, DACVR

Dental Surgery Mastering the Soft Tissue Aspects of Oral & Periodontal Surgery

Thursday 8:00 am - 12:00 pm

susan clubb DVM, DABVP-Avian

Jennifer devey DVM, DCVECC

alan rebar DVM, PhD, DACVP

Michael Schaer DVM, DACVIM, DACVECC

Dentistry Canine Dental Extraction

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

Wade Gingerich, DVM, DAVDC Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

rehabilitation & laser therapy Ophthalmic Surgery Rehabilitation & Ophthalmic Surgery Laser Therapy Thursday

Thursday 8:00 am - 12:00 pm Laurie McCauley

10:00 am - 5:00 pm Robert Swinger, DVM, DACVO Carmen Colitz, DVM, PhD, DACVO

Howard B. Seim III Christopher Smithson DVM, DAVDC DVM, DACVS

Thursday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Howard Seim, DVM, DACVS

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $345 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $545

advanced Ultrasound Advanced Abdominal Ultrasound Friday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Jason Arble, DVM, MSc, DACVR

DVM, DACVSMR, CCRT, CVA, CVC

Valerie A. Fadok DVM, PhD, DACVD

Surgery Common Canine Soft Tissue Surgery Procedures

Thursday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC Wade Gingerich, DVM, DAVDC

suE ettinger DVM, DACVIM (Oncology)

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $595 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $795

Surgery Extracapsular Suture Stabilization Friday 8:00 am - 12:00 pm

Matthew Johnson,

DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA

A N I M A L H E A L T H A Division of I-MED Pharma Inc.

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $125 | Techs $75 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $150 | Techs $125

Surgery

Medial Patella Luxation

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $375 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $575

Dental laboratory

Dental Techniques

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $295 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $495

dental laboratory

Dental Nerve Block Laboratory

friday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Saturday 8:00 am - 12:00 pm

Saturday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Matthew Johnson,

Denise Rollings, CVT, VTS Dentistry

Denise Rollings, CVT, VTS Dentistry

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Techs $95 Wet Lab Only Fee: Techs $125

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Techs $95 Wet Lab Only Fee: Techs $125

DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

CE Approved By:

■ AAVSB race - American Association of Veterinary State Boards RACE, Provider #532 ■ Sponsor of Continuing Education in New York State ■ Florida Board of Veterinary Medicine, DBPR FVMA Provider #31

www.fvma.org  |  18


• DVM • DVM/ TECH/ STAFF • TECH/ STAFF • WET LAB Basic Abdominal Ultrasound Sponsored by OCT - Seminar and Wet Lab

Mastering the S Periodontal Sur

thurs

la

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Jason Arble, DVM, MSc, DACVR

8:00 am - 12:00 pm

Sedation Drugs by

Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC Wade Gingerich, DVM, DAVDC

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 | Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595 This seminar series and combined wet lab will introduce the veterinarian to entry level abdominal ultrasound imaging in the small animal practice. The seminar consists of four, 50-minute lectures. The basic physics, an overview of instrumentation, common artifacts, and scanning techniques will be reviewed as well as normal anatomy and appearance of the abdominal organs. Wet lab participants will be introduced to basic ultrasound image manipulation (knobology), physics and artifacts of abdominal ultrasound, learn scanning techniques, know how to identify normal abdominal structures through scanning of live animals. The lecture and wet lab is geared toward entry level abdominal ultrasound.

fri

9:00 am 9:50 am

w

Extracapsular Suture Stabilization 8:00 am - 12:00 pm

Matthew Johnson, DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA With Conf. Reg.: Vets $295 Equipment Sponsored by Wet Lab Only: Vets $495

4:20 pm 5:10 pm

sat

OCT

31

With Conf. Reg.: Vets $395 Equipment Sponsored by Wet Lab Only: Vets $595 This laboratory will cover common surgical techniques to correct medial patella luxation.

Old Age Is Not a Disease - But It Sure Is a Killer

8:00 am 8:50 am

Seim

Gardner

9:00 am 9:50 am

Seim

Perineal Hernia Repair

Veterinary Hospice - It Is NOT About Prolonging Suffering

Seim

Surgical Management of Canine Cystic and Urethral Calculi Seim

Seim Emergency & Critical Care

Wound Management Secrets

Gardner

Assessing Quality of Life - Helping the Undecided Client Gardner

Common Mistakes to Avoid in the Emergency Room!

Internal Medicine

Wong

Seizu Sedation Drugs by

Wong

Vestib

Wong

Spina

Wong

The The

Mich Fre

Practice Mgmt. / Rabbit Medicine

Scott-Moncrieff

Top 10 Mistakes to Avoid in Dyspneic Patients Lee

Diagnosis of Canine Hyperadrenocorticism: The Role of Sex Hormone Profiles

The Best Staff: Finding, Interviewing & Background Checks

Scott-Moncrieff

Boone

Top 5 Mistakes to Avoid in Your Poisoned Patients

Treatment of Canine Hyperadrenocorticism: Mitotane or Trilostane?

The Best Staff - Personality Matching

Lee

Top 10 Human Medications Poisonous to Pets

2:10 pm 3:00 pm

Everything About Feathers Session 2 of 4

The Art of Euthanasia and the Science of Death Session 2 of 2 Gardner

Lee

4:00 pm 4:50 pm

Everything About Feathers Session 3 of 4

Don’t Up-Sell... Up-Serve

Clubb

Gardner

Emergency Management and Treatment of Rodenticides

5:00 pm 5:50 pm

Everything About Feathers Session 4 of 4

Your Personal Curb Appeal - Body Language in the Exam Room

The Top 10 Poisonous Plants You Need to Know

Clubb

Clubb

Clubb Medicine for the Technician

Gardner

Practice Management

Scott-Moncrieff

What’s New in Feline Hyperthyroidism?

Boone

Introduction to the Rabbit Patient: Husbandry and Nutrition

Lee

Scott-Moncrieff

Heard

Kitchen Toxins Dangerous to Pets

Insulin Therapy in Canine and Feline Diabetes Mellitus: An Update

Rabbit Anesthesia & Analgesia: How to Routinely Intubate

Lee

Gardner

Canine Hypoadrenocorticism: Best Staff - Techniques To Find the Diagnosing and Treating the Difficult The Best and the Brightest Cases Boone

Lee

The Art of Euthanasia and the Science of Death Session 1 of 2

9:50 am

Jason Arble, DVM, MSc, DACVR

With Conf. Reg. Fee | Vets $395 Wet Lab Only Fee | Vets $595

Wong

Seizu Sponsored by

This seminar series and combined wet lab are designed for veterinarians who want to further their training Seim in small animal ultrasound. Wet lab participants Surgical Management of Brachycephalic will gain experience in completing a routine small Syndrome & Chest Drain Placement abdominal ultrasound examination. Some of the more Seim challenging intra-abdominal structures to image will Anal Sacculectomy: A Novel Approach & Canine be emphasized. Urethral Surgery

Everything About Feathers Session 1 of 4

7:00 am 8:50 am

Frequ

Surgical Management of Lower Urinary Tract Disorders in Cats

1:10 pm 2:00 pm

NOV 9:00 am -

01

Practice Management

The 10 Minute Gastropexy & the 4 Ligature Splenectomy

et l a

Dispensing Legend Drugs - Edwin Bayó, JD

10:50 am - Surgical Repair of Diaphragmatic Hernia 11:40 am Seim

sun

w

Matthew Johnson, DVM, MVSc, CCRP, DACVS-SA

Surgery / Avian Medicine 7:00 am 7:50 am

et l a

b

3:20 pm 4:10 pm

Medial Patella Luxation 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Neuro

Advanced Small Animal Abdominal Ultrasound - Seminar and Wet Lab 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Seim

Principles of GI Surgery

cruciate injuries and to do a complete stifle exploratory examination for meniscal 11:10 am injury, repair, or release; and extracapsular suture placement using isometric 12:00 pm principles of the stifle joint. 1:30 pm 2:20 pm

Advanced Ultrasound

Visceral Organ Biopsy

Seim

10:10 am - This laboratory will discuss the underlying pathological processes that contribute 11:00 am to the disease process. You will learn how to diagnose complete and partial

Oftentimes, the soft tissue aspect of performin allow participants to learn the principles of g surgical extraction of teeth. Principles and tech also be emphasized.

b

30

8:00 am 8:50 am

Surgery et l a

b

OCT

Surgery

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $395 | W

w

et

bs

w

29

Scott-Moncrieff

Heard

Management of Difficult Diabetes Cases: A Case-Based Approach

Heard

Scott-Moncrieff

Lee Gastroenterology

Rabbit Dentistry: Where To Begin

Rabbits: Common Medical Problems & Surgical Procedures

Heard Medicine for the Technician

Medicine for

Laws & Rules Governing the Practice of Veterinary Medicine - Ed Feeding Tube Management and Complications

Wortinger

Payroll vs. People

Boone

Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Dogs - Update on Diagnosis and Therapy

Critical Thinking Skills

Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Intestinal Lymphoma in Cats

Creating a Triage System

Tams

10:00 am - Hepatic Lipidosis 10:50 am Wortinger

Compliance - How To Improve This Revenue Driver

Tams

11:00 am - Counseling Clients in Crisis 11:50 am Wortinger

Embezzlement - Protecting Your Practice From Fraud

Tams

12:00 pm - Nutritional Management of Vomiting and Diarrhea 12:50 pm Wortinger

Creating Your Online Pharmacy Management of Parvoviral Enteritis Patients

Boone

Boone Boone

Chronic Large Intestinal Disease in Dogs and Cats

Tams

Brashear Brashear

Implementing Protocols

Brashear

Creating a Training Plan Brashear

Triage and Maj Systems Asses Buckley

Feline Respirat Emergencies

Buckley


S c i e n t i f i c

• WORKSHOP

Soft Tissue Aspects of Oral and rgery Equipment Sponsored by

P r o g

Canine Dental Extraction Equipment Sponsored by

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm Wade Gingerich, DVM, DAVDC Christopher Smithson, DVM, DAVDC

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $345 | Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $545

Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $595

ng surgical extractions is overlooked or de-emphasized during extraction labs. This lab will gingival and mucogingival flap development for the treatment of periodontal disease and hniques for the prevention and treatment of the most common types of oronasal fistulas will

This lab is useful for veterinarians at all skill levels when it comes to surgical extractions in the dog. Participants will be given instruction on surgical extraction techniques for the major teeth, including maxillary and mandibular canines, maxillary fourth premolars, and mandibular first molars. Using cadaver specimens, principles of proper instrumentation, flap development, alveolar bone removal and management, tooth sectioning, and tension-free closure will be discussed and practiced. Participants will have the flexibility to choose which procedures to perform based on their own experience level.

rology

Dermatology

Practice Management

uently Asked Questions in Neurology

Flea Control

Client Retention - Implementing Protocols That Will Keep Top 10 Oncology Mistakes and How To Avoid Pet Owners Coming Back! Session 1 of 2 Them

Oncology

g

Hillier

ures - Pathophysiology and Causes

Staph Pyoderma Session 1 of 2

ures - Diagnosis and Treatment

Staph Pyoderma Session 2 of 2 Hillier

Wernli

bular Disease in Small Animals

g

New Approaches to the Itchy Dog Session 1 of 3

Increasing Customer Compliance Session 2 of 2

Wernli

Ettinger

al Cord Disease - Beyond Intervertebral Disk Disease

New Approaches to the Itchy Dog Session 2 of 3

Online Marketing and Social Media in 2015 Session 1 of 3

Canine Mast Cell Tumors: What’s New?

New Approaches to the Itchy Dog Session 3 of 3

Online Marketing and Social Media in 2015 Session 2 of 3

Cancer Hot Topics: Beyond Conventional Chemotherapy

g

Wernli

Hillier

g

Hillier

g

Hillier

hael Wong DVM, DACVIM (Neurology) ee Workshop, Must Pre-register

wo

Equipment Sponsored by

r ksh op

e Neurological Examination – e Key to Neurology Workshop

Hillier

Ettinger

Client Retention - Implementing Protocols That Will Keep See Something, Do Something. Why Wait? Pet Owners Coming Back! Session 2 of 2 Aspirate

Wernli

Ettinger

Increasing Customer Compliance Session 1 of 2

Dr. Sue’s Top Tips for Managing Cancer Patients in Your Practice

Ettinger

Wernli Wernli

Basic Approach to the Oncology Patient

Ettinger

Ettinger

Online Marketing and Social Media in 2015 Session 3 of 3 Wernli

Behavior

Gastroenterology / Cardiology

Clinical Pathology

Internal Medicine

Clinical Pathology / Dermatology

Ultrasound / Feline Medicine

The Dangers, the Benefits and the Science Behind Confrontational and Non-confrontational Training Methods

Acute and Chronic Diarrhea in Dogs and Cats Session 1 of 2

Commonly Missed Diseases: Case Rounds Session 1 of 6

Feline Case Challenges Session 1 of 2 Alleman & Schaer

A Case-Oriented Approach to Laboratory Profiling of the Liver Session 1 of 2 Rebar

Arble

A Case-Oriented Approach to Laboratory Profiling of the Liver Session 2 of 2

Arble

Herron

Tams

Kintzer

Radiographic Case-Based Discussion of Pulmonary Disease

Shelter Dogs - Understanding and Adapting to Their Physical and Emotional Needs From Intake to Adoption

Acute and Chronic Diarrhea in Dogs and Cats Session 2 of 2

Commonly Missed Diseases: Case Rounds Session 2 of 6

Feline Case Challenges Session 2 of 2

Herron

Tams

Understanding Canine Aggression Session 1 of 2

Use of Nutraceuticals in Veterinary Gastroenterology

Commonly Missed Diseases: Case Rounds Session 3 of 6

Is Your Patient Sick From Infectious Practical, Profitable, Dermatology Disease Session 1 of 2 Scott

“Your Pet Has a Murmur”Recommendations for Work-up and Case Discussion

Commonly Missed Diseases: Case Rounds Session 4 of 6

Sleeper

Kintzer

Alleman & Schaer

Scott

Arble

Bite Prevention: Reading Body Language and Predicting Behavior

The ABCs of ECGs Session 1 of 2

Commonly Missed Diseases: Case Rounds Session 5 of 6

Is My Dog Bleeding?

Advances in Musculoskeletal Imaging

Kintzer

Alleman & Schaer

Atopic Dermatitis Today

Herron

Sleeper

Mitigating the Environment To Keep You Safe and To Keep Your Patients Happy

The ABCs of ECGs Session 2 of 2

Commonly Missed Diseases: Case Rounds Session 6 of 6

The Difficult-To-Diagnose Anemic Patient Session 1 of 2

Managing the Atopic Patient

Alleman & Schaer

Scott

Where Have All the Cats Gone ... Step to Return Cats to Your Practice

Canine & Feline Handling Tools: Use Them Early and Use Them Often

Update on Treating Canine Congestive Heart Failure

The Difficult-To-Diagnose Anemic Patient Session 2 of 2

After All These Ears!

Meow to Vaccines ... 2013 AAFP Feline Vaccination Guidelines

Herron

Understanding Canine Aggression Session 2 of 2 Herron

Herron

Herron the Technician

Tams

Sleeper

Sleeper Dentistry for the Technician

Kintzer

Kintzer

Kintzer

Alleman & Schaer

Rebar

Alleman & Schaer

Is Your Patient Sick From Infectious Suds not Drugs - Topical Therapy Disease Session 2 of 2 Today

Scott

Scott

Radiographic Case-Based Discussion of Cardiac Disease.

Radiographic Case-Based Discussion of Abdominal Disease

Arble

Radiographic Case-Based Discussion of Musculoskeletal Disease.

Arble

Manley

Oncology

Alleman & Schaer Dermatology

Manley

Care Beyond a Cure: Mast Cell Tumors - Hot New Diagnostics and Treatment

Ogilvie

Managing Pyoderma in the Age of Methicillin Resistance

Fadok

Garcia

Care Beyond a Cure: Canine Lymphoma: Best Protocols for 2015!

Topical Therapy as a Major Tool in Our Derm Tool Box

Using Facebook for Maximized Success in 2016 Session 1 of 2 Using Facebook for Maximized Success in 2016 Session 2 of 2

Practice Management

Culture & Sen

Optimize Your Website for Local Search

Culture & S Workshop 9:00 am - 1

dwin Bayó, JD

jor Body ssment

tory

Pathology

Rollings

Feline Dentistry

Rollings

Ogilvie

Fadok

Rollings

Care Beyond a Cure: Feline Lymphoma: Best Protocols for 2015!

Otitis Externa: The Bane of Our Existence

Ogilvie

Fadok

From the Exam Room to the Dental Table

Care Beyond a Cure: Newest Approaches for Treating Oral Neoplasia for 2015

What Do We Know About Microbial Allergies?

Home Care

Rollings

Ogilvie

Fadok

Garcia Garcia

Developing a Reputation Management Strategy

Garcia

Elizabeth Baile

Assisted By Heid

No Charge Limited Seatin


g r am

n

n

n

n

g

at - a - g l a n c e

Common Canine Soft Tissue Surgery Procedures 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Ophthalm

10:00 am - 5

Equipment Sponsored by

Robert Swinger, D Carmen Colitz, DVM

Howard Seim, DVM, DACVS Assisted by J. Brad Case, DVM, MS, DACVS

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $595 | Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $795

With Conf. Reg. Wet Lab Only Fe

By the end of this course participants should have a thorough understanding of:

● how to successfully perform a variety of practical soft tissue surgery techniques ● recent developments and new techniques in soft tissue surgery ● develop a better appreciation for the regional anatomy for each procedure performed ● the instructors’ philosophical and technical views on performing a variety of soft tissue surgery procedures This course is designed to teach participants the technical aspects of a variety of practical soft tissue surgery procedures. Some ‘theory’ will be included in the lectures, but emphasis will be placed on ‘how’ to perform each procedure. The instructor will utilize video clips of clinical cases that represent the procedures participants will perform in the lab. Participants will perform the surgical procedures immediately after viewing the video. Ideally, the videos will be viewed in the lab so no time is wasted between seeing the procedure and then performing it on the cadaver.

Improve your proficien Receive step-by-step third eyelid gland rep laceration repair and e

Clinical Pathology

Gastroenterology

Emergency & Critical Care

Internal Medicine

Renal Medicine

A Case-Oriented Approach to Interpreting White Cell Responses in Disease Session 1 of 2

Prebiotics, Probiotics, Symbiotics, Oh My! What’s Bugging Our Patients?

The Dreaded Nightmare - The Cat With Hepatobiliary/Pancreatic Disease

What Do We Know About Pancreatitis and Testing for It.

Beyond Diet... What El Chronic Kidney Disease

Drug Therapies in GI Disease

The Vomiting Cat - Figuring Out What’s Wrong

Rebar

Gallagher

A Case-Oriented Approach to Interpreting White Cell Responses in Disease Session 2 of 2

Gallagher

Rebar

A Case-Oriented Approach to Interpreting Red Cell Disorders Session 1 of 2 Rebar

A Case-Oriented Approach to Interpreting Red Cell Disorders Session 2 of 2 Rebar

Introduction to Laboratory Profiling

Rebar

Devey

Ward, C.

Specht

Unusual Feline Endocrine Diseases

Beyond Fluids... What Kidney Injury?

Devey

Ward, C.

Specht

The Vomiting Cat - Making Him Better Devey

Got Milk? The Clinical Approach to Hypercalcemia

Ward, C.

Beyond Azotemia... W Proteinuria in Dogs and

Specht

IBD: What Is It and How Do We Treat

Acute Renal Failure and Diabetic Emergencies

The Clinical Challenge of Thyroid Disease in the Dog

Kidney Disease Myths. Avoiding Common Mis

Clinical Approach to Increased Liver Enzymes

90 ml/kg? What About Cats? Myths About Fluids in Shock

Hyperlipidemia and Its Problems

Devey

Ward, C.

The IRIS Guidelines for and How Can It Help Yo

Critically Evaluating IRI Know

Helicobacter Gastritis: Is It Real

Gallagher Gallagher

Devey

Gallagher

Ward, C.

A Case-Oriented Approach to Laboratory Profiling of the Urinary System Session 1 of 2

Chronic Liver Disease in the Dog

Gallagher

Anesthesia for the Critically Ill

Rebar

Devey

Therapy Update for Immune-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia

A Case-Oriented Approach to Laboratory Profiling of the Urinary System Session 2 of 2

Chronic Liver Disease in the Cat

The 4 W’s of Fluid Therapy - Who, What, Why, and When

Common Questions From Referring Veterinarians

Gallagher

Ward, C.

Rebar Orthopedics / Dermatology

Practice Management

Surgery

A Practical Approach to the Lame Puppy

Developing the Ultimate Social Media Policy Session 1 of 2

Garcia & Brashear

Buckley

Dujowich

Brachycephalics in Practice

Complications of Fracture Repair

Marcellin-Little

Physical Rehabilitation: What Can Every Clinic Do?

Devey

Surgery

Respiratory Procedures

Marcellin-Little

Garcia & Brashear

Developing the Ultimate Social Media Policy Session 2 of 2

Buckley

What Should I Know About Bracing, Orthoses, and Exoprostheses?

How To Set Fees & Communicate Value for Employees and Clients

Stabilization of Severe Trauma

Marcellin-Little

Managing Osteoarthritis Over a Lifetime

Garcia & Brashear

Marketing: How To Have Fun With Your Entire Team

Marcellin-Little

Garcia & Brashear

Flea Control in the 21st Century: Make Delivering Supreme Customer Service: It Client Friendly Online and Off

Fadok

ps Is There Anything New About Demodicosis and Scabies?

Communication Horror Stories

Treatment and Prevention of Thromboembolic Disease in Small Animals

New Ideas About Atopic Dermatitis

How Case Studies Enhance Marketing Efforts

r ksh

op

wo

Sensitivity Interpretation

ng - Must Pre-Register

Buckley

Garcia & Brashear Cardiology

nsitivity Interpretation Workshop

ey, DVM di Ward, DVM, DACVIM

When Fluids Could Harm Buckley

Fadok

10:50 am

Beyond Charcoal

Buckley

Garcia & Brashear

Garcia & Brashear

Fadok

Buckley

Sponsored by

Internal Fixation, a Refresher

Specht Specht

Tech Anesthesia

Care Beyond a Cure: The Commandments - Secrets To Improve Quality of Life for the Cancer Patient

Waste Anesthetic Gases - The Invisible Threat

Ogilvie

Reuss-Lamky

Dujowich

Ogilvie

Care Beyond a Cure: Diagnostic Secrets and the Cancer Patient for 2015

Analgesia for “Blockheads” Nerve Blocks for Technicians

Update on Elbow Dysplasia

Care Beyond a Cure: Ten of the Most Important Advances in Cancer Therapy - 2015

Anesthetic Monitors Understanding Their Use & Limitations

Care Beyond a Cure: Injection Site Associated and Other Soft Tissue Sarcomas - New Advances for 2015

Who Needs an Anesthetic Pla YOU DO!

Ogilvie

Reuss-Lamky

Care Beyond a Cure: Compassionate Chemotherapy - Money Maker, Practice Builder

Reuss-Lamky

Dujowich

Ogilvie

Update on Cruciate Ligament Disease Dujowich

Ureteral Surgery in Cats Dujowich

Ogilvie

Care Beyond a Cure: 10 Best-Kept Monster Wounds and Monster Repairs Secrets for Treating Cats With Cancer Session 1 of 2

Dujowich

GDV Surgery, Management, and Prevention Dujowich

Poultry Medicine

At Home Management of Heart Failure Patients Introduction to Working With Backyard - Tips for Clinicians and Clients Poultry Sleeper

Ward, C. Oncology

Specht

Heard

Ogilvie

Reuss-Lamky

Reuss-Lamky

Purr-fect Feline Anesthesia

Hypothermia - What's the Hy

Reuss-Lamky

Care Beyond a Cure: 10 Best-Kept Secrets Advanced Catheterization for Treating Cats With Cancer Session 2 of 2 Techniques

Behavior

Reuss-Lamky Internal Medicine

Don’t Leave Me Home Alone!: Diagnosis and Management of Canine Separation Anxiety

So Why the Confusion About Session 1 of 2

Ogilvie

Herron

Alleman & Schaer

Heard

Starting Off on the Right Paw: The Basics of Puppy Behavior So Why the Confusion About and Problem Prevention Session 2 of 2

Sleeper

Common Medical Problems of Backyard Poultry Session 1 of 2 Heard

Managing Ventricular Arrhythmias

Common Medical Problems of Backyard Poultry Session 2 of 2

Herron

Update on Pulmonary Hypertension

Sleeper

Update on Managing Feline Heart Disease

Sleeper

Clinical Management of Backyard Poultry

Heard

Herron

Alleman & Schaer

Herron

Feline Inappropriate Elimination

Pitfalls in Cytology Await Us A Session 1 of 2

Managing Animal Stress in the Kennel

Pitfalls in Cytology Await Us A Session 2 of 2

Alleman & Schaer Alleman & Schaer


almic Surgery

Rehabilitation & Laser Therapy

DVM, DACVO M, PhD, DACVO

Laurie McCauley, DVM, DACVSMR, CCRT, CVA, CVC

5:00 pm

8:00 am - 12:00 pm

Equipment Sponsored by ANIMAL HEALTH A Division of I-MED Pharma Inc.

Sponsored by

This 4-hour lecture/lab will open with an overview of laser technology and its uses in general practice, tricks to get the best clinical results with the laser you have or plan on getting, and some research on how it works and what it does. Following the lecture, students will participate in an interactive presentation of cases, protocols, and treatments on live canines. The program is open to DVMs (who examine the patient and prescribe treatment) and technicians (who perform the laser treatment). Dentistry

Swinger

Management of Common Ocular Emergencies

Dental Radiography Interpretation Session 1 of 2

Gastroenterology

New Developments in Veterinary Ophthalmology – Surgical and Pharmacological Advancements

Dental Radiography Interpretation Session 2 of 2 Smithson

Tams

Improving Your Ophthalmic Exam Skills

Mistake or Malpractice: Cases From St. Elsewhere

Acute and Chronic Vomiting in Dogs and Cats Diagnostic Approach Session 1 of 2

OCT

Smithson

Swinger

Gingerich & Smithson

Update on Disorders of the Esophagus

Swinger

Feline Ophthalmology

Ask the Expert

Gingerich & Smithson

Acute and Chronic Vomiting in Dogs and Cats Diagnostic Approach Session 2 of 2

r Kidney Disease - What's Out There You?

Glaucoma in Veterinary Medicine - Surgical and Medical Management

Updates for the Management of Feline Stomatitis and Canine Epulides Gingerich

Tams

Swinger

Corneal Ulcers - Why Some Just Won’t Heal!

Diseased Teeth, Should They Stay or Go? Session 1 of 2

Acute Pancreatitis in Dogs - Update on Diagnosis and Management

What’s Normal? A Review of the Fundic Exam

Diseased Teeth, Should They Stay or Go? Session 2 of 2

Gastric Hypomotility Syndrome in Dogs - More Common Than You May Think

Gingerich

Swinger

Cytology Workshop

With Conf. Reg. Fee | Techs $95 Wet Lab Only Fee | Techs $125

Devey

Decision Matrix for Medial Patella Luxation and Cranial Cruciate Injury in the Small Breed Dog

Wortinger

Diabetes Mellitus Pathophysiology

The Ultimate Trauma: Big Dog - Little Dog

Wound Management

Devey

Johnson

r ksh Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM Heather Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP (Clinical)

Wortinger

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Anesthesia for the Critically Ill or Injured Patient Devey

Johnson

Addison’s Disease Wortinger

Monitoring the Critical Patient Under Anesthesia

Diaphragmatic Hernias

No Charge - Must Pre-Register

All Cells That End Well - A Guide to CBCs

Vascular Access and Fluid Therapy in Patients in Shock

Nutrition and Acid-Base Balance

Constant Rate Infusion of Meds: How, When, Why and What

Wortinger

wo

Wortinger

01

GOLD

NOV

Johnson

Devey

Orthotics and Prosthetics

Johnson

Devey Devey

Thank you to Our Early Bird Sponsors

sun

Platinum

t the Effusion?

Mast Cell Tumor Workshop

Double Platinum

t the Effusion?

All

Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus

Wortinger

Platelet Rich Plasma - What’s the Evidence?

ANIMAL HEALTH A Division of I-MED Pharma Inc.

BRONZE

ype?

All

Domestication of the Cat

r ksh

sat

OCT

Wortinger

Heather Wamsley, DVM, PhD, DACVP (Clinical) Heidi Ward, DVM, DACVIM

op

With Conf. Reg. Fee | Techs $95 Wet Lab Only Fee | Techs $125

Surgery

Johnson

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

b

Denise Rollings, CVT, VTS Dentistry

Tams Emergency & Critical Care

Devey

No Charge - Must Pre-Register

Dental Nerve Block 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm et la

Tams

SIRS - Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

8:00 am - 12:00 pm

et l a

Drug Therapy for Vomiting in Dogs and Cats

Cooking With Blood Chemistries Understanding What Your Machines Are Telling You

wo

Denise Rollings, CVT, VTS Dentistry

w

Dental Techniques 8:00 am - 12:00 pm

Gingerich Medicine for the Technician

op

an?

Cytology / Mast Cell Tumor

b

Dental

Dentistry for the Technician

w

e

Tams

SILVER

IS Guidelines - What Do We Really

30

Tams

... Recognizing the Problems and stakes

Swinger

la

fri

Ophthalmology

Swinger

What You Need To Know About d Cats

w

ncy in performing practical eyelid, conjunctival, corneal and orbital surgeries. p instructions on entropion correction, eyelid reconstruction, prolapsed placement, corneal debridement techniques, conjunctival grafting, corneal enucleation.

et

bs

With Conf. Reg. Fee: Vets $125 | Techs $75 Wet Lab Only Fee: Vets $150 | Techs $125

Else Should You Know About Acute

OCT

29

Fee: Vets $375 ee: Vets $575

lse Should You Know About Treating e?

thurs

31


  Mr.

    Ms.     Mrs.

$175.00 $175.00 $175.00 $175.00 $75.00

$150.00 $150.00 $150.00 $150.00 $75.00

Recent Graduate (2015) First Year Graduate (2014) Second Year Graduate (2013)

Veterinary Technician Veterinary Assistant Practice Manager Administrative Staff Veterinary Technician Student

GuLf-AtLAntIc VeterInAry conference 7207 Monetary Drive orlanDo, Fl 32809

MAIL

Charge is september 25th, 2015. CanCellations should be reCeived in writing and aCknowledged by the fvma by the above date to be eligible for a refund. CanCellations after that date and no-shows are non-refundable.

C

(407) 240-3710

fAX

ToTal social evenT/guesT Fee $

(800) 992-3862 (407) 851-3862

B

C

www.tgavc.org info@fvma.org

a

No charge

NO TRICKS-JUST TREATS -EAT, DRINK AND bE SCARy

a positively defrightful evening A SpooktAculAr reverSe rAffle And Auction Come as you aren't and win the best costume prize!!

PHone

$

No charge

$125.00 $125.00 No charge No charge

$495.00 $595.00 $595.00 No charge

$595.00 $545.00 $795.00 $150.00 $125.00 $575.00 $595.00

onLIne

ToTal weT lab Fee

Culture & Sensitivity Workshop (Must Pre-Register)

sunday weT lab / workshop

B

$295.00 $395.00 $395.00 No charge

$395.00 $345.00 $595.00 $125.00 $75.00 $375.00 $395.00

Discover

Zip:

Thurs. Golf Tournament .................................... $125.00 Thurs. Fishing Tournament .............................. $175.00 Fri. Reverse Raffle .................................................. $95.00 Fri. Reverse Raffle Kids Dinner........................... $35.00 Fri. Kids Quest ......................................................... $70.00 Sat. Kids Quest ........................................................ $70.00

  American Express

With Conf. Reg. Fees Wet Lab Only Fees

    Mastercard

Fax:

State:

T G 2 A0 V1 C5

Dental Techniques (Techs Only)................................. $95.00 Dental Nerve Block Laboratory (Techs Only)......... $95.00 Cytology Workshop (Must Pre-Register)...................... No charge Canine Mast Cell Tumor Workshop (Must Pre-Register) No charge

saTurday weT labs / workshops

Extracapsular Suture Stabilization........................ Medial Patella Luxation............................................ Advanced Small Animal Abdominal Ultrasound The Neurological Examination(Must Pre-Register)

Friday weT labs / workshop

Oral and Periodontal Surgery.............................. Canine Dental Extraction.. .................................. Common Canine Soft Tissue Surgery .............. Rehabilitation & Laser Therapy (Vets)................. Rehabilitation & Laser Therapy (Techs)................ Ophthalmic Surgery ............................................. Basic Small Animal Abdominal Ultrasound....

Thursday weT labs

CanCellation PoliCy: CanCellation deadline for a full refund of registration fees minus a $50 administrative

a

Veterinary Student

$570.00 $370.00 $370.00 $470.00 $95.00

$495.00 $295.00 $295.00 $395.00 $95.00

Before Sept. 25rd After Sept. 25rd

Signature

Name as It Appears on Card

    Visa Expiration Date

  Charge My Credit Card Below $

Phone:

City:

Address:

Email:

Credit Card Number

Method of Payment   Check/Money Order

PaYMEnt inforMation

Business/Clinic/School:

Name:

  Dr.

Mailing inforMation

oct. 29 - nov. 1, 2015 | Boca raton, Fl

tGAVc reGIStrAtIon forM


$t9Inc5ludes:

e Tick er n cing -Din & Dan ket -DJ ffle tic Fun! - Ra ight of -N

FVMA FOUNDATION BENEFIT

a positively defrightful evening

A Spooktacular Reverse Raffle And Auction Friday, October 30, 2015 | 6:30 PM -10:00 PM

Top 10 Grand Prizes

Kids Dinner: $35 (Raffle Ticket NOT Included)

$2500 $1000 $400 $250 $200 $175 $150 $125 $100 $100

What is a Reverse Raffle? It’s where we save the best for last! A reverse raffle is an “elimination raffle”, the object is NOT to have your number called. The last 10 tickets drawn will win the grand prizes, between $100 and $2,500 in cash! Throughout the evening raffle tickets are computer drawn and their numbers removed from the board. Great door prizes will also be randomly given away throughout the drawing!

Work hard, play harder! Reward your entire team with a night of dinner, dancing, laughing and tons of fun! All for a great cause!

Top Prize

Sponsored By

Treat yourself & your staff! Have fun and support a great cause!

The FVMA Foundation contributes to:  Animal Disaster Relief  Continuing Education  Public Education in Animal Health and Welfare  Veterinary Student & Veterinary Technician Scholarships  Youth Organizations  Research Programs


CAUTION: Federal (USA) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Description: NEXGARD™ (afoxolaner) is available in four sizes of beef-flavored, soft chewables for oral administration to dogs and puppies according to their weight. Each chewable is formulated to provide a minimum afoxolaner dosage of 1.14 mg/lb (2.5 mg/kg). Afoxolaner has the chemical composition 1-Naphthalenecarboxamide, 4-[5[3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-4, 5-dihydro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-3-isoxazolyl]-N[2-oxo-2-[(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)amino]ethyl. Indications: NEXGARD kills adult fleas and is indicated for the treatment and prevention of flea infestations (Ctenocephalides felis), and the treatment and control of Black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis), American Dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), and Lone Star tick (Amblyomma americanum) infestations in dogs and puppies 8 weeks of age and older, weighing 4 pounds of body weight or greater, for one month. Dosage and Administration: NEXGARD is given orally once a month, at the minimum dosage of 1.14 mg/lb (2.5 mg/kg). Dosing Schedule: Body Weight 4.0 to 10.0 lbs. 10.1 to 24.0 lbs. 24.1 to 60.0 lbs. 60.1 to 121.0 lbs. Over 121.0 lbs.

Afoxolaner Per Chewable (mg)

Precautions: The safe use of NEXGARD in breeding, pregnant or lactating dogs has not been evaluated. Use with caution in dogs with a history of seizures (see Adverse Reactions). Adverse Reactions: In a well-controlled US field study, which included a total of 333 households and 615 treated dogs (415 administered afoxolaner; 200 administered active control), no serious adverse reactions were observed with NEXGARD. Over the 90-day study period, all observations of potential adverse reactions were recorded. The most frequent reactions reported at an incidence of > 1% within any of the three months of observations are presented in the following table. The most frequently reported adverse reaction was vomiting. The occurrence of vomiting was generally self-limiting and of short duration and tended to decrease with subsequent doses in both groups. Five treated dogs experienced anorexia during the study, and two of those dogs experienced anorexia with the first dose but not subsequent doses. Table 1: Dogs With Adverse Reactions. Treatment Group Afoxolaner

Chewables Administered

11.3 One 28.3 One 68 One 136 One Administer the appropriate combination of chewables

NEXGARD can be administered with or without food. Care should be taken that the dog consumes the complete dose, and treated animals should be observed for a few minutes to ensure that part of the dose is not lost or refused. If it is suspected that any of the dose has been lost or if vomiting occurs within two hours of administration, redose with another full dose. If a dose is missed, administer NEXGARD and resume a monthly dosing schedule. Flea Treatment and Prevention: Treatment with NEXGARD may begin at any time of the year. In areas where fleas are common year-round, monthly treatment with NEXGARD should continue the entire year without interruption. To minimize the likelihood of flea reinfestation, it is important to treat all animals within a household with an approved flea control product. Tick Treatment and Control: Treatment with NEXGARD may begin at any time of the year (see Effectiveness). Contraindications: There are no known contraindications for the use of NEXGARD. Warnings: Not for use in humans. Keep this and all drugs out of the reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion, contact a physician immediately.

Oral active control

N1

% (n=415)

N2

% (n=200)

Vomiting (with and without blood)

17

4.1

25

12.5

Dry/Flaky Skin

13

3.1

2

1.0

Diarrhea (with and without blood)

13

3.1

7

3.5

Lethargy

7

1.7

4

2.0

Anorexia

5

1.2

9

4.5

Number of dogs in the afoxolaner treatment group with the identified abnormality. Number of dogs in the control group with the identified abnormality. In the US field study, one dog with a history of seizures experienced a seizure on the same day after receiving the first dose and on the same day after receiving the second dose of NEXGARD. This dog experienced a third seizure one week after receiving the third dose. The dog remained enrolled and completed the study. Another dog with a history of seizures had a seizure 19 days after the third dose of NEXGARD. The dog remained enrolled and completed the study. A third dog with a history of seizures received NEXGARD and experienced no seizures throughout the study. To report suspected adverse events, for technical assistance or to obtain a copy of the MSDS, contact Merial at 1-888-637-4251 or www.merial.com/ nexgard. For additional information about adverse drug experience reporting for animal drugs, contact FDA at 1-888-FDA-VETS or online at http://www.fda.gov/ AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth. Mode of Action: Afoxolaner is a member of the isoxazoline family, shown to bind at a binding site to inhibit insect and acarine ligand-gated chloride channels, in particular those gated by the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), thereby blocking pre- and post-synaptic transfer of chloride ions across cell membranes. Prolonged afoxolaner-induced hyperexcitation results in uncontrolled activity of the central nervous system and death of insects and acarines. The selective toxicity of afoxolaner between insects and acarines and mammals may be inferred by the differential sensitivity of the insects and acarines’ GABA receptors versus mammalian GABA receptors. 1 2

Effectiveness: In a well-controlled laboratory study, NEXGARD began to kill fleas four hours after initial administration and demonstrated >99% effectiveness at eight hours. In a separate well-controlled laboratory study, NEXGARD demonstrated 100% effectiveness against adult fleas 24 hours post-infestation for 35 days, and was ≥ 93% effective at 12 hours post-infestation through Day 21, and on Day 35. On Day 28, NEXGARD was 81.1% effective 12 hours post-infestation. Dogs in both the treated and control groups that were infested with fleas on Day -1 generated flea eggs at 12- and 24-hours post-treatment (0-11 eggs and 1-17 eggs in the NEXGARD treated dogs, and 4-90 eggs and 0-118 eggs in the control dogs, at 12- and 24hours, respectively). At subsequent evaluations post-infestation, fleas from dogs in the treated group were essentially unable to produce any eggs (0-1 eggs) while fleas from dogs in the control group continued to produce eggs (1-141 eggs). In a 90-day US field study conducted in households with existing flea infestations of varying severity, the effectiveness of NEXGARD against fleas on the Day 30, 60 and 90 visits compared with baseline was 98.0%, 99.7%, and 99.9%, respectively. Collectively, the data from the three studies (two laboratory and one field) demonstrate that NEXGARD kills fleas before they can lay eggs, thus preventing subsequent flea infestations after the start of treatment of existing flea infestations. In well-controlled laboratory studies, NEXGARD demonstrated >94% effectiveness against Dermacentor variabilis and Ixodes scapularis, 48 hours post-infestation, and against Amblyomma americanum 72 hours post-infestation, for 30 days. Animal Safety: In a margin of safety study, NEXGARD was administered orally to 8- to 9-week-old Beagle puppies at 1, 3, and 5 times the maximum exposure dose (6.3 mg/kg) for three treatments every 28 days, followed by three treatments every 14 days, for a total of six treatments. Dogs in the control group were sham-dosed. There were no clinically-relevant effects related to treatment on physical examination, body weight, food consumption, clinical pathology (hematology, clinical chemistries, or coagulation tests), gross pathology, histopathology or organ weights. Vomiting occurred throughout the study, with a similar incidence in the treated and control groups, including one dog in the 5x group that vomited four hours after treatment. In a well-controlled field study, NEXGARD was used concomitantly with other medications, such as vaccines, anthelmintics, antibiotics (including topicals), steroids, NSAIDS, anesthetics, and antihistamines. No adverse reactions were observed from the concomitant use of NEXGARD with other medications. Storage Information: Store at or below 30°C (86°F) with excursions permitted up to 40°C (104°F). How Supplied: NEXGARD is available in four sizes of beef-flavored soft chewables: 11.3, 28.3, 68 or 136 mg afoxolaner. Each chewable size is available in color-coded packages of 1, 3 or 6 beef-flavored chewables. NADA 141-406, Approved by FDA Marketed by: Frontline Vet Labs™, a Division of Merial Limited. Duluth, GA 30096-4640 USA Made in Brazil. 1050-4493-02 Rev. 4/2014

™NexGard and FRONTLINE VET LABS are trademarks of Merial. ©2014 Merial. All rights reserved.


Coating Ceremony

UF CVM PROFESSIONAL

Kelsey Arellano and Matthew Parisi Presented With FVMA Scholarships The FVMA presented two FVMA Foundation scholarships to veterinary scholars, Kelsey Arellano and Matthew Parisi, on May 8, 2015, during the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine’s Professional Coating Ceremony. Each student received a fifteen-hundred dollar check, along with a commemorating plaque, which were presented by FVMA President-elect, Rick Sutliff, DVM, and the FVMA 2015 Champion of Veterinary Medicine, Diane Kitchen, DVM, PhD. The FVMA Foundation has awarded scholarships annually to two sophomores, as well as two freshmen and two juniors of the college, for fifteen years. The FVMA Foundation Scholarship Fund was established to recognize outstanding students at UFCVM, and it is a demonstration of the close ties between the two institutions, and the Association’s commitment to the development of young veterinary professionals. The coating ceremony marks the end of the sophomore year, and is symbolic of the next phase of training for these veterinary students, who will begin their clinical training as juniors. A hundred and three sophomores were individually presented with professional white clinic lab coats during the ceremony held at the Phillips Center on the UFCVM campus. The students were joined by family members and friends, distinguished guests, faculty, staff and other students of the college. The FVMA also gifted FVMA-branded scrubs to each student, with the Association’s congratulations for having successfully completed their pre-clinical training.

Kelsey Arellano Presented

Mathew Parisi Presented

Ms. Emily Menzen Being Coated

26  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Mr. Brian Vagt Being Coated


Thank You Note from Kelsey Arellano

Being a recipient of an FVMA scholarship in honor of Dr. Kitchen, “A True Champion of Veterinary Medicine” is a genuine privilege. The announcement of this award sure was a pleasant surprise! I sat in my chair at the white coat ceremony for a few moments in disbelief before rising. What an incredibly humbling experience! The monetary part of the award will be a great help to defray my tuition bill; but the memory and honor of receiving this scholarship is invaluable to me. I will do my best to represent the FVMA and this award in a positive and professional manner. Thank you again! Sincerely, Kelsey Arellano

(Photos by Cheuvront Studios, Gainesville, Florida) www.fvma.org  |  27


Congratulations to The

Class of 2015 On Their Outstanding Achievements Welcome To The Veterinary Profession

28  |  FVMA ADVOCATE


2015 FVMA Clinical Investigator Award J. Brad Case, DVM, MS, DACVS Dr. J. Brad Case, who is an assistant pro‑ fessor in small animal surgery in the depart‑ ment of small animal sciences at the Univer‑ sity of Florida College of Vet‑ erinary Medi‑ Dr. Ammon Peck, UFCVM Associate Dean of Research and cine, is the 2015 Graduate Studies, with Dr. Brad Case recipient of the FVMA Clinical Investigator Award. The presentation of an award plaque and a check for $500 was made to Dr. Case at the uni‑ versity, during their annual Phi Zeta Research Emphasis Days, which was held on March 26 and 27. The Award was given to Dr. Case in recognition of his dedication as a clinician, educator and researcher, and his research in small animal surgery at the College of Veterinary Medicine. Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies,

Dr. Ammon Peck, made the presentation. Dr. Case received his undergraduate degree in biology at California State University, and studied for his doctorate of veterinary medicine at the University of California, Davis. After graduating in 2006, he did an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at Texas A&M University, and later at Flatiron Veterinary Specialists in Colorado. He attended Colorado State University to earn a master of science in clinical science in 2011, where he also undertook a surgery residency in 2011. He was board certified by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons in 2012. As a student, Dr. Case distinguished himself as a scholar, graduating magna cum laude from California State, and earning a place on the dean’s lists of the University of California, Davis and Colorado State University. He was also the recipient of multiple scholarships and research grants, including the American College of Veterinary Surgeons Scholarship in 2006. Dr. Case is noted for clinical expertise in laparoscopic surgery, video-assisted thoracic surgery, and vascular interventional surgery. His recent publications include Single-Incision, Laparoscopic-Assisted Jejunal Resection, and Anastomosis Following a Gunshot Wound.

SUPPORTING VETERINARY TEAM DEVELOPMENT

FVMA Awards 2015 Scholarships to Hillsborough Community College Vet Tech Program Students

Laura Largel and Cynthia Reyes FVMA Scholarship Winners, students of the Hillsborough Community College Veterinary Technology Program, Laura Largel and Cynthia Reyes with Program Director Dr. Vincent Centonze. Congratulations Laura & Cynthia! Each year the FVMA awards two students studying for the Veterinary Technology Program Associate in Science Degree at Hillsborough Community College. The two students are presented scholarship checks of $1,000 each, plus an award plaque in recognition of their achievements. The community college’s program is a fully AVMA accredited Veterinary Technology program, aimed at serving local veterinary medical practices and the growing veterinary profession in Florida. To earn the Veterinary Technology Program Associate in Science Degree, students accomplish 73 credit hours, which may be completed in two years or over five consecutive terms. They study 18 credit hours of general education requirements, and 55 credit hours of veterinary technology courses. 30  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Completion of this degree prepares students to sit for the Veterinary Technician National Exam, and allows them to achieve the status of Certified Veterinary Technician. Graduates with an Associate Degree in veterinary technology find career opportunities in veterinary private practices, humane societies, specialty veterinary medicine, zoo and wildlife medicine, agriculture, and biomedical research.


www.fvma.org  |  31


PRACTICE Got a question? The FVMA can help. One of the benefits of membership in the FVMA is our Helpline, (800) 992-3862, available to members daily, Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 6:00 pm. Our Helpline also provides insight to the FVMA staff, of the challenges and concerns of our members. In this feature we will highlight topics from the questions we received in preceding weeks, in an effort to keep our members up-to-date on current concerns as well as regulatory and legislative changes.

Question:

Are pictures taken to monitor the healing of a wound in a patient part of the medical record, even if they were taken on my personal phone? Should I include them as part of the medical records that I’m providing to an owner who requests same?

A: It seems that anything the vet generated to assist in the management and treatment of the patient should be considered part of the record. Bottom line is, it is a VERY GOOD idea to provide copies of the pictures as part of the medical record.

Question:

What are the requirements for a veterinarian receiving a request from a client for a prescription for a controlled drug the client intends to order from an internet pharmacy? The question comes up because the veterinarian is not comfortable prescribing a controlled drug to be filled by an internet pharmacy. The vet is afraid of jeopardizing his DEA license. Are there any legal grounds to decline writing a prescription for controlled drugs to be bought from an internet pharmacy?

A: The only requirement in statute is for the veterinarian to issue a written prescription to the client when it is requested. The veterinarian is not required by law to fax a prescription anywhere, nor is the veterinarian required to speak with anyone over the phone to authorize a prescription. How much more a vet should accommodate the client’s request depends on the veterinarian. In such a case, common sense should prevail. Legally speaking, if the veterinarian's prescription for a controlled substance is valid and based on a legitimate VCPR, the fact that an "internet pharmacy" fills it cannot come back to haunt the veterinarian. According to DEA, the PHARMACY filling the prescription has a duty

32  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

to ascertain that the prescription is valid and that the doctor is authorized. DEA has never required the reverse (i.e. that the doctor verify that the pharmacy is valid).

Question:

We have a situation where a client boarded her four cats with us over a year ago. Initially, she made small payments, but stopped after about three months. After several phone calls and requests for payment, we mailed an “Animal Abandonment” letter in accordance with Florida Statues. We subsequently received a call where she said she would be willing to pick up the cats but was unable to pay any part of her bill. My question(s) are: 1. Are we obligated to return her cats with or without payment because she made contact with us and offered to pick them up? 2. Are we allowed to adopt out the cats to good homes regardless of her offer to pick them up? 3. Does Florida have an “Agister’s Law” that allows us to keep an animal until the bill is paid either partially or in full? A: 1. You are under no obligation to return the cats because she has legally abandoned them. The statute on abandonment is §705.19, F.S. and paragraph (3) states: For the purpose of this section, the term “abandonment” means to forsake entirely or to neglect or refuse to provide or perform the legal obligations for care and support of an animal by its owner or the owner’s agent. Such abandonment shall constitute the relinquishment of all rights and claim by the owner to such animal. Because the client has neglected to provide or perform her legal obligation, she has abandoned the animals under the law. The statute says what it says. It is the OBJECTIVE


refusal to perform the legal obligations for the care and support of the animal that establishes the abandonment, not the SUBJECTIVE intent of the owner. A call from the owner does not start the clock again. 2. Paragraph 2 of the same statute states: Any animal placed in the custody of a licensed veterinarian or bona fide boarding kennel for treatment, boarding, or other care, which shall be abandoned by its owner or the owner’s agent for a period of more than 10 days after written notice is given to the owner or the owner’s agent at her or his last known address may be turned over to the custody of the nearest humane society or dog pound in the area for disposal as such custodian may deem proper. The statute contemplates that the vet can turn over the animals to the pound or a humane society. It does not specifically speak to the vet adopting the animals out him/ herself. 3. Yes. The lien law is §713.655 and provides for a lien: In favor of any veterinarian who renders professional services to an animal at the request of the owner of the animal, the owner’s agent, or a bailee, lessee, or custodian of the animal, for the unpaid portion of the fees for such professional services, upon the animal to which such services were rendered. Such lien shall remain valid and enforceable for a period of 1 year from the date the professional services were rendered, and such lien is to be enforced in the manner provided for the enforcement of other liens on personal property in this state.

Question:

What are the sales tax exemptions for veterinary practice? A: Sales tax does not apply to the following:  Professional services provided by veterinarians.  Boarding charges for animals.  Drugs, medicinal drugs, and veterinary prescription drugs sold or used in connection with the medical treatment of animals.  Therapeutic veterinary diets specifically formulated to aid in the management of illness and disease of a diagnosed health disorder in an animal and which are only

available from a licensed veterinarian  Antiseptics, absorbent cotton, gauze for bandages, lotions, hypodermic needles and syringes, vitamins, and worm remedies purchased by veterinarians.  Germicides used directly on bodies of animals.  X-ray opaques (radiopaques) such as opaque dyes and barium sulfate.  Purchases of medical products, supplies, or devices by a licensed veterinarian that must be dispensed under federal or state law only by the prescription or order of a licensed practitioner and are intended for a single use.  Purchases of medical products, supplies, or devices by a licensed veterinarian used in the cure, mitigation, alleviation, prevention, or treatment of injury, disease, or incapacity of an animal that are temporarily or permanently incorporated into an animal.  Commonly recognized substances possessing curative or remedial properties that are ordered and dispensed as treatment for a diagnosed health disorder of an animal. Examples: Transdermal medications, sprays, or powders that prevent or treat flea or tick infestation when purchased, ordered, and dispensed by a licensed veterinarian. See Rule 12A-1.0215, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), Veterinary Sales and Services. Information, forms, and tutorials are available on the Department of Revenue website: www.myflorida.com/dor To speak with a Department representative, call Taxpayer Services, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., ET, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, at 800-352-3671. To find a taxpayer service center near you, go to: www. myflorida.com/dor/contact.html For written replies to tax questions, write to: Taxpayer Services – MS 3-2000 Florida Department of Revenue 5050 W Tennessee St Tallahassee FL 32399-0112

www.fvma.org  |  33


Veterinary Practice Sales & Appraisals

Ready to Sell? Buy? Need an Appraisal? Practices for Sale – Nationwide! FL: Broward County - New! 1,500sf SA w/2-exam rooms. FL78. FL: Lee County – Gross Income >$1m. Multi-doctor SA. FL75. FL: St Lucie County - 2,200sf w/RE on major hwy. 2-Dr. FL71. CA: Riverside County - The Hill area – 2,000sf SA. Family area! CA9. CA: San Diego County – New! 1,600sf SA w/real estate. CA10. ME: York County - 2,000sf w/±3.6 acres on busy Hwy. ME5. MD: Baltimore County – New! 1,600sf SA hospital. Price to sell! MD4. MI: Bay County - 2,500sf on ±1/3 acre RE. Family Area! MI1. MO: St. Louis - New! Feline, 2,200sf w/3-exam rooms. MO1. NY: Chemung County – Coming Soon! OR: Linn County - 1,800sf w/RE in town center. Gross >$330K. OR2. VT, Orleans County – 4,400sf on ±3 acres. Immaculate! VT3.

Contact us at 1.800.636.4740 for a • FREE APPRAISAL WITH LISTING • FREE Non-Binding, Confidential Consultation! Email: info@psbroker.com Visit our website: psbroker.com

Florida Practices for Sale Florida Practice Listings!

Florida Practices for Sale

Suncoast. Solo doctor, small animal practice in 1,800SF leased facility. $690K+ gross. No Emergencies. Open 4 full days and 2 half days a week. (FL10C)

Suncoast. Solo doctor, small animal practice in 1,800SF leased facility. $690K+ gross. No Emergencies. Open 4 full days and 2 half days a week. (FL10C)

Sarasota County. 4000+SF facility on approximately 1 acre corner lot near up

Sarasota County. 4000+SF facility on approximately 1 acre corner lot near up and coming new neighborhood. 2 doctor, small animal practice. $1M+ gross. No Emergencies. (FL22E)

FREE PRACTICE CONSULTATION

coming newSolo neighborhood. 2 doctor, small animal practice. $1M+ gross. No NorthandFlorida– Dr. small animal, 2014 gross $790k, Emergencies. (FL22E) Well established, well equipped, well staffed. Prx. & RE. WestDuval Coast of Fl.– Feline enthusiast, Cat hospital. Solo Dr. County. 2,400SF facility in residentialall neighborhood minutes from I-95. AAHA1.5 freestanding 2014 gross $840K. Prx.+RE. doctor, small office, animal practice with some acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. (FL18D) Sold-Pinellas Co.– Congratulations Dr. Kuykendall on selling your Practice to Dr. Jamie Todd and her husband Collin. Jacksonville. Solo doctor practice, well equipped leased facility on Monument New– S.W. Miami– Dr.emergencies SA in retail space with great Road. $675K+gross in1.5-2 2014. No or grooming. (FL42J) location. 2014 gross $813K. Very profitable. Pasco County. 3,500+SF& Specialty facility surrounded by affluent New-West Coast– Elegant 24 hr. E-clinic Prx. $3.1mm neighborhoods, commercial properties, and industry parks. Solo doctor, small gross.animal MRI,practice CT, Hyperbaric chamber, and more. with rehabilitation element grossed in excess of $500K in 2013. New-North Port– no 3200 sq.ft.and Clinic+equipment+client data Minimal boarding, grooming, no emergencies offered. (FL33O) base. Owner must sell. Great location. Negotiation: Beach County: doctor practice in NorthContract Florida– Solo Dr.Palm $750K gross, highSolo net, beenfeline in same 2,700SF facility. Gross in excess of $515K. Open 4 days a week. No boarding, location for over 30 years. Prx + RE grooming or Emergencies. Ample room and potential for growth! (FL28W) New-Central Fl. Coast– 1 Dr. in a lease space, 10 minutes to SOLD! Treasure Coast.after Congratulations to Dr. Richard Smith on the sale of Atlantic beaches. $125k debt income. his practice Hobe Sound Veterinary Clinic to Dr. Jennifer DiTrapani! (FL27H)

Contact Dr. Richard Alker for further practice information. 1610 Frederica Road * Saint Simons Island, GA 31522 850.814.9962 or Richard@tpsgsales.com Toll Free: 800.333.1984 * www.simmonsinc.com southeast@simmonsinc.com ShowcaseEmail: Properties of Central Florida, Broker Licensed Florida Real Estate Broker

34  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Duval County. 2,400SF facility in residential neighborhood minutes from I-95. 1.5 doctor, small animal practice with some acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. (FL18D) Jacksonville. Solo doctor practice, well equipped leased facility on Monument Road. $675K+gross in 2014. No emergencies or grooming. (FL42J) Pasco County. Elegant 3,500+SF facility surrounded by affluent neighborhoods, commercial properties, and industry parks. Solo doctor, small animal practice with rehabilitation element grossed in excess of $500K in 2013. Minimal boarding, no grooming, and no emergencies offered. (FL33O) Contract Negotiation: Palm Beach County: Solo doctor feline practice in 2,700SF facility. Gross in excess of $515K. Open 4 days a week. No boarding, grooming or Emergencies. Ample room and potential for growth! (FL28W) SOLD! Treasure Coast. Congratulations to Dr. Richard Smith on the sale of his practice Hobe Sound Veterinary Clinic to Dr. Jennifer DiTrapani! (FL27H)

1610 Frederica Road * Saint Simons Island, GA 31522 Toll Free: 800.333.1984 * www.simmonsinc.com Email: southeast@simmonsinc.com Licensed Florida Real Estate Broker


AD C L V AD C A C ER LA V LA DV LA TIS SS ER SS ER S T S I I ISE FIE ISE FIE TIS IFI E E D D M M M AS EN A EN E N D SIF TS V TS E C I R E E CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS

RELIEF VETERINARIANS

dental, surgery, x-ray and Class IV therapy laser. We provide all Relief or part-time veterinarian available in services that a standing general practice does with the exception the Tampa area: 30 years of experience as a practice owner. Enjoy of emergency and critical care. We have one technician and one surgery and working with people, small animal only. Call Dr. Joe Priest at receptionist on board with the Dr each day. Candidates must have excellent client education skills and enjoy building relationships (813) 230-5998. (Exp. Issue 1,2,3/15:1289) with clients. Sorry, no new grads. Flexible part-time or full-time EXPERIENCED VETERINARIAN AVAILABLE: Small animal hours possible; no weekends, holidays or emergencies. If you enjoy veterinarian with 25+ years experience available for relief or part- practicing in a relaxed, fun environment please send resume to time work in Seminole, Orange, Lake, and Volusia counties. Excellent ageer1@embarqmail.com (Exp. Issue 3/15:13687) communication and interpersonal skills, with a focus on client education and pet care with compassion and integrity. Special interest Experienced Associate Veterinarian needed: for in dermatology. References available upon request. Contact Dr. a well-established and growing small animal practice. We currently Edward Dworkin at Eddworkin@gmail.com or 407-435-3200. www. have 3 veterinarians and 32 support staff. We are a fully equipped hospital and offer services which include Chiropractics, Acupuncture, linkedin.com/in/edward-dworkin. (Exp. Issue 3/15:287) Endoscopy, Ultrasound, Dentistry with Digital x-rays, In-house Lab, looking for Veterinarian: to join our team at Central Digital Radiography, EKG’s, and Cold Laser. We also have a 100 square Florida's most dedicated minor medical/wellness clinic. Fast paced, foot in-ground Hydrotherapy Pool with a staff trained in Animal friendly environment where community education is our focus. Massage, Therapy and Nutrition. We have a wonderful reputation Affordable vaccines and low cost spay / neuter. Competitive salary. in the area for client focused services and treating our patients with Benefits that include health, dental/vision, matching 401K. Paid care and respect. vacation. End of year bonus. Admission to NAVC. Paid renewals for state and DEA licensure. Please reply to flaidtoanimals@aol.com Please send resumes to jobs@allcreaturesfl.com or visit us online at www.allcreaturesfl.com NOTES: Additional Salary Information: (Exp. Issue 3/15:6586) Full benefits package including health insurance, 401k/profit sharing FULL-time veterinarian: Non-profit, low cost animal hospital plan, production based bonuses, vacation, personal days, and holidays. in Palm Beach County seeking to hire full time vet, with shelter experience (Exp. Issue 3/15: 1044) but not required. Send Resume to;puppyrescue365@outlook.com Full Or Part Time Associate Wanted: Come join (Exp. Issue 3/15:39355) us as a full or part time associate on the Emerald Coast. Our Veterinary relief for southwest Florida: 20 years practice is 1/2 mile from the beautiful emerald green waters. We of experience with special interest in small animal surgery, dentistry, are a well-established but growing practice. We are looking for a internal medicine and emergency. Excellent with patients, clients and staff. dedicated experienced individual who wants to make a long term Days, nights and weekends. Contact Lon Miyahira, DVM 480-241-2702 commitment. Candidates must have excellent client communication (Exp. Issue 3/15:38681) skills and be able to work well with staff. We want someone to EXPERIENCED RELIEF VETERINARIAN AVAILABLE FOR become infused within the community to build a life and become ORLANDO AND SURROUNDING AREAS:  Small animal a practice leader. Candidate but be proficient at general elective and practitioner with over 25 years of service to Central Florida including 10 soft tissue surgery. We are a well-equipped practice with digital years of practice ownership. Excellent communication skills and client radiography, dental digital radiography, high speed dental unit, pleasing personality to maximize returns! Good diagnostic, medical and ultrasound, class IV laser, and in house laboratory. We also have a surgical skill sets. Please contact Dr. Brian K. Martin at (407) 461-3722 modern boarding facility for cats and dogs. Our primary focus is or bkmpetvet@aol.com. https://www.linkedin.com/in/briankmartindvm high quality medicine and treating pets like family. Take a tour of (Exp. Issue 3/15:2755) our hospital online @ www.companionpetvets.com. ProSal or salary veterinarian needed: We are growing and expanding! Our compensation available and based on experience. Send resumes to combination general practice (St. Francis Animal Hospital) and ER (Best email address provided above. (dogsandcats76@yahoo.com) VETS) in Jacksonville, FL is open 7 days a week with all the perks including Phone: 850-243-7144; Fax: 850-243-9361; State: Florida flat panel DR, digital dental xray, all the IDEXX in-house labs, ultrasound, (Exp. Issue 3/15: 14264) oxygen cage, hyperbaric oxygen chamber, etc. With ABVP diplomate on Associate wanted:Seeking experienced Veterinarian efficient staff and supervised by a DACVECC. Flexible scheduling available, full and in small animal medicine and compassionate about client care and part time. Our emphasis is on patient care and client service. If you want communication to join six doctor practice located 1 hour north to practice excellent medicine regardless of the clients’ budget, this may of Tampa. Highly leveraged support staff, state of the art facilities be the position you've been looking for. Email resume and cover letter to and equipment. Please Contact: manager@sanfrancisvet.com jobs@saintfrancisanimalhospital.org (Exp. Issue 3,4/15:1441) (Exp. Issue 2&3/15: 7798) Experienced relief veterinarian available: Experienced Associated Veterinarian needed: in Experienced, personable, reliable relief veterinarian available; will travel West Orlando area. Well established small animal practice promotes statewide for short or long term temporary assignments. Positive attitude, a high standard of care and ethics. Our vision is on creating a positive compassionate care, commitment to excellence. Contact Dr. Linda Jack: work environment and growing a customer base. Candidate should (336) 430-9062, Ljackvet@gmail.com (Exp. Issue 3/15:XXXX) have at least 3 years of in clinic experience and a solid grasp of medicine and routine surgical procedures. Good client communications is a must. Competitive salary and benefits offered. Please send cover letter Associates wanted and resume to bgmadmxr@aol.com atten: Jennifer Cumberland. Associates Veterinarian Wanted: Experienced (Exp. Issue 2&3/15: 8267) Veterinarian for Out Patient Practice in Naples, Florida. Call (239) 260-4858 (Exp. Issue 3/15: XXXX) Staff Positions Associates Veterinarian needed: Well-established, small animal practice in South Florida is looking for an associate Veterinary Technician (Naples, FL): Full-time position veterinarian to practice high-quality general medicine and available for an experienced veterinary technician (certified surgery. Clinic is equipped with digital radiography, in-house preferred). Please email resume to: bayridgevets@gmail.com lab, surgical suite, and pharmacy. No after-hours or holidays. (Exp. Issue 3/15:6295) We have been in our current location for more than 20 years, and have a loyal and affluent clientele. Good surgical skills and a practice for sale client-oriented approach a priority. New graduates considered. SMALL ANIMAL CLINIC FOR SALE: Practice & real estate. Excellent benefits and salary. Full or part-time. 954-805-3464. (Exp. Issue 3/15: 4960) Jacksonville FL On the south side. Great potential. 904-724-8866 Seeking Associate: Established full-service small-animal gowenclinic@bellsouth.net Exp. Issue 3,4/15:1110) mobile housecall practice serving the Orlando/Kissimmee area is SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE FOR SALE – JACKSONVILLE, seeking associate to join our team! We are NOT a low cost vaccine FL: Thirty five year old small animal practice at the five point intersection clinic, we are a convenience service and go only to our clients’ of Normandy Blvd., Jacksonville , Florida. 7500 square foot building, two homes. Our mission is to provide quality care for our patients while story, facing two streets, vacant site. Owner is retiring. Call Dr. Devegowda keeping them as minimally stressed as possible. We practice in a 26 Gopal, (904) 786-4919. (Exp. Issue 1,3 &5/15:1106) ft Laboit-built mobile unit equipped with in-house lab, pharmacy,


Florida Veterinary Medical Association 7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, FL 32809

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage PAID Orlando, FL Permit #793

We Have Sold More Veterinary Practices Than Anyone.

2015 Advocate Issue 3  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you