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F V M A ADVOCATE ISSUE 1 - Jan/Feb 2014

www.fvma.org

Legislative Action Days

&

Veterinary Medicine

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President's

MESSAGE

A

7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, Florida 32809 Phone – (407) 851‑3862 Toll Free – (800) 992‑3862 Fax – (407) 240‑3710 info@fvma.org www.fvma.org

t last year’s AVMA convention I was talking with two bright young doctors about how to engage young veterinarians in their profes‑ sion. One of them asked me if I remembered when I got the “letter.” It was at that moment I knew I had found the answer. This was an idea whose time had come, a common denominator in our diverse profession.

Officers Dr. Jerry L. Rayburn President Dr. Donald H. Morgan President-Elect Dr. Richard B. Williams Treasurer Dr. John R. Bass Past President Mr. Philip J. Hinkle Executive Director

District Representatives Dr. Alex M. Steverson District 1–Big Bend Dr. Richard C. Sutliff District 2–Northeast Dr. Marc A. Presnell District 3–Central Dr. Rachel Klemawesch District 4–Tampa Bay Dr. Marc D. Pinkwasser District 5–Treasure Coast Dr. Ronald W. Todd Jr. District 6–South Florida Dr. Richard M. Carpenter District 7–Southwest Dr. Michael Epperson District 8–Northwest Dr. Christine M. Storts District 9–Space Coast Dr. Ernest C. Godfrey AVMA Delegate Dr. Stephen Shores AVMA Alternate Delegate Dr. Corey Miller FAEP Representative to the FVMA Executive Board Ex Officio Dr. James W. Lloyd, Dean College of Veterinary Medicine

FVMA Staff

Sandra P. Brooks Accounting/Membership Director Amber Coon Executive Administrative Assistant Ralph E. Huber Industry Relations Director Alssa Mathews Multimedia Art & Design Director Beni Jean Price Financial/Membership Coordinator Diana Ruiz Meetings and Events Coordinator Ann Wade Communications & Public Relations Director

2  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

I like to travel around the state and speak to groups of veterinarians about the letter because it rekindles my passion for this wonderful pro‑ fession. This is our only shot at life and from time to time we all need a reason to get excited. Sociologists use the term “collective memories” to describe events so profound that everyone alive and aware will recall. Moments frozen in time and forever etched in our minds. Events like the assassination of John Kennedy and Martin Luther King, the challenger explosion and the terrorist attack on September 11th. Then there are those events that are milestones in our lives like learning to ride a bike, the first day of school and high school graduation. The letter is a milestone and memory unique to veterinarians. You all remember getting the acceptance letter into veterinary school. The details may be a little fuzzy, but I bet we all remem‑ ber the emotions. The excitement and anticipation just before you opened it and the extreme joy and thrill when you realized you made it. I hope you never forget that feeling. That letter bonds us as veterinarians and like it or not, it always will. However what the letter didn’t tell you was there are a few strings attached. The first obliga‑ tion is to always HONOR your profession, treat it with the respect it so richly deserves. This should be a simple one. To me it means treating my patients like family pets. If you ever find yourself in an ethical dilemma or question your decision just remember the advice I received from a keynote speaker: “Place the words Your Honor in front of the sentence.” This should make your choice much easier. The second string is to DEFEND and PROTECT the profession. Regardless of individual efforts, it really takes a unified and organized group to best accomplish this. Membership in your state, local and national associations is a good place to start; then become involved in your local community. You are the champion of animals’ health and welfare and the public should know it. Being involved in your local VMA’s political action team is a great way to protect your profession. Some of us can do more than others but we all can help. I believe the upcoming legislative session will prove to be the most challenging and rewarding yet for the FVMA. The third and the last I will mention, is an obligation to the future of our profession. That is to LEAVE it better than you found it. This may be the most important of all because each of us asked, begged and prayed to be a part of something special. Now we, as a profession, must do what it takes to preserve that dream for the next generation. The FVMA’s Young Practitioners Council will be sponsoring events around the state to encour‑ age the participation of new graduates and those early in their careers. I ask you to support those efforts and help in any way you can. The FVMA is committed to the success of our next generation of veterinarians and their future because they are our future. Yours in service,

Jerry Rayburn, DVM


Meet The FAEP's New Council President Suzan C. Oakley, DVM, DABVP, Equine Practice

D

r. Suzan Oakley is a 1991 graduate of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. She is the owner of Oakley Equine Sports Medicine based in De Leon Springs, Florida.

forward to the opportunity, as Council President in 2014, to con‑ tinue providing the world-class educational programs the FAEP is known for. The FAEP is an equine-exclusive division of the FVMA. Its mission is to support the professional development of its mem‑ bers and to educate its members on conditions affecting the equine industry as well as methods for improving the welfare of horses in the state of Florida.

Dr. Oakley travels regionally and nation‑ ally to provide specialist level sports medi‑ cine and diagnostic services. She currently divides her time between her busy clinical practice in Orlando, Equine-exclusive veterinarians and those with an equine inter‑ Ocala and Wellington, national speaking engagements, as well as instructing veterinarians in advanced ultrasound techniques. est who are FVMA members enjoy dual membership at no added She is one of ten certified members of the International Society of cost. One of the benefits of membership in the FVMA is the opportunity to attend world-class equine-exclusive continuing Equine Locomotor Pathology (ISELP) in the United States. education programs throughout the year, at discounted member‑ ISELP is an international organization committed to excel‑ ship rates. lence in advanced imaging and lameness in the equine athlete. Members are invited to attend our upcoming conferences: She is also board certified in Equine Practice by the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners. Equine Foot Symposium June 13-14, 2014 Dr. Oakley’s practice focus is in the use of ultrasound for the Double Tree by Hilton Orlando at SeaWorld diagnosis and rehabilitation of sport horse injuries. She has lec‑ Orlando, FL tured nationally on the topics of anatomy and equine foot ultra‑ sound, and is a regular instructor at ISELP and other ultra‑ 10th Annual Promoting Excellence Symposium sound wet labs. October 9-12, 2014 Hilton Head Marriott Resort & Spa She is a courtesy adjunct professor in the Practice Based Hilton Head Island, NC Equine Clerkship program at the University of Florida. This experience has given her the opportunity to exchange new ideas 52nd Annual Ocala Equine Conference and broaden the student’s educational opportunities. January 23-26, 2015 Hilton Ocala Dr. Oakley has been a member of the FVMA since 1991, and Ocala, FL is a member of the FAEP and AAEP. She has been active in the planning of educational programs for the FAEP and is looking For information on FVMA/FAEP membership benefits, please visit the FAEP website: www.FAEP.net.

In This Issue 14 | Legislative Action Days 6 | 2014 Emerging Leader 8 | 2014 Nominations For Executive 30 | Veterinary Medicine and the Law Board, and Budget and Finance 32 | Practice Pulse Committee 10 | Strategies to Win Under ObamaCare www.fvma.org  |  3


In Remembrance Stuart R. Rosenburg, DVM Dr. Stuart R. Rosenburg passed away on November 19, 2013, shortly after encountering a setback in his fight against lung cancer. He was 46 years old. Mourning his passing are his wife Gayle Marie Merrill and other family members, and his many clients, friends and colleagues who are all deeply saddened.

He was a global explorer, taking trips with Miss Merrill all over the world. He scuba dived in exotic locations and skydived wherever he lived, and he ate organic food and was training for a marathon. He continued working for as long as he could at the state-of-the-art veterinary facility he designed and opened just two years ago on Gandy Boulevard in South Tampa. He sold his practice in June this year and went on a two-month road trip with his wife.

His childhood dream was to become a veterinarian, Plans already made for his next adventure were sadly and he did; and then he went on to become a specialist never realized due to his untimely departure. in Eastern medicine, practicing acupuncture and herbology on his four-legged clients. A public celebration of Dr. Rosenburg’s life took place on Dec. 14, in Tampa where family, friends, fraternity Before small animals, Dr. Rosenburg specialized in brothers and veterinarians from all over the country wildlife care at Lowry Park Zoo. And he would have came together for a “roast and spiritual send-off ” of stayed there had he not taken a trip to Africa and this much loved doctor. witnessed native animals living free in their natural habitat. That experience caused him to swear off the practice of keeping animals in captivity.

Clay Wilson, DVM Dr. Clay Wilson, 57 year old of Bradenton, Florida, passed away on December 20, 2013. Originally from Johannesburg, South Africa, the late Dr. Wilson also lived in Mexico with his parents Erwin Robin and Thelma Marie (Scott) Wilson during his childhood. He graduated in 1979 from the University of Florida with a degree in zoology and earned a degree in 1987 from the Onderstepoort Veterinary Hospital at the University of Pretoria in Pretoria, South Africa. In the 1990s, Dr. Wilson moved to Manatee County, Florida where he owned and operated Beach Veterinary Clinic in Cortez for 17 years. He was considered a specialist in orthopedics, and small animal and exotics medicine. 4  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

He sold his practice in 2008, and moved to Botswana to work as primary wildlife veterinarian for the Kasane Department of Wildlife and National Parks for five Years. He also served as veterinarian and honorary game warden for the Chobe National Park in Botswana until 2011, before returning to Florida. Dr. Wilson recently published a book, “BushVet in South Africa” based on his experiences. A memorial in celebration of the life of Dr. Clay Wilson was held on January 11, in Bradenton. He is survived by his brothers, Graham Wilson, M.D. of Henderson, Nevada, and Wayne Wilson of Tucson, Arizona; and his many extended family members and friends.


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Serious adverse reactions have been reported following concomitant extra-label use of ivermectin with spinosad alone, one of the components of Trifexis chewable tablets. Treatment with fewer than three monthly doses after the last exposure to mosquitoes may not provide complete heartworm prevention. Prior to administration of Trifexis, dogs should be tested for existing heartworm infection. The most common adverse reactions recorded in clinical trials were vomiting, pruritus, lethargy and diarrhea. If vomiting occurs within an hour after administration, redose with another full dose. Puppies less than 14 weeks of age may experience a higher rate of vomiting. For product label, including complete safety information, see 28. page 34. XX. Page 1 2

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www.fvma.org  |  5


Christina R. Layton, DVM Selected as FVMA's 2014 Emerging Leader

"Compassion is the greatest form of love humans have to offer." ~ Rachel Joy Scott Dr. Christy Layton grew up in Plant City, FL with her par‑ ents Ron & Barbara Layton and her sisters Renee’ & Leisa. She always knew that she wanted to return to open a state of the art veterinary and boarding facility in her home town. After working her way through high school and college as a veterinary technician, she graduated from the University of Florida with a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Biology, minor in Agribusiness Management and Sales, and her Doc‑ torate in Veterinary Medicine. Since graduation from veterinary school, Dr. Layton initially worked at Noah’s Ark Animal Hospital in Valrico, and then was able to visualize her long term dream of serving the Plant City community as a veterinarian. She opened Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort in October 2006. Dr. Layton currently serves as vice president of the Hillsbor‑ ough County Veterinary Medical Society and was its president for two years prior. She chairs the FVMA’s Animal Welfare Committee and is also the Treasurer of the Hillsborough Animal Health Foundation. Dr. Layton lives in Plant City with her partner Chad, and her large menagerie of dearly loved pets including the rescue dogs that she shows in agility competition and the Appaloosa horses that she shows in competition during her time off work.

AVMA Veterinary Leadership Conference Dr. Layton attended the 2014 AVMA Veterinary Leadership Conference as the FVMA Emerging Leader from January 9-12. The VLC offers a robust three days of networking and workshop opportunities for current and emerging leaders, and state and allied representatives. The conference is open to any veterinary professional interested in learning more about leadership, team building, and how the AVMA works with and for the Veterinary Profession. Attendees enhance leadership skills and expand their profes‑ sional network, and the sessions and networking opportunities provide a foundation to veterinarians who want to contribute and shape the veterinary profession, and develop skills that can be used in their professional and personal lives. Dr. Layton provided The Advocate with an insight into her present and future role as a practitioner, and as a leader of her profession in the following interview.

FVMA: Please describe the experience of representing the FVMA at the AVMA Leadership Conference. 6  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Dr. Layton: I was incredibly honored to be chosen to represent the FVMA at this year's AVMA Leadership conference as the FVMA Emerging Leader. I met other emerging leaders as well as current State Association Lead‑ ers and Delegates from all over the USA. I made a lot of new contacts I plan to keep in touch with and continue to learn from. We were included in various caucus and delegate sessions which opened my eyes on the impor‑ tance of leadership at the state and national level. We went through a variety of courses regarding management style, conflict resolution and team building presented by the Veterinary Leadership Institute. I learned a lot of informa‑ tion that I could not only bring back to the team of profes‑ sionals at my hospital, but also use in the future, as it has enhanced my leadership style in regards to working with State/National Associations and working with Local/State/ National Governmental Representatives. FVMA: Describe your work as a young veterinarian. What does it mean to you? Dr. Layton: I was an Associate veterinarian for 4 years, then a Relief Veterinarian for a year while building my hospital that I opened in 2006. That has opened my eyes to what is needed to appropriately manage an entire team of professionals in an industry known for high turn‑ over. My long-term interest in management styles has con‑ tributed to a formation of a very strong & consistent team surrounding me at the hospital. I have developed a close relationship with a number of local animal rescue groups as well as the local Animal Services and Veterinarians in our county during my 2-year position as the President of the Hillsborough County Veterinary Medical Society. This has provided me the opportunity to be able to give back to my community in a number of ways. Being able to help animals in rescue organizations go from sick and unwanted to vibrant, healthy and in a new forever home is a huge part of my life that I cannot imagine being without. Also, being able to give back in our charity events that we do every year to benefit Relay For Life Cancer Research as well as local animal rescue groups have become a very important part of my career.


FVMA: What was it that made you decide to become active in organized veterinary medicine? Dr. Layton: My initial involvement in our local VMA was because a good friend, Dr. Stu Rosenburg, who has since passed due to cancer, asked me to get involved. Right after I became President, our county was inundated with people trying to get the No Kill movement into our county shelter. I was thrust into a position that as the experts in animal welfare and public health, I had to take a stance against this movement. While we all want to save as many animals as we can, as veterinarians, we must first protect public health and have the welfare of those animals at the top of our list. My entire board worked diligently to work with our county administrators so they could better under‑ stand the unintended consequences of this movement. We were also included in the Legislative Action Days at our State Capital last year, which broadened my knowledge of how state government works. Because of my prior knowl‑ edge of Trap-Neuter-Release of feral cats and our concerns with the unintended consequences, I was asked to testify in front of the Senate Subcommittee to explain our concerns for a Bill that was being presented to them.

future. I still have a hospital to run as my first priority, but as it continues to grow and be able to run without me all the time, I plan to become more involved in the FVMA. I also understand that there are a large number of animal owning individuals that cannot afford proper veterinary care for the animals they call a part of their family. That is why my next project is with HAHF as we are opening a Spay/Neuter Clinic that is strictly needs based so that we can affect a group of the population that would not be able to have their pets altered if it were not for our clinic and clinics like ours. We will work with animal rescue groups and only individuals that have proven their need for our service so as to not interfere with normal veterinary hospitals. Since these animals are the main ones causing our pet overpopu‑ lation issue, we feel it is most important to work on this population first.

FVMA: Does your service interfere in any way with the professional goals you have set for yourself? Dr. Layton: Being so involved in local and state affairs, I have found myself being pulled away from the hospital more than I would prefer. Interestingly though, my clients and my entire hospital team have been very sup‑ portive of my endeavors, as they are able to see the longterm need for what I am doing. So, in essence, my goals have evolved since I have become more involved with the local and state organizations as I have seen the "big picture" and have been able to look outside of just my hospital. FVMA: Are there ways that it enhances? Dr. Layton: I work every day to improve the HumanAnimal Bond and to ensure that all of my patients receive the best quality care that I can provide. My clients appreci‑ ate my involvement in local and state governments as they know I have their health and their animal's health at the center of my concerns and they are happy that someone is willing to fight for their protection. Overall, I feel that my interest in government and my increased community involvement has enhanced my position in my community and has benefited my hospital as a whole. FVMA: Do you intend to stay involved? Do you think you may one day want to be president of the FVMA? Dr. Layton: Absolutely! Wow, isn't that a loaded question??!! Yes, I have actually thought about that. I do have the FVMA Presidency as a goal for myself in the www.fvma.org  |  7


2014 Nominations Now Being Accepted For Executive Board and Budget and Finance Committee NOMINATION DEADLINE : FEBRUARY 24, 2014

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ominations are being received for election to the FVMA Executive Board and for District Representatives to the FVMA Budget and Finance Committee. The FVMA Bylaws establish the pro‑ cedure and timeline for nomination and election. Nominations are being accepted by the FVMA Executive Director, until February 24, 2014, after which the FVMA Execu‑ tive Director will circulate ballots to the general membership of the Association on March 11. Ballots will be valid if they are returned postmarked by March 26, 2014. A Tallying Committee comprised of two (2) active members appointed by the President, and the Executive Director, will meet 15 days prior to the FVMA annual meeting, which is scheduled for April 25, 2014, to open and tabulate the results of the election. In the event a seat is not contested at the time of the nomination deadline, no election ballot will be mailed and the qualified nominee will be elected. How‑ ever, if there are contested seats, ballots

8  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

will be mailed for those seats, received and tabulated in accordance with the FVMA Bylaws. Nominations are being received for the following on the FVMA Executive Board:

President-Elect District Representative AVMA Alternate Delegate Nominations for President-Elect Nominations of officer candidates are made by a Nominating Committee which is chaired by Immediate Past-President Dr. John R. Bass. Committee members for the 2014 election are District Repre‑ sentatives: Dr. Richard Sutliff, District 2; Dr. Rachel K. Klemawesch, District 4; Dr. Ronald W. Todd, District 6; and Dr. Michael Epperson, District 8. Members of the FVMA are encouraged to suggest names of possible candidates for the consideration of the Nominating Committee. To be eligible for nomination as

President-Elect, an active member must have served as a District Repre‑ sentative to the Executive Board or as Treasurer, and shall have been a member of the Association for the past five (5) years preceding nomination.

Nominations for AVMA Alternate Delegate Nominations for the AVMA Alternate Delegate are to be made by the Nominat‑ ing Committee. Members of the FVMA are encouraged to suggest names of possible candidates for the consideration of the Nominating Committee. To be eligible for nomination as AVMA Alternate Delegate, the candidate must be an active member of the FVMA and must currently serve on the FVMA Executive Board and be a resident of the state of Florida. The Alternate Delegate is elected to serve a 4-year term. Nominations for District Representative Nominations for District Representa‑ tives on the FVMA Executive Board are to be made by the local associations.


DISTRICT I DISTRICT II DISTRICT VIII DISTRICT IX

FVMA DISTRICTS

DISTRICT IV DISTRICT III DISTRICT VII

DISTRICT V

DISTRICT VI

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District Representative is elected to serve a three-year term, and may be re-elected to serve an additional three-year term. To qualify for nomination, candidates must live in the district they wish to represent and be a member of the FVMA in good standing. Seats for District Representative on the Executive Board that are open for election are: • District 4, presently held by Dr. Rachel Klemawesch who replaced Dr. Donald Morgan when he was elected and installed as President-Elect in 2013. • District 7, presently represented by Dr. Richard Carpenter who is completing his first term. • District 8, presently represented by Dr. Michael Epperson who is completing his first term. • District 9, presently represented by Dr.Christine Storts who is complet‑ ing a second term and is ineligible for re-election.

Nominations for Budget and Finance Committee Representative The Budget and Finance Commit‑ tee prepares a budget for the ensuing fiscal year and develops plans for added or alternative FVMA financing. The

committee is chaired by the FVMA President-Elect, and members include the FVMA Treasurer, and one representa‑ tive from each of the nine Association Districts. District Representatives on this committee are elected to serve a threeyear term and may be elected to three (3) successive terms. The FVMA Budget and Finance Com‑ mittee District Representative seats open for election are: • District 2, presently represented by Dr. Rebecca Williams who is com‑ pleting a third term and is ineligible for re-election. • District 3, presently represented by Dr. Julia Jones Reynolds. She is complet‑ ing the term of Dr. Marc Presnell, who was elected to the Executive Board as Dis‑ trict 3 Representative in 2012. • District 5, presently represented by Dr. Dana Juillerat who is completing the term of Dr. Marc Pinkwasser, who was elected to the Executive Board as District 5 Representative in 2013. • District 8, presently represented by Dr. James Zettler who is completing his first term. • District 9, presently represented by Dr. Lee Stuart who is completing his second term.

2014 OPEN SEATS Executive Board President-Elect

District Representatives District 4

District 8

District 7

District 9

AVMA Representative Alternate Delegate

Budget & Finance Committee District 2

District 8

District 3

District 9

District 5

Send Nominations To:

FVMA - 7207 Monetary Dr. Orlando, FL 32809

NOMINATION DEADLINE

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

www.fvma.org  |  9


Strategies to Win Unde Commonly Know By David Frank

As of today, there have been nearly 2 million newly insured policies applied for on the Federal and State Marketplace Exchanges and more than 5 million have lost coverage. Estimates for the next couple of years exceed 30,000,000 policies in the small group market, depending on which resource we trust the most. As the debate continues on whether or not the Affordable Care Act will remain in place, we believe it is important to provide certainty to you and your staff. A quick recap of our discussion to date concerning the state of healthcare reform and strategies to win is in order. In Part 1 of this series, we discussed a thorough overview of the Affordable Care Act. We covered the new mandates, new healthcare provisions and tax implications of the law. In Part 2, we discussed a potential alternative for all Veterinary Practices called Defined Contribution Health Plans. In short, this strategy allows veterinarians to set and control all health benefit costs. For some practice owners, it may present an opportunity to offer an employee benefits package for the very first time. For those already operating a strategy, converting to this strategy will allow the practice to control and reduce costs and spend more time on and in your business caring for patients and generating revenue. For the employees, it will lower costs through the purchase of individual insurance policies that work like traditional group insurance. The employee will be able to purchase policies that provide whatever benefit levels they desire and can afford. A real savings opportunity for the employee will result from lowering of their monthly premium liability through Federal Premium Tax Subsidies, which the vast majority of staff members will qualify for. These Premium Tax Subsidies, and in some cases, Benefit Subsidies, will be based on your staff ’s household income and determined by 10  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

the IRS. Finally, the ability to provide employer contributions that may be different for established employee classes, eliminate participation and contribution requirements and reduce health plan administration down to five to ten minutes per month is a very attractive proposition. We welcome the opportunity to help all of your with accomplishing these goals. Now we will discuss one of the major negative side effects of health care reform as the country migrates from the traditional group insurance market to subsidized individual policies; and is there a solution?

by the year 2025. In short, with fewer physicians and an additional 30,000,000 estimated newly insured Americans seeking access to a physician, we clearly have a problem to solve.

Why are physicians retiring, selling their practice or changing the type of medical work they perform?

The Problem: Access to Physician Care is Expected to Decrease by 92,000 Providers by the Year 2020

Of the top seven answers provided, the number one and two answers are: • Economic factors, such as medical malpractice insurance, overhead and electronic medical records, and • They simply do not want to practice in the era of healthcare reform. As of the fourth quarter of 2014, another major driving factor for network shrinkage is the decrease in reimbursement rates as insurance carriers attempt to reduce costs to comply with the new provisions of the Affordable Care Act.

According to organizations like the

Where are the physicians going?

Deloitte Center for Health Solutions, as well as articles dating back to August 2012, from HealthInformatics.com and The American Academy of Family Practitioners (AAFP. org), a physician shortage is expected. While the number of physicians leaving the industry is still unknown at this time, the majority of experts who are producing metrics in this area believe the number will be around 92,000 physicians by the year 2020. Some estimate, through a report called “A Tough Time for Physicians: 2012 Medical Practice & Attitude Report” that the number of physicians that will leave their industry is as high as 34% over the next decade. In addition to this exodus of care providers, we know through population growth, increased insurance coverage due to the Affordable Care Act and other factors, that another 52,000 Primary Care Physicians will be needed

According to the HealthInformatics. com, physicians are moving to: • Hospital employment or single and multiple specialty practices owned by a hospital or health system. • Teaching positions. • Adminstration opportunities. Let’s look to Massachusetts as an indicator of our future in terms of having to wait longer to receive the care we are used to receiving relatively quickly today. This is really a simple case of supply and demand. In the case of healthcare, the greater the demand (the number of insured Americans), and the lower the supply of physicians (the physician shortage), the longer it will take for us to be seen by our doctors, especially as a new patient.


er the Law wn as OBAMACARE Crystal Ball #1: How Long Will We Have to Wait to See the Doctor? Let’s look to RomneyCare in MA The GameChanger Planning Network has had the privilege of serving clients in Massachusetts whose headquarters are domiciled in Florida. The citizens of the commonwealth of Massachusetts have been required to have insurance by law since 2006 under The Massachusetts Health Insurance Reform Law, commonly known as, RomneyCare. After seven years of data, the proof that wait times increase to see a physician is in. See the chart below. The minimum wait to see a physician as a new patient is 21-30 days in Worces‑ ter and Barnstable Counties. The wait time to see a physician as a new patient is 31-40 days in Plymouth County. The wait time is 41-50 days in Berkshire and Hampden Counties. The wait time is 51-60 days in Hampshire, Middlesex and Norfolk Counties. A wait as a new patient to see a physician is 61-71+ days for a person living in Bristol or Essex Counties.

The Solution: The Future of Healthcare and Increased Access to Care is TeleHealth or TeleMedicine

If Americans are exceptionally skilled at one thing, it is technology. As manu‑ facturing output decreases, technological solutions to marketplace conundrums

are popping up at exponentially faster rates. One such technology solution has already dramatically improved Access to Care in the USA, but less than 10,000,000 of us know about it, or are using it. The solution is TeleHealth or TeleMedicine Services.

What are Telehealth services? Telehealth services, or Telemedicine, offer consumers the ability to call a doctor 24 hours per day, 7 days per week and 365 day a year for a consult by telephone, smart phone or internet video chat. To answer the questions that may already be top of your mind: • Yes. It’s legal. • Yes. They are reputable providers. This concept is innovative and highly effective. I think most people would agree that the U.S. healthcare market is in serious need of innovation and this delivers. Let’s face it, if Amazon.com and UPS can deliver packages using drones or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), it is not so crazy to think that you and your employees should be able to pick up the phone or get on a video chat for a physi‑ cian office visit.

Three of the most prevalent concerns in the healthcare industry today are: • Access to Care, as you just read. • Misuse of Emergency Rooms and Urgent Care centers. The majority of these visits could be handled by Telehealth service providers. • Continued employer shift‑ ing of costs to consumers in the form of premiums and higher out of pocket expenses. The technological innovation

of a Telehealth program is an ideal solu‑ tion because it successfully addresses three of the biggest issues in healthcare, namely timely access to care, lower cost, and quality care. Now, to be clear, this solution is not intended to take the place of the family physician, but avoiding the expense of the Urgent Care and especially the Emer‑ gency Room is time efficient, cost-effec‑ tive and convenient.

So, how does the TeleHealth process work? 1. After a consumer enrolls and receives their welcome kit, the new member goes online and establishes their account. 2. When you feel sick or have an issue, call the vendor or go online to request an appointment. 3. In an average of 30-minutes, or less, but 3 hours guaranteed, you will talk to you doctor and have your consult, which is a 15 minute consultation. This is almost double the national average faceto-face office visit in the USA, which is only 8 minutes. 4. Resolve the issue. 5. Pay for your service. How does $0 sound? This is the exclusive benefit for the non-Fortune 500 marketplace that we offer.

When you have the flu or a respiratory infection and your head is pounding and other biological functions might be very inconvenient, which would you rather do? • See your doctor in 2 hours, which includes preparing to be seen in public, travel time, physician office check-in and wait time, or • See your doctor in 30 minutes, which includes scheduling your appointment on-demand and waiting an average of 24 minutes to be seen by a U.S. Board Certified in the privacy of your own home or work? Assuming you are at home, wouldn’t you rather wait for your appointment with the doctor in your pajamas while you watch your favorite recorded shows on your DVR that you have been missing? www.fvma.org  |  11


I am sorry, but wouldn’t it also be much more comfortable knowing you are five seconds from your bathroom, if necessary, instead of being in your car en route to the doctor’s office where you would be stricken with fear over how to contend with a biological emergency? Yes. That is what I thought you would say!

2. Consider working with us to help you offer this program through your company as an employee benefit. It can be purchased by the employer or 100% by the employee with a monthly cost as low as $8.50 per employee per month. The entire household of dependents will be covered for this fee.

I think most people agree that the US healthcare market is in serious need of innovation. If Amazon and UPS can deliver packages using military drones or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), why can’t you and I have a doctor visit over the phone or internet video chat?

Individual Consumers have access to two packages which both contain the following:

The American Medical Association agrees, too. They say about 70% of doctor, emergency room and urgent care center visits could be handled over the phone. This makes a lot of sense considering we all have the same "parts" that break down the same way over and over again! To be clear, telehealth or telemedicine does NOT replace your family doctor. If you have a chronic condition, this isn’t the place to get your prescription refilled – you need to be under a doctor’s continuous care. We will keep this short and simple. The GameChanger Planning Networks preferred Telehealth solution offers the following features, benefits and results: • The first and largest provider of Telehealth medical consultations in the U.S. and the only one with National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) certification for physician credentialing. • 6 million members • 24-minute average response time • 90% patient issues resolved • 15 years average physician experience • U.S. Board Certified Physicians, State-Licensed and living and working in the USA • Zero malpractice claims • 95% member satisfaction • Exclusive $0 co-pay per visit

There are two ways to purchase this program. 1. Recommend your employees consider the purchase of this service on their own as an Individual Consumer directly from our website. 12  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

Individual Consumer Package One: Health Helper is only $12/ month and covers all members of the household. • A Medical Health Advisor program. • A Medical Bill Saver™ Program. • Aetna Dental Access® with a network of over 132,000 providers nationwide. • Coast To Coast Vision with access to over 12,000 eye care locations nationwide. • Pharmacy Discount program with savings from 10% to 85% at over 60,000 locations nationwide.

Individual Consumer Package Two:

Health Helper + Security provides all benefits in the Health Helper Program and also provides these three additional services all for $22/ month and covers all members of the household. • Safe Identity ID Theft Protection services. • Legal Care program • Roadside Assistance.

IMPORTANT: There are three packages for employers to offer their employees via a 100% employer paid, 100% employee paid or cost-sharing option, starting at $8.50 per employee per month. Our Freshbenies Platform Provides the Platform You and Your Employees Need to Receive Care which is Accessible, Affordable and Delivers Quality Care for up to 70% of your medical needs.

an easy-to-understand overview of the program for your benefit. Our videos are very humorous and highly informative. The site also explains: • What this valuable membership card does. • Provides sample savings when the service is used. • Includes nearly 100 testimonials. • Reviews the Individual Consumer Packages above • Provides a video based Frequently Asked Questions • Permits individual consumers to purchase this program directly from the website.

So, in summary, I told you in our first article we had a solution for each of the four profile categories we know exist within the FVMA membership. These four profiles were and our recommendations are: 1. A veterinary practice that has no interest in offering any insurance or benefits.

a. Recommendation 1: Inform your staff about freshebenies.com/ fvma and provide them access to this valuable service. Or, offer it as a very low cost, but highly valuable employee benefit through payroll deduction for a reduced price.

2. A veterinary practice that wants to offer insurance or benefits, but is concerned about the cost and administration of offering a Plan.

a. Recommendation 1: Offer Freshbenies to your staff at a minimum in one of the two ways suggested above. b. Recommendation 2: Consider offering a Defined Contribution Health Plan. c. Recommendation 3: Consider offering 100% voluntary non-medical benefits in demand by your employees.

3. A veterinary practice that offers a “stipend” to cover health insurance policies purchased on We encourage all of you to visit www. the individual health insurance freshbenies.com/fvma to learn more. marketplace. There you can watch three one-and-ahalf minute videos designed to provide

This group of practitioners are the trail blazers of the FVMA


membership. However, you could be violating several laws and we want to provide 100% assurance that you are in compliance with the Em‑ ployee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

a. Recommendation 1: Offer Freshbenies to your staff.

b. Recommendation 2: Investigate converting your “stipend” program into a 100% compliant Defined Con‑ tribution Health Plan under multiple laws to avoid stiff penalties if there is a violation occurring. c. Recommendation 3: Permit us to work with your staff to help them determine if they qualify for Federal Premium Tax Subsidies (most will) and how much assistance they may receive and help them maximize their benefits with an Individual Policy Review. d. Recommendation 4: Consider offering 100% voluntary non-medical benefits in demand by your employ‑ ees. 4. A Veterinary practices that is currently offering group health insurance or other employee benefits to their staff.

a. Recommendation 1: Offer Fresh‑ benies to your staff. b. Recommendation 2: If you are not ready to offer a Defined Contribution Health Plan, let us help you custom design a health plan that by-passes some of the Affordable Care Act provi‑ sions that improves your plan designs and has the potential to produce sig‑ nificant savings to the company and employees. In this option, you can eliminate contribution requirements, but must maintain participation re‑ quirements similar to your current strategy. We can review your current program for future ACA Compliance and investigate better alternatives. c. Recommendation 3: Consider a Defined Contribution Health Plan. Determine a date to cancel your group, define any amount of reimbursement the office can afford for insurance, let us help your staff with Federal Premi‑ um Tax Subsidy assistance and policy

selection and implement your 100% legally compliant Defined Contribu‑ tion Health Plan. d. Recommendation 4: Consider offering 100% voluntary nonmedical benefits in demand by your employees.

Your Next Steps: 1. We believe every single member of the FVMA and their staff should have the Freshbenies program. Contact us to offer an employer package or direct your staff to sign up online for our Indi‑ vidual Consumer solution at www. freshbenies.com/fvma. 2. Visit www.davidfrank.zanehealth.com and click on the Request Demo button. We will arrange your 10 minute Discovery Call and Demo of the Defined Contribution Health Plan administrative platform. FVMA members are receiving a 50% discount on the set-up of this platform. 3. Decide if a Defined Contribu‑ tion Health Plan or an alternative group health strategy is right for your organization. If yes, we would ask that you consider working with GameChanger Planning Network, one of the leading providers of these solutions in Florida. 4. Elect to have GameChanger

Planning Network present a Wel‑ come Packet to your staff that lets us provide an estimate of your staff ’s eligibility and how much they could receive in Federal Premium Tax Sub‑ sidies to help pay each month with their health insurance premiums. Insurance coverage is now required by law of every citizen with some exceptions. 5. Finally, we will help each staff member choose the Individual Insur‑ ance Policy that is best for them and their family or assist you and your staff with new group health alternatives. It has been a pleasure writing for the FVMA Advocate and we look for‑ ward to more opportunities to discuss concepts and solutions that save you time, money and frustration while improving your work-life balance. We hope to be of service in the very near future.

David Frank

Founder & President of A. D. Frank & Associates, LLC, d/b/a The GameChanger Planning Network. Mr. Frank has been an Employee Benefits & 401k Consultant since 1998 and an industry professional since 1994. He is a Certified College Planning Relief Specialist, Board Certified Health Coach and Certified Customer Loyalty Expert. The GameChanger Planning Network makes available to the FVMA customizable solutions that have been used by more than 13,000 companies and over 16,000,000 Americans through The GameChanger Planning Network team members. Mr. Frank can be reached by email at davidfrank@gamechangerpn.com or by phone at 800-378-1514. You may visit our newest website www.gamechanger-rewards.com to see a sampling of one of the most innovative rewards program in America, which you may wish to make available to your friends, families and customers. Our home website, www.gamechangerpn.com is currently being rebranded. Please contact us with any questions you may have concerning the topics we have discussed. We may be able to send you short video education responses to as many as 72 subjects regarding business, personal or retirement related issues, or you may wish to sign up for one of our three free video courses. Mr. Frank lives in Ponce Inlet, FL with his wife and two children.

www.fvma.org  |  13


Members encouraged to attend the fvma's legislative action days

T

he Florida Veterinary Medical Association (FVMA) exists to promote and protect the interests, health and livelihoods of its key stakeholders and to work for the progress of the profession its 3,600 members engage in on a daily basis. One of the major tools employed by the FVMA in carrying out its mission to “promote animal health and wellbeing, public health, and the advancement of the veterinary profession” is its program of advocacy. This element of the FVMA’s work comes into sharp focus yearly during the Florida Legislative Session which runs for 60 days beginning in March. During these sessions the Association engages in what is known as Legislative Action Days, two days when the FVMA converges at the seat of government to address its legislative priorities. As the event’s name suggests, Legislative Action Days is planned and carried out to achieve maximum response from Florida Legislators and their respective staffs. The association makes its presence felt by deploying a delegation to Tallahassee to interact personally with individual law makers who represent their districts, and to lobby for the development and passage of laws that are constructed in the best interests of the Veterinary Profession and the health and welfare of animals entrusted in our care. Officers of the FVMA, members, veterinary students from the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, FVMA’s legal and government consultants form the Tallahassee delegation. FVMA members have increasingly shown enthusiasm for this aspect of the advocacy program, and during Legislative Action Days. Teams in Tallahassee include a broad contingent of members coming from all corners of the state. The 2013 Legislative Session had the participation of more than 50 practicing veterinarians, practice owners and students. The event provides members with a two-day window to engage their Senators and House Representatives in Tallahassee. Legislative Action Days also includes a workshop for attending FVMA members to be briefed on the Senate and House bills that are of significance to the Veterinary Profession. The workshop also introduces members, new to the legislative process, to the proactive advocacy strategies of the FVMA and serves as a session to plan the strategies of the Association during Legislative Action Days. Participating members have repeatedly attested to the usefulness of this workshop and the two days of interaction with Florida

lawmakers. They speak to the overall empowering experience of Legislative Action Days. Participating members value the opportunity to network with fellow leaders of the profession and to participate and learn from the steps being taken by the Association to overcome the challenges facing veterinarians. Dr. Christy Layton attended the legislative session for the first time last year, and described her experience as having “opened my eyes to how to proceed locally with county government as well as the need for more veterinarians to be involved locally and on a statewide level to protect our profession.” While the FVMA’s activist profile is in full display during the Legislative Session, the Association’s program of advocacy is active year round. The FVMA engages the firm of Mixon & Associates, who are based in Tallahassee, as lobbyists for the Association. They have been a part of a successful FVMA advocacy team for six years. FVMA’s partnership with professional advocates dates back to the 1960s, and is a critical component of the work that encourages legislators to produce laws that will continue to protect, promote and advance the profession of Veterinary Medicine in the State of Florida, and to reject those that would have negative impacts. Leading up to the start of the legislative session, Mixon and Associates work to introduce FVMA initiatives to legislative committees and are an important presence, along with officers of the FVMA, at committee meetings. Successful outcomes in reviewing committees ensure that Bills reach the Senate and House for a vote. Last year, the FVMA introduced a new arm to further strengthen its advocacy program. Spearheaded by FVMA President Jerry L. Rayburn, DVM, the FVMA’s Political Action Team (PAT) was inaugurated on June 22, 2013. The PAT engages members from local veterinary medical associations to enhance awareness of the political process at the local and statewide levels, and develops strategies that improve and create relationships between elected officials and the local associations. It also serves to educate members of the profession about the importance of maintaining a strong, viable, local grassroots advocacy network. The 2014 FVMA Legislative Action Days will be held March 12-13, 2014. All members are encouraged to attend and join your colleagues in this extremely important legislative advocacy event!

The most valuable asset the FVMA has in influencing regulatory and legislative initiatives that impact veterinary medicine is the engagement of our membership

14  |  FVMA ADVOCATE


2014 Legislative Action Days Schedule of Events Wednesday, March 12, 2014 2:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.

Legislative Workshop Group Dinner

The FVMA will host a group dinner following the Legislative Workshop. If you are traveling with a spouse or guest, they are invited to attend.

Thursday, March 13, 2014 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. 8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m. 8:30 a.m.

Group Breakfast Final Review of FVMA Legislative Priorities and “Charge to Delegates” Delegates walk to Capitol to attend their legislative appointments

The FVMA will host a group breakfast Thursday morning prior to our visit to the Capitol. Following breakfast, we will recap our legislative agenda and then head to the Capitol for our scheduled appointments.

APPOINTMENTS WITH LEGISLATORS Registration for this event is free for members, but pre-registration is required. Should you have any questions on registration, please contact the FVMA office at (800) 992-3862 . To gain the most out of our visit to the Capitol, FVMA staff will secure appointments for you with legislators from your respective district. These appointments are made subject to the legislators’ availabilities. Members attending Legislative Action Days for the first time will be paired with seasoned veterans to ensure you gain the most out of your Capitol visit. We encourage all members to take the opportunity and participate in this important grassroots advocacy event! HOST HOTEL

Four Points by Sheraton Tallahassee Downtown 316 W Tennessee Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 Special FVMA room rate of $159 plus taxes ends March 3, 2014, subject to availability. Book your room today by calling (888) 627-7082 and asking for the special FVMA room rate. www.fvma.org  |  15


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a list of supported accounting software and other details, visit pnc.com/cashflowinsight. Monthly charges will apply unless you un-enroll. CFO: Cash Flow Optimized and Cash Flow 16  |  un-enroll, FVMA ADVOCATE Insight are service marks of The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. ©2014 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved. PNC Bank, National Association. Member FDIC


85

distinguished Speakers

The

Ms. Carrie Anderson Dr. Nicholas Bacon Dr. David Brunson Dr. Bobbi Conner Dr. Doug DeBoer Mr. Eric Garcia Dr. Lorrie Gaschen Dr. David Grant Mr. Richard Heysek Ms. Debbie Hill

th FVMA Annual

Conference Dr. Lauren Olavessen Dr. Ann Penn Dr. John Phillips Dr. Alan H. Rebar Dr. Michael Reems Ms. Kelly Salgado Dr. Thomas Schubert Dr. Matthew Winter Dr. Cristopher Young

Dr. Sharon Hoffman Dr. Adam Honeckman Dr. Matthew Johnson Ms. Chastity Ketchum Dr. Anita Kiehl Dr. Victoria Lukasik Dr. Dennis Marcellin-Little Dr. Andrew Mackin Dr. Lloyd Meisels Dr. Kate Myrna

VETERINARIANS

WET LAB OFFERINGS MPL – Medial Patellar Luxation Repair Wet Lab Saturday, April 26, 2014 | 1:30 P.M. - 5:10 P.M.

Vets- $349

Dr. LeeAnn Blackford

Medial patellar luxation is a very common orthopedic condition seen in many dog breeds and also cats. This laboratory will discuss the principles and forces behind this condition. You will learn how to diagnose the grade of MPL and decide on repair options based on your diagnosis. This laboratory will teach you methods such as trochlear wedge recession, block recession, tibial crest transposition and soft tissue procedures. Participants will practice on cadavers to improve surgical skills. Sponsored by:

MASTER CLASSES/WORKSHOPS Sunday, April 27, 2014

9:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.

11:00 a.m. – 12:50 a.m.

Let’s talk about YOUR cases so that YOU have a better idea of what to do when dealing with YOUR clients and patients. The cases can be “ordinary and routine” or “crazy and difficult” – we’ll discuss them all. Approaches to diagnosis and treatment – behavior modification, environmental modification, and pharmacological therapies – will be addressed. Sponsored by:

At ram ce og n Pr A-Gla

Pending Race Approval -

Dr. Terry Curtis

The most important thing when dealing with dogs and cats is COMMUNICATION – especially in the veterinary clinic. Let’s talk about what the dogs and cats are saying to you and how you should be responding. Basics about canine and feline body language will be covered as well as techniques that will help in handling these “scared” pets. Sponsored by:

American Association of Veterinary State Boards RACE Provider #532

VETERINARIANS

Sunday, April 27, 2014 Dr. Terry Curtis

Culture and Sensitivity Interpretation Workshop

Behavior Master Class for Veterinary Technicians – Aggressive Dogs and Cats in the Clinic

Technicians

VETERINARIANS

Behavior Master Class for Veterinarians – Bring Your Own Cases

Sunday, April 27, 2014 11:00 a.m. – 12:50 a.m.

Dr. Elizabeth Bailey Assisted By: Dr. Heidi Ward

The workshop will begin with a presentation introducing principles of culture and sensitivities and interpretation of results to maximize antimicrobial efficacy. All workshop attendees will also be given a Target Book. This guide is divided into four sections to provide a number of ways to approach culture and sensitivity information which include: Location of Infections, Antimicrobials, Formulary and Antimicrobials vs. Pathogens. Sponsored by:

This program has been submitted (but not yet approved) for 319 hours of continuing education credit in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE approval; however participants should be aware that some boards have limitations on the number of hours accepted in certain categories and/or restrictions on certain methods of delivery of continuing education. Call Diana Ruiz, FVMA Meetings and Events Coordinator, at (800) 992-3862 for further information.


Reserve Your Room Today FVMA Room Block Deadline March 28! Hotel Information

Special GroupRates FVMA's

Customize your stay from one of the following Room Rate: (Rates Include the Hotel's $14.95 Daily Resort Fee)

Begin at

$164

Room Type Single Rate Double Rate Triple Rate Quad Rate Resort View Guestrooms $164.00 $164.00 $184.00 $204.00 Water View Room $174.00 $174.00 $194.00 $214.00 Downtown Disney View $184.00 $184.00 $204.00 $224.00 1-Bedroom Island Suite $264.00 $264.00 $284.00 $304.00 1-Bedroom Tower Suite $445.00 $445.00 $465.00 $485.00

The daily charge of $14.95 will be inclusive of the rate. The Resort (Hotel Services) Program includes the following: Wired and wireless in-room Wayport® High Speed Internet. (In-room WebTV® not included.); Cyber Café (24 hour access) located on the 1st floor of the main building; Pool Ambassador, offering personalized pool amenities and services; Daily Membership to the Fitness Center (guest room key required for entry) and Spa, including unlimited use of Fitness Center; Equipment, lockers, hot tubs, sauna, steam room and shower facilities; Minimum age for Spa guests is 18 years. (Membership does not include Spa treatments or services); Weekday New York Times Newspaper available in lounge; In room coffee and tea; Complimentary self parking; Disney Bus Transportation – Daily to Disney ® Theme Parks(Magic Kingdom, Epcot, Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studio, Typhoon; Lagoon and Blizzard Beach. Nightly Transportation to Downtown Disney; Marketplace and Pleasure Island (Beginning At 6pm).

Things To Do The major attractions of Walt Disney World Orlando are just minutes away from the Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa. The luxurious hotel, known for its comfort and location, is ideally situated across the street from Downtown Disney and a stone’s throw from all the major attractions. When you stay here, you are shuttled by Disney to wherever you like in sampling the delights of Disney - their four theme parks and water parks. Exciting and exotic worlds await you at Disney’s Epcot Center, Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Magic Kingdom. Downtown Disney features top-of-the-line restaurants, unique shops, including the world’s largest Disney store, and one-of-a-kind great entertainment.

Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa Across the street from Downtown Disney 1900 E. Buena Vista Drive, Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830

Make Your Room Reservations Now! Call: 866-397-6516 and mention “FVMA”

4

Register

Easy Ways to

Register today & save! After March 28 add $75 per registrant.   Mail:

  Online:

FVMA 7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, FL 32809

www.fvma.org info@fvma.org

 Phone:

  Fax:

(800) 992-3862 (407) 851-3862

(407) 240-3710

RE

DAY! TO R E GIST


B u i l d i ng t h e Dynam i c Veter i nary T eam

World-Class CE

Cutting-edge Wet Labs Quality

CE

Networking Opportunities Dynamic Marketplace

Professional Excellence

85

LECTURE & LAB TOPICS ■ Surgery ■ Clinical Pathology ■ Dentistry ■ Emergency & Critical Care ■ Practice Management ■ Gastroenterology ■ Dermatology ■ Anesthesia ■ Urology ■ Tech Procedures ■ Physical Rehabilitation ■ Cytology ■ Cardiology ■ Radiology ■ Behavior ■ Avian Medicine ■ Internal Medicine ■ Ophthalmology ■ Endocrinology

■ Neurology ■ Exotics ■ Medicine ■ Intraoral Radiology for Technicians ■ Avian Handling, Restraint and Basic Behavior ■ Dental Wet Lab ■ Anesthetic Monitoring: How to Use the Tools ■ Demystifying the Neurological Exam ■ MPL – Medial Patellar Luxation Repair ■ Fracture Repair of the Tibia and Femur

th FVMA Annual

Conference

April 25-27, 2014

Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa

Special Room Rate Ends March 28th

at the Walt Disney World® Resort

Offering Florida’s New Requirement on Laws & Rules & Dispensing Legend Drugs  2 hours in Laws & Rules Governing the Practice of Veterinary Medicine in Florida - Bryan Reynolds, JD Friday, APRIL 25th | 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

 1 hour in Dispensing Legend Drugs - Dr. Thomas Vickroy Saturday, APRIL 26th | 7:00 a.m. to 7:50 a.m.

World-class Continuing Education for e v e r y m e mb e r of t h e V e t e r i n a r y T e a m www.fvma.org  |  19


Your Featured Speakers

Invitation

Dr. Clarke Atkins

Dr. Terry Curtis

Dr. Todd Duffy

Cardiology

Behavior

Emergency/ Critical Care

Ms. Karyn Gavzer

Dr. Peter Kintzer

to Attend Dr. Richard Ford

Dr. Philip Fox

Internal Medicine

Cardiology

Dr. Teresa Lightfoot

Dr. Caryn Plummer

Dr. David Polzin

Urology

Practice Management

Practitioners Challenge

Exotics & Avian

Ophthalmology

Dr. Elke Rudloff

Dr. Michael Schaer

Dr. Todd Tams

Dr. Cynthia Ward

Dr. Sonja Zabel

Emergency/ Critical Care

Internal Medicine

Gastroenterology

Endocrinology

Dermatology

canine dENTAL eXTRACTIONS

Feline Dental WET LAB

Friday, April 25, 2014 | 1:30 P.M. - 6:10 P.M. Dr. Eva Ojolick

Saturday, April 26, 2014 | 1:30 P.M. - 5:10 P.M. Dr. Sharon Hoffman

Saturday, April 26, 2014 | 8:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. Dr. Jan Bellows

This 4 hour lecture/lab will open with an overview of laser technology and its uses in general practice. This session will include innovative ways to market the laser to your clients. Following the lecture, students will paticipate in an interactive presentation of cases, protocols, treatments on live canines, and outcomes. The program is open to DVMs (who examine the patient and prescribe treatment) and technicians (who perform the laser treatment).

Vets- $295 This lab is an intermediate level lab for the veterinarian that is already taking dental radiographs and using a high speed drill. We will focus on tooth root tip extraction and mandibular canine tooth extraction techniques in the dog and cat. These are two of the most common problematic dental extractions in general practice. Participants should bring magnification and if possible, a head lamp or other light source. Co-Sponsored by:

Demystifying The Neurological Exam

Saturday, April 26, 2014 | 8:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. Dr. LeeAnn Blackford

Sunday, April 27, 2014 | 9:00 A.M. - 10:50 A.M. Dr. Thomas Schubert

Vets- $349 Are you looking for more experience in approaching the tibia and femur and would like to learn how to stabilize these fractures using different modalities? This laboratory experience will demonstrate reliable techniques and give valuable tips useful in repairing simple tibia and femur fractures using pins and wire and the Aesculap DCP plating system. Participants will practice surgical repair on plastic models and cadavers to become more familiar with the surgical technique.

Vets- $75 This wet lab is designed to remove the mystery of the neurological examination. Through PowerPoint presentations for anatomy review and the utilization of live canine subjects, the attendees will be guided by a boarded neurologist in a hands-on review and evaluation of reflexes, postural responses and cranial nerves. This wet lab is limited to 16 participants guaranteeing one-on-one instruction.

Sponsored by:

Vets- $295 Worry free extractions-- if the

prospect of tooth extractions sends shivers up your spine, this lab for veterinarians only is for you! Intraoral radiology, flap exposure design and creation as well as proper sharpening and use of wing tipped elevators will be covered. Using cadaver specimens, tension free closures will also be taught and practiced. Participants will be able to extract and close defects on cat incisors, premolars, canines and molars by the end of the lab. Co-Sponsored by:

Fracture Repair of the Tibia and Femur

VETERINARIANS

VETERINARIANS

Sponsored by:

Intraoral Radiology for Technicians Straightening the Learning Curve

TECHNICIANS

Vets- $149 | Techs- $149

VETERINARIANS

Rehabilitation & Laser Therapy

VETERINARIANS

DVM/TECHNICIANS/STAFF

WET LAB OFFERINGS

Sunday, April 27, 2014| 9:00 A.M. - 12:50 P.M. Dr. Jan Bellows

Techs- $95 Sixty percent of a cat’s (and dog’s) teeth are located under the gum line and virtually impossible to see clinically. This wet lab, open to veterinarians and technicians, will help every veterinarian and technician along their journey of incorporating intraoral radiology into every professional oral assessment, treatment, and prevention visit. Technicians will be able to expose and prepare for the veterinarian, full mouth series of intraoral radiographs in the cat. Sponsored by:

co n ti nu i ng e d u c a t i o n c r e d i t This program has been:

 Approved as New York State Sponsor of Continuing Education

 Approved by Florida Board of Veterinary Medicine DBPR FVMA Provider # 31


8:00 am 8:50 am

Radiology

Anesthesia / Heartworm

Immune Mediated Disease

Exotics

How to interpret radiographs in the vomiting dog and cat

Anesthesia for the overweight animal:obesity and anesthetic risk

Avian Basics

Brunson

Immune-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia: Pathophysiology & Diagnosis

Mackin

Practical aspects of gastrointestinal contrast radiography

New techniques for sedation and anesthesia

Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia: Pathophysiology & Diagnosis

Gaschen 9:00 am 9:50 am

FRIDAY−APRIL 25

Gaschen 10:10 am 11:00 am

Practical aspects of urinary contrast procedures Gaschen

11:10 am 12:00 pm

1:30 pm 2:20 pm

Anesthesia and sedation for excited or fractious animals

Immune-Mediated Blood Disorders: Emergency Management

Brunson

Mackin

Rabbit Medicine

Lightfoot

Bone Marrow Collection in the Dog and Cat

Avian Neoplasia

Gaschen

Brunson

Imaging of hepatobiliary disease in dogs and cats

Using NSAID for pain management of the anesthetized dog

Immunosuppressive Therapy: Better Use of 'Established' Drugs

Ultrasonography of the feline pancreas

Cerenia benefits and uses for the surgical patient

Mackin

Brunson

Mackin

The 2014 Pract

Advancing Medicin

▶ Interpret hematolog

"routine" tests to fo

▶ Determine what oth

Mackin

for each case

▶Discuss how trending and outcome

▶Discuss treatment op

Lightfoot

Kintzer

Lightfoot

Exotic Facts you MUST Know

USDA Accreditation Mo USDA Program, and Re Young

Rabbit dental disease treatment options

USDA Accreditation Mo Health Certificates for C Young

2:30 pm 3:20 pm

Gaschen

4:20 pm 5:10 pm

Improve your interpretation of radiographic Heartworm Disease Part 1: Separating lung patterns in dogs and cats Fact from Fiction

Gaschen

Olavessen

Mackin

Basics of CT and MRI for brain and spinal disease

Heartworm Disease Part 2: Lessons from the Delta

Mackin

Lightfoot

Technician Best Practices / Neurology Avian Medicine

Orthotics and Rehabilitation / Oncology

Radiology

Behavior

Radiology Safety and Positioning – “Sit, Stay and Lay if only it were that easy”

Speer

Canine Rehabilitation – Introduction to starting a rehabilitation program

To Cut or Not to Cut: Radiographic Assessment of the Vomiting Patient

Curtis

Respiratory Emergencies – “Can you catch your Breath?”

Management of Aggressive and Frightened Birds

Acute Wound Management

Abnormal Radiographic Findings: When the lesion tells us to look elsewhere Winter

Orthotics and Prosthetics

Gaschen

8:00 am 8:50 am

SATURDAY−APRIL 26

Mackin

Ferret Medicine

Lightfoot

Combining ultrasonography with radiogra- Practice tips for improving anesthetic phy in patients with vomiting and diarrhea management of animals

Gaschen

5:20 pm 6:10 pm

Ketchum

9:00 am 9:50 am 10:10 am 11:00 am

4:20 pm 5:10 pm

Johnson Johnson

Ferret Neoplastic Conditions

Lightfoot

Diseases of Geriatric Rabbits

Winter

Hyperesthesia syndr

Implementing a beh

Curtis

Speer

Johnson

The Vomiting Patient: Radiography vs. Ultrasound

Curtis

Patient Assessment – “Tecking a room, tips and review”

Speer

Coelomitis in Birds

Bladder cancer in dogs and cats / Bladder and Urethral cancer – any new ideas?

Bacon

Pulmonary patterns: Interpretation of pulmonary parenchyma

Winter

Treating departure/s cats

Nursing Skills and Patient Care- “Things every technician should already know”

Speer

Soft tissue sarcoma in the dog – diagnosis, treatment and prognosis

The cardiac silhouette: What do we really know?

Curtis

Recognizing Neurological Disease for Technicians

Speer

Bone cancer in dogs – more than just amputa- Aggressive vs. non-aggressive bone tion disease Bacon

Winter

Curtis

Special Needs of the Neurological patient for Technicians

Speer

New advances in the surgical and medical treatment of mast cell tumours in dogs

The limping puppy: Developmental bone disease

Curtis

Practice Management

Advanced Procedures for the Veterinary Technician

Hiring Smart

Placement of the ARROW Jugular Catheter, The Bone Marrow A and Strontium Radiation Therapy

Ketchum 3:20 pm 4:10 pm

Parrot Behavior: Normal and Disorders

Hypoalbuminemia

Lightfoot

Speer

Ketchum

1:30 pm 2:20 pm

Olavessen

Fever of Unknown

Feline Nursing Care- “Tigers, Lions and oh my!”

Ketchum 11:10 am 12:00 pm

Brunson

Immunosuppressive Therapy: What’s New

Ketchum

Schubert

Schubert

SUNDAY− APRIL 27

Brunson

Lightfoot

Practitioner's Ch

How I Treat: Auto mutilation in Birds

Chickens! The Basics

Bacon

Pet Chicken Diagnostics and Therapeutics Feather Picking!

Bacon

Clinical Pathology 9:00 am 9:50 am

Conner

Grant

10:00 am 10:50 am

Conner

Coagulation review

Training for Results

11:00 am 11:50 am

Hypoalbuminemia – when to treat & what to use

Primary hemostasis

Conner

Grant

Client Retention Strategies

Grant

12:00 pm 12:50 pm

www.fvma.org

Winter

Winter

Winter

My dog knows bette

Curtis

Behavioral changes

House soiling in cats

Behavioral welfare –

Salgado

Nursing Care for the Cancer Patient: Syndromes that Should be Veterinary Technician

Salgado

Chemotherapy Safety: Everybody Has a Concern When Chemot

Salgado


Sc i e n t i f i c P r o g r

hallenge / USDA Program

titioners' Case Challenge:

Practice Management

Cardiology

Dermatology

Neurology

Internal Medicine

Using Technology to Communicate Value

Management of Asymptomatic Heart Disease in Dogs and Cats Part 1

Sublingual Immunotherapy: A New Option for Allergy Patients

The Neurological Examination Schubert

Systemic hypertension - what goes u must come down!

Vestibular Syndromes

Coughing dogs - cardiac or respirator

ne: Trends in Diagnostic Testing

Garcia

Atkins

gy, chemistry, urinalysis and other orm a differential diagnosis her diagnostic testing is appropriate

25 Electronic Tools That Will Rock Your Veterinary Practice Garcia

Management of Asymptomatic Heart Disease in Dogs and Cats Part 2

Atkins

What's New in Drug Therapy of Allergic Dermatitis?

Boosting Exam Room Compliance Using Digital Tools

Atkins

Unusual Clinical Manifestations of Dermatophytosis in Dogs and Cats

Seizures, are they all emergencies?

Garcia

Feline Hypertension: Risks, Diagnosis and Management

Dyspneic cats - how to make them breathe more easily

Reputation Management

Diagnosis, Treatment and Prognosis of Feline Cardiac Disease

Treatment of Cornification Disorders in the Dog

Paraparesis/paraplegia

Approach to elevated liver enzymes in dogs

g of results can improve patient care

ptions and monitoring protocols

Garcia

odule #3 - Overview of Foreign Animal, Managing the Social Media Beast eportable Diseases Garcia

odule #9 - Interstate and International Category I Animals

Atkins

DeBoer

DeBoer

DeBoer

DeBoer

Advances in the Management of Canine Treatment Options for Managing Heart Failure Part 1 Everyday Otitis Atkins

DeBoer

Measuring the Performance of Digital Advances in the Management of Canine Managing Chronic and Recurrent Otitis Marketing Campaigns Heart Failure Part 2 Part 1

Honeckman

Schubert

Schubert

Honeckman

Honeckman

Schubert

Honeckman

Quadriplegia/quadriparesis

Schubert

Icteric cats - more than just hepatic lipidosis

Honeckman

How to treat CNS trauma of the head and back

All you need to know about FUO Honeckman

Garcia

Atkins

DeBoer

Schubert

Strategies on How to Implement and Handle Client Feedback Programs

Differentiating Cardiac from Respiratory Disease

Managing Chronic and Recurrent Otitis Part 2

GME/MUE and other Sterile Inflammatory CNS Disorders

Hypoalbuminemia - Why is this albumin so low?

Garcia

Atkins

Driving Client Engagement and Loyalty with Digital Media

The Case of the Coughing Cat and Other Feline Facial Dermatoses DeBoer Topics in Feline Thoracic Medicine

Schubert

Infectious CNS Disorders of Dogs

The Anemic Dog - Beyond Steroids

Internal Medicine / Ophthalmology

Gastroenterology

Emergency / Critical Care

Cardiology

Clinical Pathology / Cytology

Zoonoses…how real the threat? Ford

Acute and Chronic Vomiting in Dogs and Cats - Diagnostic Approach Part 1 Tams

Resuscitation from Hypovolemic Shock: Clinical pearls for success: the hisMoving in and preventing the kill Part 1 tory and physical examination

Rudloff

Rebar

havior modification plan

Small animal vaccines and vaccinations for the technician

Acute and Chronic Vomiting in Dogs and Cats - Diagnostic Approach Part 2 Tams

Resuscitation from Hypovolemic Shock: Managing canine congestive heart Moving in and preventing the kill Part 2 failure: new strategies

Rudloff

Fox

Case Oriented Approach to Biochemi Profiling of the Urinary System Part 1

er… really?

Unwrapping the Red Eye

Drug Therapy for Vomiting in Dogs and Cats

Respiratory Distress: Localization of the lesion and interventions

Feline cardiomyopathy – hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Case Oriented Approach to Biochemi Profiling of the Urinary System Part 2

Garcia

rome in cats

Ford

separation anxiety in dogs and

Myrna

s – the new AAFP guidelines

– at home and in the clinic

Atkins

Schubert

Fox

Honeckman Honeckman

Introduction to Biochemical Profiling

Rebar

Tams

Rudloff

Fox

Cure for Diabetic Cataracts? Updates on new nutraceuticals

Acute Pancreatitis in Dogs – Update on Diagnosis and Management

GDV: The Difficult Ones

Coughing, dyspnea-Diagnostic imaging made simple Part 1

Case Oriented Approach to Biochemi Profiling of the Liver Part 1

Exam tips

Acute and Chronic Diarrhea in Dogs and Acute Abdomen- An Ugly Situation Rudloff Cats Part 1

Coughing and dyspnea- Diagnostic imaging made simple Part 2

Case Oriented Approach to Biochemi Profiling of the Liver Part 2

Acute and Chronic Diarrhea in Dogs and SIRS and Sepsis in the ICU Part 1 Rudloff Cats Part 2

The ECG revisited – what you must know

Cytological Collection Techniques and General Approach to Interpretation Part1 Rebar

Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Dogs Update on Diagnosis and Therapy

SIRS and Sepsis in the ICU Part 2

Challenging cases – interactive Fox

Cytological Collection Techniques and General Approach to Interpretation Part 2 Rebar

Myrna

in elderly cats and dogs

DeBoer

Myrna

Glaucoma in private practice Myrna

When the corneal ulcer doesn’t heal Myrna

Tams

Rudloff

Fox

Tams

Tams

Tams

Rudloff

Fox

Fox

Rebar

Rebar

Rebar

n

Dermatology

Surgery

Gastroenterology

Practice Management

Emergency / Critical Care

Aspirate, Performing Cryotherapy

Cyclosporine/Apoquel versus glucocorticoids- when to use…or not!

No Pain, More Gain: Understanding Your Minimally Invasive Surgery Options

Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Intestinal Lymphoma in Cats

New, Innovative Ideas to Wake Up Your Veterinary Practice

Rudloff

Known and Recognized by the

therapy is Involved

Zabel

Reems

Tams

Two-step approach to otitis externa treatment

Reems

How to Heal That Wound

Chronic Large Intestinal Disease in Dogs and Cats

The Marketing Secret that Can Take Your Practice to the Top!

Urinary Tract Obstruction: Bad to the Stone

Chronic otitis externa- how does treatment differ

Beyond the Blocked Tom: Emergencies of the Urogenital System in Dogs and Cats

Early Disease Detection/Wellness Testing Programs in Clinical practice Part 1

3 Meeting Techniques to Drive Change and Accountability

Severe Gastroenteritis-

Zabel

Tams

Zabel

Reems

Tams

DLE vs PF

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease

Early Disease Detection/Wellness Testing Programs in Clinical practice Part 2

Zabel

KEY:

Reems

DVM

Gavzer

Poisonings and Overdoses

Gavzer

Gavzer

TEAM

Rudloff

The Critical Dog: Head Injuries Rudloff

Tams

Rudloff

DVM/TEAM


r a m A t - A - Gl a n c e

up,

ry?

Endocrinology

Internal Medicine

Ophthalmology

Dentistry / Oncology

Emergency / Critical Care/Pharmacy

Feline Thyroid Storm and Unusual Manifestations of Feline Hyperthyroidism

Schaer

Heat stroke

The eye examination

Skyrocket your dental practice starting and ending with the exam room

Fluid therapy Duffy

Ward

Unusual Feline Endocrine Diseases

Plummer

Bellows

Interpreting laboratory and imaging results

The approach to the red eye (canine) Plummer

Remove, Reevaluate, Root Canal, or Refer- Making the Right Dental Decisions Bellows

CPR Update – RECOVER Project Duffy

Updates on Adrenal Axis Testing; Making the Diagnosis

Serum Sodium disorders

The approach to the red eye (feline) Plummer

How to Handle Feline and Canine Tooth Resorption Bellows

Interesting Cases in Emergency & Critical Care Part 1 Duffy

Fun with Atypical Cushing’s Disease and Extended Adrenal Panels

Serum potassium disorders

Blindness in dogs and cats: Where is the lesion?

Interpreting intraoral films to make treatment decisions Bellows

Interesting Cases in Emergency & Critical Care Part 2 Duffy

The Clinical Challenge of Thyroid Disease in the Dog

Atypical Addisons

Feline corneal disease

Plummer

What you need to know about dentistry to be the best dental assistant Bellows

Practice Pearls for Common Emergencies Duffy

Ward

Ward

Ward

Ward

Addison’s and Atypical Addison’s Disease

Schaer Schaer

Schaer

Plummer

Schaer

Managing the Cushing patient

Ward

Schaer

Corneal disease in older dogs

What’s normal and what’s not in your patient’s mouth Bellows

Analgesia & Anesthesia of the Emergent and Critically Ill Duffy

Ward

Hyperlipidemia and its problems

Intoxication Schaer

Ocular pharmacology - the best and the rest

Speaking to your clients about preventative dental care Bellows

DKA in the ER Duffy

Common questions from referring veterinarians

Schaer

Insulin- what's new

Cherry eye repair Plummer

Grading of tumors: What does a practitioner need to know? Kiehl

Apoquel – A success story Phillips

Physical Rehabilitation

Practice Management

Urology

Dental Wet Lab

Practice Management / Dermatology

The foundation of physical rehabilitation: what is it and who needs it?

Teamwork! How to make it work and what to do when it doesn't Part 1

Diagnosing Kidney Disease – The tools & how to use them

Why would they think that’s ok? Addressing Employee Issues

ical 1

The foundation of physical rehabilitation: what do we need?

Teamwork! How to make it work and what to do when it doesn't Part 2 Gavzer

Optimizing Outcomes for CKD: Managing the Pet and the Owner – The Ultimate Key to Success Polzin

ical 2

A practical approach to the lame dog

Do you Know How to Get to the 3rd Level of Client Care?

Optimizing Outcomes for CKD: Longer, Happier Lives

Feline Dental Worry Free Extractions 8:00am – 12:00pm WET Dr. Jan Bellows LAB

ical

Managing osteoarthritis over a lifetime

Go Local to Build a Marketing Advantage for Your Practice

Updated Concepts of Fluid Therapy in Kidney Patients

Marcellin-Little

Take a New Look at an Old Problem & Do More for Senior Pets!

Polzin

Managing hip dysplasia, a review and update

3 Telephone Mistakes Even the Best Receptionists Make

Treating Proteinuria: When, Why, and How

g

ical

1

2

e

Ward

Marcellin-Little

Marcellin-Little Marcellin-Little

Marcellin-Little

Pediatric orthopedics

Marcellin-Little

Managing pelvic fracture

Plummer

Plummer

Gavzer

Gavzer

Gavzer

Gavzer

Gavzer

Polzin

Vets- $295

Co-sponsored by

Equipment sponsored by

Polzin

Polzin

KPI – Window to the Practice

Hill

Marketing 101 – Developing Your Plan

Hill

Polzin

Proteinuria: Deciding What It Means

Hill

The Art of using the right diagnostics in veterinary dermatology Zabel

Canine Dental Extraction 1:30pm – 5:10pm WET Dr. Sharon Hoffman LAB

The pruritic patient- How do we approach it- Part 1 parasites

Vets- $295

Zabel

Co-sponsored by

Equipment sponsored by

Zabel

The pruritic patient- How do we approach it- Part 2 pyoderma

How to Make the Value Proposition with Clients

Urinary Tract Infections - Simple & Complex

Dentistry

Clinical Pathology

Behavior Master Class

The oral exam: More is missed by not looking than not knowing Part 1

Cytology of Lymph Nodes

The oral exam: Intraoral radiograph evaluation Part 2

Cytology of the Liver

Behavior master class for Demystifying the Neurological Exam VeterinariansMaster class 9:00am – 10:50am Bring your own cases WET Dr. Thomas Schubert 9:00am – 10:50am

Marcellin-Little

Hoffman

Hoffman

Gavzer

Rebar

Rebar

What’s New in Veterinary Dentistry Part 1 Case Oriented Approach to Blood Film Hoffman Evaluation Part 1 Rebar

What’s New in Veterinary Dentistry Part 2 Case Oriented Approach to Blood Film Hoffman Evaluation Part 2 Rebar

WET LAB

Zabel

Polzin

Dr. Terry Curtis

Neuro Master Class / Workshop

Vets- $75

Limited Availability

Behavior master class for Culture and Sensitivity Veterinary Technicians- Master class Interpretation Workshop Aggressive Dogs & Cats 11:00am – 12:50pm 11:00am – 12:50pm Dr. Elizabeth Bailey & Dr. Terry Curtis Limited Dr. Heidi Ward Availability

WORKSHOP

The pruritic patient- Atopic dermatitis

Tech Procedures

Blood gas basics

Anderson

Hematology

LAB

Anderson

wo rks ho p

Anderson

MASTER CLASS

Common small animal toxins Radiographic positioning

Anderson


Laser Therapy

Internal Medicine / Practice Management

Feline vaccines & vaccination

Ford

Canine vaccines & vaccination

22

Ford

1

Tick-borne diseases: ehrlichiosis & lyme borreliosis & anaplasmosis Part 1

2

Tick-borne diseases: ehrlichiosis & lyme borreliosis & anaplasmosis Part 2

y

50 319

Offering Speakers, Presenting Lecture Hours! Attendees Can Earn a Maximum of Credit Hours!

Ford

Ford

Rehabilitation and Laser Therapy 1:30pm – 6:10pm Dr. Eva Ojolick Vets- $149 Techs - $149

WET LAB

Register Now on Pages 25-26

Rabies awareness challenge

Ford

Hyperlipidemic states in the dog & cat

Ford

Infectious disease update

Ford

Get Your Piece of Charitable Pie-Charitable Funds for Practices Heysek

Emergency / Critical Care / Drug Dosing Anesthesia

Surgery Wet Lab

Triage & Initial Treatment of the Emergent Patient

Alternative Inductions to Propofol

Fluid Therapy for the technician

Anesthesia of the Geriatric Patient

Fracture Repair of the Tibia and Femur 8:00am – 12:00pm Dr. LeeAnn Blackford WET LAB Vets- $349

Duffy Duffy

Nursing Pearls in the ER

Duffy

Lukasik

Lukasik

Balanced Post-Operative Analgesia Lukasik

Drug dosing and administration – the mistake Anesthesia of the Patient with proof method Chronic Renal Failure

Meisels

Lukasik

Hospital discharge instructions

Multimodal Medical Management of Chronic Pain

Meisels

Lukasik

Register Now on Pages 25-26

MPL – Medial Patellar Luxation Repair WET 1:30pm – 5:10pm LAB Dr. LeeAnn Blackford

Pharmacology & Medical Math for Smarties Part 1

Anesthesia of Non-Traditional Patient

Pharmacology & Medical Math for Smarties Part 2

Understanding unwanted side effects of the anesthetic drugs

Surgery

Wet Lab

Now I have removed the tumour – how do I close the wound?

Intraoral Radiology for Technicians - Straightening the Learning Curve 9:00am – 12:50pm WET LAB Dr. Jan Bellows

Penn

Penn

Bacon

Feline lower urinary tract surgery

Bacon

Intestinal surgery in dogs

Lukasik

Lukasik

Vets- $349

Bacon

Techs- $95 Resection and reconstruction techniques for soft tissue sarcoma in dogs Bacon

Equipment sponsored by

Disney

Character Breakfast Sunday, April 27th 2014

6:50 am - 7:50 am Sponsored by

Patterson Veterinary

Preliminary Program Subject to Change


To reserve your room at the Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa at a special rate beginning at $164.00, call 1-866-397-6516 for reservations. Reservation deadline is March 28, 2014. When making reservations use promo code: FVMA.

(U.S. Funds drawn on U.S. Banks)

Phone

Email

Address

  Signature  

Expiration Date 

Total Membership Dues

$

(Spouse registration only allows entrance to the exhibit hall and social events. Spouses who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

Spouse/Guest Name – Please Print Legibly

(Must be registered for conference)

  Spouse/Guest Registration................. $50.00

C

Total Spouse/Guest Fee 

$

www.fvma.org  |  25

Veterinarian Registration FORM

Veterinarian Registration Total (A, B, C, D, E): $__________

Total Registration Fee   $

Total Wet Lab Fee   $

E

Grand Total (Total of Both Sides): $

Total Other Function Fee $

Sat., FVMA Business Luncheon........................... $25.00   Sat., UF CVM Alumni & Friends Reception............ $0.00  

Other Functions

Sun., Culture and Sensitivity Workshop............ N/C   Sun., Behavior Master Class...................................N/C  

Master Classes/Workshops

Year Graduated

Form/2014AC-ADVocate Issue 1

Team Registration (From Other Side): $_______

D

 Fri., Laser Therapy.............................$149.00  Sat., Dental Extractions – Feline ...$295.00  Sat., Dental Extractions – Canine .....$295.00  Sat., Tibia/Femur Fracture Repair....$349.00  Sat., Patellar Luxation Repair ...........$349.00  Sun., Neurology Exam..........................$75.00

Wet Labs

Spouse/Guest Registration

College

  Children’s Registration.............................$0.00   Non-Member..........................................$600.00 Child's Name (Please Print Legibly):

   (Current Member of State VMA or Military)

  FVMA 2014 Member...........................$475.00*   Graduated 2012-2013..............................$0.00   Graduated 2011....................................$300.00   Recent Graduate 2010........................$350.00   Non-Resident.........................................$475.00

(Includes Conference Proceedings on DVD)

B

After March 28, 2014 Add $75 Per Registrant

Fax

Membership  Yes, I would like to join and take advantage of the discounted registration fee. Please check one of the following membership categories for which you qualify:   Regular Member $248.00  Recent Graduate (within last 2 years) $137.00  State/Federal Employee $137.00   Non-Florida Resident $101.00  Part-Time Employed $137.00 (Employed at FVMA Member practice & work 20 hrs per week or less)

Registration Fee

A

License Number

   Visa    Mastercard   American Express Discover

Cell

*To register at the discounted member rate below, your 2014 dues must be current.

Name As It Appears On Card

Credit Card Number

Method of Payment   Check/Money Order    Charge My Credit Card Below $

Payment

Y MEMBER OF THE VETERINARY TEAM

at the Walt Disney World® Resort

BUENA VISTA PALACE HOTEL & SPA

The major attractions of Walt Disney World are just minutes away from the Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa, the host hotel for the FVMA’s 85th Annual Conference. The luxurious hotel, known for its comfort and location, is ideally situated across the street from Downtown Disney and a stone’s throw from all the other major attractions. Courtesy shuttles are available from Downtown Disney providing transportation to wherever you like to sample the delights of Disney − their four theme parks and water parks.

Clinic Name

Hotel Reservations

APRIL 25-27, 2014

• Friday, April 25…7:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. •Saturday, April 26..7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. •Sunday, April 27...7:30 a.m. –12:00 p.m.

Name

Registration Desk Hours:

ANNUAL CONFERENCE

On-site registration will be available at the Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa at the FVMA Desk.

85

Pre-registration deadline is March 28, 2014.

Veterinarian Registration

Registration is required for admission to all aspects of the 85th Annual Conference. The FVMA strongly recommends advanced registration. Your registration covers all CE sessions (excluding wet labs that require additional fees), access to the Marketplace, conference proceedings and all breaks held in the Marketplace.

th FVMA

Advanced Registration

Remit to: Florida Veterinary Medical Association 7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, FL 32809 Fax: (407) 240-3710

General Information


Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa 1900 E Buena Vista Drive Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830

Special Room Rates End March 28, 2014

$164

at the Walt Disney World® Resort

BUENA VISTA PALACE HOTEL & SPA

APRIL 2014 1st25-27, TEAM MEMBER

Starting at

Total Registration Fee  $

Total Wet Lab(s) Fee

$

  Children’s Registration...........................$0.00

Total Spouse/Guest Fee $

Email:

Each 50-minute lecture is worth one continuing education credit. Attendees can earn up to 22 credit hours. For your convenience in recording your CE hours, one certificate will be included in your registration packet. It is your responsibility to document the sessions you attend and the number of hours you receive.

pENDING rACE aPPROVAL

This program has been submitted (but not yet approved) for 319 hours of continuing education credit in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE approval; however participants should be aware that some boards have limitations on the number of hours accepted in certain categories and/or restrictions on certain methods of delivery of continuing education. Call Diana Ruiz, FVMA Meetings and Events Coordinator, at (800) 992-3862 for further information.

$

3rd TEAM MEMBER

Total Registration Fee  $

Total Wet Lab(s) Fee

Child’s Name (Please Print Legibly)

3 Total Spouse/Guest Fee Please Add Total To Grand Total On Reverse

$

$

  Children’s Registration...........................$0.00

(Spouse registration only allows entrance to the exhibit hall and social events. Spouses who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

Spouse Guest Name (Please Print Legibly)

  Spouse/Guest Registration.......................$50.00

Spouse/Guest Registration

B

Wet Labs / Master Class   Fri., Laser Therapy........................................... $149.00   Sun., Dental Radiography..............................$95.00   Sun., Behavior Master Class..............................$0.00

A

  Certified Veterinary Technician (CVT).... $100.00   Certified Veterinary Assistant (CVA)........ $100.00   Veterinary Assistant....................................... $100.00   Practice Manager............................................ $100.00   Other Administrative Staff.......................... $100.00

(Includes Conference Proceedings on DVD)

Registration Fee

Address:

Email:

Name:

Veterinary Technology Students

Form/2014AC-ADVocate Issue 1

Pre-registration fees are complimentary, however, on-site registration is $25.

Full-Time Students Must Be In One Of The AVMA− Accredited Programs Below - Check One:  Eastern Florida State College Hillsborough Community College Miami Dade College Pensacola State College St. Petersburg College Distance Learning Sanford Brown Jacksonville Sanford Brown Ft. Lauderdale Students are limited to two complimentary conference registrations during student years.

*Proof of current enrollment required

School: School:

(Proof of current enrollment must accompany registration form)

  Veterinary Students - Complimentary I am a veterinary student enrolled in an AVMA− accredited College of Veterinary Medicine. SPACE IS LIMITED - First come, first served

Phone:

Address:

Email:

Name:

*Proof of current enrollment required

VETERINARY/VETERINARY TECHNICIAN STUDENT

A registration discount is offered to the 3rd and any additional team member from the same FVMA member practice.

2nd TEAM MEMBER

Registration Fee

Total Registration Fee  $

Total Wet Lab(s) Fee

Total Spouse/Guest Fee $

  Children’s Registration...........................$0.00

2

Child’s Name (Please Print Legibly)

(Spouse registration only allows entrance to the exhibit hall and social events. Spouses who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

Spouse Guest Name (Please Print Legibly)

  Spouse/Guest Registration.......................$50.00

Spouse/Guest Registration

B

Wet Labs / Master Class   Fri., Laser Therapy........................................... $149.00   Sun., Dental Radiography..............................$95.00   Sun., Behavior Master Class..............................$0.00

A

  Certified Veterinary Technician (CVT).... $125.00   Certified Veterinary Assistant (CVA)........ $125.00   Veterinary Assistant....................................... $125.00   Practice Manager............................................ $125.00   Other Administrative Staff.......................... $125.00

(Includes Conference Proceedings on DVD)

Address:

Continuing education hours

TEAM Member/student Registration

If received by March 28, 2014, your registration fee will be refunded, minus a $50 administrative charge. Cancellations not received in writing and acknowledged by the FVMA by the date required will not be eligible for a refund. Noshows will not be refunded.

Name:

Cancellation Policy

Total Team Member Payment (1,2,3): $

1

Child’s Name (Please Print Legibly)

(Spouse registration only allows entrance to the exhibit hall and social events. Spouses who wish to attend C.E. sessions must pay full registration fees.)

Spouse Guest Name (Please Print Legibly)

  Spouse/Guest Registration.......................$50.00

Spouse/Guest Registration

B

Wet Labs / Master Class   Fri., Laser Therapy........................................... $149.00   Sun., Dental Radiography..............................$95.00   Sun., Behavior Master Class..............................$0.00

A

  Certified Veterinary Technician (CVT).... $125.00   Certified Veterinary Assistant (CVA)........ $125.00   Veterinary Assistant....................................... $125.00   Practice Manager............................................ $125.00   Other Administrative Staff.......................... $125.00

Registration Fee

Reserve Your Room Today! (866) 397-6516

(Includes Conference Proceedings on DVD)

Address:

Email:

OR EVERY MEMBER OF THE VETERINARY TEAM

Name:

FVMA ANNUAL CONFERENCE

85th

Host Hotel

VETERINARY TEAM/Student Registration FORM

26  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

General Information


7

th

Annual

Dr. Harvey Rubin

Memorial Food Animal Veterinary Medical Conference

March 1st - 2nd, 2014 Early Registration Ends February 20th

99

15 CEU Credits

99

$100 Pre-registration

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Animal Industry; pharmaceutical and animal food industry partners, and the Florida Veterinary Medical Association, invite you to attend the Sixth Annual Dr. Harvey Rubin Memorial Food Animal Veterinary Medical Conference. Our program provides 15 hours of continuing education obtained through quality food animal informational lectures presented by specialists in the field of food animal veterinary medicine. We invite you to enjoy the steak dinner Saturday evening that also features native Southern foods compliments of our industry partners. Without their support, we could not bring you this high quality continuing education program. The FVMA hosts the conference in conjunction with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Animal Industry. Pharmaceutical and animal food industry partners sponsor the annual steak dinner. To register, call the FVMA toll free at (800) 992-3862 or visit the FVMA website at www.fvma.org. On-site registration begins at 8:30 a.m. on March 1, at the Osceola County Extension Building, Kissimmee, FL.

99

FREE

for CVM Students (Pre-registration is required)

Topics & Speakers ▶ Dispensing Legend Drugs & Laws and Rules (Mandatory 3 hours of CE for FL licensure) – Ed Bayó, Esq. ▶ USDA Program Updates ▶ Electronic Certificates of Veterinary Inspection, Identification Rules, etc. ▶ Guidance Documents and New FDA Regulations on Feed Directives ▶ Accreditation Status - 2 Accreditation Modules ▶ Cattle Identification and Traceability Resources


Schedule At-A-Glance Saturday, March 1, 2014 Registration Desk Open 8:30 a.m. − 5:00 p.m. Preliminary Program subject to change 10:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m. 10:10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Introductions New FDA Regulations – Impact on Food Supply Veterinarians and Producers Dr. Gary Sides 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch –FVMA President’s Welcome – Dr. Jerry Rayburn UF-CVM Update – Dean Jim Lloyd 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m. USDA Program Updates - Dr. Suzan Loerzel 2:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m. TBA 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Animal Disease Traceability  Electronic CVIs  Documentation requirements  Identification regulations  Federal & State rules Dr. Diane Kitchen 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Social hour and hotel check-in Steak Supper served at FCA Headquarters 6:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. How to prepare for the New Documentation Demands Traceability, FDA, and What Else?

EVENT LOCATIONS Osceola County Extension Building 1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane Kissimmee, FL 34744 Florida Cattlemen’s Association 800 Shakerag Road Kissimmee, FL 34744 (Saturday’s Social Hour, Dinner, Cases & Roundtable Events)

Sunday, March 2, 2014 Registration Desk Open 7:30 a.m.− 1:30 p.m.

`

`

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Coffee and Socializing 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Potpourri from FDACS  FDACS, Division of Animal Industry Update - Dr. Thomas J. Holt  Summary of Trichomoniasis Project in South Florida - Dr. John Crews 9:45 a.m. – 11:55 p.m. Veterinary Accreditation Modules (2)  Module 11 – Sheep and Goats – Disease Awareness and Health Certificates - Dr. Kendra Stauffer  Module 8 – International Movement of Horses - Dr. C. Dix Harrell Lunch 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m. Mandatory Veterinary Pharmacy CE - Edwin Bayo, Esq 2:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m. Required FL Laws CE - Edwin Bayo, Esq

4

Easy Ways To Register For your convenience a conference registration form is provided on page 27 in this issue of the Advocate.

7207 Monetary Drive Orlando, Florida 32809 28  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

MEALS & REFRESHMENTS SPONSORED BY


7 Clinic Information

th Annual

Dr. Harvey Rubin

Memorial Food Animal Veterinary Medical Conference

March 1 - 2, 2014

MEETING VENUE: Osceola County Extension Building 1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane Kissimmee, FL 34744 (321) 697-3000

TO REGISTER:

SATURDAY EVENING EVENTS: Florida Cattlemen’s Association 800 Shakerag Road Kissimmee, FL 34744 (407) 846-6221

Call: (800) 992-3862 Fax: (407) 240-3710

Online: www.fvma.org

Address City

State

Phone

Fax

Email

Zip

(Make copies of this form for additional registrations) On or before 2/20/2014

After or on-site 2/20/2014

Veterinarian

$100.00

$125.00

A

$

Food Animal Industry Professional

$100.00

$125.00

B

$

No Charge

No Charge

C

$ 0.00

Number of Attendees

Registration Categories

Student (UF CVM)

Total

Total Registration Fee (Total A, B, & C) Name(s)

Payment Information

(Print name(s) of registrant(s) & check appropriate box(s) below) qDVM qSTUDENT

qDVM qSTUDENT

qDVM qSTUDENT qDVM qSTUDENT

qDVM qSTUDENT qDVM qSTUDENT

qDVM qSTUDENT

qDVM qSTUDENT

Remit to: FVMA, 7207 Monetary Drive, Orlando, FL 32809 • Email: info@fvma.org • Web: www.fvma.org Phone: (407) 851-3862 • Fax: (407) 240-3710 • Toll Free: (800) 992-3862

q Check enclosed made payable to Florida Veterinary Medical Association q Charge my credit card the total qVISA qMC qAMEX qDISCOVER Credit Card No. Name on Card Signature

$

Exp. Date

 2014 REGISTRATION

Name

www.fvma.org  |  29


&

Veterinary Medicine

You have all likely heard the adage perpetuated by Plaintiff ’s attorneys that, “If it’s not in the medical record, it didn’t happen.” Certainly, you cannot be expected to memorialize absolutely everything that is said and done during an appointment. However, well documented medical care is not only beneficial to the patient and their owners, but to you and your practice should you ever be placed in the position of having to defend that care. The medical record is very often helpful, especially where memories have faded and the only recollection of the event is the written record. Regardless of all the benefits of a well-documented medical record, it is also a requirement and condition of Florida statutes and administrative codes, and the retention of your license. Florida Statutes require that, “Each person who provides veterinary medical services shall maintain medical records, as established by rule.”1 Though Florida Statutes do not go into greater specificity about what should be included in the medical record, Florida Administrative Code for the Board of Veterinary Medicine provides specific guidelines for the creation and content of medical records.2 Florida Administrative Code requires that the medical record be created, “as treatment is provided or within 24 hours from the time of treatment.” 3 It goes on to state that the medical record shall include: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Date of each service performed Name of owner Patient identification Record of any vaccinations administered Complaint or reason for services History Physical exam including weight, temperature, pulse and respiration Any present illness or injury Provisional diagnosis

The primary purpose of the medical record is to communicate the condition of the patient at the time of examination or treatment. It serves to document what you have done and why. Inversely, it also serves to document what you have not done and in some circumstances, why you have chosen not to do so. Therefore, the medical record corroborates your actions, thought process and decision making with respect to your care of the patient. The patient’s history is also relevant, especially where different veterinarians within the practice will be seeing the animal, so that each veterinarian is fully informed of the patient’s condition in one accessible place and optimal care can be provided. Remember as well, that patients may leave your practice and therefore, your medical record becomes important 30  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

the Law:

How to Provide Good Care & Protect Yourself in the Process

Part II: Medical Records By Francys C. Martin, Esq. Claims and Litigation Coordinator University of Florida Health Center Self-Insurance Program

to the continuity of care provided by subsequent treating veterinarians. Depending on the number of patients seen in the day and the requirements of your practice, it may be difficult to complete your documentation contemporaneous with your care or within 24 hours. Contemporaneous documentation is so important, however, that Florida Statutes4 allow disciplinary action for the failure to do so, and Florida Administrative Code allows for the issuance of a reprimand, up to one year of probation, and a fine of up to $2,000, for failure to keep contemporaneously written medical records.5 Therefore, it is advisable that you make every effort to document as much as is reasonably possible as soon as is reasonably possible. In addition, Florida Administrative Code also requires that if the following services are provided, they shall also be documented in the medical record:6 ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Laboratory reports Radiographic studies Consultation Medical or surgical treatment Hospitalization Medications prescribed or administered Pathology reports Necropsy findings

Note that this section of the Florida Administrative Code deals primarily with the actions taken by the veterinarian after having assessed and examined the patient. Though the mere decision to perform these tests, administer medications, or perform surgery speaks to your thought process, it remains beneficial to document your reasoning. These tests, medications and procedures are very often where a majority of costs to the client are incurred and the ability to explain and justify their performance can become an issue should billing be brought into question. One of the key components of this medical record


documentation, and which is frequently the cause of adverse incidents, is medication administration. Medication is a critical component of the record and often takes the place of other treat‑ ments or is the primary treatment before other procedures are explored. It is also advisable to document by whom the medi‑ cation was ordered, administered and dispensed, as well as the route, strength and dosage of the medication. It is of such critical importance, that the failure to appropriately document medica‑ tion administration can also lead to disciplinary action pursu‑ ant to Florida Statutes and Florida Administrative Code. Florida Statutes allow disciplinary action for failure to document the, “… storing, labeling, selling, dispensing, prescribing and administer‑ ing of controlled substances.”7 Sanctions can include an adminis‑ trative fine from $1,500 to $5,000, and up to two years probation.8 Though not required by statute or administrative code, client communications are an essential component of the medical record. Because so much of the care provided to animals is an option presented to the client, you should ensure that the treat‑ ment plan, recommendations for tests and procedures, the cli‑ ent’s agreement with or refusal of, and the possible consequences of these decisions be documented. A client’s recollection can at times be clouded by their emotional involvement in the outcome. The medical record, therefore, can provide a factual recitation of the offers presented and the risks, benefits and costs associated with these. Florida Statutes do provide for disciplinary action when, “Performing or prescribing unnecessary or unauthorized treatment.”9 For that reason, documentation of the need for treatment and the client’s authorization may also serve to protect the veterinary provider from disciplinary action. Further, some clients may be non-compliant with the care of their animals and treatment is rendered ineffective. It is recommended that this also be documented so that in the event of an undesired outcome the veterinarian can refer to the good care and recommendations given. Significant complications, adverse incident or unexpected outcome should also be disclosed to the client as timely as pos‑ sible. A good guideline is to make disclosure if the incident is material to the care, the client has required another procedure or additional care as a result, and certainly if they have suffered a serious injury. Medical record documentation of such an inci‑ dent is not required by statute or code, but depending on your institution or practice, you may be required to document disclo‑ sure of the incident in the medical record. This need only be a brief summary of when the disclosure was made, to whom it was made and a factual recitation of the event, free of specula‑ tion. Do not criticize other healthcare providers as the medi‑ cal record is not a vehicle for assigning blame. When in doubt, call your malpractice insurer for advice and guid‑ ance on whether disclosure needs to be made and how to appropriately accomplish that. Do not criticize other healthcare providers as the medical record is not a vehicle for assigning blame. When in doubt, call your malpractice insurer for advice and guidance on whether dis‑ closure needs to be made and how to appropriately accomplish that.

Florida requires veterinarians to retain medical records for a minimum of three years after the last patient treatment entry, terminated their practice or relocated their practice.10 In the event of the veterinarian’s death, the executor should retain the records for two years from the date of death.11 Though certainly good guidelines, your particular facility or practice may have more specific guidelines you are required to follow. You should also consider the statute of limita‑ tions, whether there were significant complications with the care of the animal, and whether there existed a contentious relationship with the owner, in determining how long to keep particular records as having these available is a vital part of the defense of any malpractice action. In Florida, records are confidential and may not be fur‑ nished to any person other than the client, his or her legal representative or other veterinarians involved in the care or treatment of the patient, without written authorization.12 Several exceptions exist, including exceptions for a sub‑ poena from a court of competent jurisdiction with proper notice, statistical and scientific research (provided the information is de-identified), a medical negligence action or administrative proceeding, disciplinary actions against veterinarians, and suspected animal cruelty.13 The importance of medical records cannot be overstated. Medical records not only provide the veterinarian with an outlet to document the care provided, but also encourages continuity of care within the practice and with other vet‑ erinarians if necessary. Within the context of a possible claim or litigation, they are of tantamount importance to the defense of good veterinary care. Words have power. When those words are used concisely and thoughtfully in the medical record they have the ability to deliver optimal care to the patient and afford the veterinarian a great deal of protection. In the final segment of this article, we will discuss veteri‑ nary malpractice litigation.

1

§ 474.2165(2) Fla. Stat. (2013) Fla. Admin. Code R. 61G18-18.002 3 Fla. Admin. Code R. 61G18-18.002(3) 4 § 474.214(ee) Fla. Stat. (2013); §474.214(2) 5 Fla. Admin. Code R. 61G18-30.001(ee) 6 Fla. Admin. Code R. 61G18-18.002(4) 7 § 474.214(1)(mm) Fla. Stat. (2013); §474.214(2) 8 Fla. Admin. Code R. 61G18-30.001(mm) 9 § 474.214(1)(l) Fla. Stat. (2013) 10 Fla. Admin. Code R. 61G18-18.0015(1) 11 Fla. Admin. Code R. 61G18-18.001 12 § 474.2165(4) 13 Id. 2

www.fvma.org  |  31


PRACTICE . e FVMA can help

Got a question? Th

membership in th ne of the benefits of O , available line, (800) 992-3862 to FVMA is our help e

8:00 am Monday to Friday, to members daily, 6:00 pm. e FVMA ovides insight to th pr o als e lin lp he ur O our ges and concerns of staff, of the challen members. ce and ceived calls for advi Recently we have re “pre‑ the state sales tax on clarification about effect over s which went into scription” pet food require‑ other issue is the CE two years ago. An . ments for licensure will and following, we In this new feature received m the questions we highlight topics fro our ep s, in an effort to ke in preceding week as well ns er e on current conc members up-to-dat islative changes. as regulatory and leg

USDA ACCREDITIATION

The U. S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) also revised its Na‑ tional Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP) in 2010. New accreditation for all veterinarians who were accred‑ ited before February 1, 2010 was required by October 1, 2011. Important information about USDA accreditation to take note of: • Accreditation renewal is required every three years. • A new application must be submitted whenever there is a change in a veterinarian’s contact information. The USDA removes a veterinarian from its database of accred‑ ited practitioners when his or her contact information is inaccurate. • USDA provides supplemental online training (NVAP Training Modules) which is required for accreditation. • Renewal instructions are sent to Florida veterinar‑ ians from the Florida office Area Veterinarian-in-Charge, USDA, APHIS, VS, 8100 NW15th Place, Gainesville, FL 32606-9137 • Veterinarians who have not received an email and need to know their accreditation dates should call the USDA Florida office at (352) 313-3060 • Your questions on accreditation may be directed to Robert Chadwell at the Florida office at (352) 313-3081.

32  |  FVMA ADVOCATE

CE REQUIREMENTS FOR VETERINARIANS

Licensed veterinarians are required to complete 30 hours of continuing professional education in veterinary medicine in the two-year period leading up to their license renewal. New rules that came into effect June I, 2012 require that at least one (1) of those hours be in the area of dispensing legend drugs, and at least two (2) hours in the area of laws and rules governing the practice of Veterinary Medicine. It is also important to know that not more than fifteen (15) hours should be non-interactive correspondence courses; and veterinarians can receive credit for no more than five (5) hours of continuing education in business and practice management courses or stress and impairment seminars during any two-year period. Five hours of continuing education in laws and rules may be obtained once per biennium by attending one full day or eight hours of a Board of Veterinary Medicine meeting at which disciplinary hearings are conducted. The FVMA will offer the pharmacy and laws and rules governing the practice of Veterinary Medicine require‑ ments of the CE at the FVMA 85th Annual Conference to be held in Orlando, April 25-27, 2014. The FVMA will also offer a self-study correspondence course, which should be available February 15, 2014. Candidates for first time licensure can access study guide materials for the Veterinary Medicine laws and rules ex‑ amination which are available at the following link: www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/servop/testing/Vet_ Study_Guide.html. You can view and print from this link.


The Health Care Clinic Establishment (HCCE) Permit Points to Remember 1. HCCE allows corporations to purchase and main‑ tain prescription drugs in one corporate inventory to be dispensed by qualifying practitioners who work with them. 2. All licensed veterinarians have the legal authority to purchase and own prescription drugs. 3. HCCE Permit is required by any multi-veterinar‑ ian clinic or solo practitioner who orders drugs through a corporation’s name. The permit covers all the practitioners in a group practice, but requires a “qualifying practitioner” to be named on the permit. That practitioner is responsible for all record keeping, storage and handling of all prescrip‑ tion drugs ordered and dispensed under the HCCE. 4. An Individual practice where there is a sole prac‑ titioner that orders prescription drugs under his/her name and license, does not need the HCCE permit. 5. A Veterinarian who has previously been issued a permit, but who has decided to purchase drugs under his/ her individual license instead, should return the renewal notice to the Department of Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics, Division of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation along with a letter or simple note stating they are not renewing the permit. 6. It is not the intention of the law to prohibit the use of Rx drugs by practitioners at an establishment in a group practice that were purchased by another member of the group practice at that establishment. 7. An HCCE Permit is renewable every two years for a fee of $225. 8. For help and other information concerning HCCE Permits contact the Department of Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics, Division of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation at (850) 717-1800, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or the FVMA helpline at (800) 992-3862.

SALES TAX RULE CHANGE ON “PRESCRIPTION” PET FOODS The Florida Department of Revenue amended the rules regarding sales tax for veterinarians in June 2010 which became effective July 12, 2010. The amendments establish three significant rules: 1. Veterinarians are allowed to purchase and sell drugs, medicinal drugs and veterinary prescription drugs tax free for use in connection with the medical treatment of animals. 2. An Exemption Certificate allows veterinarians to continue to purchase tax free, medical products and sup‑ plies, and medications and drugs that are intended for use in the treatment of animals during the course of an office visit or during boarding or grooming for which the cus‑ tomer is not billed separately. These products cannot be itemized and a charge included on an invoice to the client. 3. “Prescription Diets,” drugs, flea treatments, sham‑ poos, etc., not labeled with the Federal Caution Statement, are taxable and sales tax must be collected when they are sold to a client. The amended rules resulted from the Department of Rev‑ enue’s audit and review of the rules to ensure they were supported by statutory authority; as a result, they reversed the long-standing tax-exempt status of “prescription diets” that existed for over 30 years. The FVMA has initiated legislation this Session, HB 257 and SB 534, which seek to restore the classification of these therapeutic diets to their pre-2010 sales tax-exempt status that was enjoyed by Florida’s pet owners for more than 3 decades as was the original legislative intent, and to clarify by statute, their tax exemption.

www.fvma.org  |  33


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36  |  FVMA ADVOCATE


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS RELIEF VETERINARIANS EXPERIENCED SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARIAN-Available anytime, anywhere! R. A. Swiezy, DVM-(772) 418-1939. (Exp. Issue 2/14:557) Full or part-time, or relief DVM for busy ER clinic - in Mobile, AL. The Animal ER of Mobile is adding 1 or 2 veterinarians to their staff. We practice great medicine in a fun environment. New or recent grads are welcome to apply, as well as experienced veterinarians who would like to pick up some extra money while covering a few shifts a month. Full time includes 14-18 shifts per month. You are welcome to apply to work fewer based on your needs or schedule. ER medicine allows you to have a longer stretch of time off while still making good money. If you are a cheerful veterinarian who enjoys working with a knowledgeable staff, and wants to practice good medicine with appreciative clients, we'd like to talk with you! Contact Dr. Tracy Kusik at tmkusik@gmail.com or 920-851-1908. (Exp. Issue 1/14:34538)

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Part time associate needed –Part time associate needed for small animal hospital located in Palm Beach County. We are looking for a veterinarian who is experienced and practices quality medicine with compassionate care. Experience with birds and exotics a plus but not required. E-mail resume to: Brian@idea180.com (Exp. Issue 1/14:2537)

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Bowie (equine) veterinarian half box for 8 foot pickup truck. The style is a Crown Deluxe body. Has refrigerator and hot water tank with hose. Good Condition $1,500.00. Call 863 602-0192. (Exp. Issue 1/14:xxxx)

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d his wife, a to Dr.

SOLD IN 6 MONTHS! Congratulations to Dr. Chris Thompson and his wife, Kim, on the sale of Thompson Animal Hospital in Lakeland, Florida to Dr. Dawn Morgan-Winter! (#FL23D)

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38  |  FVMA ADVOCATE


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2014 Advocate Issue 1  
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