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Great ways to get paid for your images » Weddings » Portraits » Selling stock » Events & more... Over

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weddings

Discover ways to get started with wedding photography

Professional advice Learn how the experts make money from their imagery

portraits

The ultimate guide to making your portraits pay


06 _ make cash with your camera


Contents make cash with your camera CHAPTER 1

My Big Break



8

The biggest names in the industry reveal the moments and photographs that marked a turning point in their careers.

CHAPTER 2

Getting Started

28

Stock libraries...............................................................................................30 Selling prints.................................................................................................34 Part time portraits......................................................................................38 Online portfolio.......................................................................................... 42 Local business.............................................................................................46 Part time weddings...................................................................................50 Full time weddings....................................................................................54 Events..............................................................................................................58 Portrait studio..............................................................................................62 Going full time.............................................................................................66 Getting a job..................................................................................................70 Competitions................................................................................................74

CHAPTER 3

Business

78

Insurance for pros.....................................................................................80 Website building.........................................................................................86 Bookkeeping................................................................................................ 92

CHAPTER 4

Marketing

chapter 6

98

Marketing videos......................................................................................100 Blogging.......................................................................................................106 Facebook......................................................................................................112 Pinterest.........................................................................................................118 SnapChat.....................................................................................................124 PR.....................................................................................................................130 Instagram.....................................................................................................136 Mail-out marketing.................................................................................. 142

CHAPTER 5

Training

The Kit



Storage devices......................................................................................... 170 Large format printers..............................................................................176 Is rental mental?.......................................................................................182 Studio lighting guide..............................................................................188

On FileSILO

What’s on FileSilo 148

168



194

Discover how to access FileSilo.......................................................194

There are many training routes into professional. Here, we introduce you to the best University......................................................................................................150 Accreditation..............................................................................................152 Short course...............................................................................................154 High-end workshop...............................................................................156 Online course............................................................................................158 Assisting........................................................................................................160 The education debate...........................................................................162

make cash with your camera _ 07


Big break

Kate Hopewell-Smith Kate Hopewell-Smith specialises in lifestyle, portrait and wedding photography. She contributes regularly to a number of photography magazines and is on the panel of The Guild of Photographers. To see more of her work visit www.katehopewellsmith.com 10 December 2012 • Oxfordshire, England • Nikon D3

A

s a lifestyle photographer, Kate Hopewell-Smith believes it is difficult to pinpoint a single photo “that just changed everything for me.” Unlike news and sport images, which can reach a global audience almost immediately, Kate’s work is more personal: commissioned portraits, weddings and anniversaries. “When you’re taking pictures of families it’s quite hard for other people to connect with them because it’s not them,” she explains. “For the kind of work that I do, it’s less likely that one image would change everything.” Instead, she has to select images that will appeal to potential clients, images typical of her style, such as the peaceful moment here. “It is very representative of the type of image I love to take for clients,” says Kate. Taken less than four years ago, it has since become her most published photograph.

16_ Make cash with your camera

The picture wasn’t entirely planned. On the day it was taken Kate was running a training workshop, teaching metering and exposure for moody, side-lit images. A friend brought her two young daughters and helped style this scene. Kate recalls: “The girl, Kitty, was not in a very good mood, which was quite funny – it was showing all over her face. So I said to Kitty, ‘Just shut your eyes, honey, shut your eyes and go into yourself for a second.’ And she did. She sat for a few minutes like that and naturally went into that position.” While her eyes were shut, the sun came out through the window to the left of the frame.

A signature image

Although intended primarily to show her clients the practicalities of spot metering for natural side lighting, this image has had far greater value for Kate’s standing as a lifestyle photographer. Barely a week later it was published in a national magazine, and remains a popular choice with picture editors. Print requests have also followed: “This is probably the only image where I have had more than a couple of people ask me if I would sell it as a print,” says Kate. “I’ve had a lot of people say, ‘I love that and I want a print of that’.” As well as its obvious popularity, this picture has quickly become Kate’s signature image. “I’ve got six quite large prints in my office and this is one of them. They all represent the style that people can identify with me. This picture is really representative of the imagery that attracts my client base.”


Jeremy Walker is one of the UK’s most-sought after location photographers, with a client list that includes British Airways, Mercedes and Vogue. He is a brand ambassador for Nikon UK, and he also runs photography workshops. To see more of his superb images, visit www.jeremywalker.co.uk August 2013 • Dunnottar Castle, Scotland • NIKon Df

I

n a career spanning more than 20 years, Jeremy Walker has worked with some of the biggest brands in advertising, but one job ranks above all the others as a milestone, and it was one he didn’t even pitch for. “I just got an email from an ad agency in Tokyo that I’d never heard of, saying that they had this brochure project, they’d been given my name by Nikon, and would I be interested?” The email came in April 2013, and after several Skype calls and the signing of a non-disclosure agreement, Jeremy was shown the camera that he would be using to provide the pictures for the brochure: the Nikon Df. Seeing it for the first time on Skype took him right back: “I really liked it: the whole look of it, with the dials on the top plate. I thought it was a great idea to go really retro. It felt like a throwback to the FM2, which of course it was.”

Mastering the brief

This picture really tested Jeremy’s mastery of the brief – a historic building in a dramatic location with a nonprofessional model – and his skills as a casting director! “That guy came on a weekend workshop with me in Glencoe years ago, and he came down to dinner dressed in his tartan and said, ‘Any excuse to get dressed up in the kilt...’ So when I needed a shepherd for that shot, I thought, well, he lives in Scotland and he’s the ideal character for it.” It was overcast when they reached Dunnottar. As they waited for the light to break through, Jeremy took a blackand-white portrait of his ‘shepherd’. For the main image of the castle Jeremy used the Nikon AF-S 28mm f/1.8G. Both pictures appeared in the Nikon Df brochure, which Jeremy shot in its entirety, except for the camera product pictures. So how did this assignment rate among all of his other blue-chip commissions? “This was definitely up there! It was probably one of the biggest jobs, if not the biggest job, I have ever done.” Make cash with your camera _ 17

Images: Jeremy Walker

Jeremy Walker

Jeremy had just eight days to scout for locations in Scotland and hire people to feature in the brochure. One stipulation was that he used non-professional models. “They wanted to use real people. We had to shoot a gamekeeper, a guy making barrels in a distillery. The theme was tradition.” The shoot took place in August and included a variety of locations, from the Edinburgh Festival to the ruins of Dunnottar Castle, where this image was taken.


getting started

If you’ve got a collection of really top-quality photos sitting around already, why not make them start earning their keep as stock?

Sell through stock libraries We explore how you can make money from great photos you’ve already taken

TODAY, there are many professional photographers who will tell you sadly that stock photography is dead. But that isn’t really the case at all. The market for stock photography has changed dramatically over recent years, true, but it’s still going.

Do your research There are many stock libraries that could sell your images, so you need to do some research to find the right one for you. You should check that the library wants the type of images that you can supply, and then make sure that your images will meet their guidelines. Most of the larger libraries will then require you to register, and submit a small number of images for approval. This process is critical, so make sure that you only submit your very best images.

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In the ‘good old days’ you could get good returns from a few images, but with the proliferation of images and low-cost ‘microstock’ sites, nowadays the returns per sale of individual images can be extremely low. This means that making an income

Once these have been accepted you will be able to upload more, although some libraries still have a limit of the number you can submit per week or month. Once you have started to upload your images to the site your work doesn’t stop there. The first thing you need to do, with some sites, is to decide on how your images will be sold. There are two main ways that libraries license images, which can affect how much money you will get for them. These are royalty-free (RF) and rightsmanaged (RM).

from stock images is now mostly about getting many lower-return sales, rather than a few bigger ones. Don’t let that put you off, though – if you’re determined, you can do it, and we’re going to show you how to go about getting started.

Keywording is vital if buyers are to find your images. For travel shots, make sure you include the location – and spell the place name correctly!


GOING PRO: part 1 Photographer Graham Parker is in his second month on his journey to turning pro, and is getting his studio sorted out

The level of image manipulation that’s permitted varies, so check how much is acceptable before you submit your shots

With royalty-free licensing, the buyer pays a single fee which allows them to use the image multiple times and for any length of time, but the image is still available to other buyers to use. Rights-managed gives the buyer exclusive use of the image for a limited time and number of uses. What this means for you is that a royalty-free image will bring you less money per sale, but has the potential to be sold many more times, while a rightsmanaged image will command a higher price per sale, but will potentially achieve fewer sales. So you need to choose a library that offers the type of licensing agreement that best suits your images. Most image libraries now use the royalty-free licensing model, particularly those known as microstock, as it lets them sell more images more cheaply than the rightsmanaged licence. You then need to get busy with the task of keywording your images. This may seem like a waste of time, but it’s the main way that buyers will find your images among the millions

It’s important to submit photographs that stand out as thumbnails as well as full size, so a buyer will pick them out from a screen full of options when searching

available on many sites. So, do some research about which words image buyers are likely to use, and add the relevant ones to your photos. Finally, it’s best to keep adding shots regularly, so look at uploading at least five or 10 images per week for quite some time to give you the best chance of making some cash.

What to submit Firstly, you should submit only your very best images, both

Bear in mind that the shots that appeal to other photographers, friends or even users of sites like Flickr aren’t necessarily what image buyers are looking for

technically and aesthetically – but there’s more to successful stock photography than this. When considering what type of images to submit to stock libraries, bear in mind that the shots that appeal to other photographers, friends or even users of online sharing sites like Flickr aren’t necessarily what image buyers are looking for. One of the most popular uses for stock photography is to illustrate articles, books or websites that are trying to get across some concept or meaning. Because of this, for your images to sell well they need to be more than just a good photo. Take a look at any stock site and they are full

Once I’d got enough studio kit to set up a studio, there was one thing left to sort… yes, the studio itself! I considered various locations for the studio, including retail high street, industrial estates, business parks and even my shed! Most of the units were either very expensive or required signing up to a lease of 10 years or more. Then I found a perfectly sized unit in a workspace hub made up of creatives and independent professionals. It was out of my price range, but after some negotiating I was able to secure it for a short term. Setting up the studio was easy. Put white vinyl at one end, set up lights, test them – and I was off. Yes, it was that simple, though if I had more lights it would have taken longer. My first set-up was for pets as I have two models – one willing and one not so willing – who are always available! With the studio set up it was time to get customers. I decided to do a charity photo shoot. My idea was to charge a small sitting fee, to cover printing and postage costs, for each pet, and to ask the owners to bring a 15kg bag of dog food that I would deliver to the local dogs’ home. In my adverts I specified 15kg and the type of food (requested by the dogs’ home) so that everyone knew from the outset how much it would cost. I was donating my time, and giving a 12x8 print to the owners of each pet. Pet Planet, a local independent pet shop, helped out by selling the pet food at a discounted rate to all the people who were taking part. On the day, with help from a friend I photographed 23 dogs – and one rat. The most difficult part was finding a place to store just over a ton of dog food! Everything went smoothly and I got some fantastic shots!


getting started

Photographing events & functions

Events photography can be extremely lucrative, as long as you’re prepared to put in the time SHOOTING events is a good way to earn money with your camera, and it can offer more diverse subjects than specialising purely as, say, a wedding photographer. Events work involves a number of different photographic and business skills, because you need to be able to shoot many

Experience pays Before you start charging for your event photography, it pays to get some experience of the type of events you plan to cover. You can often find small, local events to shoot for free that will enable you to gain some experience, although even these will often require you to be able to demonstrate that you can provide images suitable for their needs. You may also have to pass a criminal records (CRB) check if the event involves children. Many charities 58 _ make cash with your camera

different types of subject, and to deal with the needs and demands of both the organisers and participants. The skills and style of photography needed for shooting portraits for a corporate function, say, are very different to those needed for shooting sports events,

hold fund-raising events such as fun runs or activity days that need photographers, which are perfect for learning the basics, so try approaching these organisations, or look out for adverts for volunteer photographers on job websites such as www.indeed.com to find events close to your home. Once you have the experience you need, and you’ve developed your skills, you can begin to look for paid work. Start by approaching local businesses and events, although

so you need to decide which types of events you want to shoot. Once you’ve decided on a type of event that suits your skills or interests, then seek out as many opportunities as possible to practise before you go fully professional – there’s absolutely no substitute for experience!

Local sports events, such as motor races, are a great way to cut your teeth, whether you’re shooting for the organiser, or offering prints to participants after the event


don’t be surprised if it takes some time before you get your first booking, because it can be a difficult area to break into without a track record. You’ll have a better chance of getting bookings if you can show organisers that you’re capable of shooting images that capture the spirit of the event and its participants. Remember that while it’s great to shoot creative images using techniques such as motion blur, shallow depth of field or panning to show some action, most event organisers are more interested in seeing pin-sharp images that clearly show what’s happening, and who’s there, than in arty techniques. Make sure that you get your straight shots before you try to get too arty with your images – although there’s nothing wrong with getting some more creative

Charities and clubs often hold fundraising events such as fun runs or activity days. These are perfect for learning the basics of events photography

In 12 parts, spanning his first year turning pro, Graham Parker shares what he’s been up to on his journey

I did it! Paul Carroll ■ Paul Carroll is a full-time professional photographer with extensive events photography experience, shooting corporate and sports events for high-profile clients. Here he shares his top tips…

Be prepared

Arrive early to scope out the venue, talk through the brief with the client, and get on good terms with staff, especially the security team. Take all your gear. That new monopod or fast prime is no good at home. Even if you think you don’t need it, stick it in the boot just in case – especially if you don’t know the venue or what you’re going to face there.

Don’t miss key shots

Things like the CEO’s keynote speech, the presentation of the main award, and the group shot

GOING PRO: part 8

of the senior management team are the important shots the client will want to use straight away, so if nothing else, don’t mess these up!

Be discreet

Don’t be afraid of doing your job and getting the shots you need, but be self-aware. If you upset guests by blocking their view, ordering people around or flashing the hell out of everything, your client won’t be happy, regardless of how good your pictures are.

Capture some emotion

Shoot lots so you can pick out the images with the nicest

smiles, expressions and human interactions. This will build a positive narrative of the event with some feeling and emotion.

Work the angles

Shoot from a range of vantage points and vary your focal lengths with wide and telephoto lenses for some variety in your shots.

Record the details

Time and money has been spent dressing the event, so make sure you capture plenty of set-up shots and all the little incidentals.

It’s beginning to feel a lot like Christmas, the time of year for parties, and I have a few gigs booked. I had an idea for something to offer to clients as an add-on, making use of my pop-up studio, which is really easy to set up and doesn’t take up much space. I’ve seen adverts for DIY photo booths to hire for parties. But who likes DIY? I think it’s better if someone organises it and does it for the host, so there’s less hassle and all they have to do is turn up. Because of that, I just took the photo booth idea and changed it slightly so that it wasn’t DIY any more. Clients really seem to like it. I needed to practise at a real-life party, and as luck would have it, two friends were celebrating their birthdays a couple of weeks ago, so I part-organised their surprise bash. That gave me a chance to test my photo booth. I had my kit set up and had a load of props – silly hats, glasses, moustaches, empty picture frames and so on. A willing subject stands in front of the backdrop and is given one minute to put on a prop, pose, wait for the flash and repeat. And that’s it, apart from lots of laughing, shouting encouragement and just being silly. It’s really great fun, and everybody enjoys themselves. Processing the images was easy and very quick. Hardly anything needed to be done except whitening out anything beyond the backdrop if I shot wide. Everybody loved the images, and I’ve already seen some of them used on Facebook. As you can see from the photo below, it helps to have very attractive subjects! So the practice went very well. I had great fun and learnt a lot.

Deliver images quickly

Clients want to promote their events as soon as possible, not weeks afterwards. If it’s going to take you a couple of days to sort out a full set of shots, send through some key images straight away.

make cash with your camera _ 00


marketing case study

Married to the job

Wedding photographer Lisa Darby explains how she keeps visitors coming back – www.lisadawn.co.uk/photography

When and why did you start blogging? In 2007, the same year I started Lisa Dawn Photography. I wanted to showcase the weddings we (my husband, Scott and I) had photographed. I also wanted to ensure good SEO, and build up traffic to our website. The ultimate reason for this was, and still is, to gain enquiries, most of which come via the website. Blogging also enables me to share more personal photography work, which gives our audience the chance to get to know us more personally How did you set up the blog? Originally, I used a WordPress theme. My husband and business partner, Scott Darby, has since built a custom content management system, using which I can prepare and publish blog posts easily.

Lisa ensures her blog is a useful resource, so her visitors return again and again

The blog has many pages, and different content, so it’s far reaching, more so than the website itself.

How do you choose what to write? I try to write a little bit of background about each wedding – perhaps a little about the couple, the wedding day itself, and the What’s your blog’s purpose? location, for example. Our blog is where we showcase This helps to set the scene so our our latest photography work. It’s readers connect with the images great for new visitors and in the post. I always try to write in a potential clients to see a wedding personable way as if I were talking day from beginning to end. And to a client: this helps me to choose it’s where visitors can really get a what I write about. feel for the photography we offer. It’s also for our existing How do you encourage traffic? clients, because many of our I spend a lot of time ensuring that couples like to see and read our the website comes up for relevant features. Plus we’ve found our key phrases. Organic SEO has blog is used to inspire others with worked for us, but it’s very their wedding plans and ideas. time-consuming.

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Booking out a couple of hours once a week in your diary and committing to that time is a good move. professional photographers, such as photojournalist Benjamin Lowy (www.ben lowy.tumblr.com) and portrait photographer Jake Chessum (www.thedailychessum.com). It’s very easy to set up and shouldn’t take more than an hour or so to get it off the ground. Sign up at www.tumblr.com and you’ll be walked through the process. Other popular free blogging platforms include Blogger.com and WordPress.com, although having been around since the early days of Web 2.0, they’re now commonly perceived to be a little dated, and you’re unlikely to find many pro photographers using them. WordPress.com shouldn’t, however, be confused with WordPress.org. The latter is a much more advanced blogging system that’s quite a bit more involved to set up than Tumblr, plus you’ll need to provide your own domain name and hosting separately. That said, you don’t need to understand code to use it, it offers a high degree of customisation, and there’s a huge range of templates specifically designed for photographers – some free, some paid for. Mike Garrard, David Griffen and Richard Peters are among the thousands of professional photographers who have built their blogs on the WordPress platform. Another service worth mentioning is FotoJournal, which describes itself as ‘a blogging platform built especially for professional photographers’. Like SmugMug, Zenfolio et al, it provides you with a full website, including a portfolio, gallery and blog. It also includes website hosting. But its strong emphasis on blogging makes it worth investigating with the free trial option. If you like it, you’ll need to pay $160 (limited storage) or $240 (unlimited storage) per year. Once you’ve set up your blog, you’ll need to actually write blog posts and organise any other assets you’d like to share with your readers. If this doesn’t come easy at first, don’t


case study

Writer’s block? Struggling to find a way to get started? Here’s our top ideas for blog post subjects…

Fotojournal is a blogging platform designed specially for photographers, but there are plenty of alternative services you could look at first before you commit

worry: you’re not alone. “Those first posts can be the hardest,” says wedding photographer Lisa Darby, who blogs at www.lisadawn.co.uk/ photography. “But don’t worry too much about whether anyone will read your posts. Try to enjoy the process, and use blogging as a journal rather than seeing it purely as a way of promoting your business. No-one wants to read a post that’s so crammed full of keywords that it sounds robotic – readers will just switch off. When I first started blogging, I found it hard to get the right voice. I think this comes with practice, and I feel more comfortable writing now.” Once you get into the swing of it, your biggest problem will probably be finding the time to keep your blog updated. “I certainly find it difficult in the middle of a busy wedding season, when fulfilling client deadlines takes precedence over marketing efforts,” says Mike Garrard. “However, booking out a couple of hours once a week in your diary, and committing to that time, is a good move.” And it’s certainly worth making the effort. Failing to update your blog frequently enough could end up alienating potential customers and ruining your reputation, warns Chris Brock. “If you’re able to blog new work on a regular basis, it makes you appear in demand,” he points out. “When I look at photographers and see that their blog hasn’t been updated in six months, I get the impression that they’re not getting much work, and that there must be some reason people don’t want to work with

them. That could be completely wrong, but that’s the impression I get.” So no matter how busy you are, you need to find the time somehow. David Griffen offers this tip: “I often dictate my blog posts to a dictaphone, and have this transcribed using an online service. I find this saves time, and it means that I can compose an article when I’m on the road.” If all this sounds like hard work (and it can be), bear this in mind. All the photographers we spoke to said that their blog has become an integral part of their business. “It’s only one part of the entire marketing approach, like newsletters, business cards, portfolio, social media and so on,” says Chris Brock. “But in my mind, the blog is where the action happens. And I like to think that people visit it as part of my broader website and think, ‘This guy is pretty active, and consistent in his work. Let’s hire him!’.”

Failing to update your blog frequently enough could end up alienating potential customers.

There’s no right or wrong answer to what you should write about on your blog. Think about what interests you, what’s likely to interest your audience, and then go with your gut feeling. The obvious thing to blog about is your recent work, and any behind-the-scenes detail you can add, such as how you got a particular shot. This will help to sell you as a skilled and dedicated professional. Some clients may ask you not to blog about a shoot, for commercial confidentiality reasons, for instance. If you have a gap in your schedule, dip into some of your best archive work, adding as much background detail as you can. Your blog doesn’t all have to be about work, though. Why not tell your readers what inspired you to become a photographer in the first place, or talk about the kit you bring to a shoot? You could also talk about your favourite clients, showcase a personal project, or offer tips on wet weather gear. Or you might want to share before-andafter images to showcase your editing skills, or tell a story of a shoot that went particularly wrong.

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Training

the online path “It’s spurred me onto land some really cool jobs” Paul Shaw was a serving solider and photography business owner when he decided to enrol on a nine-month web course with The Photography Institute in a bid to become a full-time photographer

“Work kept me very busy, so the course gave me the flexibility to study at my own pace, which attending a college would not have,” says Paul Shaw on choosing an online course. But was it worth the nine months and £450? “Undoubtedly. After completing the course I went on to become an army photographer, one of only 37. The Photography Institute gave me the knowledge I needed to progress, and I’ve since spent six months as a video cameraman in Afghanistan as part of a Combat Camera Team, almost five months as the Prime Minister’s official photographer, and four months in Sierra Leone covering the Ebola virus.” He was given experiences on the course which Shaw feels he wouldn’t have gained elsewhere. “It was like a kickstart to understanding what can go well and what can go wrong, as well as how to use your camera correctly and efficiently, the right lenses to have, what equipment to use and why. “I was impressed by how in-depth the technical side of the course goes, without it being confusing. It taught me a vast amount: so much so that I gained a commendation on my eight-month Defence Photographers course. I’m not sure I would have done so well without the course, as it has spurred me onto win some awards and land some really cool jobs.” paulshawphotography.co.uk

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Paul Shaw went on to spend four months in Sierra Leone covering the Ebola crisis after completing an online course.

overview

LEARN ON THE WEB Affordable, flexible, and accessible, online courses have been growing in popularity over the past five years. Most of them don’t require any formal

qualifications, and do link photographers with expert tutors from all over the world from the comfort and convenience of their living room – wherever that is. Anthony Mondello, CEO of The Photography Institute, explains how courses like its Diploma

of Professional Photography work. “All the learning is done online. When you enrol you get a username and password, which enables you to log onto a secure student site. From there, you can download your first module, which you could liken to your text book as it contains all the


information you will need to complete assignment one. Each module is around 60 pages and is full of detailed technical information delivered in a friendly, conversational manner. The concepts are further explained by way of diagrams, images and examples.” Assignments usually

include a mix of theoretical and practical tasks, which are then uploaded for a tutor to mark. “You’ll be given a grade out of 10 and a comprehensive evaluation of your work and ideas to help nurture and improve your skills each step of the way.” The self-paced Diploma

of Professional Photography from the Photography Institute will currently set candidates back £649 and takes 24 weeks to finish, with students expected to invest an average of four to six hours a week. But there are options out there to suit everyone’s budget and time frame.

For example, the Open University is currently offering a £200 ten-week course in partnership with the RPS, the British Academy of Photography currently offers three home-based courses ranging from three to nine months, and £350 to £750 in cost, whereas the Institute of

Photography delivers a variety of online courses, priced between £250 and £950, and with no set completion time. Future Publishing, which produces this magazine, offers e-learning from £69 per year at https:// learn.digitalcamera world.com with no set time limit.

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