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Canon Photographer’s Handbook

2 great ways to learn! PLus! read our guides • watch the videos

Canon

10 expert video lessons Discover new ways to use your DSLR todaY

Photographer’s 224 pages

● Master your

Canon DSLR ● Canon School ● Gear tests ● Photo projects ● Pro techniques

Handbook


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162 PAGE GUIDE

Essential seasonal advice on shooting landscapes and wildlife from the experts at Digital Camera magazine. www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk/photography/outdoor-photo


CAMERA SKILLS

Canon Welcome…

Handbook

ESSENTIAL SLR SKILLS

Welcome to the new Canon Photographer’s Handbook, your guide to helping you take your Canon DSLR photography to the next level. Whether you’ve just bought your first EOS camera, or are a serious enthusiast, you’ll discover new camera tips and techniques to ensure you master your beloved Canon DSLR. The following sections are packed with expert advice; we begin with Camera Skills with big guides on getting perfect exposures to learning how to use different lenses. In Canon School we go in-depth into key camera settings, including aperture, shutter speed and ISO control. Next up in Essential SLR Skills, learn how fellow amateurs improve how they shoot specific photography subjects, by spending a day with a top Canon professional photographer. In our Photo Projects section we provide inspiration and creative topics to photograph, accompanied by free video guides which you’ll find online at www.bit.ly/phb1video. We round things off with our Gear Tests, which include tests of Canon’s latest and greatest enthusiastlevel DSLRs, the EOS 80D and 7D Mark II, plus a Super Test of ten wide-angle lenses for shooting big scenes. Plus a whole lot more besides inside! We hope you enjoy reading this Canon Photographer’s Handbook and it helps you to start improving your photography today.

PROJECTS GEAR TESTS

Peter Travers, editor

Canon Photographer’s Handbook 

CANON SCHOOL

Photographer’s

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CONTENTS Future Publishing Limited Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA www.digitalcameraworld.com

Editor Art Editor Disc Editor

Peter Travers Martin Parfitt Richard Hill

Future Publishing Limited Editorial Director Global Editor-in-Chief Group Art Director

Matt Pierce Chris George Rodney Dive

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Tel: +44 (0)1225 687511 matt.bailey@futurenet.com

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LICENSING Senior Licensing and Syndication Manager Matt Ellis matt.ellis@futurenet.com Phone: + 44 (0)1225 442244 Fax: + 44 (0)1225 732275 Printed in the UK by William Gibbons on behalf of Future. Distributed in the UK by Seymour Distribution Ltd, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London EC1A 9PT Phone: + 44 (0)20 7429 4000

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Chief executive Zillah Byng-Thorne Non-executive chairman Peter Allen Cheif financial officer Penny Ladkin-Brand Tel: +44 (0) 1225 442244 www.futureplc.com All information contained in this magazine is for informational purposes only and is, to the best of our knowledge, correct at the time of going to press. Future Publishing Limited cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies that occur. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers direct with regard to pricing. Š Future Publishing Limited 2016. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher.

We are committed to only using magazine paper which is derived from well managed, certified forestry and chlorine-free manufacture. Future Publishing and its paper suppliers have been independently certified in accordance with the rules of the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council).

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32 Canon Photographer’s Handbook


Camera skills Canon DSLR techniques

8

Master your Canon lenses

20

Master your Canon DSLR in 12 hours

32

Canon DSLR sports skills

42

Perfect portraits

52

Canon School

Essential SLR skills Breathtaking landscapes

106

Candid family portraits

116

Still-life in the home

126

Safari park wildlife

136

The photographic journey

62

How to handle your Canon DSLR

68

The importance of aperture

74

The need for shutter speed

80

Understanding ISO

86

Projects

In-camera metering

92

Hyper-real HDR

150

The importance of white balance

98

Polarized opinions

154

Music to your eyes

156

Let there be light!

160

Hyperfocally speaking

164

Create brilliant black & white images

168

In-flight entertainment

172

Shoot in the sea

176

Make the time fly

178

Mad hatter’s tea party

182

136

Gear tests

202 Canon Photographer’s Handbook 

Canon EOS 80D

188

Canon EOS 7D Mark II

194

Wide-angle zoom lenses

202

Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT

216

Camera backpacks

218

Sturdy tripods

220

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CAMERA SKILLS CANON SCHOOL

Canon DSLR techniques

8

Master your Canon lenses

20

Master your Canon DSLR in 12 hours

32

Canon DSLR sports skills

42

Perfect portraits

52

8

GEAR TESTS

PROJECTS

ESSENTIAL SLR SKILLS

Camera skills

20 6

Canon Photographer’s Handbook


CAMERA SKILLS

CANON SCHOOL

PROJECTS

GEAR TESTS

7

Canon Photographer’s Handbook 

52

42

ESSENTIAL SLR SKILLS

32


CAMERA SKILLS

mode dial special!

Canon D-SLR techniques Discover how to shoot with confidence by following our D-SLR field guide to mastering the Mode Dial and more… All images and words Peter Travers

PROJECTS

ESSENTIAL SLR SKILLS

CANON SCHOOL

canon dslr techniques

Image Zone

Flash Off Full Auto Intelligent Scene Auto Creative Auto

Sports Night Portrait Handheld Night Scene HDR Backlight Control Portrait Landscape Close-up Movie

GEAR TESTS

Basic Zone

8

12 12 12 13

10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11

Creative Zone Program AE Aperture Priority Shutter Priority A-Dep Bulb Manual

14 15 16 17 18 19

Canon Photographer’s Handbook


CANON SCHOOL

ESSENTIAL SLR SKILLS

PROJECTS

GEAR TESTS

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Canon Photographer’s Handbook 

CAMERA SKILLS

canon dslr techniques


CAMERA SKILLS

canon dslr techniques

Image Zone

GEAR TESTS

PROJECTS

ESSENTIAL SLR SKILLS

CANON SCHOOL

T

he Image Zone (part of the Basic Zone) is home to the ‘picture’ modes. These fully automatic modes are helpful for beginners, as your EOS D-SLR will take full control over the exposure, focus points and other settings to help you obtain a good shot. But you’ll be working within restricted parameters, with little control over your results – your camera will focus on what it wants (usually what’s closest in the scene), will expose averagely for the scene or subject, may not set the best aperture or shutter speed for your shot, it won’t know if you’re using a tripod and so may set an unnecessarily high ISO creating image noise, and on older cameras you will be restricted to shooting JPEGs rather than Raw images. Each shooting mode in the Image Zone has its own settings, and own benefits and restrictions, as we reveal in detail…

Sports N

ot just for sports, this mode is suited to anything that moves – such as children and wildlife! It uses your D-SLR’s fastest Continuous Mode (eg 5fps) and sets a fast (around 1/500 sec) shutter speed to freeze the action. To do this, your camera often sets a high ISO, especially in low-light situations – and could be as high as ISO6400.

Priority: Freezing movement Exposure program: Sets the fastest shutter speed it thinks suitable for the lighting conditions Picture style: Standard Drive mode: Continuous AF mode: AI Servo Flash: Disabled

The 650D/T4i Picture Modes Image Zone modes take control of camera settings for foolproof photos

T

he 650D/T4i (and above) has two additional shooting modes in the Image Zone. Handheld Night Scene helps you to capture shots after dark without using a tripod. It does this by pumping up the ISO and combining consecutive shots to create a ‘stable image’. HDR Backlight Control helps when shooting something with bright and dark areas in your frame. It fires three bracketed exposures and combines them in-camera to try and improve shadow and highlight detail. Both modes only record one JPEG.

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NIGHT PORTRAIT H

elpful for shooting at night when you want to capture a well-exposed background behind your portrait subjects. Your camera will judge light levels and, if very low, will suggest you use a tripod for sharp shots as it will set

Priority: Balanced flash exposures in low light with nearby subjects Exposure program: Sets the shutter speed slow enough so the background is not dark Picture style: Standard Drive mode: Single AF mode: One-shot Flash: Auto

shutter speeds sometimes too slow to shoot handheld without camera shake becoming an issue. Depending on the widest aperture of your lens (if it’s only f/5.6 and not f/2.8), your camera may or may not use the built-in flash.

Canon Photographer’s Handbook


Portrait

I

n this auto shooting mode, your EOS D-SLR will use a wide aperture for a shallow depth of field to blur the background and make your portrait subjects stand out. It will also make skin tones and hair look softer. Check that the AF point covers your subject’s face or eyes. Flash pops up automatically if light levels are poor.

F

or those used to newer EOS D-SLRs, you may not realise that older models didn’t have the ability to record video. Now all Canon D-SLRs are ready to shoot home movies – this is found on the Mode Dial on most cameras, but on newer models it can have its own switch; on the 650D/T4i, Movie mode is initiated by the On/Off/Movie mode switch under

the Mode Dial, while on the 5D Mk III, there’s a Live View/Movie Mode switch by the eyepiece. For all cameras, you need to press the Record Start/Stop button to begin recording video.

Close-up U

se this Image Zone setting when you’re photographing close-ups of smaller subjects such as flowers and insects. It sets a wide aperture and assumes you’re shooting handheld – and automatically increases ISO for a fast shutter speed and sharp result. It works best when you shoot as close as possible – and use a telephoto or macro lens.

CANON SCHOOL

Priority: Restricting depth of field Exposure program: Sets the aperture to the widest it thinks wise for the lighting, in order to blur the background Picture style: Portrait Drive mode: Continuous AF mode: One-shot Flash: Auto (with red-eye reduction option)

Movie mode

CAMERA SKILLS

canon dslr techniques

ESSENTIAL SLR SKILLS

Priority: Restricting depth of field Exposure program: Sets as wide an aperture as it thinks wise for the lighting conditions, so as to try to blur the background Picture style: Standard Drive mode: Single AF mode: One-shot Flash: Auto

PROJECTS

LANDSCAPE

I

Canon Photographer’s Handbook 

GEAR TESTS

deal for landscape photographers who aren’t confident manually setting their apertures. Best used with a wide-angle lens to further increase your depth of field so scenes are in focus from near and far. Your camera will set a narrow aperture as possible Priority: Maximising depth of field (but could be as wide as f/5.6 Exposure program: Sets the in low light) to maximise aperture to the narrowest it thinks depth of field, and will wise for the lighting conditions, for capture vivid blues and maximum sharpness greens and sharp images Picture style: Landscape Drive mode: Single suited to landscape shots. AF mode: One-shot Flash: Disabled

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CAMERA SKILLS

canon dslr techniques

Basic Zone

GEAR TESTS

PROJECTS

ESSENTIAL SLR SKILLS

CANON SCHOOL

W

ithin the Basic Zone – next to the Image Zone picture modes – are full automatic and slightly more advanced auto modes. On older EOS cameras, like the 550D/T2i and 60D, you have Full Auto (green square), while on newer EOS cameras like the 600D/T3i, 700D/T5i and 5D Mk III, you get the improved Scene Intelligent Auto (A+) mode instead. In both Full Auto/A+ modes, all you need to do is point and shoot, your camera sets everything automatically. Most EOS cameras (from the 500D/ T1i onwards) also have a Creative Auto mode, where you can change a few more advanced settings, but in a simplified way…

FLASH OFF A

lso found within the Basic Zone modes is Flash Off, which does exactly what you’d think and ensures the built-in flash doesn’t pop up. This can be helpful if you’re shooting indoors in places that have a ban on flash photography (eg art galleries, sporting events, churches) or if you’re shooting a portrait and don’t want flash interfering. It effectively sets a high ISO setting (and suitable shutter speed) to prevent camera shake.

Full Auto is fine for quick snaps but offers little control – this shot is underexposed, the f/6.3 aperture gives very limited depth of field, and white balance is a bit too cool

FULL AUTO/A+ W hether your EOS camera has Full Auto (green square) or A+ (Scene Intelligent Auto) mode, they both work in a similar way – you concentrate on framing your pictures, while the auto mode analyses the scene and automatically picks the best settings to capture it. In A+ it will also set an ‘Auto’ Picture Style, which makes fine adjustments to colours. So, you simply aim at your scene or subject, press the shutter button halfway and wait for an AF point to highlight and beep to confirm you’ve achieved focus, then fully press the button to take the shot. Your camera sets

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everything from exposure brightness to ISO to metering, and will also change the autofocus mode from One-Shot AF to AI Servo AF if your subject moves. The flash might pop up if you’re shooting indoors, it’s dark or lighting conditions are low. Full Auto/A+ is a good all-rounder for shooting ‘everything’, but of course, like the Image Zone picture modes, you have no control or ability to tweak settings if your shots are too bright or dark, if the flash pops up, if the ISO is too high or low, of if the aperture is too wide or the shutter speed is too fast, or white balance a little off.

Creative Auto offers a simple way of determining your depth of field

Canon Photographer’s Handbook


Photography Handbook 01 (Sampler)  

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