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Volume 3

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CAMERA SKILLS NIKOPEDIA Q&A GEAR CRAFT

rse! u o c h s ra c r u o h it w t fi n Get photo tand at ease troops! Are you ready to work hard to improve your shooting skills? Are you going to make this the year that you truly master your SLR, and get really photo fit? If so, you’ve come to the right place. This is the Nikon Boot Camp – our intensive five-day course where our crack team of camera commandos will take you through the basics, and get you to think about photography like a true soldier. Whether you’re a new photography recruit or a battle-scarred snapping squaddie, our instructors will get you through our SLR assault course. And through your own hard work you’ll come out the other side as a better sharp shooter, with all the essential survival skills you need to make the most of your own Nikon SLR.

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

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8 The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3

Our course runs over five days, which are split up by photographic subject and camera topic. On day one we head to the hills to get down and dirty with exposure and landscapes. On day two we learn essential field skills – depth of field skills, that is – and use them for taking portraits of civilians. On the third day, we head back to camp to learn about why focusing is more a challenge when shooting still lifes. On day four the mission is moving targets, and using the right shutter speed to avoid disaster from a shaky trigger finger, and ensuring that we can freeze even the fastest of targets. We finish off our Boot Camp by getting you to lose your fear of noise and be a master of the push up! So what are you waiting for? Grab your backpack and off we go…


Camera skills NIKOPEDIA GEAR CRAFT

ILLUSTRATIONS BY PAUL STERRY

Q&A

What you’ll learn…

DAY 2 FIELD EXERCISES

DAY 3 FOCUSED FITNESS

DAY 4 MOVING TARGETS

DAY 5 PUSH UP SKILLS

The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3 9

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

DAY 1 EXERCISES IN EXPOSURE


CAMERA SKILLS

BEN BRAIN’S ULTIMATE GUIDE TO...

NIKOPEDIA

EXPOSURE Main image: Mario Tarello, www.tarello.it

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

GEAR CRAFT

Q&A

Master the art of exposure, discover the mysteries of the histogram, and get creative with metering. Ben Brain tells you everything you need to know…

nderstanding how exposure works is probably the most fundamental photographic skill you need to master. Learn how to control your Nikon’s aperture, shutter speed and ISO and you’ll be able to take control of how your images look. Whether you want to isolate the subject of your photo from the background with a shallow depth of field, or capture the misty effects of moving water as part of a moody

seascape, you’ll need to understand the basics of exposure. At first it might seem like there are just too many options with apertures, histograms, ISOs, metering modes, f-stops and so on to juggle. However, once you understand the basic principles you’ll have all the tools you need to take control and get creative. Today’s digital SLRs come complete with an armoury of functions and features to help you

p24

p22

01 The basics

p26

02 Metering

20 The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3

03 histograms

get the best out of your exposures, and they are all without doubt useful, but concentrate on the fundamental relationship between aperture, shutter speed and ISO, and maybe even restrict yourself to manual mode to begin with, and you’ll learn the essence of photography. We’re going to take you on a whirlwind tour of all you need to know to start taking control of your exposures today. So, let’s get started!

p28

p30

04 troubleshooting

05 break the rules


Camera skills

NIKOPEDIA

Q&A

GEAR CRAFT

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3 21


PART 1

BACK TO BASICS re) osu exp W (more SL O

FA S

re)

0 160 NARROW (LESS exposure)

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

The length of an exposure is controlled by your Nikon’s shutter. The shutter is a mechanism that opens and closes extremely quickly when you press the shutter release. As you press, the mirror flips out of the way and a curtain opens to reveal the sensor. While it’s open, it exposes the sensor to the light and an image is recorded. In most cases the shutter is

1/1000 SEC One-one-thousandth of a second is a fast shutter speed. It’s frozen the movement of the water.

1/60 SEC

only open for a fraction of a second, but this is often all that’s needed to capture an image. Fast shutter speeds are ideal for freezing action in a fraction of a second or in situations that are very bright, while slow shutter speeds are perfect for capturing the motion of water or capturing detail in low-light situations. Moving objects will blur if your shutter speed is too slow, however.

RULE OF THUMB

1

250 125

60

It’s a good idea to use a tripod whenever your shutter speed is slower than the longest focal length of your lens because anything slower can lead to blur from camera shake when handholding. For example, if you’re using an 80-200mm lens, consider using a tripod for exposures slower than 1/200 sec.

1/8 SEC

One-sixtieth of a second keeps some At one-eighth of a second, the blur clarity to the water, but it’s starting has changed the water from to blur as it runs over the sink base. individual parts to one fluid mass.

22 The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3

50 0

15 8 4 2

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These little fractions of a second make a huge difference to your shots

00 40 00 2000 10

get up to speed with your shutter

30

APERTURE

8 15 30

WIDE (MORE exposure)

4

NIKOPEDIA

D SPEE

TTER SHU

osu

T (Less

exp

exp

(more

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HIGH

osu

THE EXPOSURE TRIANGLE

ISO

Q&A

re)

The relationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO is at the heart of all photography. At one time, shutter speed and aperture were the only exposure variables you could change from one shot to the next because the ISO was set by the type of film you were using, but the introduction of digital cameras has made it possible to change ISO on the fly rather than unloading film or switching bodies. Photographers now have more control over exposure than ever before.

osu

Understand how exposure works by following this simple three-pointed guide

exp

THE EXPOSURE TRIANGLE EXPLAINED

(less

it’s really worth putting in the groundwork and getting to grips with the basics of shutter speed (how long the camera’s sensor is exposed to the light), aperture (how much light the lens lets in, which also affects depth of field) and ISO (the sensitivity level of the sensor). Once you know how to do this, there’s nothing you can’t do.

L OW

Creating a harmonious exposure using the aperture, shutter speed and ISO is a juggling act. As soon as you make a decision about one element, you’ll need to compromise with another. The trick is to get all three elements working together so you get the results you want and not what the camera tells you you can have. Because of that,

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Get to grips with apertures, speeds & ISOs

2

CAMERA SKILLS

CAMERA SKILLS

1 SEC A full second of exposure, and motion blur removes all definition and a lot of contrast from the water.


being open about APERTURE

The aperture controls the light entering the lens and the depth of field in the picture

f/2.8 Wide open for many lenses, f/2.8 blurs the background and makes the subject appear to be separated from it so it really stands out.

confusing at first, but you’ll soon get the hang of it. In addition to controlling the amount of light that passes through the lens, the aperture also affects the depth of field. This allows you to control the parts of a scene before and beyond the point of focus that also appear sharp. This is an exceptionally useful thing to understand.

f/5.6 At f/5.6, the background is still blurred. DOF is partly controlled by focal length – the longer the lens, the shallower at a given aperture.

It’s like ‘turning up the volume’ in low-light conditions

HIGH ISO

ISO200

ISO6400

f/22

At f/11 the structure of the fence at the bottom-right begins to reveal itself, and the subject’s separation from the background begins to fade.

At f/22 the background is quite defined and the subject no longer stands out. Diffraction starts to take hold, softening the image.

EXPOSURE MODEs – which to choose There’s a bunch of exposure modes to choose from on your Nikon, but which will work best for you? It all depends on what you’re shooting…

Aperture-priority

You choose the aperture and the camera will pick a suitable shutter speed. Using this mode will allow you to keep creative control of your depth of field.

Shutter-priority

In this mode you select the shutter speed and the camera will choose an appropriate aperture. This is perfect for action photography when it’s important to know your shutter is at the right speed.

Manual mode

In manual mode you set the aperture, shutter speed and ISO without any prompting from the camera. This makes it ideal for creative photography, but you’ll have to know what you’re doing.

won’t be able to flex your creative muscles. Ideal if you’re in a ‘point and shoot’ frame of mind.

Program

This is a little like the Auto mode in that the camera determines the exposure for you. However, it’s easier in program mode to intervene when you want creative control.

Scene modes

These modes are tailored to specific shooting situations, and it’s pretty obvious from the icons which one you need to use in a given situation. These modes can be limiting, though, and they’re no substitute for using your own skills.

Auto

You’ll relinquish exposure control to your Nikon, so you The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3 23

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

In recent years Nikon has pioneered wonderfully noise-free high-ISO photography, revolutionising low-light picture taking. However, if you still feel there’s too much noise in your images you can reduce it a little in image editing software such as Photoshop or Nikon’s Capture NX 2.

f/11

GEAR CRAFT

ISO allows you to control how sensitive your Nikon’s sensor is to light. The higher the number (such as ISO1000 or above), the more sensitive the sensor will be. This is a good solution to low-light situations because it allows you to keep your shutter speed up and use your Nikon without a tripod. However, like all things that sound too good to be true there’s a down side. Higher ISOs also introduce the dreaded ‘noise’ – pixels that aren’t the colour they should be – into your images, and sometimes this is not what you want.

Lenses come in different shapes, sizes, focal lengths and aperture ranges. A lens with a large widest aperture, such as f/2.8 or f/1.4, is often referred to as a ‘fast’ lens. They’re typically more expensive too, but their ability to control depth of field is unrivalled.

Q&A

sensor sensitivity: ISO

FAST LENSES

NIKOPEDIA

The amount of light passing through the lens is controlled by the aperture. The size of the aperture can vary in size to let in more or less light. The size of the hole is measured in f-stop numbers, and the range usually varies from its widest setting, be that f/2.8 or f/5.6, to f/22 (which is nearly closed). This can seem a little

Camera skills

CAMERA SKILLS


CAMERA SKILLS

CAMERA SKILLS

Q&A

NIKOPEDIA

BEN BRAIN presents…

The big poser’s Professional portrait guide Start taking professional-looking portraits today. Ben Brain reveals how to get started with his no-nonsense guide to the essential compositional and lighting skills

or many people the idea of shooting portraits in a studio with fancy lighting equipment is so daunting that it’s quite simply off-putting. This is a shame because it really needn’t be intimidating, and the results can be extremely rewarding. In this feature we’re going to guide you through the process of taking studio portraits, with no-nonsense, jargon free tips, techniques and advice. Whether you’re trying

GEAR CRAFT

F

to choose a lens and decide which aperture to use, wrestling with reflectors, struggling with softboxes or panicked by posing, you’ll learn all you need to get started. Using nothing more than a simple two-head home studio lighting kit you’ll learn how to create several studio set ups, from a classic Rembrandt to a more contemporary clamshell arrangement. These easy-to-arrange strobe combinations will

enable you to take complete control of lighting so you can go into a studio and shoot with confidence. We’ll also take a look at lenses, apertures, camera angles, posing the model and more, skills which will be useful in other situations too. To finish, we’ll look at creative aspects of portraiture and go off-piste with modern crops, basic retouching skills, the cross-processed look and more. Let’s get started…

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

what you’ll learn…

p34 lens choices

Start by selecting the right lens and aperture for the style of portrait you want to take

p36 Studio basics

Don’t be daunted! Here are the six things you need to start taking studio portraits

32 The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3

p38 flash placement

Get the most flattering results from your flash, and learn classic lighting styles

p40 perfect posing

Some subjects don’t know how to pose – but that’s okay, because you can direct them!

p42 Arty effects

Take your portraits further with classic techniques and 21st century trends


Camera skills

CAMERA SKILLS

NIKOPEDIA Q&A ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

Image: Ben Brain

GEAR CRAFT

The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3 33


1

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CAMERA SKILLS ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

GEAR CRAFT

Q&A

NIKOPEDIA

CAMERA SKILLS

ALI JENNINGs’s creative selection

HOME pROJECTS

You’ve learnt the basics, now flex your creative muscles with these 12 quick and easy projects for advanced photography enthusiasts 56 The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3


Camera skills

CAMERA SKILLS

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10

11

12

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Freeze a leaf Play with mini models Spirographs of light Dramatic mono rose Colourful zoom burst Cook up your own rainbow

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Still life solarisation Bokeh & light trails X-ray vision HDR vegetables Catch a water drop Back-lit fruit slices

give you a better insight into the workings of your Nikon SLR camera. Each project uses just a few simple pieces of equipment, such as commonly used lenses and remote triggers, so there’s little need to invest in any new kit, and you should be able to find all the props you need around your home. You’ll discover how to get creative with still lifes, capture artistic light trails, use light to see objects in a different way and how to create your own X-ray shots. So, get your Nikon out of hibernation and let’s get started… The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3 57

January 2014

57

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

ometimes it can be hard to get outdoors with your camera. So what do you shoot when you’re stuck indoors and are itching to do something creative? We’ve come up with 12 great DIY photography projects for you to do at home. We’ve devised a dozen indoor and low-light photo projects that you can do to keep the photography spark alive, even if family commitments or a busy time at work leave you with limited time for photography. They will also help you to improve your techniques, skills and

PROJECT 7 PROJECT 8 PROJECT 9 PROJECT 10 PROJECT 11 PROJECT 12

GEAR CRAFT

PROJECT 1 PROJECT 2 PROJECT 3 PROJECT 4 PROJECT 5 PROJECT 6


CAMERA SKILLS

PUBLISH A PHOTOGRAPHY BOOK SET UP A PHOTOGRAPHY BLOG

PHOTOGRAPH YOUR OTHER INTERESTS AND PASSIONS

NIKOPEDIA

PULL A PHOTOGRAPHY STUNT

OFFER YOUR OWN PHOTOGRAPHY TOURS

PRINT YOUR OWN PHOTOGRAPHY CARDS

GET YOUR WORK FOUND OUT VIA WORD OF MOUTH

SET UP A PHOTOGRAPHY WEBSITE

Q&A

RUN WORKSHOPS

& ONLINE TUTORIALS SHOW OFF YOUR WORK ON 500px

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

GEAR CRAFT

TRY TO FIND A PHOTOGRAPHY NICHE TO SPECIALISE IN

EIGHT NIKON PHOTOGRAPHERS SHARE…

80

Get your photos seen… Become an online success… Make cash from your camera… and then turn pro! 68 The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3


Camera skills

SEND OUT REGULAR PHOTOGRAPHY NEWSLETTERS

SHARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS ON FLICKR

NIKOPEDIA

MAKE FRIENDS AND TWEET ON TWITTER CONNECT TO PHOTOGRAPHERS ON FACEBOOK BUILD A CULT FOLLOWING OR PHOTOGRAPHIC FAN BASE

SEND YOUR FIRST COVER SHOT TO N-PHOTO

BI-LINGUAL? DOUBLE YOUR CLIENT BASE

Q&A

WHY NOT JOIN PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETIES

ILLUSTRATION : Robin Wells, www.robinwellsdesign.com

GET YOUR WORK PUBLISHED IN MAGAZINES

00

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GEAR CRAFT

2 SELL us A COVER

3 SHOOT WEDDINGS

4 SELL FASHION SHOTS

5 SNAP HORSES

6 FIND YOUR NICHE

7 SELL TRAVEL SHOTS

10 take the plunge

The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3 69

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

1 shoot for STOCK


CAMERA SKILLS Q&A

Image: Marsel van Oosten

NIKOPEDIA

Essential Accessories

A

ngle of view

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

GEAR CRAFT

This is the single most important characteristic of a lens. On a simple level, the angle of view controls how much of a scene you can squeeze into a photograph. This dramatic landscape was taken with a super-wide-angle lens, which enabled the photographer to capture both the

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okeh

This is a Japanese word used to describe the precise quality or appearance of out-offocus areas in a picture. It’s sometimes used to describe blur in general, but that’s an oversimplification – there’s much more to blur than that! The appearance of blur can vary considerably, and photography aficionados will be quick to claim that some lenses (invariably expensive prestige lenses) produce better ‘bokeh’ than others. Bokeh is influenced by bright highlights or light sources in the background, or by

dramatic rock formations and the hot air balloons floating overhead in a truly bizarre juxtaposition. Wide-angle lenses are very good at capturing the bizarre and the surreal because they also exaggerate perspectives and the difference in size between objects close to the camera and those in the distance. Angle of view is connected with focal length

the shape of the diaphragm (iris) in the lens. Digital SLRs have larger sensors than compacts, which leads to shallower depth of field and more pronounced and controllable ‘bokeh’ effects.

196 The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3

– the shorter the focal length of a lens, the wider the angle of view will be. Telephoto lenses have longer focal lengths and a correspondingly narrower angle of view. They’re good for shots where you want to fill the frame with objects in the distance, compressing the perspective, or for picking out individual details.


C

onverging lines

NIKOPEDIA

These are sometimes called ‘leading lines’ because of the way they lead your eyes into the picture. Converging lines are a powerful compositional tool, and a side-effect of using wide-angle lenses and shooting at an oblique angle to your subject. They’re most effective when the convergence is horizontal, such as a road or railway tracks leading into the distance, or the edges of this pier. This shot works because the camera has been positioned in the middle of the pier to preserve its perfect symmetry. The camera has also been tilted upwards, which works here, but sometimes can look like a mistake, when capturing a tall building, for instance, where the effect is less effective.

Camera skills

essential accessories

Q&A

E

ffective focal length

The focal length of a lens is used to work out its angle of view and what kind of photography it’s suited for, but the size of the camera sensor makes a difference. The smaller sensors in Nikon DX D-SLRs means that they capture a smaller angle of view than a full-frame FX camera using the same lens, which is why lens makers often quote an ‘effective’ focal length too. For example, when fitted to a DX-format camera, a 50mm lens has an ‘effective’ focal length of 75mm. On an FX-format (full-frame) camera it’s a ‘standard’ lens with an everyday angle of view, but on a DX Nikon D-SLR, it becomes a short telephoto

DX FX lens – the sort of length you might use for portraits, for example. In an ideal world, we’d all work with angles of view instead of focal lengths, but you’d still have the same problem with different-sized sensors in different cameras. Besides, we’re all used to focal lengths now anyway.

The Ultimate Nikon SLR Handbook: Volume 3 197

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

Depth of field is the zone of sharp focus in front of the camera. Telephoto lenses and wide lens apertures give the shallowest depth of field, so that there’s only a narrow plane of sharp focus in the picture. However, landscape photographers often want as much depth of field as possible, so that both nearby objects and the distant horizon are sharp. You can achieve this with narrow lens apertures and wide-angle lenses. But the focus distance is also a factor – the closer you focus, the less depth of field there is, and you can see that in this picture, where the distant deckchairs have gone out of focus.

GEAR CRAFT

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epth of field


Photography Masterclass 62 (Sampler)  

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Photography Masterclass 62 (Sampler)  

You can subscribe to this magazine @ www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk