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Our Lady of the Rosary Caloundra Catholic Primary School Visioning Process

August 2006


OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Table of Contents Table of Contents..................................................................................................1 Acknowledgments.................................................................................................1 Introduction ...........................................................................................................2 Workshop One ......................................................................................................2 Our agreed Principles & Values for Visioning:...................................................2 Our agreed outcomes for success:....................................................................3 Workshop Two ......................................................................................................3 Alternative Scenarios for the School’s future.....................................................4 Workshop Three ...................................................................................................6 Five key focus areas of the OLR Catholic School vision ...................................6 Workshop Four .....................................................................................................7 Workshop Five ......................................................................................................9 School Community Visioning Workshop .............................................................11 School community vision survey .....................................................................11 Preferred school scenario and overall characteristics .....................................13 Draft OLR Caloundra Catholic School Vision ..................................................15 Action planning – timelines into the preferred future .......................................15 Workshop Six......................................................................................................16 Review of draft vision statement......................................................................16 Creative Visualisation – engaging right-brain thinking.....................................17 Structure of vision document ...........................................................................22 Workshop Seven.................................................................................................23 Appendix A: Key Focus Areas for the school’s vision Appendix B: 2021 OLR School Vision’s action plan

Acknowledgments Thank you to the members of the OLR futures committee for their commitment to the foresight process: Donita Bell, Marilyn Carmody, Paul Castelli, Tracey Hickey, Liza Neil, Col O’Brien, Lynne O’Brien, Kerryn Poncini, Michael Poncini, Kaye RyanAllen, Aidan Sauvage, Jessica Simpson, Belinda Spiller, Pat Toohey, Patricia Wilson.

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Introduction Our Lady of the Rosary Caloundra Catholic primary school, in response to its changing community and Catholic Education’s Strategic Renewal Framework, embarked on a visioning process. This report describes the process facilitated by Mr Phillip Daffara of Futuresense. It is structured under the headings of each workshop and their respective outputs are presented for current and future stakeholders of the school to reflect and learn from.

Workshop One By the end of the workshop the committee had: • Agreed on Principles & Values for the school visioning process; • Agreed on Outcomes for success; • Drafted Key Focus Areas (strategies) for the school’s vision and their principles.

Our agreed Principles & Values for Visioning: My hands will grasp our faith, and God’s gifts to us, to get the job done. My arms will embrace social justice and sustainability. Through my eyes I hope to see respect for others and each other’s uniqueness. I will use my head to be responsible for my actions and gain knowledge. I will use my heart to respect everyone in the group and reach out to others in a nurturing way. At the core is our sense of fun, play and interdependence. Our legs will move us in the direction of attaining our full potential in God’s love. Our feet and toes keep us planted in dignity.

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Our agreed outcomes for success: •

Certainty of direction: described by a renewed vision for the school, and a documented 5 yr strategic plan.

Broad community ownership of the vision that is meaningful and attainable.

A culture of continual improvement has grown, where our collective capacity for leadership and foresight are encouraged. Within the school community, the ability to apply foresight tools has increased.

A renewed enthusiasm exists for making noticeable change, towards our shared vision of the future.

A copy of the draft table showing the key focus areas and their principles is available in Appendix A, Table 2a.

Workshop Two By the end of the workshop the committee had: • Explored deeper stories and metaphors about the school; and • Explored Alternative Scenarios for the school that will be presented to the wider school community. Some powerful stories that influence the school’s culture and its future include: •

The school is like a large family, in all aspects (good, bad and the ugly) with an extended family also, through volunteers. The glue for our family is the mystery of life (creation). The story of Sid In the early 1980’ s an elderly gentleman. After attending Mass wandered past my Year 1 classroom on a typically hot February morning, and noticed that the “little ones” as he called them didn’t have the comfort of a fan. The next day 2 ceiling fans were installed. That man was Sid Jones and over his time with us, he cared and provided so generously for the comfort of our little ones. He had no family of his own, the children of OLR “adopted” him and he became part of all our celebrations. Sid donated the first fridge, arrived with ice blocks on hot days. One winter he made so much soup to warm the children that the tuckshop freezer was filled. When he died, he remembered his “little ones” and his bequest is the gazebo next to the pre-school which shelters our children and provides a place to play.

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Sid lived modestly, he put others first and we were fortunate that we were the others. Sid Jones is like the story of OLR, a story of praying, caring and sharing. A story to be treasured and handed on!

The school reflects the life of Mary MacKillop, when looking at its development. In the beginning… There was Mary MacKillop with a vision to assist/overcome poverty and low status (of Catholics and women) through education and spiritual dedication. Then there was… The creation of the Order and the creation of schools through resourceful determination and spiritual dedication. The beginnings of reward for effort. Now there is.. OLR school overcoming it’s poverty with high status and amongst the prosperous through education and spiritual dedication. One day there will be… OLR School and Community - sharing prosperity and high status. With quality environments and resources for education and spiritual dedication. Helping others overcome poverty and misfortune through vision, spirit, education, and determination. (Mission to the world – Mary MacKillop could be the next big exporter of goods – deeds and children with vision)

The school’s image of children is that they are believed to be competent (not empty vessels) and their ideas are open to change.

Alternative Scenarios for the School’s future Questioning the two most important factors upon which the school’s future depends, generated the following responses from committee members: Two (2) responses: Money to fund the school Three (3) responses: Hope – the fact that we have a future. The energy to continue re-evaluating ourselves and our practice. Embedding flexibility and the ability to change. Accountability of stakeholders (reflection). Four (4) responses: Children – as the reason for the school and inclusiveness in responding to each child’s uniqueness. Five (6) responses:

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Our Story and identity. Our beliefs and values. Our Catholic ethos. Our faith in humankind and God. Spirituality – prayful, just and inclusive, reconciling and hopeful. Seven (7) responses: Our people. Our community spirit – pastoral, educational and relational. Removing insularity, where all members of the school community contribute something to our students. People with passion, who can evoke it. Action-learning kids, teachers, parents and community.

The committee agreed that the two main factors to explore the alternative futures for the school are: 1. A strong identity and culture of Catholic/Christian interdependence; and 2. Collaborative learning. The alternative futures that emerge when relating the opposing conditions of each factor are: Learners are selective team players or innovators in life Children are self-seeking strategists in life Learners are co-creators in life (Committee’s preferred image) Children are traditional leaders/workers in life

Collaborative, inclusive learning

(A) Learners are selective team players or innovators in life

(C) Learners are cocreators in life

(B) Children are selfseeking strategists in life

(D) Children are traditional leaders/workers in life

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Strong cultural identity – Catholic Christian interdependence

Weak cultural identity – individualism and competitiveness

A. B. C. D.


OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Authoritarian, non-inclusive teaching

Workshop Three By the end of the workshop the committee had: • Refined the Key Focus Areas for the vision and their principles.

Five key focus areas of the OLR Catholic School vision To create a better future and achieve our vision, we focus our talents, energy, time and money in the following areas: KFA 1. Develop our spirituality through our Catholic/Christian heritage, values and virtues to shape our relationships. Principles • Seek meaningful ways to respond to: • Jesus’ mission and example of love and service; • the Josephite vision of helping the disadvantaged; • the Church mission of making a difference in the local community; • Celebrate our unity amid our diversity. KFA 2. Offer our children fun, meaningful and useful learning experiences to help them reach their full potential. Principles • Recognise children are at the heart of our concern; • Recognise the whole child including social/emotional, cognitive, spiritual, physical and individual needs; • Create a culture that encourages students to think and act critically and creatively; • Cater for difference. KFA 3. Make informed, transparent decisions to achieve our vision Principles • Maintain financial accountability and effective resource management to bring out the best; • Ensure inclusive engagement of P&F community in decision making for the school’s future; • Allow cultural change towards ecological efficiency; • Reflect upon our decisions, evaluate our disappointments and celebrate our achievements. KFA 4. Build new partnerships in the community to provide creative, successful

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

‘life’ skills for our learners Principles • Work together towards a culture of inquiry as both teachers and learners, ready to share our talents; • Build opportunities to participate; • Create learning experiences responsive to our needs; • Encourage innovative thought and action. KFA 5. Enrich our natural and built learning environments with a culture of sustainability Principles • Our places give learners and teachers a sense of creativity; • We replant trees, and reduce, reuse and recycle our resources; • Ensure our places are inspiring, comfortable, safe, useful and adaptable over time, with equitable access; • Encourage care and compassion for the environment, social justice and cultural wellbeing.

A copy of the final table showing the key focus areas and their principles is available in Appendix A, Table 2b.

Workshop Four By the end of the workshop the committee had: • Refined alternative scenarios with distinct characteristics for the school that will be presented to the wider school community. The futures committee agreed that scenario (C) is the preferred future for the school and to present these scenarios at the school-community visioning workshop (refer to Scenario Table and Figure 1).

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

The qualities of each alternative future are described below: Scenario:

A

B

C

D

Characteristics of the future

Learners are selective team players or innovators in life

Children are selfseeking strategists in life

Learners are cocreators in life

Children are traditional leaders/workers in life

Metaphor Values

Packs of dingoes Mate-ship for the betterment of the pack - to gain the advantage Concern for Self and immediate network of family/friends/ or teams Embedding a mix of opportunism, innovation and Aussie mate-ship

Birds of Prey: Eagles Personal growth and well being (worry about yourself)

Pod of Dolphins Balance of personal and community growth and wellbeing

Bee Colony Traditional morals and ethics

Egocentric: Concern for ‘own world’ and wellbeing

Our social relationships within the school are based on…

Strong group identity and teamwork to achieve shared goals

Strong competitiveness and rivalry amongst individuals (peers, teachers, parents)

Concern for global and local interdependent wellbeing Embedding responsibility to consciously contribute towards the common good Informed spiritual awareness– playful, just, inclusive, reconciling, compassionate and hopeful.

Ethnocentric: Concern for local, cultural/community Well being Embedding habitual ethics and moral obligations. Lack of questioning responsibility Clearly defined roles/rules for each person born into and to follow

Our Community Partnerships are…

Goal orientated partnerships only when needed and move on

Exclusive partnerships for financial gain for the school

Designed to provide creative, holistic, ‘life’ skills for our mutual benefit

Access to Technology

Shared computer labs with timetabled (routine) access

Each student has access to state of art ICT resources

Our natural and built environment

Comfortable, safe and useable learning environments

Our school’s economy - how we value money and resources

Funding aimed to benefit most within the school with the most effective resources. There may be some losers. Calculated and controlled consultation or involvement from the top

Diversely different class environments that are stimulating & creative, driven by teachers’ competitiveness Money is important and a measure of success. Users pay for better education – all are winners

Equitable access to all forms of ICT: digital, inquiry methods, artistic and manual Inspiring, comfortable and sustainable learning environments

Strictly limited to likeminded believers with boundaries that maintain the status quo Teachers have priority access to ICT resources (computers seen only as privileged tool) Ordered, functional learning environments

Worldview

View of schooling Problem/ Solution

The way we make decisions

Embedding independence – to be the best ‘self’ to compete in the world

Authoritarian: Top down and lack of authentic consultation

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Money is one means to achieve our vision – to be more rather than to have more through healthy relationships Participatory and empowered ‘family’ members

Frugal provision and use of resources for the many, but charitable hand to the disadvantaged Top down, expert and strategic. Little consultation with stakeholders


OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

(A) Learners are selective team players or innovators in life

(C) Learners are co-creators in life

(Packs of dingoes)

(Pod of Dolphins)

(B) Children are self-seeking strategists in life

(D) Children are traditional leaders/workers in life

(Birds of Prey: Eagles)

(Bee Colony)

Strong cultural identity – Catholic Christian interdependence

Weak cultural identity – individualism and competitiveness

Collaborative, inclusive learning

Authoritarian, non-inclusive teaching

Figure 1: Alternative scenarios with animal metaphors to help students comprehend them.

Workshop Five By the end of the workshop the committee had: • Reviewed the school community vision survey, • Reviewed the school community visioning workshop agenda, and • Delegated tasks for community participation. The school community vision survey included a background information section, explaining its purpose and two further steps. Step 1, asked participants to compare the qualities of each alternative future for the school, described in the scenario table and in Figure 1. Step 2, asked participants for their level of

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

agreement of disagreement about: (1) the key focus areas of the vision; and (2) each school scenario. The results were independently analysed by Futuresense. OLR Catholic School Vision Survey

Disagree

Somewhat disagree

Neither Agree nor disagree

Somewhat Agree

Agree

Strongly Agree

Name:

Strongly Disagree

Q 1.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Please rate the four alternative scenarios. Which one(s) best describes our school’s preferred future: Scenario (A) Learners are selective team players 8.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

9.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

2.

Are you either a Parent/Guardian…; Friend … or Teacher…

Key focus areas of the vision To create a better future and achieve our vision, we focus our talents, energy, time and money in the following areas: 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

10.

Develop our spirituality through our Catholic/Christian heritage, values and virtues to shape our relationships Offer our children fun, meaningful and useful learning experiences to help them reach their full potential Make informed, transparent decisions to achieve our vision Build new partnerships in the community to provide creative, successful ‘life’ skills for our learners Enrich our natural and built learning environments with a culture of sustainability

or innovators in life Scenario (B) Children are self-seeking strategists in life Scenario(C) Learners are co-creators in life

11.

Scenario(D) Children are traditional leaders/workers in life

12.

For any statement that you ‘somewhat disagreed’ to ‘strongly disagreed’ with, we invite you to explain your reasons why:

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

13. If you think we have missed something, please tell us:

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

School Community Visioning Workshop By the end of the visioning workshop participants had: • Explored the alternative scenarios for the school’s future, and the impacts of their respective qualities; • Polled the preferred scenario; • Brainstormed key vision ideas/actions that we need to do, to create our preferred future.

School community vision survey The results of the school community survey conducted between Fridays 14-21 July are shown in the graphs below. The average levels of agreement for each of the five key focus areas (KFA) of the school’s vision show good support from the survey participants (Figure 2). A score of seven represented “Strong Agreement”, six represented “Agreement”, and five represented “Partial Agreement”.

Average Scores for Vision's Key Focus Areas 7

Av. Agreement Score

6.8 6.6 6.4 6.2 6 5.8 5.6 5.4 Spirit

Learning

Decisions

Partnerships Environments

Key Focus Areas

Figure 2 The partial agreement of KFA no.1: The desired spiritual culture within the school; may be due to a number of parents not of the Catholic faith who may be

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

concerned about the Catholic heritage over-defining the relationships within the school community. The average levels of agreement for the alternative scenarios of the school’s future show that Scenario C (Learners are co-creators in life) is the preferred image of the future, held by the survey participants (Figure 3). The numerical scores represent the following levels of agreement: 1 being “Strongly Disagree” 2 being “Disagree” 3 being “Somewhat Disagree” 4 being “Neither Agree or Disagree” 5 being “Somewhat Agree” 6 being “Agree” and 7 being “Strongly Agree”

Average Agreement Scores for Alternative Scenarios 7.00 Av. Agreement Score

6.00 5.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 0.00 ScenarioA Dingoes

ScenarioB ScenarioC Eagles Dolphins Alternative Scenarios

ScenarioD Bees

Figure 3 The results of the community survey and the community workshop 1 show that Scenario C is the preferred future for the school.

1

Twenty six participants unanimously agreed that Scenario C is the preferred future to develop further as the school’s vision.

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Preferred school scenario and overall characteristics Participants of the community workshop considered and discussed the impacts of the various aspects or characteristics of each scenario and identified which of these qualities they would like to see included and excluded from their vision of the future. The results of this discussion show which qualities were most liked (green) and disliked (red),(Table 1).

Figure: Table groups at the school community visioning workshop

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

The results of the multi-voting activity for the qualities of the school’s preferred future are: Table 1: Multi-voting Characteristics of the future Metaphor

Learners are selective team players or innovators in life

Children are selfseeking strategists in life

Learners are cocreators in life

Children are traditional leaders/workers in life

Packs of dingoes

Pod of Dolphins

Bee Colony

Values

Mate-ship for the betterment of the pack - to gain the advantage Concern for Self and immediate network of family/friends/ or teams Embedding a mix of opportunism, innovation and Aussie mate-ship

Birds of Prey: Eagles Personal growth and well being (worry about yourself)

Balance of personal and community growth and wellbeing

Traditional morals and ethics

Egocentric: Concern for ‘own world’ and wellbeing

Concern for Global/local interdependent wellbeing Embedding responsibility to consciously contribute towards the common good Informed spiritual awareness– playful, just, inclusive, reconciling, compassionate and hopeful. Designed to provide creative, holistic, ‘life’ skills for our mutual benefit

Ethnocentric: Concern for local, cultural/community Well being Embedding habitual ethics and moral obligations. Lack of questioning responsibility Clearly defined roles/rules for each person born into and to follow

Worldview

View of schooling Problem/ Solution Our social relationships within the school are based on… Our Community Partnerships are…

Embedding independence – to be the best ‘self’ to compete in the world

Strong group identity and teamwork to achieve shared goals

Strong competitiveness and rivalry amongst individuals (peers, teachers, parents)

Goal orientated partnerships only when needed and move on

Exclusive partnerships for financial gain for the school

Access to Technology

Shared computer labs with timetabled (routine) access

Each student has access to state of art ICT resources

Our natural and built environment

Comfortable, safe and useable learning environments

Our school’s economy - how we value money and resources

Funding aimed to benefit most within the school with the most effective resources. There may be some losers. Calculated and controlled consultation or involvement from the top

Diversely different class environments that are stimulating & creative, driven by teachers’ competitiveness Money is important and a measure of success. Users pay for better education – all are winners

The way we make decisions

Authoritarian: Top down and lack of authentic consultation

Equitable access to all forms of ICT: digital, inquiry methods, artistic and manual Inspiring, comfortable and sustainable learning environments Money is one means to achieve our vision – to be more rather than to have more through healthy relationships Participatory and empowered ‘family’ members

Strictly limited to likeminded believers with boundaries that maintain the status quo Teachers have priority access to ICT resources (computers seen only as privileged tool) Ordered, functional learning environments

Frugal provision and use of resources for the many, but charitable hand to the disadvantaged Top down, expert and strategic. Little consultation with stakeholders

Based on the preferences in Table 1, the vision for the school was drafted by Futuresense for further consideration by the Futures Committee at Workshop Six. 14 of 36


OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Draft OLR Caloundra Catholic School Vision The vision that we share and that shapes our school’s future is that we are all learners and co-creators in life. We balance our personal and community growth and wellbeing, with appropriate ethics and mate-ship. We avoid an unbalanced concern for self interest and gain at the expense of the wellbeing of others. Shaping our worldview is an interdependent concern for global and local issues and qualities. Our big picture approach to schooling and education is to embed responsibility within our learners to consciously contribute towards the common good and the creation of a better World. A healthy mix of independence to be the best ‘self’ in the world and the ability to collaboratively innovate is important. Our approach seeks to avoid embedding habitual ethics and moral obligations that undermines the ability to question our responsibilities. Our social relationships within the school are based on informed spiritual awareness that is also playful, just, inclusive, reconciling, compassionate and hopeful. We have strong group identity and teamwork to achieve shared goals and we avoid strong competitiveness and rivalry amongst individuals (peers, teachers, parents). Our community partnerships intentionally provide creative, holistic, ‘life’ skills for our mutual benefit. We avoid limiting or excluding ourselves to like-minded believers with boundaries that maintain the status quo. A culture of sustainability enriches our natural and built environments so that they are inspiring, comfortable, safe useable and accessible learning places. We have equitable access to all forms of state of the art Information/communications Technology: digital, inquiry methods, artistic and manual to enhance our life long learning experiences. Computers are not seen only as a privileged tool for the few. Our school’s economy – how we value money and resources – is seen as the means to achieve our vision to be more through healthy relationships, rather than to have more. We strongly avoid seeing financial profit as the most important measure of success. The way we make decisions is transparent, participatory and empowers stakeholders as ‘family’ members. We avoid authoritarian, top down, expert-focused leadership; and lack of authentic consultation.

Action planning – timelines into the preferred future Participants of the community workshop identified actions or events that need to occur, for each focus area of the vision, for the school to create their desired image of the future. One hundred and fifteen draft vision actions were collected for the Committee’s review and prioritisation.

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Workshop Six By the end of the visioning workshop the committee had: • Reviewed the school’s draft vision statement in light of the community workshop’s preferences.

Review of draft vision statement The draft vision statement, which provided a description of the school’s preferred future was reviewed by the Futures Committee at workshop six. The draft vision statement was questioned against seven vision criteria, and the group’s levels of agreement on whether the vision satisfies the criteria show where the vision needs improvement (Figure 3). OLR VISION CHECK

Vision Criteria

Meaningful shared story that motivates our purpose Defines/ transforms the role of leadership Relevant over the long term (20yr) Holistic: shaping intent, behaviour, culture, systems Ennoble people Manages/ impacts forces of change to improve school 1.0 Strongly Disagree

2.0

3.0

4.0

5.0

6.0

Level of Agreement

7.0 Strongly Agree

Ownership/Legitimacy amongst community

Figure 3 The Futures committee agreed that the first draft needed to be edited so that it is: • more easily understood; • more careful about including some of the other qualities from the other scenarios, polled at the community workshop; • multi-layered, including the Key Focus Area goals, principles and related vision actions; and • explicit about defining and transforming the role of leadership and decision-making. For example all in the school are leaders and followers.

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Creative Visualisation – engaging right-brain thinking A guided visualisation conducted in workshop six with the futures committee generated the following images of the school’s preferred future: I saw a smaller school with less students. Students are learning and laughing in a child friendly environment with fewer classrooms and more teachers. I felt a gentleness and generosity of spirit which united a diverse group of people (male, female, old, young, diverse parent/carer families, abled, disabled, rich, poor, different races and faiths). Gardens and winding paths with open spaces entice exploration. Children are laughing happily and there is a buzz of learning noise. Buildings have few interior walls, but lots of mobile dividers and changeable learning centres/places that can cater for whole group (common) learning, small group and individual learning. I saw a small neighbourhood school still named OLR with obvious links to its heritage yet it remodeled itself as a hub, connected to its natural (ocean beach) and built (Parish church facilities) surroundings. There are green open spaces and multi-coloured buildings. Within these spaces, defined learning groups are growing their capabilities and laughing. Many students walk to school in supervised walking buses. I saw a physical environment in harmony with itself and the planet with obvious signs of alternative energy use; and colourful indoor and outdoor spaces interlocking. The sound of laughter rippled through the school where young and recently young alike took part in casual or fervent discussion. The teachers are glowing – some with youth, others with experience, all with Love (Jesus’ law of Love) and eyes of understanding. The students are gathered around holographic displays of learning options for the day and they are excitedly mapping out their own program of the day’s activities. People are walking in off the streets to facilitate and participate in these activities and to bask in the enthusiasm and energy that buzzes around. The swell is 4-5ft and offshore with perfectly breaking left and rights with few people on them. I hear kids having fun with nature. From the outside the school is very modern, yet small. Inside, former classrooms are used for different activities including facilities for multi-arts. I see more technology being used. Outside the grounds are open with expansive views to the ocean. 17 of 36


OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

I see lush green grass, a small creek or waterway and many happy faces learning in nature. I hear cheery voices echoing off bright clean buildings. There is an eagerness to learn in clean, well supplied buildings. There is a sense of togetherness and belonging amongst a multi-cultural family environment. Modern technology is used and students are walking to school with family, siblings and friends. I’ve just visited the most wonderful school. It’s the kind of school that I’d love to be a part of as a teacher, parent or student. It has an underlying positive, happy ambience, beautiful in soul, spirit and natural environment. The students are so happy. How could they not be? The environment is so scenic and inviting – trees around the oval full of birds, wildlife, in and around buildings, providing clean areas to sit at tables or play. The classrooms are warm and inviting – teachers encourage family involvement. Learning groups are well resourced with print and media surrounded by colourful, learning inducive, productive displays of student work. Happy students welcome visitors and encourage each other in a noncompetitive but friendly, open, honest and helpful way. They are enriched by their faith in our God and the ways of those who came before us – Mary McKillop, and the Josephite sisters - and they love each other, their school and the lives we’ve been given. It is enlightening. I see no traditional classrooms, only learning groups made up of children of different ages. Students are moving from self-directed group to group. Teachers are doing different tasks, some are sitting and talking sharing ideas, others are directing, whilst others become learners themselves working with students for a time. Teachers are relaxed with a strong focus on the development of the person within their learning styles, abilities, gifts and preferences. Diverse activities are used – play, watching, participating, building, moving as individuals or within groups. No style is seen as “incorrect”. There is a strong sense of supporting the learner within the framework of the group. I saw children’s classes with engaged students, assisted by myriads of parents, carers and mentors in hands-on projects. Classes are facilitated by people whether staff or volunteers, who have the most to offer. There are indoor and outdoor learning spaces, small secluded mediative places and larger amphitheatres. The school moto continues to be lived as it has in the past. OLR is

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

known for its depth of relationships between kids, parents, teachers and community. I saw creative play spaces where children can climb, create, be alone or together, dig in the sand, play in the mud, make music and artwork. Classrooms combine both inside and outside. Children work together or alone on projects that are relevant and meaningful to their changing world around them. They have access to art materials, music and computers within the classroom. There is a new IT hub library, art/music centre and toilet block. There are areas for lower, middle and upper students within the playground. Teachers work together with students and each other to design learning experiences (curriculum). Parents are involved at all aspects of school life – in the classroom, tuchshop, sharing their many skills. The buildings are naturally cool (not air conditioned), waste is recycled as is water. The gardens are lush and well maintained. This material generated by Right-brain thinking, provided potent word pictures for inclusion into the vision statement, so far generated by Left-brain thinking. The revised vision statement follows next. The values of the Catholic, Christian tradition and the spirit of the MacKillop legacy give purpose and meaning to our existence: who we are, what we do and how we do it. All children are capable learners who have been learning since birth. Our core business is to welcome children whoever and where ever they are in their life journey and support them to build their capacity as life long learners. It is from and within this context that we aspire to grow our capabilities as a community of learners whose generosity of spirit enables us to co-create the following vision for our future. Our school community is recognised by our connectedness to one another, to our natural and built environments, to the broader community, and to our God. Personal and communal prayers are integral to our way of life as we act with gentleness, justice, and compassion on behalf of families: locally, nationally and globally. There is a pervading spirituality of warmth and welcome extended to all. The unique spirit of each child develops in connection with the spirituality of the community. Some learning programs are

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

negotiable with children to ensure that each child’s learning is rich, real and relevant to both the child and their families. There are also some non-negotiable areas of learning to ensure that each child’s learning is rich, real and relevant to that which our community values. Children gather around displays of optional real life learning investigations to negotiate their weekly individual learning plan. During each week children are engaged in common areas of investigation alongside teachers and community experts who act as learning mentors. At the end of each week, children demonstrate what they have learned during their investigations by posting a report via the information and communication technologies at hand. These reports, available to parents / carers and teachers, serve as a reference point for negotiating the next phase of each child’s learning. Our community partnerships intentionally provide creative, holistic, ‘life’ skills for our mutual benefit. A buzz of learning energy and laughter prevails throughout each day as teachers, community mentors, children and their families enter into learning partnerships with one another. Learning investigations involve a range of learning technologies: traditional literacies (cultural, social, print, mathematical, and scientific), e-literacies and the arts. By building their capacity as life long learners, children acquire new knowledge and understandings about the world in which we live and begin to respond to our call to be co-creators of a more just world for the future. Information and communication technologies are readily accessible to all to support children’s learning and their demonstrations of that learning. The school’s facilities, resources and capabilities are accessible to the broader community. Similarly, community groups offer facilities, resources and capabilities to OLR to enhance our services to families. This mutual relationship ensures that the school’s curriculum continues to develop and be relevant within a changing world. Our commitment to environmentally sustainable practices affects many aspects of school life. Many students walk to school in supervised walking buses. Others will travel via the transport of the day, private and public. What all students have in common is an eagerness to come to a “green, cool” school. The natural environment is rich with trees and gardens and interspersed with waterways and open spaces for both quiet and active play. Birds, insects and various other wildlife life species abound, interconnected with the ecosystems of the nearby beach environs to create a natural curiosity for investigating the mystery of the interconnectedness of all things. The buildings are bright, airy and 20 of 36


OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

comfortable with movable internal partitions to create learning spaces suited to a wide range of learning investigations. Indoor learning spaces integrate with and flow naturally into outdoor learning spaces. Water harvesting and alternate energy generation make the school more self-sufficient. There is a wide range of lunch time experiences accessible to children. Participatory decision making processes in all aspects of school life reflect a commitment to openness, transparency and empowering stakeholders as ‘family’ members to achieve our vision for the future. Likewise, our school’s economy – how we value money and resources – is seen as the means to achieve our vision and our learning framework

Our Learning Framework: Students, their families and staff members are at a range of stages as we develop our full potential as life long learners. In common, we are: ¾ Leaders and collaborators sharing responsibility for the sustainable, holistic well-being of self, others, our natural and our built environments. ¾ Community contributors enriching the lives of families and communities through educational services founded on partnerships among and between: children, families, staff, religious communities, other schools and universities, other community agencies and organizations, local, state and federal governments. ¾ Effective communicators mastering a repertoire of practices with traditional and new communication technologies via spoken language, print, multimedia and the arts to sustain learning which is life long and life giving. ¾ Quality producers sustaining that which we value from our past and our present while encouraging risk taking and innovation in responding to the shaping of our future. ¾ Active investigators identifying problems, bringing a spirit of open enquiry to those problems and fostering new ways of knowing, doing and being which deepen our experience of justice, inclusiveness, reconciliation, compassion and hope for the future.

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

¾ Designers and creators of a prayerful, caring, fun filled learning community which believes that all learners are capable of reaching their full potentials. ¾ Reflective, self directed learners recognizing and respecting our interdependence and holding the rights and needs of the individual alongside the common good of the community in a healthy state of tension which leads to new ways of knowing, doing and being. Five key focus areas of the OLR Catholic School vision ensure that our actions are responsive to our concerns and aspirations. To create a better future and achieve our vision, we focus our talents, energy, time and money in the following strategy areas: [Within the vision document, insert next, vision strategies and action plans]

Structure of vision document

Vision Statement Learning Framework Vision Key Focus Areas (strategic outcomes) 1

2

3

4

5

Vision’s ideas and action plan

Figure 4 Within the final vision document, the vision describes the future image of the school’s future in 2021. This is followed by Catholic Education’s learning framework that clarifies the education approach to realise the image of the learner. Key Focus Areas of the vision (developed by the Futures Committee in workshop three), ought to precede the vision’s action ideas. The KFAs are high 22 of 36


OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

level strategies or outcomes for the school and are accompanied by principles that guide the implementation of the vision’s action plan (Table 2b).

Workshop Seven By the end of the visioning workshop the committee had: • Reviewed and sorted the school’s vision actions and prioritised them using the impact/ease method, and • Drafted an action plan with timelines for inclusion into the School’s Strategic plan. The committee reviewed each vision idea/action to ensure it was a defined task and then rated them accordingly: 1. being, this idea is easy to implement/ do and would have a major beneficial impact in the school 2. being, this idea is hard / complex to implement and would have a major beneficial impact in the school 3. being, this idea is easy to implement and would have a minor beneficial impact in the school 4. being, this idea is hard/ complex to implement and would have a minor beneficial impact in the school This process of evaluation and prioritisation is called Impact/Ease assessment. Actions rated (4) in most cases were deleted from the action plan. The rating guided the actions being designated a timeframe as follows: Rating (1) ≡ 2006>2008 Rating (2) ≡ 2008>2009 Rating (3) ≡ 2009>2011 The draft vision actions (Appendix B) require further development by the futures committee to include links to Catholic Education’s Strategic Renewal Framework; and performance indicators.

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Workshop Eight By the end of the visioning workshop the committee had • Agreed on the general form of the vision statement • Celebrated and reflected on the achievements of the visioning process • Evaluated the facilitation of the visioning process • Outlined the next steps in the implementation process The committee checked the vision statement against the vision criteria and agreed that the latest version is better all round. Members liked the following aspects of the visioning process were identified the most: Non threatening environment; the community workshop and its world café activity; the creative visualisation; working with students on the future; sharing of ideas; learning a range of tools and models that can be applied in diverse situations; complex visioning was broken down into manageable steps; and the card-storming technique (all voices were heard). Some activities that could have been done differently to improve the process include: More participation with the broader community throughout; more time for the community survey; more appropriate language for the survey – pitching it to capture people’s interest; better promotion of the community workshop; targeted canvassing to diverse parents to get involved or provide feedback; too much homework between meetings; and more time for the whole process. The results of the process evaluation are described in Figure 5

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

Average scores for process evaluation I am confident that the visioning process will make a positive change to our organisation My/our understanding of futures tools and how we may use them in our work has grown

Enough time was given to each task The workshops design were effective in allowing everyone to have a say and achieve the workshops' purpose Workshop leadership was effective

5.4 5.6 5.8

6

6.2 6.4 6.6 6.8

7

Level of agreement

Figure 5

Next Steps for OLR vision implementation Launching the vision by: 1. Completing the action plan (check timelines and add strategic renewal framework linkages and performance indicators); 2. Each committee member is to approach five parents and explain the vision and collect feedback and garner support for involvement with action teams; 3. Promote the vision by creating a newsletter with vision highlights, with the full version on the web. Both promoting a forthcoming public presentation. 4. At the school community public meeting the: • School vision is presented along with the journey of developing it; • Participants provide feedback using a form/survey as an activity; • Participants are invited to nominate to be apart of the vision implementation teams Setting up the vision action team(s) by:

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OLR Futures Committee School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

5. Clarifying what sort of structure is needed. For example, a larger futures committee with champions leading working groups for each strategy area or smaller vision steering committee/board and formal action teams with delegated tasks. 6. Clearly define role of the teams with a simple charter, e.g.: • Action and monitor impact of tasks • Further scope more complex projects • Reporting lines 7. Align personal passion with strategy areas of the school vision Foresight as a ‘lifestyle’ in the school by: 8. Annual reporting of the vision action plan to whole school community 9. Continual refinement of meaningful and relevant integration of futures tools into the curriculum to build capabilities of students 10. Create events to celebrate the vision and keep it in the collective memory of the school

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OLR Futures Committee: Appendix A School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006 Table 2a. Our agreed draft key focus areas for our vision of the future: We will invest our energy, time and money in the following areas, to focus our talents in making positive changes and creating our preferred future. Our children reach their full potential through, fun, meaningful and useful learning experiences

Learn together as a community at play

Build new partnerships in the community to provide creative, successful ‘life’ skills for our learners

Principles • We put our children first; • Learning is playful and diverse.

Principles • We are all teachers and learners, ready to share our talents; • We take the time to reflect upon and reward our achievements.

Principles • We partner with people with a passion for sharing; • We resource our classrooms, to bring out the best; • We deliver balanced education, responsive to the needs of our learners; • We encourage positive risk taking in our people, to achieve our vision.

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Our relationships are based on daily practice of our spiritual vision for fairness (justice), dignity, and hospitality for all Principles • Practice Jesus’ mission and example of love and service; • Practice the Josephite vision of helping the disadvantaged; • Practice the Church mission of making a difference in the local community; • We understand that people’s beliefs may be different, and we seek the common ground, when relating to each other.

Our enriched natural and built learning environments are inspiring, comfortable and sustainable Principles • Our places give learners and teachers a sense of creativity; • We replant trees, and reduce, reuse and recycle our resources; • Our places are safe, useful and adaptable over time.


OLR Futures Committee: Appendix A School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006 Table 2b. Our agreed Key Focus Areas for our vision of the future: To create a better future and achieve our vision, we focus our talents, energy, time and money in the following areas: Offer our children fun, meaningful and useful learning experiences to help them reach their full potential

Make informed, transparent decisions to achieve our vision

Build new partnerships in the community to provide creative, successful ‘life’ skills for our learners

Develop our spirituality through our Catholic/Christian heritage, values and virtues to shape our relationships

Enrich our natural and built learning environments with a culture of sustainability

Principles • Recognise children are at the heart of our concern; • Recognise the whole child including social/emotional, cognitive, spiritual, physical and individual needs; • Create a culture that encourages students to think and act critically and creatively; • Cater for difference.

Principles • Maintain financial accountability and effective resource management to bring out the best; • Ensure inclusive engagement of P&F community in decision making for the school’s future; • Allow cultural change towards ecological efficiency; • Reflect upon our decisions, evaluate our disappointments and celebrate our achievements.

Principles • Work together towards a culture of inquiry as both teachers and learners, ready to share our talents; • Build opportunities to participate; • Create learning experiences responsive to our needs; • Encourage innovative thought and action.

Principles Seek meaningful ways to respond to: • Jesus’ mission and example of love and service; • the Josephite vision of helping the disadvantaged; • the Church mission of making a difference in the local community; • Celebrate our unity amid our diversity.

Principles • Give our learners and teachers places with a sense of creativity; • Replant trees, and reduce, reuse and recycle our resources; • Ensure our places are inspiring, comfortable, safe, useful and adaptable over time, with equitable access; • Encourage care and compassion for the environment, social justice and cultural wellbeing.

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OLR Futures Committee: Appendix B School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

2021 OLR SCHOOL VISION’S ACTION PLAN ID No.

KFAStrategy

Impact Ease Rating

Action

1

KFA1

1

2

KFA1

2

3

KFA1

1

4

KFA1

1

5

KFA1

4

6

KFA1

2

7

KFA1

1

8

KFA1

1

9

KFA1

4

Spirituality audit of families, find out what families know and where they are at in own spirituality.

10

KFA1

1

11

KFA1

4

12

KFA1

4

Holding open church gatherings in/out week, that is twilight service. Adopt an elder to be an adopted grandparent for class. Host guest speakers from different cultures and religions to visit our school.

2007>2010

13

KFA1

2

More open mass/services for families, make them more family focused.

2007

Explain Mary Mac Killop dream and Josephite heritage of our school. Develop more relationships between school and community groups in regard to our school prayer liturgy Involve, invite school parents to be included in our school prayer Open our prayer liturgies to others schools, students and families. Help families to live our school motto and understand to pray to care to share. E.g. Promoting family involvement in prayer and weekend worship. Promote Catholic Christian values in all groups. Explore, discuss accept our differences and recognize our togetherness. A greater understanding of others with individual needs, backgrounds, cultures and religions.

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Timeframe

2006

2006 2006

2006

2006>2008 2006

2006

2007

SRF Link

Achievement/ Performance Indicators


OLR Futures Committee: Appendix B School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

2021 OLR SCHOOL VISION’S ACTION PLAN ID No.

KFAStrategy

Impact Ease Rating

Action

14

KFA1

4

Invite other religions to share in ecumenical services at OLR and develop ecumenical relationships with others.

15

KFA1

4

16

KFA1

1

Hold youth group interdenominational meetings. Explain the difference between Catholic and independent school with parents and community.

17

KFA1

4

Question enrolment; increase our non-catholic school community participations/attendance.

18

KFA1

1

Create an event to inspire a passion for social justice within students. Develop student’s leadership in Social Justice.

19

KFA1

20

KFA2

4

21 22

KFA2 KFA2

2 3

23

KFA2

1

24

KFA2

3

25

KFA2

2

26

KFA2

2

27

KFA2

1

28

KFA2 KFA2

1 2

29

Timeframe

2006

2007

Increase understand-ing and acceptance of all others beliefs and faith. Create Catholics in spirit if not name, (increase spiritual population of the world, give hope and direction). Introduce languages Identify specific skills for each teacher, (skills audit) Employ a range of specialist teacher eg PE, art, drama, music Increase fees or voluntary levies to improve resources Improve indoor and outdoor learning areas Ensure cool classrooms (optimum working environment) Share resources and expertise with local school Recognise individual talent Treat lunch times as an opportunity for more meaningful

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2007 2009 2006 2006>2021 2006>2011 2006>2011 2006 2006 2006>2021

SRF Link

Achievement/ Performance Indicators


OLR Futures Committee: Appendix B School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

2021 OLR SCHOOL VISION’S ACTION PLAN ID No.

KFAStrategy

Impact Ease Rating

Action

Timeframe

activities 30

KFA2

31

KFA2

2

32

KFA2 KFA2 KFA2 KFA2

1 1 1 1

37

KFA2 KFA2

2 2

38

KFA2

4

39 43

KFA2 KFA2

1 1

44

KFA2

1

45

2

46

KFA2 KFA2

48

KFA2

1

49

KFA3

50 51

KFA3 KFA3

1 2

52

KFA3

3

53

KFA3

2

54

KFA3 KFA3

3 4

33 34 35 36

56

Boys need ‘Ian Lillico-ising’ (offer more alternatives for boys who don’t play soccer. Implement pedagogy to sustain play based learning models Create a parent skills database Create edible gardens More training for teachers Set up paid tuck shop and uniform conveners Review senior school structures Review of staffing policy and practice Use super learning methods for children – accredited learning Bring back the musical Continue to enhance the outdoor education program Establish and fund an ongoing equipment upgrade (IT) Differentiate teacher/learning/ assessment to cater for difference Pilot a self-directed learning group Establish a vision committee that : Reports to local parish Involves the wider community in developing partnerships. Reports to the schools community on the vision Track monitor and review progress annually, develops a communication plan with expert reviews. Improve the school newsletter Set up a notice board for

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2006>2007 2007 2007 2006>2021 2007 2007 2006

2009 2006>2021 2006>2021 2006>2021

2007

2007 2008 2009

2009 2007

SRF Link

Achievement/ Performance Indicators


OLR Futures Committee: Appendix B School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

2021 OLR SCHOOL VISION’S ACTION PLAN ID No.

KFAStrategy

Impact Ease Rating

Action

Timeframe

feedback. Conduct regular parent satisfaction surveys. (electronic feedback forums & surveys).

57

KFA3

4

58

KFA3

1

59

KFA3

1

60

KFA3

1

61

KFA3

2

62 63

KFA3 KFA3

1 3

64

KFA3

1

65

KFA3

1

66

KFA4

2

Brainstorm ways to increase consistent and effective parental involvement

67

KFA4

1

Increase level of volunteer involvement - introduce a parent welcoming committee from each year level

69

KFA4

1

Involve diverse adult role models which enhance positive attitudes in learners

70

KFA4

1

72

KFA4

1

73

KFA4

1

74

KFA4

Get kids out of the school and involved in community projects. Parents share specific knowledge and skills. Network with other schools, eg professional development, resources Network with businesses to share interest areas.

Setup a children’s suggestion box. Conduct student satisfactions surveys. Involve kids at all levels as stakeholders. Est. a culture of just global protocols & policies Invest in community board. Establish clear role descriptions for staff Establish a school parliament to build citizenship skills. Build communications and best practice and use of technology

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2006>2007 2007 2006 2007 2006

2003 2006

2006

2006

2006 2006 2006

2006

SRF Link

Achievement/ Performance Indicators


OLR Futures Committee: Appendix B School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

2021 OLR SCHOOL VISION’S ACTION PLAN ID No.

KFAStrategy

75

KFA4

76

KFA4

77

KFA4

78

KFA4

79

KFA4

80

KFA4

81

KFA4

82

KFA4

83

KFA4

84

KFA4

85

KFA4

86

KFA4

87

KFA4

88

89

Impact Ease Rating

1

1

** 2

Action

Build connections with local art councils - artists Invite local expertise to develop a school project eg market garden Network with the parish in regard to surrounding land uses. Schools developing and specializing areas, sharing/bartering with other local schools Involve people with individual needs, and disabilities. Involve children in major school functions, eg fete cultural events (music speech drama). Increase profile of school and local community Mentoring, involve experienced wider community members. Setup learning partnerships with Sunshine Coast Uni.- teacher training Integrate vocational education within classroom. Involve students in directing their learning. School creates an open learning institute with internet courses, yet the core business of kids education remains

1

Consider what school facilities/rooms may be able to be used by the community or training organisations and introduce venue hire to increase revenue

KFA4

** 2

KFA5

1

Establish short term apprenticeships, include lifestyle and learning styles. Develop a school and Parish land master plan

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Timeframe

2007

2006

2006

2006

SRF Link

Achievement/ Performance Indicators


OLR Futures Committee: Appendix B School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

2021 OLR SCHOOL VISION’S ACTION PLAN ID No.

KFAStrategy

Impact Ease Rating

Action

91

KFA5 KFA5

1 1

92

KFA5

3

93

KFA5

1

94

KFA5

1

Promote litter free lunch box Establish and fund a building maintenance program Invite speakers (Ian Low) on sustainability Introduce walking school buses and bikes to school Establish a tree planting day with Council and land care support, as an annual event to improve the school’s landscape

95

KFA5

1

Introduce recycling processes and bins at school e.g. Worm farm, composting, chickens

96

KFA5

2

Build rainwater tanks and seek govt grants

97

KFA5

3

98

KFA5

1

Build a permaculture -peace garden Stewardship – get students involves in community projects that sustain the environment

99

KFA5

3

90

100

KFA5

1

101

KFA5

2

102 104

KFA5 KFA5 KFA5

1 1 2

105

KFA5

1

106

KFA5

** 3

103

Investigate the benefits of creating a ‘Cooee’ kids website for the school Build playground – creative play space Improve drainage (water sensitive urban design) rehabilitate a small creek through the grounds Link teachers with ‘cool schools’ Use the beach area more Create natural cooling for existing rooms Introduce more water play Use our terraced area more

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Timeframe

SRF Link

Achievement/ Performance Indicators

2007 2005

2007

See #110

2007 Need to replace asbestos roof

2007

2007 2006

2009 2007 2005

2006 See #94

What's Cooee Kids?


OLR Futures Committee: Appendix B School Visioning Process Outputs 2nd May – 22nd August 2006

2021 OLR SCHOOL VISION’S ACTION PLAN ID No.

KFAStrategy

Impact Ease Rating

Action

107

KFA5

2

108

KFA5

2

109

KFA5

1

110

KFA5

1

111 113

KFA5 KFA5 KFA5

2 1 2

114

KFA5

2

Plan and build new classrooms (dependent on 89) Refurbish classrooms to be more versatile (dependent on 89) Build a tactile learning environment (mud-sand) Introduce more shade both natural and built Plan and build a new library Promote Sunsmart kids Pilot solar alternatives eg. Power and water Plan and build a new technology hub, art/music centre and toilet block (dependent on 89)

115

KFA5

2

112

2

Notes

Timeframe

Move towards being an autonomous school e.g. With levels of self sufficiency in energy, water, food, that also minimises waste and reuses grey water. Reduce the amount of water used - install AAA water fittings

**

Actions marked with" " require more discussion to define the actual task

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2006 See #94 2006>2010 2007

2008>2009

SRF Link

Achievement/ Performance Indicators

Profile for Phillip Daffara

Our Lady of the Rosary Caloundra Catholic Primary School Visioning Process  

Final Report describing the visioning process and Strategic Vision for the OLR Caloundra Catholic Primary School

Our Lady of the Rosary Caloundra Catholic Primary School Visioning Process  

Final Report describing the visioning process and Strategic Vision for the OLR Caloundra Catholic Primary School

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